Gerald J. Maxfield

30 Oct 1927 - 24 Jan 2000

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Gerald J. Maxfield

30 Oct 1927 - 24 Jan 2000
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Grave site information of Gerald J. Maxfield (30 Oct 1927 - 24 Jan 2000) at Orem Cemetery in Orem, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Gerald J. Maxfield

Born:
Married: 20 Nov 1951
Died:

Orem Cemetery

770 Murdock Canal Trail
Orem, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Children: Chris, Carla, Connie, Curtis, Clark, Corey, Collette
Transcriber

SouthPawPhilly

June 27, 2011
Transcriber

junedraper

April 13, 2020
Transcriber

KessparkJOWBR

April 13, 2020
Transcriber

jbbj24

April 4, 2020
Transcriber

snoladi

April 10, 2020
Photographer

GraveTrain

June 26, 2011

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Family

Relationships on the headstone

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  • Gayle C. Maxfield (Clay)
    Buried here
    14 Mar 1932 - Not Available
  • Gayle C. Maxfield (Clay)
    Buried here
    14 May 1932 - Not Available
  • Chris Maxfield
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Carala Maxfield
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Connie Maxfield
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Curtis Maxfield
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Clark Maxfield
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Corey Maxfield
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Collette Maxfield
    Child
    Others not buried here

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Grave Site of Gerald J.

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Gerald J. Maxfield is buried in the Orem Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Memories

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Rosamond's Musical Genius

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Mother was truly gifted! As a young girl of about 12 years of age she begged for a piano and her father (Joseph Fred Palmer) finally was able to get one for her. Mother took only 3 or 4 lessons then taught herself the rest. She willingly shared her innate musical talents and taught her sisters, Della and Vida also to play the piano. Mom played very well by sight/music notes as well as by ear. She could easily transpose music into whatever key was needed so you could sing it in your best vocal range. Someone has said good music is the language of the angels. Mother spoke it well and true to her form, she passed it on. (An excerpt from "Life History of Rosamond Palmer Maxfield" by Rosamond) When I was 13 years old I was sustained as Primary Organist. At age 16 or 17, I served on the Sunday School Stake Board for 5 years. For many years we had only one stake and it was known as the Jordan Stake. It covered the big territory from the south end of Murray to the Point of the Mountain and from Granite (now known as Little Cottonwood) on the east side to Bingham Canyon on the West. To fulfill my Stake calling, many times I walked up the canyon from lower Bingham to Highland Bay, a healthy distance on the west end. For many years I served as Ward Organist. . . (An excerpt from "Maxfield Family History" by Rod Maxfield, a son) Mother formed a family dance band and of course she was on the piano. Clark and Gerald were originally on Saxaphones; when Gerald went away to school, her brother Ross Palmer switched from Rhythm guitar to Saxaphone; another brother Elmer Palmer was on the Steel Guitar; a man by the name of Cox was the drummer; another brother, Donald Palmer became the Rhythm Guitarist with JeNeal and Rod (at age 4 and 9 respectively) as vocalists. At age 12, Rod added the Trombone to the band. They were in great demand and performed regularly 3 or 4 times a week for about 10 years until missions and military service took them elsewhere. Mother always taught that the Lord gave us talents to enjoy and develop to their fullest and the way you develop best is to use them as often as possible to bless others lives. Whenever Mom could, she would sit at the piano or organ producing beautiful memories for everyone. As she grew older her hands tightened up with Arthritis until she could only play one note or occasionally two with her right hand and maybe two notes with her left hand, but with an uncomplaining attitude she always did her best. Up to her last weeks of life, she was ever-willing to bring another moment or two of happiness through her music to anyone who asked. Even when she was so weak she could hardly get to the organ bench, she struggled happily do her best. Mother's life was a constant. When her voice became older and unsteady, she'd apologize for it, but unwilling to give up the beautiful internal feeling music delivers and all the "togetherness" it spawns, she'd sing on. To her last few weeks at 88 1/2 years old, as wobbly and inarticulate as she became, still she sang on and with almost immobile, arthritic hands she played on. Epilog (by Cheryl Maxfield Peters - daughter): Through it all, Mom taught each of us to sing and let the music in our souls flow freely to create beautiful harmony within our lives, our family, and our hearts. She willingly accompanied each of us as she constantly affirmed our efforts to blend our lives into beautiful melodies. These precious memories of so long ago are an invisible but heartfelt thread that binds each of us to Mom's wonderful ways. In Mother's last weeks of life she suffered a debilitating stroke. Carrying on a conversation was now a thing of the past as she could no longer "connect one word to the next.". Nonetheless, each night as I sat by her bedside I sang songs that Mother had sung, played, and taught us all throughout her life. She reached deep into her soul to allow her innate music abilities to rise to the surface. In spite of her physical limitations, she sang every note and word perfectly to every song. At the conclusion of our mini concert she was able to convey how much she loved each tune. It was a treasured time for me to glimpse ever more deeply into the magnificence of Mother's beautiful gift of music.

Rosamond's Treadle Sewing Machine

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

My Mother was a problem solver. When life didn't go as she imagined it should she gathered strength from deep within and fought to bring sweetness to the experience. When Mom was 73 years old she suffered a debilitating stroke which left her with minimal use of her right side. She struggled to lift her arm, use her hand and even walk . It was a difficult time for her. As you can imagine, following this major event in her life, there were many doctor appointments, treatments and possible solutions implemented. Alas, the doctor announced that the damage caused by the stroke was permanent and she would never have complete use of her right side again. With her usual spunk and conviction, she looked him in the eye, and said, "Oh, yes I will! You watch me!" With that she left his office to face her challenge with determination. At this time, her son, Gerald, was in the manufacturing clothing business. Mom asked if he had any fabric scraps left over from the patterns cut. When he answered affirmatively, she asked if could she have them. She had always been a quilter and so it began. Gerald had the extra fabric cut into 4" x 4" squares and gave them to her ready for assembly. Of course, there was no rhyme or reason to the colors or patterns of the fabric so it was an unplanned bonus for Mother's creativity to surface in crafting beautiful quilts. Carefully she organized the quilt squares with her left hand by pinning them together in a colorful pattern. Then the struggle began. The only sewing machine Mom ever had was an old "Treadle" sewing machine. She put those squares on the surface of the machine; placed both her feet on the "pedal"; lifted her right hand in place to hold the fabric and used her left hand to guide it through the actual sewing process. Over next few years, she patiently endured her "limitations" with faith that, with the Lord's help she could overcome her personal test and challenge. Add to that her tenacity as she continued this process thousands of times, creating beautiful quilts for her children, grandchildren and friends who were amazed at her accomplishment. By doing this, eventually, with the help of her "Treadle" sewing machine forcing her right side to function, the left side of her body "taught" the right side how to develop and use different muscles. Even though age took its' natural toll on her in other physical ways, it was a joy to see what her faith, her vision, and her persistence had overcome. Her optimism in dealing with life had a remarkable impact on me. Yes, I did watch her as she had challenged us in the doctors' office that day and yes, she did prevail over disability. For me it was a sacred experience to observe. I'm grateful beyond expression that she was my Mom. God bless her beautiful memory!

Life timeline of Gerald J. Maxfield

1927
Gerald J. Maxfield was born on 30 Oct 1927
Gerald J. Maxfield was 3 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Gerald J. Maxfield was 18 years old when World War II: Nagasaki is devastated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, is dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. Thirty-five thousand people are killed outright, including 23,200-28,200 Japanese war workers, 2,000 Korean forced workers, and 150 Japanese soldiers. Nagasaki is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan. The city's name, 長崎, means "long cape" in Japanese. Nagasaki became a centre of colonial Portuguese and Dutch influence in the 16th through 19th centuries, and the Hidden Christian Sites in the Nagasaki Region have been recognized and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Part of Nagasaki was home to a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War.
Gerald J. Maxfield was 25 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Gerald J. Maxfield was 37 years old when Thirty-five hundred United States Marines are the first American land combat forces committed during the Vietnam War. The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.
Gerald J. Maxfield was 45 years old when Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers leave South Vietnam. The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and the government of South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese army was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; the South Vietnamese army was supported by the United States, South Korea, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some US perspectives. The majority of Americans believe the war was unjustified. The war would last roughly 19 years and would also form the Laotian Civil War as well as the Cambodian Civil War, which also saw all three countries become communist states in 1975.
Gerald J. Maxfield was 62 years old when Cold War: Fall of the Berlin Wall: East Germany opens checkpoints in the Berlin Wall, allowing its citizens to travel to West Berlin. The Berlin Wall was a guarded concrete barrier that physically and ideologically divided Berlin from 1961 to 1989. Constructed by the German Democratic Republic, starting on 13 August 1961, the Wall cut off West Berlin from virtually all of surrounding East Germany and East Berlin until government officials opened it in November 1989. Its demolition officially began on 13 June 1990 and finished in 1992. The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls, accompanied by a wide area that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses. The Eastern Bloc portrayed the Wall as protecting its population from fascist elements conspiring to prevent the "will of the people" in building a socialist state in East Germany.
Gerald J. Maxfield was 66 years old when The Rwandan genocide begins when the aircraft carrying Rwandan president Juvénal Habyarimana and Burundian president Cyprien Ntaryamira is shot down. The Rwandan genocide, also known as the genocide against the Tutsi, was a genocidal mass slaughter of Tutsi in Rwanda by members of the Hutu majority government. An estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 Rwandans were killed during the 100-day period from 7 April to mid-July 1994, constituting as many as 70% of the Tutsi population. Additionally, 30% of the Pygmy Batwa were killed. The genocide and widespread slaughter of Rwandans ended when the Tutsi-backed and heavily armed Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) led by Paul Kagame took control of the country. An estimated 2,000,000 Rwandans, mostly Hutus, were displaced and became refugees.
Gerald J. Maxfield died on 24 Jan 2000 at the age of 72
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Grave record for Gerald J. Maxfield (30 Oct 1927 - 24 Jan 2000), BillionGraves Record 28441 Orem, Utah, Utah, United States

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