Godfrey Fuhriman

15 Jun 1859 - 8 Dec 1920

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Godfrey Fuhriman

15 Jun 1859 - 8 Dec 1920
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Grave site information of Godfrey Fuhriman (15 Jun 1859 - 8 Dec 1920) at Providence City Cemetery in River Heights, Cache, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Godfrey Fuhriman

Born:
Died:

Providence City Cemetery

900 River Heights Blvd
River Heights, Cache, Utah
United States

Epitaph

FATHER

Headstone Description

Father
Transcriber

Carol23

April 27, 2012
Transcriber

Amador82

September 17, 2020
Photographer

MDSIMS

April 15, 2012

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Godfrey Fuhriman Obituary 9 Dec 1920

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

WORTHY BISHOP of PROVIDENCE PASSES AWAY Our neighboring town of Providence was called upon to suffer the loss of its worthy bishop yesterday when death claimed Bishop Godfrey Fuhriman. It was but a few days ago that the bishop was on the streets of Logan attending to business just as he has done for years. Last Monday at 2 o'clock in the afternoon he suffered a hemorrhage of the brain followed by a paralytic stroke. The shock was more than he could bear and death claimed him at 12:45 p.m. yesterday. Bishop Fuhriman was born at Durrenroth, in Canton Bern, Switzerland 15 Jun 1859, and made the trip across the ocean to the United States with his parents in 1860. His parents immediately started across the plains arriving in September of that year in the James T. Ross company. Bishop Fuhriman was a good citizen, thrifty, honest, progressive, at all times living up to the high ideals of good American citizenship. He was genial, his face all beaming with sunshine and it is a pleasure to look upon his smiling countenance as he is photographed with his magnificent family in a splendid half tone in the latest history of Utah. He was a farmer by occupation. His education was obtained in the district schools of Providence. During his life he held many positions of trust, having been president and director of many water and milling companies. He was a stockholder and director of the Cache Valley Banking company, and at one time was a director in a sugar factory. On 7 July 1881, he married Bertha Mary Frederick. Six children were the result of this union. His wife died 11 Feb 1895. The following July he married Elizabeth Fluckiger Von Alman. Four children were the result of this union. All of these children are living and will greatly mourn the loss of their good father. His sons have always shown their loyalty in a good cause, answering the call to fill missions for the church and two of them following the flag in the great world war. Bishop Fuhriman has always been a consistent Latter-day Saint, having served as counselor to Bishop Theurer for 20 years and bishop of Providence for 11 years. He was the kind of a man of whom good men are made, a safe barometer for men and women to follow. He was a leader in his town, his industry and individual worth bringing that success that made him independent. Funeral services at this writing have not been decided upon.

Godfrey Fuhriman Obituary 9 Dec 1920

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

WORTHY BISHOP of PROVIDENCE PASSES AWAY Our neighboring town of Providence was called upon to suffer the loss of its worthy bishop yesterday when death claimed Bishop Godfrey Fuhriman. It was but a few days ago that the bishop was on the streets of Logan attending to business just as he has done for years. Last Monday at 2 o'clock in the afternoon he suffered a hemorrhage of the brain followed by a paralytic stroke. The shock was more than he could bear and death claimed him at 12:45 p.m. yesterday. Bishop Fuhriman was born at Durrenroth, in Canton Bern, Switzerland 15 Jun 1859, and made the trip across the ocean to the United States with his parents in 1860. His parents immediately started across the plains arriving in September of that year in the James T. Ross company. Bishop Fuhriman was a good citizen, thrifty, honest, progressive, at all times living up to the high ideals of good American citizenship. He was genial, his face all beaming with sunshine and it is a pleasure to look upon his smiling countenance as he is photographed with his magnificent family in a splendid half tone in the latest history of Utah. He was a farmer by occupation. His education was obtained in the district schools of Providence. During his life he held many positions of trust, having been president and director of many water and milling companies. He was a stockholder and director of the Cache Valley Banking company, and at one time was a director in a sugar factory. On 7 July 1881, he married Bertha Mary Frederick. Six children were the result of this union. His wife died 11 Feb 1895. The following July he married Elizabeth Fluckiger Von Alman. Four children were the result of this union. All of these children are living and will greatly mourn the loss of their good father. His sons have always shown their loyalty in a good cause, answering the call to fill missions for the church and two of them following the flag in the great world war. Bishop Fuhriman has always been a consistent Latter-day Saint, having served as counselor to Bishop Theurer for 20 years and bishop of Providence for 11 years. He was the kind of a man of whom good men are made, a safe barometer for men and women to follow. He was a leader in his town, his industry and individual worth bringing that success that made him independent. Funeral services at this writing have not been decided upon.

Godfrey Fuhriman Obituary 9 Dec 1920

Contributor: Carol23 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

WORTHY BISHOP of PROVIDENCE PASSES AWAY Our neighboring town of Providence was called upon to suffer the loss of its worthy bishop yesterday when death claimed Bishop Godfrey Fuhriman. It was but a few days ago that the bishop was on the streets of Logan attending to business just as he has done for years. Last Monday at 2 o'clock in the afternoon he suffered a hemorrhage of the brain followed by a paralytic stroke. The shock was more than he could bear and death claimed him at 12:45 p.m. yesterday. Bishop Fuhriman was born at Durrenroth, in Canton Bern, Switzerland 15 Jun 1859, and made the trip across the ocean to the United States with his parents in 1860. His parents immediately started across the plains arriving in September of that year in the James T. Ross company. Bishop Fuhriman was a good citizen, thrifty, honest, progressive, at all times living up to the high ideals of good American citizenship. He was genial, his face all beaming with sunshine and it is a pleasure to look upon his smiling countenance as he is photographed with his magnificent family in a splendid half tone in the latest history of Utah. He was a farmer by occupation. His education was obtained in the district schools of Providence. During his life he held many positions of trust, having been president and director of many water and milling companies. He was a stockholder and director of the Cache Valley Banking company, and at one time was a director in a sugar factory. On 7 July 1881, he married Bertha Mary Frederick. Six children were the result of this union. His wife died 11 Feb 1895. The following July he married Elizabeth Fluckiger Von Alman. Four children were the result of this union. All of these children are living and will greatly mourn the loss of their good father. His sons have always shown their loyalty in a good cause, answering the call to fill missions for the church and two of them following the flag in the great world war. Bishop Fuhriman has always been a consistent Latter-day Saint, having served as counselor to Bishop Theurer for 20 years and bishop of Providence for 11 years. He was the kind of a man of whom good men are made, a safe barometer for men and women to follow. He was a leader in his town, his industry and individual worth bringing that success that made him independent. Funeral services at this writing have not been decided upon.

Swiss German Missionary Conference 1884 by Paul-Anthon Nielson

Contributor: Carol23 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

This portrait was taken in the photograph studio of Moritz Emil Vollenweider (d. 1899) and his son, Emil Vollenweider (1849-1921), at Postgasse 68 in the city of Bern on 24 December 1884. A conference of the missionaries serving in the Swiss-German Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) convened in the Hotel Emmentalerhof in Bern on 20 December 1884 under the leadership of European Mision President John Henry Smith (1848-1911), a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (since 1880). On that same day, David Kunz wrote in his diary: “[… on the morning of December 20th,] walked [from Niederstocken] to Thun. Got on the train to Bern. My brother, John, joined me at the station at Thun. As we arrived in Bern [at the mission office at] 36 Postgasse, we found Apostle John Henry Smith and several of the Elders there. At 5 P.M. a Priesthood meeting was appointed where all the elders that were present were called upon to speak their feelings. Afterwards Apostle Smith spoke to us for about two hours and gave us some extra good council and told us how to go on and fulfill our duties. It was really a time of rejoicing for the elders to meet again and hear words spoken by one of the Twelve Apostles. I and three more of the Elders went to Brother [John] Teuscher’s to sleep. John Kunz III’s account of that day is somewhat similar: “[…] took train to Bern and there the first Thing we knew met President John Henry Smith one of the twelve Apostels, being then President over the European Mission. And we all had a good blessed time for in the same evning Dec. 20 we had a Priesthood Meeting in the English Languge and all spocke in turns and President Smith give us most exellent Instructions so that we thought we should never forget them it lasted until 11 p.m.” Three sessions were held on Sunday, December 21, 1884, at 10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. On Monday, the 22nd, general sessions were held at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.; a conference of the Relief Society was held at 7:30 p.m. that same evening. John Kunz commented that “The whole of the Conference was a decided Success, we received lots of good Teachings and the Spirit of God was there, we all felt to rejoice and to thank God for his Mercy and Blessings.” In his diary entry on Tuesday, John Kunz wrote: “Dec. 23 was spent in having a Jolly time counseled all the Time by John Henry. In the Evning we gathered in the Capacity of a Sonday School Meeting around a nice Christmus tree full of nice Gifts for the little ones. They done so remarkably well that President Smith give each of the Boys who Prayed by opening and dismissing a franc, or twenty cents in U.S. Moneys worth.” On Wednesday, Christmas Eve day, David Kunz commented: “Had our breakfast there [in the Hotel Emmentalerhof] in the morning and went down to [the mission office at] 36 Postgasse. About 11 A.M. all the elders, 14 in number, and Apostle John H. Smith went to Vollenweider’s Gallery to have our likeness’ taken all in one picture. As all 15 of us were placed, we were taken once and Mr. Vollenweider told us to remain in our places. We did so for to be taken again, but before it could be taken again I fainted and fell to the floor. The brethren lifted me up and after a few minutes I came to my senses again and was placed on a chair among the others and our picture was taken. I spent the rest of that day in the office, also that night I stayed there.” John’s account of the experience is similar: “Dec. 24 was resolved by all of the Elders from Zion 15 to have each a Group Picture of all of the 15. We contracted and as we where about to be taken David my Brother fainted a dead faint, we doubted whether he would come again, but finely he got so we could take them, but later Experience learned us they where a failure. David I transported to the Officce and got Sister [Bertha Kunz] Pluess to care for him and went according to apointment in the Emmenthaler Hof to a Christmus Dinner where 14 of us had a good Time with an American Plum Pudding, allthough I missed my Brother very much and returned sooner and found him a great deal improoved. On Christmas day, December 25th, John Kunz III wrote: “a good many of the Brethren left to their diferent fields of Labor and here I must state that my Brother David was appointed President of Central Swiss Conference and myself as such of the Bern conference.” He continued: “Dec. 26, 1884 left Bern and also took leave of my Brother who was told to stay untill more improoved in his health, this Occasion was a new trial and a hard one to me, but as I had resolved to Labor and do whatever the Servants of God placed over me, would advise and apoint me to do, I left all though cryeing and praying, changing untill my head and eyes requested some stop about it.” This photograph is the second shot. Front row, left to right: David Kunz (1855-1916), Assistant Mission Secretary Louis Frederick Moench Sr. (1846-1916), European Mission President John Henry Smith (1848-1911), Swiss-German Mission President Frederick William Schoenfeld II (1831-1918), Mission Secretary Joseph Albert Smith (1844-1926), Thomas Biesinger (1844-1931) and Conrad Vaterlaus III (1835-1917); back row, left to right: Gottlieb Hirschi (1837-1900), Gottfried Fuhriman (1859-1920), George Conrad Naegle (1860-1935), John Kunz III (1844-1918), Jacob Hafen (1836-1917), Jacob Arnold Bigler (1849-1916), Francis (Fred) Marion Lyman Jr. (1863-1957) and John Rudolf Boshard (1856-1928). Information and Identification by Paul-Anthon Nielson kupan@bluewin.ch

Mission Story

Contributor: Carol23 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Godfrey Fuhriman, served his mission in Switzerland and Germany in the 1850’s. The following is an experience he had while traveling from Utah to the mission field: The group of missionaries took the train to New York City and spent the night there in the Grand Central Hotel at a cost of $1 a night. In early November, the weather was still cold and it was necessary that they turn on the heat in their hotel room. To do this, it was necessary that they turn on the valve that would allow the gas to tfill the radiators. When they thought they turned the valve off, they inadvertently left it on causing the room to fill with poisonous gas fumes. The next morning Godfrey’s companion found that Godfrey was still sleeping! He was unconscious having inhaled the gas fumes. The elders gave him a priesthood blessing when he was still unconscious and when he woke up, he and the others knew that his life had been spared.

Swiss German Missionary Conference 1884 by Paul-Anthon Nielson

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

This portrait was taken in the photograph studio of Moritz Emil Vollenweider (d. 1899) and his son, Emil Vollenweider (1849-1921), at Postgasse 68 in the city of Bern on 24 December 1884. A conference of the missionaries serving in the Swiss-German Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) convened in the Hotel Emmentalerhof in Bern on 20 December 1884 under the leadership of European Mision President John Henry Smith (1848-1911), a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (since 1880). On that same day, David Kunz wrote in his diary: “[… on the morning of December 20th,] walked [from Niederstocken] to Thun. Got on the train to Bern. My brother, John, joined me at the station at Thun. As we arrived in Bern [at the mission office at] 36 Postgasse, we found Apostle John Henry Smith and several of the Elders there. At 5 P.M. a Priesthood meeting was appointed where all the elders that were present were called upon to speak their feelings. Afterwards Apostle Smith spoke to us for about two hours and gave us some extra good council and told us how to go on and fulfill our duties. It was really a time of rejoicing for the elders to meet again and hear words spoken by one of the Twelve Apostles. I and three more of the Elders went to Brother [John] Teuscher’s to sleep. John Kunz III’s account of that day is somewhat similar: “[…] took train to Bern and there the first Thing we knew met President John Henry Smith one of the twelve Apostels, being then President over the European Mission. And we all had a good blessed time for in the same evning Dec. 20 we had a Priesthood Meeting in the English Languge and all spocke in turns and President Smith give us most exellent Instructions so that we thought we should never forget them it lasted until 11 p.m.” Three sessions were held on Sunday, December 21, 1884, at 10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. On Monday, the 22nd, general sessions were held at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.; a conference of the Relief Society was held at 7:30 p.m. that same evening. John Kunz commented that “The whole of the Conference was a decided Success, we received lots of good Teachings and the Spirit of God was there, we all felt to rejoice and to thank God for his Mercy and Blessings.” In his diary entry on Tuesday, John Kunz wrote: “Dec. 23 was spent in having a Jolly time counseled all the Time by John Henry. In the Evning we gathered in the Capacity of a Sonday School Meeting around a nice Christmus tree full of nice Gifts for the little ones. They done so remarkably well that President Smith give each of the Boys who Prayed by opening and dismissing a franc, or twenty cents in U.S. Moneys worth.” On Wednesday, Christmas Eve day, David Kunz commented: “Had our breakfast there [in the Hotel Emmentalerhof] in the morning and went down to [the mission office at] 36 Postgasse. About 11 A.M. all the elders, 14 in number, and Apostle John H. Smith went to Vollenweider’s Gallery to have our likeness’ taken all in one picture. As all 15 of us were placed, we were taken once and Mr. Vollenweider told us to remain in our places. We did so for to be taken again, but before it could be taken again I fainted and fell to the floor. The brethren lifted me up and after a few minutes I came to my senses again and was placed on a chair among the others and our picture was taken. I spent the rest of that day in the office, also that night I stayed there.” John’s account of the experience is similar: “Dec. 24 was resolved by all of the Elders from Zion 15 to have each a Group Picture of all of the 15. We contracted and as we where about to be taken David my Brother fainted a dead faint, we doubted whether he would come again, but finely he got so we could take them, but later Experience learned us they where a failure. David I transported to the Officce and got Sister [Bertha Kunz] Pluess to care for him and went according to apointment in the Emmenthaler Hof to a Christmus Dinner where 14 of us had a good Time with an American Plum Pudding, allthough I missed my Brother very much and returned sooner and found him a great deal improoved. On Christmas day, December 25th, John Kunz III wrote: “a good many of the Brethren left to their diferent fields of Labor and here I must state that my Brother David was appointed President of Central Swiss Conference and myself as such of the Bern conference.” He continued: “Dec. 26, 1884 left Bern and also took leave of my Brother who was told to stay untill more improoved in his health, this Occasion was a new trial and a hard one to me, but as I had resolved to Labor and do whatever the Servants of God placed over me, would advise and apoint me to do, I left all though cryeing and praying, changing untill my head and eyes requested some stop about it.” This photograph is the second shot. Front row, left to right: David Kunz (1855-1916), Assistant Mission Secretary Louis Frederick Moench Sr. (1846-1916), European Mission President John Henry Smith (1848-1911), Swiss-German Mission President Frederick William Schoenfeld II (1831-1918), Mission Secretary Joseph Albert Smith (1844-1926), Thomas Biesinger (1844-1931) and Conrad Vaterlaus III (1835-1917); back row, left to right: Gottlieb Hirschi (1837-1900), Gottfried Fuhriman (1859-1920), George Conrad Naegle (1860-1935), John Kunz III (1844-1918), Jacob Hafen (1836-1917), Jacob Arnold Bigler (1849-1916), Francis (Fred) Marion Lyman Jr. (1863-1957) and John Rudolf Boshard (1856-1928). Information and Identification by Paul-Anthon Nielson kupan@bluewin.ch

Mission Story

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Godfrey Fuhriman, served his mission in Switzerland and Germany in the 1850’s. The following is an experience he had while traveling from Utah to the mission field: The group of missionaries took the train to New York City and spent the night there in the Grand Central Hotel at a cost of $1 a night. In early November, the weather was still cold and it was necessary that they turn on the heat in their hotel room. To do this, it was necessary that they turn on the valve that would allow the gas to tfill the radiators. When they thought they turned the valve off, they inadvertently left it on causing the room to fill with poisonous gas fumes. The next morning Godfrey’s companion found that Godfrey was still sleeping! He was unconscious having inhaled the gas fumes. The elders gave him a priesthood blessing when he was still unconscious and when he woke up, he and the others knew that his life had been spared.

Brief Sketch of Parents by Jacob R. Fuhriman

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Jacob Fuhriman left Switzerland on March 16, 1860 with his wife and one son, Godfrey. He crossed the plains in Captain Ross’s Company. He was one of the first settlers in Providence, Utah. He was a carpenter by trade and helped build the first Providence meeting house. He was one of the carpenters in the building of the Logan Temple. He also built three houses of his own and several other buildings. He was successful. He was always active in the Church, working in the Temple he had helped build. He was a cheerful donator. He was President of the German organization for 20 years. He was also a trustee on the school board. Anna Barbara Loosli Fuhriman immigrated to America with her husband and infant son. She endured all the hardships of the pioneers, carrying her child all the way across the plains. She carded wool, spun yarn and knit the hose for her family. She was a good seamstress, making clothes for the dead, and preparing the bodies for burial. She was an active church worker, a teacher in Relief Society and taking care of the sick. She was also a hat maker, making them from straw. She was bedfast for many years before finally dying from cancer. **Written by Jacob R. Fuhriman

Swiss German Missionary Conference 1884 by Paul-Anthon Nielson

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

This portrait was taken in the photograph studio of Moritz Emil Vollenweider (d. 1899) and his son, Emil Vollenweider (1849-1921), at Postgasse 68 in the city of Bern on 24 December 1884. A conference of the missionaries serving in the Swiss-German Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) convened in the Hotel Emmentalerhof in Bern on 20 December 1884 under the leadership of European Mision President John Henry Smith (1848-1911), a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (since 1880). On that same day, David Kunz wrote in his diary: “[… on the morning of December 20th,] walked [from Niederstocken] to Thun. Got on the train to Bern. My brother, John, joined me at the station at Thun. As we arrived in Bern [at the mission office at] 36 Postgasse, we found Apostle John Henry Smith and several of the Elders there. At 5 P.M. a Priesthood meeting was appointed where all the elders that were present were called upon to speak their feelings. Afterwards Apostle Smith spoke to us for about two hours and gave us some extra good council and told us how to go on and fulfill our duties. It was really a time of rejoicing for the elders to meet again and hear words spoken by one of the Twelve Apostles. I and three more of the Elders went to Brother [John] Teuscher’s to sleep. John Kunz III’s account of that day is somewhat similar: “[…] took train to Bern and there the first Thing we knew met President John Henry Smith one of the twelve Apostels, being then President over the European Mission. And we all had a good blessed time for in the same evning Dec. 20 we had a Priesthood Meeting in the English Languge and all spocke in turns and President Smith give us most exellent Instructions so that we thought we should never forget them it lasted until 11 p.m.” Three sessions were held on Sunday, December 21, 1884, at 10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. On Monday, the 22nd, general sessions were held at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.; a conference of the Relief Society was held at 7:30 p.m. that same evening. John Kunz commented that “The whole of the Conference was a decided Success, we received lots of good Teachings and the Spirit of God was there, we all felt to rejoice and to thank God for his Mercy and Blessings.” In his diary entry on Tuesday, John Kunz wrote: “Dec. 23 was spent in having a Jolly time counseled all the Time by John Henry. In the Evning we gathered in the Capacity of a Sonday School Meeting around a nice Christmus tree full of nice Gifts for the little ones. They done so remarkably well that President Smith give each of the Boys who Prayed by opening and dismissing a franc, or twenty cents in U.S. Moneys worth.” On Wednesday, Christmas Eve day, David Kunz commented: “Had our breakfast there [in the Hotel Emmentalerhof] in the morning and went down to [the mission office at] 36 Postgasse. About 11 A.M. all the elders, 14 in number, and Apostle John H. Smith went to Vollenweider’s Gallery to have our likeness’ taken all in one picture. As all 15 of us were placed, we were taken once and Mr. Vollenweider told us to remain in our places. We did so for to be taken again, but before it could be taken again I fainted and fell to the floor. The brethren lifted me up and after a few minutes I came to my senses again and was placed on a chair among the others and our picture was taken. I spent the rest of that day in the office, also that night I stayed there.” John’s account of the experience is similar: “Dec. 24 was resolved by all of the Elders from Zion 15 to have each a Group Picture of all of the 15. We contracted and as we where about to be taken David my Brother fainted a dead faint, we doubted whether he would come again, but finely he got so we could take them, but later Experience learned us they where a failure. David I transported to the Officce and got Sister [Bertha Kunz] Pluess to care for him and went according to apointment in the Emmenthaler Hof to a Christmus Dinner where 14 of us had a good Time with an American Plum Pudding, allthough I missed my Brother very much and returned sooner and found him a great deal improoved. On Christmas day, December 25th, John Kunz III wrote: “a good many of the Brethren left to their diferent fields of Labor and here I must state that my Brother David was appointed President of Central Swiss Conference and myself as such of the Bern conference.” He continued: “Dec. 26, 1884 left Bern and also took leave of my Brother who was told to stay untill more improoved in his health, this Occasion was a new trial and a hard one to me, but as I had resolved to Labor and do whatever the Servants of God placed over me, would advise and apoint me to do, I left all though cryeing and praying, changing untill my head and eyes requested some stop about it.” This photograph is the second shot. Front row, left to right: David Kunz (1855-1916), Assistant Mission Secretary Louis Frederick Moench Sr. (1846-1916), European Mission President John Henry Smith (1848-1911), Swiss-German Mission President Frederick William Schoenfeld II (1831-1918), Mission Secretary Joseph Albert Smith (1844-1926), Thomas Biesinger (1844-1931) and Conrad Vaterlaus III (1835-1917); back row, left to right: Gottlieb Hirschi (1837-1900), Gottfried Fuhriman (1859-1920), George Conrad Naegle (1860-1935), John Kunz III (1844-1918), Jacob Hafen (1836-1917), Jacob Arnold Bigler (1849-1916), Francis (Fred) Marion Lyman Jr. (1863-1957) and John Rudolf Boshard (1856-1928). Information and Identification by Paul-Anthon Nielson kupan@bluewin.ch

Mission Story

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

Godfrey Fuhriman, served his mission in Switzerland and Germany in the 1850’s. The following is an experience he had while traveling from Utah to the mission field: The group of missionaries took the train to New York City and spent the night there in the Grand Central Hotel at a cost of $1 a night. In early November, the weather was still cold and it was necessary that they turn on the heat in their hotel room. To do this, it was necessary that they turn on the valve that would allow the gas to tfill the radiators. When they thought they turned the valve off, they inadvertently left it on causing the room to fill with poisonous gas fumes. The next morning Godfrey’s companion found that Godfrey was still sleeping! He was unconscious having inhaled the gas fumes. The elders gave him a priesthood blessing when he was still unconscious and when he woke up, he and the others knew that his life had been spared.

Brief Sketch of Parents by Jacob R. Fuhriman

Contributor: Amador82 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

Jacob Fuhriman left Switzerland on March 16, 1860 with his wife and one son, Godfrey. He crossed the plains in Captain Ross’s Company. He was one of the first settlers in Providence, Utah. He was a carpenter by trade and helped build the first Providence meeting house. He was one of the carpenters in the building of the Logan Temple. He also built three houses of his own and several other buildings. He was successful. He was always active in the Church, working in the Temple he had helped build. He was a cheerful donator. He was President of the German organization for 20 years. He was also a trustee on the school board. Anna Barbara Loosli Fuhriman immigrated to America with her husband and infant son. She endured all the hardships of the pioneers, carrying her child all the way across the plains. She carded wool, spun yarn and knit the hose for her family. She was a good seamstress, making clothes for the dead, and preparing the bodies for burial. She was an active church worker, a teacher in Relief Society and taking care of the sick. She was also a hat maker, making them from straw. She was bedfast for many years before finally dying from cancer. **Written by Jacob R. Fuhriman

Life timeline of Godfrey Fuhriman

Godfrey Fuhriman was born on 15 Jun 1859
Godfrey Fuhriman was 3 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Godfrey Fuhriman was 21 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Godfrey Fuhriman was 24 years old when Krakatoa begins to erupt; the volcano explodes three months later, killing more than 36,000 people. Krakatoa, or Krakatau, is a volcanic island situated in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in the Indonesian province of Lampung. The name is also used for the surrounding island group comprising the remnants of a much larger island of three volcanic peaks which was obliterated in a cataclysmic 1883 eruption.
Godfrey Fuhriman was 37 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
Godfrey Fuhriman was 46 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Godfrey Fuhriman was 53 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Godfrey Fuhriman died on 8 Dec 1920 at the age of 61
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Godfrey Fuhriman (15 Jun 1859 - 8 Dec 1920), BillionGraves Record 39462818 River Heights, Cache, Utah, United States

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