George W Bean

1 Apr 1831 - 6 Dec 1897

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George W Bean

1 Apr 1831 - 6 Dec 1897
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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF GEORGE WASHINGTON BEAN by Mary Clark Olsen, his Granddaughter The biographical sketch I will give today is that of my mother's father, Grandfather Bean. George Washington Bean was born on the 1st day of April 1831 in Adams County, Illinois. His Parents were James Bean and Eliz

Life Information

George W Bean

Born:
Died:

Richfield City Cemetery

800 North Main
Richfield, Sevier, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Wife of George W. Bean, born in Illinois, Mother

Headstone Description

Wife of George W Bean
Born in Illinis, THE WOMEN ARE ALL WIVES OF GEORGE W BEAN
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Chynna67

November 29, 2012
Transcriber

KittieC

October 27, 2012
Transcriber

brentstring

December 4, 2012
Transcriber

nathantots

June 2, 2015
Photographer

becky stoneman

October 23, 2012

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George Washington Bean biographical sketch, by Mary Octavia Clark

Contributor: KittieC Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF GEORGE WASHINGTON BEAN by Mary Clark Olsen, his Granddaughter The biographical sketch I will give today is that of my mother's father, Grandfather Bean. George Washington Bean was born on the 1st day of April 1831 in Adams County, Illinois. His Parents were James Bean and Elizabeth Lewis Bean. They both passed through the war of 1812 in the region of St. Charles County, Missouri. They were both very religious, his father being a Methodist and mother a Presbyterian. His mother was a very devout Bible student and after they joined the Mormon church their familiarity with the scriptures enabled them to do much by way of converting others to the religion of Mormonism. Grandfather's parents moved to Nauvoo during the year 1845 and helped build the Nauvoo Temple. Grandpa was in military service at the age of 14 years, and remembered the burning of the saints homes at Green Plains, near Carthage , which occurred in September 1845. He was an excellent speller and at the age as early as 10 or 12 years, would go 5 miles and farther to contest with other schools and was seldom defeated in this line. Grandfather was left to see that his mother and family were taken care of and to bring them across the plains, his father having been called to go with the Mormon Battalion. His company reached Salt Lake City, October 4th, 1847. they were given a small building spot within the fort and there they made enough mexican adobes to build a small house for their family. He related many hardships that they passed through during the winter of 1847, when they were almost entirely out of food of any kind. He told of one woman who called all the women together for the purpose of praying for help from the Lord, that they might find plants of thistle roots and segos to sustain them. They were surely surprised to find that this same woman had 4 barrels of flour horded away, buried in her lot. When she finally was forced to uncover them there, two of the barrels of flour was spoiled, teaching the lesson of course that selfishness never wins out in any case. In May 1948 Grandfather went back East to meet President Young who was coming West with companies of Saints. In spring of 1849 he moved with others to make a settlement which is now Provo City. The Indians objected very seriously to their entering Provo Valley, but after much pleading and making many promises and compromises they allowed them to move on unmolested. This seemed to be a regular gathering place for the Indians, they would meet every spring and have their big pow-wow, horse racing and etc. and would have great feasts on the suckers they could catch in Utah Lake. The first serious outbreak with Indians was occasioned when one of the men in his company claimed a shirt being worn by one of the Indians. When the Indian refused to return the shirt, they started to scuffle and fight and it resulted in the killing of the Indian, this caused much anger and excitement among the tribe and many of the white people were killed by them at this time. On Sept. 1st, 1848 Grandfather had been helping his father build a log house and just at sundown as they were returning home they met Lieut. William Dayton, who was in charge of the old cannon, called the six-pounder, and he told grandfather that they had just been waiting for him to have a cannon practice, without waiting for anything he went up the ladder with the Lieut, and helped him ram the first cartridge, a grass wad was fired, and then without cleaning the cannon Dayton jumped up and put in another load of old cotton containing 1 1/2 pounds of powder. The gun not having cooled off of course caused a terrific explosion killing Lieut. Dayton, throwing Grandfather 30 feet off the ground and blowing his left arm off. He was only a young man about 18 or 19 years, when this tragedy occurred but his faith and spirits were never daunted. He was always courageous and ambitious and raised a large family even though he was handicapped. During his confinement after the accident he was visited very often by the Indians, Chief Walker came more than any of them and taught Grandfather the Indian language. After a while the Indians became more troublesome and it looked as though war was a sure thing, the measles were raging among the whites and spread into the Indian tribes, quieting them down for a while. About 100 men from Salt Lake came and helped drive the Indians into the mountains and far away from the valleys. In the spring of 1850 Grandfather was called by Pres. Young to accompany a party of men into the southern country as Indian interpreter, and was off on a 4 weeks journey passing through San Pete, Sevier and other valleys into Parawan. In 1856 he was married to my Grandmother Mary Jane Wall. I cannot remember her of course, because I was but a month old when she died, but I have had many people tell me of what a loveable and noble woman she was. I would like to relate one little incident in her life. One day while she was in confinement after child birth, Grandfather brought some of the visiting brethren home for dinner from conference. She of course being in bed and having no help at that time had nothing prepared to eat, so she got out of bed and made hot bread and prepared dinner for them after which she got back in bed and stayed the required time, showing to me her ambitious and courageous character. If you will pardon my being personal I would like to tell you of a little experience of mine about 10 years ago. I was over in Castle dale to a big celebration and a nice little elderly lady stepped up and said, "Pardon me, lady, but are you any relation to Mary Jane Wall?" When I told her she was my Grandmother, she said, "I thought as much, you look like Mary come to life again." I indeed felt happy and complimented to be recognized by my resemblance to my Grandmother. Grandfather had two other wives of whom I can well remember many kind and commendable things. I have often heard my mother tell of the love and unity that existed between the three families, there being seldom if ever any friction. Grandpa and his families moved in Sevier valley in the 70's and settled out at Prattsville, and he was appointed Probate Judge which office he held for a great number of years. He was a member of the city council for years and also served in the Sevier Stake Presidency. During his service as Judge he had many occasions to settle trouble between husband and wife, when applying for a divorce, trying to show them where probably both were at fault. He often effected a reconciliation with them. Grandfather died in Richfield on Dec. 9th, 1897.

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF George Washington Bean

Contributor: KittieC Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The following are some excerpts from a BOOK found on line at the FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY (familysearch.org/books). It is "copied" from the PDF version so there may be some errors in the copy. It was done by COPYRIGHT 1945 by FLORA DIANA BEAN HORNE: The parents of George Washington Bean were devout Christians. He read the Bible through seven times, and made the dictionary his other leisure-time friend. His faith in God and His prophet was undaunted. President Brigham Young was his close friend and advisor. As a sixteen year old pioneer, George Washington Bean entered Salt Lake Valley October 4, 1847, in Captain Jedediah M. Grant's company; pioneered in Provo in 1849 and in Sevier County in 1873. He lost his left hand in Provo September 1, 1849, when a cannon exploded. At this time when his life was dangerously ebbing from powder burns and mutilations, he prayed to die, but President Brigham Young and his counselors, Heber C. Kimball and Dr. Willard Richards, came to his side and brought him new life. He had previously been called by President Young to go with Orrin Porter Rockwell with a message of "Peace and Brotherhood" to the Indian tribes—a life mission. He was Indian interpreter for Governor Brigham Young and all Government officials and military men and was given commission from the Governor in 1867 as Lieutenant Col onel of Cavalry. Two badges tell the story of his activities the Indian War Badge and the Pioneer Golden Jubile Badge for a pioneer of 1847. A few of his civic and political positions held are: One of the first teachers in Provo; first United States Deputy Marshall in Utah; clerk or secretary of most civic movements; Probate Judge for many years in Utah County and later in Sevier County; legislator; Assessor and Collector at several different times; Collector of Internal Revenue; guide and interpreter with topographical engineers; and explorer with government engineers. His school days ended when but thirteen years of age, but he continued to study. He enjoyed Orson Pratt's classwork in astronomy, science, and theology. He was pleased to know personally all the officials of the Latter-day Saint Church and entertained most of them in his home (which we children appreciated). Among his most important positions held in the Church were: his ordination to a Seventy in Nauvoo by Joseph Young in the 30th Quorum and services as first counselor to President W. H. Seegmiller in the Sevier Stake. He also labored as Sevier Stake Presiding Bishop under Presiding Bishop Edward Hunter in the day when tithes were paid in produce such as the tenth load of hay, a tenth calf, a tenth bushel of wheat or a tenth dozen of eggs. All of these had to be dispensed or properly stored by the sixteen wards of the Stake—which was a great responsibility. In 1893, our Father was ordained a Patriarch by Apostle John Henry Smith. Among his truest friends were the Indians. He learned the names of their Chieftains when he joined in their games at the Spring fish-feasting season on Timpanogos (Provo) River in 1849 while the pioneers were building Fort Utah. He studied the character of these red men in their games and as their suspicion changed to confidence, he exchanged 'bits" of language with them. Our Father always contended that the lack of wisdom on the part of the "Whites caused ,11 the trouble with Indians. It was he, as Interpreter, „hose life was endangered many times, who learned the facts. His life was saved twice by Washear (Squash) and once by Chief Peteetneet. The relationship of lhe Great Spirit " "Big White Chief" at Washington, D. C , and the "White Chief" at Salt Lake City, and the "Happy Hunting Ground" had to be explained patiently so many times. It was fortunate that our Father's sense of humor was his shock-absorber. That gift he has handed down to the family. George Washington Bean was recognized for his dependability, fidelity to a trust, and his unswerving testimony to the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the Divinity of the great mission of the Prophet Joseph Smith and his successors. He was a kind and lovable Father, and his powerful humility was shown in all his marvelous accomplishments. His trust in God was genuine. May we, his descendants to the last generation, emulate his power of faith and strength of character. Humbly, Your Genealogist-Historian Flora Bean Horne.

Autobiography of George Washington Bean as Saints Prepare to Go West

Contributor: KittieC Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Autobiography of George Washington Bean My second sister, Sarah Ann, married William Wallace Casper in Adams County, who had been baptized and came to Nauvoo with the family. Saints Prepare to Go West: My soldier service in Nauvoo Legion, or Col. Stephen Markham’s posse, was an important chapter of my experiences. We virtually captured the towns of Warsaw and Carthage, aided by several hundred intantry in wagons from Nauvoo. But few arrests were made, however, as the mobbers hid until they could cross the Mississippi River into Missouri. In the Fall of 1845, owing to mob pressure, our Church authorities, with President Brigham Young at the head, were obliged to agree to move to the West next spring and give up our beautiful City with all its pleasant surroundings and take whatever we could get for our homes and hard-earned improvements and become exiles and wanderers in the great and unexplored West. One of the first moves toward our departure was the organization of all the families into companies of fifty each with a Captain over all, and one over each ten. These details were made for suitable workers in the shops, and in all lines necessary to aid our successful and speedy removal. In the spring, those who had teams and wagons assisted the families to move into Nauvoo from outlying settlements. Corn, vegetables, products of all kinds necessary for the sustenance of man or beast were carefully gathered; while tailors, shoemakers, blacksmiths and wagon makers were busy almost night and day. My father belonged to Capt. Shadrack Roundy’s Company, so I was detailed to go over into Iowa to Sugar Creek on the Half Breed tract, as it was called, there being no particular owner, to cut and prepare wagon timber of white oak and hickory that grew there in abundance. I had for companions George Mayers and Hy Woolsey, the latter about as worthless a customer as you could see. We worked a month and boarded at old father Kessman’s and nearly starved, as no one knew how to cook. Besides, some of them were shaking with the ague every day, and young fellows do...

George Washington Bean biographical sketch, by Mary Octavia Clark

Contributor: nathantots Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF GEORGE WASHINGTON BEAN by Mary Clark Olsen, his Granddaughter The biographical sketch I will give today is that of my mother's father, Grandfather Bean. George Washington Bean was born on the 1st day of April 1831 in Adams County, Illinois. His Parents were James Bean and Elizabeth Lewis Bean. They both passed through the war of 1812 in the region of St. Charles County, Missouri. They were both very religious, his father being a Methodist and mother a Presbyterian. His mother was a very devout Bible student and after they joined the Mormon church their familiarity with the scriptures enabled them to do much by way of converting others to the religion of Mormonism. Grandfather's parents moved to Nauvoo during the year 1845 and helped build the Nauvoo Temple. Grandpa was in military service at the age of 14 years, and remembered the burning of the saints homes at Green Plains, near Carthage , which occurred in September 1845. He was an excellent speller and at the age as early as 10 or 12 years, would go 5 miles and farther to contest with other schools and was seldom defeated in this line. Grandfather was left to see that his mother and family were taken care of and to bring them across the plains, his father having been called to go with the Mormon Battalion. His company reached Salt Lake City, October 4th, 1847. they were given a small building spot within the fort and there they made enough mexican adobes to build a small house for their family. He related many hardships that they passed through during the winter of 1847, when they were almost entirely out of food of any kind. He told of one woman who called all the women together for the purpose of praying for help from the Lord, that they might find plants of thistle roots and segos to sustain them. They were surely surprised to find that this same woman had 4 barrels of flour horded away, buried in her lot. When she finally was forced to uncover them there, two of the barrels of flour was spoiled, teaching the lesson of course that selfishness never wins out in any case. In May 1948 Grandfather went back East to meet President Young who was coming West with companies of Saints. In spring of 1849 he moved with others to make a settlement which is now Provo City. The Indians objected very seriously to their entering Provo Valley, but after much pleading and making many promises and compromises they allowed them to move on unmolested. This seemed to be a regular gathering place for the Indians, they would meet every spring and have their big pow-wow, horse racing and etc. and would have great feasts on the suckers they could catch in Utah Lake. The first serious outbreak with Indians was occasioned when one of the men in his company claimed a shirt being worn by one of the Indians. When the Indian refused to return the shirt, they started to scuffle and fight and it resulted in the killing of the Indian, this caused much anger and excitement among the tribe and many of the white people were killed by them at this time. On Sept. 1st, 1848 Grandfather had been helping his father build a log house and just at sundown as they were returning home they met Lieut. William Dayton, who was in charge of the old cannon, called the six-pounder, and he told grandfather that they had just been waiting for him to have a cannon practice, without waiting for anything he went up the ladder with the Lieut, and helped him ram the first cartridge, a grass wad was fired, and then without cleaning the cannon Dayton jumped up and put in another load of old cotton containing 1 1/2 pounds of powder. The gun not having cooled off of course caused a terrific explosion killing Lieut. Dayton, throwing Grandfather 30 feet off the ground and blowing his left arm off. He was only a young man about 18 or 19 years, when this tragedy occurred but his faith and spirits were never daunted. He was always courageous and ambitious and raised a large family even though he was handicapped. During his confinement after the accident he was visited very often by the Indians, Chief Walker came more than any of them and taught Grandfather the Indian language. After a while the Indians became more troublesome and it looked as though war was a sure thing, the measles were raging among the whites and spread into the Indian tribes, quieting them down for a while. About 100 men from Salt Lake came and helped drive the Indians into the mountains and far away from the valleys. In the spring of 1850 Grandfather was called by Pres. Young to accompany a party of men into the southern country as Indian interpreter, and was off on a 4 weeks journey passing through San Pete, Sevier and other valleys into Parawan. In 1856 he was married to my Grandmother Mary Jane Wall. I cannot remember her of course, because I was but a month old when she died, but I have had many people tell me of what a loveable and noble woman she was. I would like to relate one little incident in her life. One day while she was in confinement after child birth, Grandfather brought some of the visiting brethren home for dinner from conference. She of course being in bed and having no help at that time had nothing prepared to eat, so she got out of bed and made hot bread and prepared dinner for them after which she got back in bed and stayed the required time, showing to me her ambitious and courageous character. If you will pardon my being personal I would like to tell you of a little experience of mine about 10 years ago. I was over in Castle dale to a big celebration and a nice little elderly lady stepped up and said, "Pardon me, lady, but are you any relation to Mary Jane Wall?" When I told her she was my Grandmother, she said, "I thought as much, you look like Mary come to life again." I indeed felt happy and complimented to be recognized by my resemblance to my Grandmother. Grandfather had two other wives of whom I can well remember many kind and commendable things. I have often heard my mother tell of the love and unity that existed between the three families, there being seldom if ever any friction. Grandpa and his families moved in Sevier valley in the 70's and settled out at Prattsville, and he was appointed Probate Judge which office he held for a great number of years. He was a member of the city council for years and also served in the Sevier Stake Presidency. During his service as Judge he had many occasions to settle trouble between husband and wife, when applying for a divorce, trying to show them where probably both were at fault. He often effected a reconciliation with them. Grandfather died in Richfield on Dec. 9th, 1897.

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF George Washington Bean

Contributor: nathantots Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

The following are some excerpts from a BOOK found on line at the FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY (familysearch.org/books). It is "copied" from the PDF version so there may be some errors in the copy. It was done by COPYRIGHT 1945 by FLORA DIANA BEAN HORNE: The parents of George Washington Bean were devout Christians. He read the Bible through seven times, and made the dictionary his other leisure-time friend. His faith in God and His prophet was undaunted. President Brigham Young was his close friend and advisor. As a sixteen year old pioneer, George Washington Bean entered Salt Lake Valley October 4, 1847, in Captain Jedediah M. Grant's company; pioneered in Provo in 1849 and in Sevier County in 1873. He lost his left hand in Provo September 1, 1849, when a cannon exploded. At this time when his life was dangerously ebbing from powder burns and mutilations, he prayed to die, but President Brigham Young and his counselors, Heber C. Kimball and Dr. Willard Richards, came to his side and brought him new life. He had previously been called by President Young to go with Orrin Porter Rockwell with a message of "Peace and Brotherhood" to the Indian tribes—a life mission. He was Indian interpreter for Governor Brigham Young and all Government officials and military men and was given commission from the Governor in 1867 as Lieutenant Col onel of Cavalry. Two badges tell the story of his activities the Indian War Badge and the Pioneer Golden Jubile Badge for a pioneer of 1847. A few of his civic and political positions held are: One of the first teachers in Provo; first United States Deputy Marshall in Utah; clerk or secretary of most civic movements; Probate Judge for many years in Utah County and later in Sevier County; legislator; Assessor and Collector at several different times; Collector of Internal Revenue; guide and interpreter with topographical engineers; and explorer with government engineers. His school days ended when but thirteen years of age, but he continued to study. He enjoyed Orson Pratt's classwork in astronomy, science, and theology. He was pleased to know personally all the officials of the Latter-day Saint Church and entertained most of them in his home (which we children appreciated). Among his most important positions held in the Church were: his ordination to a Seventy in Nauvoo by Joseph Young in the 30th Quorum and services as first counselor to President W. H. Seegmiller in the Sevier Stake. He also labored as Sevier Stake Presiding Bishop under Presiding Bishop Edward Hunter in the day when tithes were paid in produce such as the tenth load of hay, a tenth calf, a tenth bushel of wheat or a tenth dozen of eggs. All of these had to be dispensed or properly stored by the sixteen wards of the Stake—which was a great responsibility. In 1893, our Father was ordained a Patriarch by Apostle John Henry Smith. Among his truest friends were the Indians. He learned the names of their Chieftains when he joined in their games at the Spring fish-feasting season on Timpanogos (Provo) River in 1849 while the pioneers were building Fort Utah. He studied the character of these red men in their games and as their suspicion changed to confidence, he exchanged 'bits" of language with them. Our Father always contended that the lack of wisdom on the part of the "Whites caused ,11 the trouble with Indians. It was he, as Interpreter, „hose life was endangered many times, who learned the facts. His life was saved twice by Washear (Squash) and once by Chief Peteetneet. The relationship of lhe Great Spirit " "Big White Chief" at Washington, D. C , and the "White Chief" at Salt Lake City, and the "Happy Hunting Ground" had to be explained patiently so many times. It was fortunate that our Father's sense of humor was his shock-absorber. That gift he has handed down to the family. George Washington Bean was recognized for his dependability, fidelity to a trust, and his unswerving testimony to the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the Divinity of the great mission of the Prophet Joseph Smith and his successors. He was a kind and lovable Father, and his powerful humility was shown in all his marvelous accomplishments. His trust in God was genuine. May we, his descendants to the last generation, emulate his power of faith and strength of character. Humbly, Your Genealogist-Historian Flora Bean Horne.

Autobiography of George Washington Bean as Saints Prepare to Go West

Contributor: nathantots Created: 3 years ago Updated: 7 months ago

Autobiography of George Washington Bean My second sister, Sarah Ann, married William Wallace Casper in Adams County, who had been baptized and came to Nauvoo with the family. Saints Prepare to Go West: My soldier service in Nauvoo Legion, or Col. Stephen Markham’s posse, was an important chapter of my experiences. We virtually captured the towns of Warsaw and Carthage, aided by several hundred intantry in wagons from Nauvoo. But few arrests were made, however, as the mobbers hid until they could cross the Mississippi River into Missouri. In the Fall of 1845, owing to mob pressure, our Church authorities, with President Brigham Young at the head, were obliged to agree to move to the West next spring and give up our beautiful City with all its pleasant surroundings and take whatever we could get for our homes and hard-earned improvements and become exiles and wanderers in the great and unexplored West. One of the first moves toward our departure was the organization of all the families into companies of fifty each with a Captain over all, and one over each ten. These details were made for suitable workers in the shops, and in all lines necessary to aid our successful and speedy removal. In the spring, those who had teams and wagons assisted the families to move into Nauvoo from outlying settlements. Corn, vegetables, products of all kinds necessary for the sustenance of man or beast were carefully gathered; while tailors, shoemakers, blacksmiths and wagon makers were busy almost night and day. My father belonged to Capt. Shadrack Roundy’s Company, so I was detailed to go over into Iowa to Sugar Creek on the Half Breed tract, as it was called, there being no particular owner, to cut and prepare wagon timber of white oak and hickory that grew there in abundance. I had for companions George Mayers and Hy Woolsey, the latter about as worthless a customer as you could see. We worked a month and boarded at old father Kessman’s and nearly starved, as no one knew how to cook. Besides, some of them were shaking with the ague every day, and young fellows do...

Life timeline of George W Bean

1831
George W Bean was born on 1 Apr 1831
George W Bean was 9 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
George W Bean was 28 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
George W Bean was 38 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
George W Bean was 44 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
George W Bean was 54 years old when Louis Pasteur successfully tests his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. Louis Pasteur was a French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the "father of microbiology".
George W Bean died on 6 Dec 1897 at the age of 66
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for George W Bean (1 Apr 1831 - 6 Dec 1897), BillionGraves Record 2449422 Richfield, Sevier, Utah, United States

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