George Facer

4 Jul 1834 - 22 Feb 1903

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George Facer

4 Jul 1834 - 22 Feb 1903
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George Facer, son of Henry and Mary Jarvis Facer was born at Eynesbury, Huntingshire, England, on 4th day of July 1834. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on August 5th 1854. His father Henry, died when George was two years old, leaving his mother Mary and one broth

Life Information

George Facer

Born:
Died:

Willard City Cemetery

Unnamed Rd
Willard, Box Elder, Utah
United States
Transcriber

MollyM

June 26, 2013
Transcriber

R and N Englestead

July 7, 2013
Photographer

Thorsted

June 23, 2013

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Biography of George and Mary Prior Facer

Contributor: MollyM Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

George Facer, son of Henry and Mary Jarvis Facer was born at Eynesbury, Huntingshire, England, on 4th day of July 1834. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on August 5th 1854. His father Henry, died when George was two years old, leaving his mother Mary and one brother, William Facer, of whom little is known. On September 6th 1857 he married Mary Prior, the daughter of James and Dove Brown Prior of Garverly, England. Parson Mall married them. After George was baptized, he was put in as presiding Elder over the church branch, oft times walking many miles to his meetings. George worked on the farm of Edward Peck. He paid monthly payment to an emigration fund, preparing for the journey to Zion. He gave all of their fund to the Church, by request, then he sorted onions for peck to get more money to come to Zion. Mary Prior (Facer), daughter of James Prior and Dove Brown, was born January 27th 1840 in Garverly, Cambridgeshire, England. She was baptized June 3rd 1855 by James Baely and Confirmed by John Joyce the same day. She was fifteen years old, her father was very bitter and angry at her when he heard she had been baptized. Two of her neighbors reported it to him. He turned her away from her home, and gave her the only whipping she ever had. Mary went to live with Mary Chandler, George Facer’s mother. Later she married George Facer. He was a good man and they were happy, although it was hard to leave her father and brothers and come to Zion. In fourteen months, a new joy came into their lives. George, their baby boy was born November 13th, 1858. The baby was sixteen months old when they left their home for the sake of the Gospel and came to America. They started their journey on March 27th and arrived in Liverpool March 28th 1860. They sailed March 28th 1860 on the ship Underwriter with 594 of the Saints. James D. Roos was president of the company of travelers. The journey was very rough. They arrived in New York City May 1st 1860 after 32 days on the water. There was much sickness on the boat and George was of great assistance. From New York City, they went to Florence, Nebraska by rail and boat on the Missouri River. In Iowa, George worked for a Mr. Ford digging post holes for which he received some food. At Florence the handcarts were prepared. They remained there until June 14th waiting for the handcarts (which had not yet been built). The handcart was a two wheel outfit with a tongue at which two could pull. George Q. Cannon was there to superintend the work. They had lots of clothing and bedding, but owing to their mode of travel, it was impossible to take but very little along, so the rest was burned. They started across the plains with happy hearts, little knowing the trials they must meet. They felt fine the first few days, then they started to have sore feet, which made it hard on them. Later on Grandmother’s (Mary Prior Facer) feet were so sore from walking, blood would run out of her shoes when she took them off. Only the very young or very ill could ride on the handcarts. All others had to walk. Her feet became so sore she couldn't keep up with the Company, so Grandfather would hide her in the bushes near the trail until the Company camped for the night. Then he would walk back, pick her up, and carry her to the camp. One night while she was hiding form the Indians and awaiting Grandfather’s return, an Indian war party almost ran over her with their horses. After a few days on the trail, they met the first company of missionaries going back to England. In the company there was one lady. She felt very bad to see them traveling with handcarts. She well knew what they would have to go through. Grandfather was a sub-captain in the company, being in charge of ten families. They had six wagons in the company which were heavily loaded. In fact the loads were so heavy, the captain commanded them to burn all they really didn't need. Soon after they began their journey, they were met by a band of Indians. Daniel Robinson, captain of the company of Saints, talked with the Indians, but they were determined not to leave until they got some food. The Indians took several sacks of flour and some shot and powder to shoot wild game. Captain Robinson said giving the Indians these things was the all that saved their lives While the Indians were there, Grandmother was so frightened that she forgot her little boy and he wandered over to the horses. She saw him just in time to save his life as a horse kicked at him. One day the company was met by a herd of buffalo. As the buffalo were running through the camp, the oxen turned to run to the mountains. The men worked hard to get them back in the road, constantly warning the people to keep back because they were afraid someone, especially the children would get killed. They had to mend wagons and carts after this scare. Soon afterward, another band of Indians came upon them. These Indians were mean and wanted to trade ponies for Grandmother and one other lady. They said, “Indians like white squaw.” The company finally gave more flour and ammunition to the Indians and were happy to see them go. Captain Robinson told Grandfather, “They would be killed if they didn't give it to them.” By giving their food away, they ran short and had to request Brigham Young to send flour, bacon, rice and a little tea for the older folks. One morning they had to walk eight miles without anything to eat. There weren't many “nick-knacks”, for them, sometimes a few pig weeds or mushrooms for a change. They gathered dried buffalo chips with which to build their fires and cook and bake bread. President Young sent flour and meat to them twice before they reached Salt Lake City, and they still ran short of food. One day the company stopped while some of the men went hunting. The men got lost, and after waiting so long for them, those at camp built a big bonfire to help them find their way back. But it was after midnight before the hunters arrived. They would travel some days about twenty five miles, then lie down at night too tired to get supper. The food and bedding were kept in the handcart. The little boy George would walk until he was tired, and then Grandmother would carry him until she became too tired, then they would have to put him in the cart. Each day Grandmother got more tired carrying young George, when one of the men with a wagon said that he would put the little boy in his wagon, so she didn’t carry him again. Grandmother carried him about five hundred miles. Grandmother rode only half of one day during the entire journey. And that was when she was sick. She said it was hard to be sick on a journey like that. There was only one death in their company during the journey. When they were within sixty miles of Salt Lake City, a little two year old boy died. They arrived in Salt Lake City on August 27th 1860. They were then sent to Willard, Box Elder County, Utah, arriving there August 29th 1860. In this company there were 233 people, 43 handcarts, 6 wagons, 30 oxen and 10 tents. Grandmother said it was no honeymoon. Their hands were sore and their feet blistered. The first place they went after reaching Willard was to Bishop Dives’. Grandfather was a farmer and Bishop Dives gave him a job. They cleaned up an old granary to live in. Having no money made it very hard starting out in the new world. Many times they went hungry and half clothed. Grandmother went into the fields to glean some wheat and husked corn to buy a pair of shoes for their little boy. When they went to church the first time, the people looked at them, Mary’s face was sunburned and wind burned. She had a pretty good dress, but no shoes. There were many who came barefoot. Everyone was in the same boat those days. They picked up potatoes in the fields to buy each one a pair of shoes for the winter. They could not buy any dress goods. Calico and factory was very high (expensive). It cost $1.25 per yard and thread was 25 cents per spool. Grandfather built a chicken coop for a lady to get some shirting to make him his first new shirt. They made many friends, some who had been there for sometime. These friends were very good to them, often sending them a little milk or a piece of butter, all of which was much appreciated, as cows were scarce and money still more scarce. Bishop Dives gave them a good cow. They lived on Bishop Dives’ farm for three years, then they moved to south Willard on a farm owned by Mrs. Lawrence Jacobson. About this time Grandfather’s suit wore out. All that was left of it was the lining, so he had to have a new one. It did not take him long to choose something for a new one. Anything was in style, just so it was a good suit. On the next Sunday he came out in his new suit made of bed ticking. Sometimes they traded two pounds of butter for two spools of thread. Grandfather had to have something to shave by, so he used a shiny tin plate for a mirror. At first they had no soap for their washing and no iron to iron clothes, as they had no room to bring those thing along. They later moved to north Willard, where the family farm and home still stands. There were slaves on the place, owned by a Mr. Bankhead, who then moved to Wellsville, Cache County, Utah. The new bishop told Grandfather not to buy the place, but he did and worked it well. One year he had a good crop of wheat which brought 50 cents per bushel. They were troubled very much by Indians at their home. They would come when Grandfather was away. One day Grandfather was out in the field at work and two Indians came. One went inside while the other stayed outside. The one on the outside put his hand in the window and took a beautiful pin that Grandfather had given Grandmother on their wedding day. As soon as the Indians had gone, Grandmother discovered the pin was gone. That night at a dance, Grandmother saw her pin on a Sister Cardon. Grandfather inquired of Brother Cardon where they got it and he was told from an Indian that day. Brother Cardon gave it back to Grandmother. One other time Grandmother was baking bread with the last of their flour when three other Indians came into the house. They saw the bread cooking and “wanted bread.” They sat down in front of the fireplace to wait for the bread to cook. They sat quite sometime and Grandmother didn't know what to do, when suddenly a big spider came down from the ceiling right in front of the Indians. They jumped up and hollered and left saying the house was haunted. Later on Grandfather became a friend of the Indians, some of them being very savage and always on the war path, but he had very little trouble with them. He could speak enough of their language to make them understand that he was their friend and to his dying day, he never met one but what they had to shake hands with him, and always told him that he was “heap”good man. George was a man of faith and integrity. Very clean in person and language; true to living oracles or authorities, strictly honest and trustworthy. He was firm in his testimony of the gospel. Very careful in his dress. He had a head of curly hair and always wore a mustache. He was about 5 feet 8 inches in height and weighed about 165 pounds. He was intelligent, a good provider, and a good economist. Grandfather (George) was ordained a Seventy the 23rd of September 1860 by J. T. Brewerton and ordained a High Priest, on the 9th of September 1877. He was endowed in the Endowment House in November 1863. He and Mary were sealed in the Salt Lake Temple in November of 1863 by H. C. Kimball. He received three patriarchal blessings. The first on 27 September 1860 by Isaac Morley, the second on 10 May 1871 by C. W. Hyde, and the third by John Smith, date unknown. George Facer was set apart as first counselor to Bishop Ward of the Willard, Utah ward on September 9, 1877. He held this position until December 3, 1882, when he was called as Bishop of the Willard ward, and ordained by Apostle Lorenzo Snow. He continued as bishop for a number of years, then he was released to fill other duties in the Church. After a few years, he was called again to be Bishop over the his ward. Grandfather was a farmer by trade and also a sheep man. He was one of the Directors of the Logan Temple, a director of the First National Bank, Brigham City, Utah, head man of the Cooperative Sheep Company of Box Elder County, and a school trustee for several terms. Many times when he was being hunted by law officers for having more than one wife, he would use his mother’s maiden name of Jarvis, and stay safely near home. He was the father of 26 children, there being more wives than Mary Prior. Six of his sons served missions for the Church, two of them to his native land of England. Four sons have been Bishops in various wards of the Church. Grandfather was Bishop of the Willard Ward until two weeks before his death, at which time he got up from his sick bed and went to meeting, as the Willard Ward was to be reorganized, and he wanted to thank the people who had so loyally supported him during the 30 years that he hd been Bishop. He died February 22, 1903 at his home in Willard, Utah. Mary Prior, was called to work in the Church Relief Society and Primary organizations. She walked many, many miles delivering the Relief Society message and checking on the welfare of their neighbors. It required a lot of faith and courage to do this for so many years. Grandmother was the mother of twelve children. Four of them died in childhood, and one daughter, Dove, died when she was 18 years of age. Another of Grandfather’s wives died, leaving two little children, whom Grandmother took into her home and raised. Grandmother was interesting to talk with, had a sense of humor, even though her life had its share of sorrow and trials. She often entertained us with stories. She always enjoyed a good joke, one of which she told about Grandfather, Which was, once in their later life, when he used a mirror instead of the shiny tin plate to shave by, Grandfather was standing by the dresser shaving; all of a sudden the glass turned over and he turned to Grandmother and said, “Mother, I have cut my head off”. Grandmother was always very thrifty, and many grand children remember her sitting at the table with the loaf of bread in her arm, cutting off just enough as each person wanted it, spreading it lightly with butter and giving it to the person. Grandmother often talked about their first days in Willard and how she traded her only corset for a hen and a brood of chicks. One granddaughter (Alida Dixon) remembers Grandmother first from when she was little and went to visit their home. We were down in the fruit yard, when a big snake crawled across the path where we were playing. We were scared, but Grandmother assured us it was just a blow snake and was harmless. The next time I remember seeing her was when she came to Rigby, Idaho on a visit. I was about 11 or 12, and she annoyed me because when we ate she would start clearing up the dishes as soon as the first person was through eating. She also saw to it that we didn't run out to play until the dishes were washed. Mother had four boys younger that I and their capers and laziness were quite an annoyance. Mother used to say to Grandmother, “leave them alone Mother, they will get their work done.” I don’t remember seeing Grandmother again until she came to my mother’s (Dove) funeral. She took this death awfully hard. The day after I was married, my husband and I spent the night with Grandmother and had a nice visit with her. I saw her once again when my first baby was a year old. I have been told many times that I (Alida Dixon) looked like her, and since my hair has turned white, I can see a strong resemblance in build and features. The Facer home was a central stopping place for people traveling through Willard, going north or south on a trip. Many of the General Authorities of the Church spent overnight at the Facer home on their way to speaking assignments. In fact it is said the Facers never turned away any person who was hungry without giving them something to eat. One reason may have been, in Grandfather Facer’s Patriarchal Blessing, he was promised that if he lived a righteous life, that he would be visited by one of the “Three Nephites”. One story relates to this. One early evening, Just before supper, a knock came on the Facer door. When they opened it, a tall man with white hair and translucent skin stood there. He was dressed differently than anyone who had ever been to their door. He asked if he could have something to eat. He came in and ate with them at their table. It was not related what they talked about, when he was ready to leave, they walked to the door with him. He left, and a couple of minutes later, they went outside to see which way he had gone, and, looking up and down the roan they could see no one. There was not a person in sight. Had this been his promised “Nephite?” Grandmother was a widow for 27 years after Grandfather’s death. After Grandfather died several children cared for their mother. Joseph lived with his mother for four years. Willard then moved in the little house, farmed the land and cared for his mother until about August 1923. Willard and his family moved to salt Lake City after the Willard flood. Grandmother then moved to Brigham City and lived with her daughter Elizabeth and family until Elizabeth moved to Garfield to be with her husband. `Grandmothers remaining years she lived with her son George and his wife Caroline, where she died on December 12, 1930 at the age of 90 years. She stated as pioneers, they had much trial and tribulation to pass through, but they did it for the Gospel’s sake. They had many hardships, but were made better men and women for it.

Short Life Sketch of George Facer (handwritten by a granddaughter Ethel Dawn Eliason)

Contributor: MollyM Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

This is a short sketch of the life of my maternal grandfather George Facer who died before I was born. He was born July 4th 1834 in Eynesbury Huntingdonshire, England son of Henry Facer & Mary Jarvis. He was baptised into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints August 5, 1854. His childhood was uneventful. He was one of several and they were poor. He could not attend school and in his whole life had only six days of schooling. He married Mary Prior September 6 1857. Their first child George H was born November 13 1858. With his wife and small son he sailed from Liverpool for America in the early part of 1860. After arriving in New York they traveled by train to Council Bluffs. In Council Bluffs he assisted in building handcarts. In the spring of 1860 they put all their belonging in a handcart and started on an 1100 mile trek to Utah - George pulling and Mary pushing and their sixteen month old son riding. They encountered many of the hardships that were prevalent to all the pioneers. Their company was captained by Daniel Robinson and was made up of 233 persons, 43 handcarts and 6 wagons. My grandfather was a sub captain over 10 handcarts. The company arrived August 27, 1860 in Salt Lake City. After a few days in SLC my grandfather, wife and son moved on the South Willard. Here they lived 3 years on a farm belonging to a Mr Davis. Then Bankhead farm. This farm be purchased and it still remain in the family. In this family there was eleven children born. He married Sarah Thompson November 1863 in Salt Lake City. They had three children. He married my grandmother on Sept 6 1875 in Salt Lake City. She was Susanna Nebeker, daughter of Peter Nebeker and Elizabeth Davis and was born in Salt Lake City April 9 1848. They had seven daughters and one son. Of these only two lived to maturity. My mother Ethel Rose who died in 1944 at the age of 64 and my Aunt Susanna who died when she was in her early forties. His fourth wife was Hattie Shumway whom he married April 9 1885 in Logan Utah. They had 4 children. He was the father of 26 children. He was prominent in religious, civic and business of Willard of Box Elder County. He was a director of Brigham City Co Op, Director First National Bank of Brigham Manager of Box Elder Co Op Sheep Company and trustee of school district several times. At the time the Indians were given land in Northern Box Elder, he was called to help establish them on the farms. He was called to be bishop of Willard Dec 3 1882. Served for 8 years and was released. Shortly after at the request of the people he was called to be bishop again. Held this position for another 3 years and was released just 2 weeks prior to his death which occurred Feb 22, 1903 at the age of 68 years, 8 months and 18 days. He lived for 3 years on the underground. At this time the church was taking tithes in kind. He led 300 cattle & horse, and was called to take them to Treasureton, Idaho. On his return trip he & son Joseph camped on the Bear River where they had left a cow. He went to look for it while Joseph was making camp. On a bridge nearby he encountered a man whom he asked if he had seen any stray animals. On returning Joseph asked him if he didn’t recognize the man. His answer was no. Joseph informed him it was U. S. Marshall Steele. Grandfather was very surprised. This was the man who had been looking for him so long. Had been to the house many times to search for him. On March 21st 1889 he gave himself up - was sentenced by Judge Henderson to 4 months imprisonment and an a 50 dollar fine. He was released July 1st 1889. He was a man who wouldn’t tolerate profanity. On his land he had a small granary. He insisted that if the men who worked for him smoked they would have to do it in the granary and no place else. He wouldn’t rent any land unless the man promised to pay tithes. In 1920 David O. McKay testified on his tithing record as follows quote “No man had a better record than he had. Sanctified the land by the honest paying of tithing”.

A Sketch of the Life of James Jarvis Facer

Contributor: MollyM Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

A SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF JAMES JARVIS FACER He was born in Willard, Utah, June 10, 1866, to George and Sarah Thompson Facer, in a house that was behind the Facer home located on the "North String" of Willard. They lived on the farm that George Facer bought from a man by the name of Bankhead; known as the "Bankhead Homestead.” When a small boy, he moved into Cache Valley to a little town called Paradise; his Mother, Joh, Lizzie, (two children by a former marriage) and Emma, an older sister. This home was in the Western part of Paradise, on land owned by George Facer, his father. Here he grew up as other boys. Harry Shaw was his pal. The Shaw family lived close by and his early life was more or less connected with this family. His education was very meager, and as they were poor he had to go to work that they might live, which seems to have been the lot of most every family. Early in life his father and mother had trouble; and a "step father" moved in by the name of Charles Littlewood, and he was an Englishman of the Old School. They could not see eye to eye, so at an early age he left home. In this early age in Paradise, there was nothing for a poor boy to do except farm in summer and canyon work in the winter. So he found himself in Beaver Canyon working for William M. Thomas, a mill-man. Here he worked for four years in almost every kind of a position found around a saw mill. He learned the art of using an ax, skidding logs, even freighting supplies; he told of this "five yoke team of bulls and three wagons" many times to me. He learned all the tricks of a "Bull Whacker" such as the use of a "Bull-whip," to "drop-a-link," and the art of raising "a hoop on a barrel." In this line of work you have to be "all man" and at the end of his stay in Beaver Canyon, he came back to Willard to work for his Father, something that was new to him. He had become six feet three inches tall and weighing around 175 lbs., with (as he told me) fear of no man and a lot of guts, and did not know what it was to be tired. (And I believe this to be true for I saw him in action many times in my early life, and to say the least "he was all man. ") While in Willard, he made his home with Susanah, another wife of his father. Here he became a pal of Pete, son of Susanah, "Brig" Nebeker, and Steve White. They seemed to have done about everything that young men of their age did in Utah at this time. Their work seemed to have been on the “Bp's farm,” handling of Church cattle. (A story related to me by father) Brig, Steve and I were sent to Cache Valley for a heard of cattle and while going up Box Elder Canyon, (being sons of Polygamists) and knowing the work of the "Depts”. we thought it would be a lot of fun to be a “dept” and look for the “Brethren” with more than one wife; so, when we got to the little settlement of Mantua we noised it around “who we were” and in no time we could see several horsemen going over the “Old Indian Trail” back into the hills. In fact there were very few men left in the Valley. Note: Maybe father will not thank me for keeping this story alive; however, the many times we went through Mantua, in latter years, father almost always thought of this prank of his youth, and we had a good laugh. His father having more than one wife he was on the “underground". Many was the night father said he “stood watch.” He told me one night they made a "call" and as they always stopped at Johnie Barker’s, the local watering place, he, Barker, always notified the "Brethren" of these gentlemen being in town. "So, father went “under-ground" and I stood watch. The "Depts" came, left their horses and searched father's home. While they were, I removed the bridles and rapped them on the rumps and started them all loose back toward home. When those gentlemen returned and found they were left a foot they used language that cannot, appear in this story. “The Mormon so and so that had done this was spoken of as a very low character, and, so, the only thing to do now was to go back to Barker’s and make a night of it. “Well, this was but one of the times I helped Father during this period of time. I remember a time when I drove team with Father from Willard through Cache Valley over Bear River Pass into Box Elder Co. and while we were stopped at the Bear River Ford, I was watering the team and who should show but a group of “Depts.” Father was sitting on the seat of the rig, so he pulled an old slough hat on and put an old "corn-cob pipe in his mouth and set there and answered their questions; if he had seen some of those Dam Mormons they mentioned by name that they were out looking for. While living at Susanah's I met Myrtle, a beautiful daughter of Susanah' s whom I latter married. We lived the first year of our married life in Joe Jones' home across the street from Myrtle' s mother's home in Willard, where our first child, Vere. was born. During this year Myrtle's brother. Pete, Will Renshaw, my brother-in-law, and I were in the business of making bricks and driving wells. The following year Myrtle, our only child, and myself left Willard, and moved into Cache Valley, with all we had in the world in a team and wagon; and located in Avon in the south end of Cache Valley. Here I bought the Allen homestead. Our first home was up on the bench; this later was moved down in the valley and became the home of Will Weeds. In this home George Lester was born; however, he only lived a few days. We next moved down in the valley in what was known as the Old Log House, where we lived until I returned from my mission, when I wrecked this home and built a “new” home where we made home until Myrtle' s health broke down in 1905; then we moved to Ogden. During this time our family had grown to a group of four children, Vere, Fay, Wanda, and Ethel, a little girl adopted at the age of two weeks. During our stay in Avon we had lost five other children. We had worked very hard to gather together what we had when we left Avon. Myrtle was the main stay when it came to faith in Mormonism in our early married life. (Note: by James V. “ Mother often told of the time they were married in the Salt Lake Temple. It seems there was a question in her mind as to father's worthiness, and when they had got to the meeting just before they were to go through the Temple, one in charge got up and asked if James J. Facer would step forward. She thought ‘Well its all over now. He and the woman of his choice next move would be Out.’ However, Mother said, when Father returned to her there was a twinkle in his eye, and when she could ask him what the man wanted, Father said: 'He wanted to know what the ' J' stood for.” Father very seldom ever used his Grand-Mother's maiden name Jarvis. Mother said this took a load off her heart. ) When I was a boy, Mother used to walk and drag us kids to Sunday School, Primary, and Relief Society while Father stayed home and mended harness so he could go to the Canyon the following week, or playing base-ball. Early in the spring Father was away from home shearing sheep as long as this job lasted. It took a "Call" from “Bex B.” to wake him up to Mormonism. I well remember when this letter came; and when Father asked Mother, what he should answer. And Mother spoke up with these words: "Jim you set down and tell them you will accept the "Call" and we will start and figure out how soon." Which he did and they figured out that they could get their affairs in shape by the following fall. “The farm had to be rented, I had some cattle, a nice bunch of sheep; those sheep were the beginning of a dream I had for years. And while not a great herd, a good foundation to build upon. We had just got our heads above water; what we had around us was ours, a lot of hard work. Now this "Call" meant to let go of most of the reward for our hard work and efforts.” Father told me he felt his other brothers were getting along much better than he, and his main desire was to show them he had it in himself to make good. He had an idea that he was considered not the most promising Facer. In his own words, “I felt I hadn't been given a glowing start in life.” However, when the news got around that he had been "called," and was going; and when he told his father, he felt that nothing he could have done, or accomplished, could have given him more joy. “I will never forget the six or eight months I was getting ready to go. I so1d my sheep that I might have money enough to fulfill this mission and right when I was, as I thought, the Jackson Meadow came up for sale; a forty acre plot that joined us on the East, and a parcel of ground I had dreamed of owning." I well remember when this happened and Mother and Father talked it over. Father saying, 'look now what is happened, I've turned over heaven and earth to get ready for this mission, now the Jackson Meadow comes up for sale and I'm going on a mission." Much was said about this seemingly 'lost opportunity;' it took Mother to settle the matter when she said: "We have the money, why not go down to Paradise and see Aunt Bessie Jackson tomorrow and buy this meadow. We will get along while you are away;" which he did in the morning. Well, father left in the fall for a mission in the Southern States, where he labored under Ben E. Rich for two years. When he was released and came home to find us, the family was in Brigham at Aunt Lizzie's where Hazel Renshaw had the small-pox. We had to get a permit to go home to the ranch where the whole family took the small-pox, while in time we got over with it. The Avon Ward now gave a homecoming party to which we all went. Being shut in all winter, Bessie, our baby took cold and it developed into pneumonia and she passed away in a short time. Fay also took pneumonia and laid at death's door for days. During those trying days we found out how many friends we had--there was never a moment when someone was not in our home giving a helping hand. (Their names will never leave my memory.) Father for days hung on to Fay's life--when it was s loosing battle; however, he would not give up, even when his sister Lizzie begged him to give up and let the boy die in peace. Fay began to mend. The winter went, and spring came at last. (Note: Along with all this trouble during the winter we “run out of hay" and I will never forget the name of Lefthouse. Father went to Bro. Lefthouse for some hay, enough to pull our stock through; and when father told him he was broke, Bro. Lefthouse said: “You are welcome to all the hay you need and don't worry about the money.” ) (Note: Another name comes to me that I think Father would be to have mention in this. I do not remember the date, but it was shortly after Bessie's death; and about the time Fay was mending. It was snowing very hard. About eight o' clock at night our spirits were very low, we were alone at the time, when out of the night came a Hello and going to the door found Uncle Dave James, as he was known to us as a family, on horse back carrying a sack. When he got in the house and the snow off and opened the sack, there were the largest apples to this day I ever remember seeing. The company, the feeling of lonesomeness, and the fact he had come five miles in a storm, and that I was just a kid; his act of kindness has never left my mind. ) The next five years are eventful; father drained the "Jackson Meadow" made a very good meadow, got a living stream of water (about 50 inches) which was the making of the land on the River Bottoms, the surroundings around the house and barn yard. This made it possible for a large garden, trees, both shade and fruit, a large lawn, to say nothing of the value of a live stream of water around the yard for stock winter and summer. Father later sold a half interest to a neighbor on the West, Bro. Sam Knowles. It was during this time that the house was built, the barn (24 x 60, a slope on the south side, that had stable room for 15 cows, five head of horses.) More cattle, sheep, horses and many acres were added to his holdings. There was section 13, the Berry place in East Canyon, 60 acres dry farm, known as the Henry Jackson place, and as I remember now about 1000 acres of range land. Father was interested in every thing that started in Avon, such as getting out Pole Canyon water, the cattlemens organization. It was also during this time in his life that he was put in as Bishop of Avon Ward. Mother's health began to break; hard work while father was away on his mission, the trying time of the first year father got home, the death and sickness of Bessie and Fay, the loss of more children, all this did not help her condition. We rented the ranch and moved to Ogden; in my work as buying cattle I was away from home a good deal of the time. We lived in Ogden but a few months when we moved back to Cache County, Logan. Mother' s mother and two sisters lived in Logan and they thought it would be better for mother to be close to her own. Father's work was more or less in Cache Valley and North. In this move he bought the “Green House" a home owned by Myrtle' s mother, which he soon sold to a Brickmore family, moving around the corner to the Gablisome Place. It was in this home that Mother passed away, Sept 1906; the spring of 1907 we moved back to the ranch in Avon. After Mother's death, Grandma was with us most of the time; so she, father, and we kids all started over again on the Avon Ranch. Father was a combination cattle buyer and rancher. It was during this summer that Father was called to be Bishop of the 3rd Ward in Hyrum. I well remember this; if there was ever a time when father was hard to get along with, it was from Thursday to the second Sunday. We were all in the dark until Grandma read of a new Bishop that was being put in the Hyrum 3rd Ward; and asked, "Jim are they calling you for this job?" and his answer was, “You are a good Yankee!" We were hauling hay and I remember he asked me what I thought of him going to Hyrum and I guess my answer was not much help to him, being young and with little experience I spoke up and said, “I would soon give Pres. Parkson his answer and it would be NO!" I even gave my reasons, first he was alone with us kids on his hands, also his business of buying cattle was Picking up and I'd be damned if I'd give that up.” You see I had lived with him while he was Bp. of Avon Ward, and I know what a job of this kind entailed. He did not take my advise; however, he did ask if I would accompany him the following Sunday to Conference at Hyrum. He also told me he was a total stranger in the 3rd Ward with the exception of Bill Squires. So Sunday we went to Hyrum; the evening meeting was when his name was presented to the people. Now I see why it was wise that they did it at a stake meeting for his name came as a surprise to the 3rd warders. By the time they got their breath the rest of the Stake members had voted for him; however, when the opposing vote was asked for, with few exceptions, they all voted No. Had it been only the members of the 3rd Ward that was given a vote, I am sure we would never have made the move to Hyrum, and the Church would have had a selected bishop on their hands, that the people wouldn't have. Dad, however, was declared elected and let me say it was not long before he had the love and the support of all; being Bp in the 3rd Ward was the outstanding mark of his success. And while I was worried about his trading business, well, I was wrong again. With all the work of running the Ward, yet his business grew by leaps and bounds. Also, it was during his sojourn in Hyrum that he entered the game of politics, he ran for commissioner of the County of Cache and held this position for a number of years. It was while in office that the Consolidation of Schools question came up and to say the least his name was often in the local paper, and feelings ran high. It was shortly after he was put in as Bp. in Hyrum that he married Emma Jackson in Aug. 1907, and they had a boy, Elden J. During the ten years he lived in Hyrum, he bought several homes. In 1920, he bought a ranch in Tyhee, Bannock Co., Idaho, from Stewart which he ran in connection with buying Cattle. This ranch cost $33,000 which he cut in several smaller places. Also, a ranch at Fairfield, Idaho, also a ranch at Kilgore, Idaho, and one at McCammon, Idaho. This he held until his death which was deeded to us kids. A few years before his death, he left Pocatello and moved to Hyrum again and built a nice new home on East Main Street, which was left to Aunt Emma. While he was in Tyhee, he served as Bp, of North Pocatello Ward, this making three wards he was Bp. of. He was, both in Hyrum Stake and Pocatello Stake, on the High Council. . He lived out his days in Hyrum well respected and loved by a host of friends, passing away Feb. 3rd, 1947, and was laid to rest in the Paradise cemetery along side of Myrtle and five children. He ended this life in almost the point where his life began. On his road of life he left many marks, he became known for being on the side of the right. One outstanding virtue of his was his desire to help some soul who was down on his or her uppers. I can not remember a time when he did not have someone around; these were not always his type. For example, a Bp. and the town drunkard going around together was just something some people could not understand. I could insert names, there were many, he felt and spoke of it, that they had something, and in giving them a helping hand, he in return got well paid for his efforts. In my walks in life I often meet men that never fail to mention these kind of virtues in my father. Perhaps I know him best for I was with him longer than anyone living today, and as I look back over his life, I see many things that made him what he was. He was very loyal to his father and mother; while a boy he never had a good home, or the benefit of the guiding hand of a father. While his father was living he often went to Willard to see his father; however, I feel he felt more or less alone in the world. This no doubt accounts for his overdose of Independence; which carries the Spirit “that’s the way I think is right” and that the way is right. He had a hard time to compromise; to put over what he thought should be, he put in his all. Early in his life he entered every battle to win and the people where he made his home can thank him for many of the things they are enjoying today. While he made his home in Willard, in helping his father, his father being Bp. in those days the Mormons paid their tithing in kind and father must of received tithing for his father such as hay, spuds, cattle, sheep; in fact everything that was raised, and as it needed someone to be a caretaker, he fell heir to the nickname of tithing Jim. I remember well that many of the older people of Willard knew father by this nickname, Tithing Jim. Sketch of the life of James J. Facer as he Dictated to his Granddaughter, Nadine Dunn Gray, June 10, 1943. I was born in Willard June 10, 1866, son of George Facer and Sarah Thompson Facer. I came to Cache Valley as a small boy. We lived in Paradise where my father had land. I went to Beaver Canyon and worked for several years for W. N. Thomas. My first school teacher was Mrs. Oldham, another, Miss Price: and another was Harry Shaw. I didn't get very far in school as I threw too many snow balls. It was early in my teens when I went to work in the Canyon. May 1, 1888 I was married to Myrtle Lechtenberg (Conyngham) of Willard, daughter of Paul Lechtenberg (Conynghm) and Susanah Nebeker. They were the parents of three children; Peter, Myrtle,, and Karl. Susanah Nebeker had earlier married my father. We resided in Willard until after James Vere was born May 28, 1889, and then we moved to Avon, Cache county, Utah. George Lester was born June 10, 1891, Redmond Fay was born March 16, 1896, Myrtle Rose was born June 15, 1903. George Lester died June 11, 1891; Elizabeth (Bessie) died Feb. 26, 1901; Myrtle Rose died June 16, 1903; after the death of this baby Myrtle and I adopted Ethel, who was born April 2, 1903. I was sustained as Bishop of Avon Ward, 1904. I was released in 1906 temporarily on account of my wife, Myrtle's illness and we moved to Ogden. We later moved to Logan and on Sept. 6, 1906, Myrtle passed away. We went to Avon in the next spring as I had some property there. That spring Andrew M. Israelson came to see me at Avon and approached me as to being Bishop of Hyrum Third Ward. So I accepted and we moved to Hyrum Sept., 1907. I was an alternate High Councilman of the Hyrum Stake before I was made Bishop. On Aug. 14, 1907, I married Emma Jackson of Avon, daughter of Bishop Almo 0. Jackson, Sr. We first lived at the home of Zachariah Israelsen, then later moved to the home by Mrs. Estel Smith one block north of the Third Ward meeting house. I then bought the home of Soran Hansen and the house where Bishop Maughan lives, next house east of the Hanson place and also the home of Jacob Allgaire. I was Bishop of Hyrum Third Ward from 1907 to 1917. Z. W. Israelsen, Louis T. Miller and Niels J. Nielsen were my counselors. Fred Ralph and John A. Israelsen and Hans Mikelsen were my ward clerks. We moved to Idaho in 1919 where I bought a ranch in Tyhee. There I was called to serve as Bishop. The name was changed to North Pocatello while I was Bishop. I served on the High Council after being released as Bishop. I bought the Chauncy Stewart place then sold that home and built a home. I divided the farm into small acreages. I built the store on the corner of the farm which is known as the Bringhurst store. Up to 1943 there are over thirty families who have lived on this Stewart property. I later traded my home in Tyhee with Swessey for his home in Pocatello City on 1256 E. Clark Street. I sold it and built a home in Hyrum in 1939, on the west part of Algernon Petersen’s property between 1st and 2nd East on Main Street in Hyrum. I built a modern five room home with an attached garage where I now reside at the time. I served as Precinct Constable in Avon Cache County. This was my first turn in politics. In 1912, I served as Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners for four years. My associate commissioners were Oluf Cronquist and James Meikle, Ephrain Bergesen and Eli Bell. After moving to Pocatello I was again elected on the Democratic Ticket as a member of the Board of County Commissioners for one two year term. At this time I am the only living member of the former Commissioners with whom I served. On June 10, 1943, I celebrated my 77 birthday and still enjoy good health and I operate the farm in Idaho. I am serving as group leader of the High Priest Quorum of the Hyrum Third Ward; an active member of the Gospel Doctrine Class. For a number of years I have directed the Ward Teaching in the 3rd Ward. At present I am a member of the Hyrum Stake Melchizedik Priesthood committee, visiting all the Wards of the Stake encouraging the Brethern to support the Church Welfare Program and be active in their Quorum duties.

George Facer = A biographical compilation from histories written by his descendants

Contributor: MollyM Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

GEORGE FACER A biographical compilation from histories written by his descendants George Facer, son of Henry and Mary Jarvis Facer, was born July 4th, 1834 at Eynesbury, Huntingtonshire, England. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, August 5, 1854. On September 6, 1857, he married Mary Prior, daughter of James and Dove Brown Prior. After joining the Church, he was put in as Presiding Elder over the Branch, oft times walking many miles. George worked on the farm of Edward Peck. He paid monthly payments to an emigration fund, preparing for the journey to Zion. He gave all of their funds to the Church, by request, then he sorted onions for Mr. Peck to get more money to come to Zion. March 28, 1860, he, his wife and 16 month old son, George H., left England to come west. They arrived in New York May 2, 1860, after being six weeks on the ocean. There was much sickness on the boat, and George was of much assistance. From New York they went to Florence, Nebraska, on the Missouri River by boat and also traveled by rail. Here they made a handcart ready for their journey West. They had lots of good clothes and bedding, but owing to their mode of travel, it was impossible to take but very little of it along, so the rest was burned. June 14, 1860, the Company started. Captain Dan Robinson was President of the Company. The handcart was a two-wheeled outfit with a tongue at which two could pull. The box was about six feet long, three feet wide with a cover. It contained the bedding and one-weeks provisions for five people. It was the first company of the season, consisting of 233 people, 43 handcarts, six wagons, 30 oxen and 10 tents. During the journey their hands were blistered, feet bleeding; their food was exhausted due to feeding the Indians. It was either feed or fight. Father shot and wounded a buffalo, they did not get it. The Indians were determined to have Mary and Sister Hannah Slater. They offered three ponies; they caused the company much trouble. The company arrived in Salt Lake City, August 27, 1860. In Salt Lake City they stayed with Mark Lindsay one night, and left for Centerville on August 28 and stayed with John Ford Sr. They arrived in Willard August 30, 1860. Father worked for Bishop Virl Dives. George Q. Cannon told father to go to North Willard and he would succeed. On Dives farm, known later as the O. H. Dudley farm they lived in a one room house. Wm. J. Facer was born there July 13, 1861. They had no change of clothes. Mother washed them at night so they would be dry in the morning. Mary went into the fields to glean some wheat and husked corn to buy a pair of shoes for their little boy. When they went to Church the first time, she had a pretty good dress, but no shoes. There were many who came barefoot. They picked up potatoes in the field to buy each one a pair of shoes for winter. Benjamin Taylor gave them their Christmas dinner. They had no shoes or boots but wrapped their feet in burlap and tied it on with a string. Prices of goods at that time were: factory $1.25 per yard, tea $3.00 per pound, sugar $1.25 per pound. They had no soap and no matches. How did they make a fire? They wrapped a cloth right on a stick, then went to the neighbors, set it on fire and carried it home. Sarah Ann was born March 26, 1863. At this time sewing cotton .25 a spool They traded two pounds of butter for two spools of thread. Bishop Dives gave them a cow. Mary said it was a good one. Father bought the Bankhead property in North Willard, the old homestead. The new bishop told George not to buy the place, but he did and worked it well. He had a good crop of wheat at $5.00 per bushel. George’s suit wore out until all that was left was the lining, so he must have a new one. It did not take him so long to choose it, as it does today, as most anything was very much in style just so it was a good suit. So on Sunday he came out in his new attire made of bed ticking. They were troubled very much by Indians at their home. They would come when George was away. One day when George was out in the field at work, two Indians came; one came inside, while the other stayed outside. The one on the outside put his hand in the window and took a beautiful pin George had given to Mary on their wedding day. As soon as they had left, Mary found the pin was gone. That night at a dance, Mary saw her pin on a Sister Cardon. George asked Brother Cardon where they got it. He gave it back to George. One other time Mary was baking bread with the last of their flour, three Indians came into the house. They saw the bread cooking and “wanted bread.” They sat down in front of the fireplace to wait for the bread to cook. They sat quite sometime and Mary didn’t know what to do, when suddenly a big spider came down from the ceiling right in front of the Indians. They jumped up and hollered and left saying the house was haunted. Later on George became a friend of the Indians, some of them being very savage and always on the warpath, but he had very little trouble with them. He could speak enough of their language to make them understand he was their friend and to his dying day, he never met one but what they had to shake hands with him, and always told he that he was a “heap” good man. George was a man of faith and integrity. Very clean in person and language; true to living oracles or authorities, strictly honest and trustworthy. He was firm in his testimony of the gospel. Very careful in his dress. He had a head of curly hair, always wore a mustache. He was about 5 feet 8 inches in height, weighing about 165 pounds. He was intelligent, a good provider and a good economist. George was set apart to act as first counselor to Bishop Ward of the Willard Ward, September 9, 1877. He held this position until December 3, 1882, when he was chosen Bishop and ordained by Apostle Lorenzo Snow. This office he held for a number of years, then he was released to fulfill other duties. After a few hears he was again called to be Bishop over his ward. His health had begun to fail and he tried to be let off, but was told that he had been called to this position by a Higher Power and that he would be blessed if he would do so. He held this position until failing health caused his release two weeks before he died. He held many different offices, such as Director of the First National Bank, Director of the Brigham Co-op Store, Manager of Box Elder Sheep Company, School Trustee for several terms and a Director of the Logan Temple. Lorenzo Snow taught George the celestial order of marriage, or polygamy. He was instructed to marry more women. He married three more. He married Sarah Thompson in November, 1863, in the Endowment House. He married Susannah Nebeker September 6, 1875 also in the Endowment House, and then married Hattie Shumway, April 9, 1885 in the Logan Temple. From these unions were born 26 children. Six of his sons went on Missions, two of them to his native land, England. Four have been Bishops in various wards. Many times when he was being hunted for polygamy, he would take his mother’s name of Jarvis, and stay safely near home. He spent three years on the Underground. It was during this time that the Church was receiving tithing in kind. After feeding about 300 horses and cattle at Willard, Bishop Facer was ordered to deliver them to the Church ranch at Treasureton, Idaho. On the return trip he and his son Joseph camped on the Bear River west of Collingston, where they had left a cow on their way to the ranch. While Joseph cleared up after breakfast George walked over to the bridge over Bear River to inquire from a man he saw there of the whereabouts of the cow. Neither man recognized the other and no inquiry was made. When Joseph drove over the bridge and his father climbed into his accustomed place under cover in the back of the wagon, he said, “Father, didn’t you know that man?” George answered that he did not. Joseph said, “That man was the United States Marshall Steele!” Naturally George was greatly surprised for this same man had been looking for him for such a long time, had been to the family home and had searched everywhere for him. On March 21, 1889 George gave himself up to the Federal Officers and was sentenced by Judge Henderson of Ogden First District Court to four months imprisonment and $50.00 fine. He was discharged from the Penitentiary July 1, 1889. George passed away February 22, 1903 at the age of 68 years, 8 months, and 18 days.

History of Pioneer George Facer, of Eynesbury Huntingdonshire, England -- Written by his Granddaughter Wanda Facer Dunn

Contributor: MollyM Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

My Grandfather, George Facer, was the son of Henry Facer and Mary Jarvis Facer. He was born at Fynesbury, Huntingdonshire, England, July 4, 1834. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, August 5, 1854. He married Mary Pryor, daughter of James and Dove Brown September 6, 1857, of Eynesbury, Huntingdonshire, England. They immigrated to America with their small son George who was 16 months old. They set sail in March 1860, arriving in New York in June, 1860. Traveling by train, they landed in Council Bluffs, Iowa, which was the end of the railroad at that time. Here he assisted in building handcarts for the journey across the plains for Utah. All their belongings were put in one handcart, and they began their 1100 mile trek, which distance they walked; George pulling and Mary pushing the cart in which their small son rode. They crossed the Plains in the Captain Daniel Robinson Company of Saints. Grandfather was a Sub-captain over 10. They arrived in August, 1860 at Salt Lake City. After a few days’ rest, they left SLC, and settled in South Willard, on a farm belonging to a Mr. Davies, where they lived for three years, they moved to North Willard, on a farm known as the Bankhead Farm. Grandfather purchased this farm. He married Sarah Thompson, my Father’s mother, November 1863, in the Salt Lake Temple. He married Susannah Nebeker September 6, 1875 in the Salt Lake Temple. Susannah was my Mother’s Mother by a previous marriage. Grandfather married Hattie Shumway April 9, 1885 in the Logan Temple. From these unions were born 26 children. Grandfather was active in religious and civic affairs in Willard Ward and Box Elder County. He was set apart as 1st Counselor to Bishop George W. Ward, of the Willard Ward, September 9, 1877; he was ordained Bishop of Willard by Lorenzo Snow, December 3, 1882. This position he held for 8 years. By special call, three years later, President Snow again called him to serve as Bishop of the Willard Ward. This call was made because of the request of his ward members that he be returned as their Bishop. This time he served for three years. He was released two weeks prior to his death. Grandfather was a Director of the First National Bank of Brigham City; Manager of the Co-op Sheep Company of Box Elder Country; served as School Trustee for three terms. During the Crusade against Polygamists Grandfather spent three years on the Underground. It was during this time that the Church was receiving tithing in kind. After feeding about 300 horses and cattle at Willard, Bishop Facer was ordered to deliver them to the Church ranch at Treasureton, Idaho. On the return trip, he and his son Joseph camped on the Bear River west of Collingston, where they had left a cow on their way to the Ranch. While Joseph cleared up after breakfast, Grandfather walked over to the bridge over Bear River to inquire from a man he saw there of the whereabouts of the cows. Neither man recognized the other and no inquiry was made. When Joseph drove over the bridge and his father climbed into his accustomed place under cover in the back of the wagon, he said, “Father, didn’t you know that man?” Grandfather answered that he did not. Joseph said, “That man was United States Marshall Steele.” Naturally, Grandfather was much surprised (greatly surprised) for this same man had been looking for him for such a long time; had been to the family home, and had searched everywhere for him. The Washakie Indians were given land in Northern Box Elder County, and Grandfather was asked to help establish the Indians on the farms there. On March 21, 1889, Grandfather gave himself up to the Federal Officers, and was sentenced by Judge Henderson of Ogden First District Court to four months imprisonment and $50 fine. He was discharged from the Penitentiary July 1, 1889. Grandfather would not tolerate any profanity from the man who worked on his place. He consented to rent a portion of his farm at one time, with the stipulation that the man pay a tithe from the produce from this land. In 1920, President David O. McKay testified of his record as follows: “No man had a better record-that he had sanctified the land by the honest payment of tithing.” Grandfather passed away February 22, 1903, at the age of 68, 8 months and 18 days.

The History of George Facer, written by his granddaughter Wanda Marie Facer Dunn

Contributor: MollyM Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

My Grandfather, George Facer, was the son of Henry Facer and Mary Jarvis Facer. He was born at Eynesbury, Huntingdonshire, England, July 4, 1834. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, August 5, 1854. He married Mary Pryor, daughter of James and Dove Brown September 6, 1857, of Eynesbury, Huntingdonshire, England. They immigrated to America with their small son George who was 16 months old. They set sail in March 1860, arriving in New York in June, 1860. Traveling by train, they landed in Council Bluffs, Iowa, which was the end of the railroad at that time. Here he assisted in building handcarts for the journey across the plains for Utah. All their belongings were put in one handcart, and they began their 1100 mile trek, which distance they walked; George pulling and Mary pushing the cart in which their small son rode. They crossed the Plains in the Captain Daniel Robinson Company of Saints. Grandfather was a Sub-captain over 10. They arrived in August, 1860 at Salt Lake City. After a few days’ rest, they left SLC, and settled in South Willard, on a farm belonging to a Mr. Davies, where they lived for three years, they moved to North Willard, on a farm known as the Bankhead Farm. Grandfather purchased this farm. He married Sarah Thompson, my Father’s mother, November 1863, in the Salt Lake Temple. He married Susannah Nebeker September 6, 1875 in the Salt Lake Temple. Susannah was my Mother’s Mother by a previous marriage. Grandfather married Hattie Shumway April 9, 1885 in the Logan Temple. From these unions were born 26 children. Grandfather was active in religious and civic affairs in Willard Ward and Box Elder County. He was set apart as 1st Counselor to Bishop George W. Ward, of the Willard Ward, September 9, 1877; he was ordained Bishop of Willard by Lorenzo Snow, December 3, 1882. This position he held for 8 years. By special call, three years later, President Snow again called him to serve as Bishop of the Willard Ward. This call was made because of the request of his ward members that he be returned as their Bishop. This time he served for three years. He was released two weeks prior to his death. Grandfather was a Director of the First National Bank of Brigham City; Manager of the Co-op Sheep Company of Box Elder Country; served as School Trustee for three terms. During the Crusade against Polygamists Grandfather spent three years on the Underground. It was during this time that the Church was receiving tithing in kind. After feeding about 300 horses and cattle at Willard, Bishop Facer was ordered to deliver them to the Church ranch at Treasureton, Idaho. On the return trip, he and his son Joseph camped on the Bear River west of Collingston, where they had left a cow on their way to the Ranch. While Joseph cleared up after breakfast, Grandfather walked over to the bridge over Bear River to inquire from a man he saw there of the whereabouts of the cows. Neither man recognized the other and no inquiry was made. When Joseph drove over the bridge and his father climbed into his accustomed place under cover in the back of the wagon, he said, “Father, didn’t you know that man?” Grandfather answered that he did not. Joseph said, “That man was United States Marshall Steele.” Naturally, Grandfather was much surprised (greatly surprised) for this same man had been looking for him for such a long time; had been to the family home, and had searched everywhere for him. The Washakie Indians were given land in Northern Box Elder County, and Grandfather was asked to help establish the Indians on the farms there. On March 21, 1889, Grandfather gave himself up to the Federal Officers, and was sentenced by Judge Henderson of Ogden First District Court to four months imprisonment and $50 fine. He was discharged from the Penitentiary July 1, 1889. Grandfather would not tolerate any profanity from the man who worked on his place. He consented to rent a portion of his farm at one time, with the stipulation that the man pay a tithe from the produce from this land. In 1920, President David O. McKay testified of his record as follows: “No man had a better record-that he had sanctified the land by the honest payment of tithing.” Grandfather passed away February 22, 1903, at the age of 68, 8 months and 18 days. Written by his granddaughter, Wanda Marie Facer Dunn

Biography of George and Mary Prior Facer

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

George Facer, son of Henry and Mary Jarvis Facer was born at Eynesbury, Huntingshire, England, on 4th day of July 1834. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on August 5th 1854. His father Henry, died when George was two years old, leaving his mother Mary and one brother, William Facer, of whom little is known. On September 6th 1857 he married Mary Prior, the daughter of James and Dove Brown Prior of Garverly, England. Parson Mall married them. After George was baptized, he was put in as presiding Elder over the church branch, oft times walking many miles to his meetings. George worked on the farm of Edward Peck. He paid monthly payment to an emigration fund, preparing for the journey to Zion. He gave all of their fund to the Church, by request, then he sorted onions for peck to get more money to come to Zion. Mary Prior (Facer), daughter of James Prior and Dove Brown, was born January 27th 1840 in Garverly, Cambridgeshire, England. She was baptized June 3rd 1855 by James Baely and Confirmed by John Joyce the same day. She was fifteen years old, her father was very bitter and angry at her when he heard she had been baptized. Two of her neighbors reported it to him. He turned her away from her home, and gave her the only whipping she ever had. Mary went to live with Mary Chandler, George Facer’s mother. Later she married George Facer. He was a good man and they were happy, although it was hard to leave her father and brothers and come to Zion. In fourteen months, a new joy came into their lives. George, their baby boy was born November 13th, 1858. The baby was sixteen months old when they left their home for the sake of the Gospel and came to America. They started their journey on March 27th and arrived in Liverpool March 28th 1860. They sailed March 28th 1860 on the ship Underwriter with 594 of the Saints. James D. Roos was president of the company of travelers. The journey was very rough. They arrived in New York City May 1st 1860 after 32 days on the water. There was much sickness on the boat and George was of great assistance. From New York City, they went to Florence, Nebraska by rail and boat on the Missouri River. In Iowa, George worked for a Mr. Ford digging post holes for which he received some food. At Florence the handcarts were prepared. They remained there until June 14th waiting for the handcarts (which had not yet been built). The handcart was a two wheel outfit with a tongue at which two could pull. George Q. Cannon was there to superintend the work. They had lots of clothing and bedding, but owing to their mode of travel, it was impossible to take but very little along, so the rest was burned. They started across the plains with happy hearts, little knowing the trials they must meet. They felt fine the first few days, then they started to have sore feet, which made it hard on them. Later on Grandmother’s (Mary Prior Facer) feet were so sore from walking, blood would run out of her shoes when she took them off. Only the very young or very ill could ride on the handcarts. All others had to walk. Her feet became so sore she couldn't keep up with the Company, so Grandfather would hide her in the bushes near the trail until the Company camped for the night. Then he would walk back, pick her up, and carry her to the camp. One night while she was hiding form the Indians and awaiting Grandfather’s return, an Indian war party almost ran over her with their horses. After a few days on the trail, they met the first company of missionaries going back to England. In the company there was one lady. She felt very bad to see them traveling with handcarts. She well knew what they would have to go through. Grandfather was a sub-captain in the company, being in charge of ten families. They had six wagons in the company which were heavily loaded. In fact the loads were so heavy, the captain commanded them to burn all they really didn't need. Soon after they began their journey, they were met by a band of Indians. Daniel Robinson, captain of the company of Saints, talked with the Indians, but they were determined not to leave until they got some food. The Indians took several sacks of flour and some shot and powder to shoot wild game. Captain Robinson said giving the Indians these things was the all that saved their lives While the Indians were there, Grandmother was so frightened that she forgot her little boy and he wandered over to the horses. She saw him just in time to save his life as a horse kicked at him. One day the company was met by a herd of buffalo. As the buffalo were running through the camp, the oxen turned to run to the mountains. The men worked hard to get them back in the road, constantly warning the people to keep back because they were afraid someone, especially the children would get killed. They had to mend wagons and carts after this scare. Soon afterward, another band of Indians came upon them. These Indians were mean and wanted to trade ponies for Grandmother and one other lady. They said, “Indians like white squaw.” The company finally gave more flour and ammunition to the Indians and were happy to see them go. Captain Robinson told Grandfather, “They would be killed if they didn't give it to them.” By giving their food away, they ran short and had to request Brigham Young to send flour, bacon, rice and a little tea for the older folks. One morning they had to walk eight miles without anything to eat. There weren't many “nick-knacks”, for them, sometimes a few pig weeds or mushrooms for a change. They gathered dried buffalo chips with which to build their fires and cook and bake bread. President Young sent flour and meat to them twice before they reached Salt Lake City, and they still ran short of food. One day the company stopped while some of the men went hunting. The men got lost, and after waiting so long for them, those at camp built a big bonfire to help them find their way back. But it was after midnight before the hunters arrived. They would travel some days about twenty five miles, then lie down at night too tired to get supper. The food and bedding were kept in the handcart. The little boy George would walk until he was tired, and then Grandmother would carry him until she became too tired, then they would have to put him in the cart. Each day Grandmother got more tired carrying young George, when one of the men with a wagon said that he would put the little boy in his wagon, so she didn’t carry him again. Grandmother carried him about five hundred miles. Grandmother rode only half of one day during the entire journey. And that was when she was sick. She said it was hard to be sick on a journey like that. There was only one death in their company during the journey. When they were within sixty miles of Salt Lake City, a little two year old boy died. They arrived in Salt Lake City on August 27th 1860. They were then sent to Willard, Box Elder County, Utah, arriving there August 29th 1860. In this company there were 233 people, 43 handcarts, 6 wagons, 30 oxen and 10 tents. Grandmother said it was no honeymoon. Their hands were sore and their feet blistered. The first place they went after reaching Willard was to Bishop Dives’. Grandfather was a farmer and Bishop Dives gave him a job. They cleaned up an old granary to live in. Having no money made it very hard starting out in the new world. Many times they went hungry and half clothed. Grandmother went into the fields to glean some wheat and husked corn to buy a pair of shoes for their little boy. When they went to church the first time, the people looked at them, Mary’s face was sunburned and wind burned. She had a pretty good dress, but no shoes. There were many who came barefoot. Everyone was in the same boat those days. They picked up potatoes in the fields to buy each one a pair of shoes for the winter. They could not buy any dress goods. Calico and factory was very high (expensive). It cost $1.25 per yard and thread was 25 cents per spool. Grandfather built a chicken coop for a lady to get some shirting to make him his first new shirt. They made many friends, some who had been there for sometime. These friends were very good to them, often sending them a little milk or a piece of butter, all of which was much appreciated, as cows were scarce and money still more scarce. Bishop Dives gave them a good cow. They lived on Bishop Dives’ farm for three years, then they moved to south Willard on a farm owned by Mrs. Lawrence Jacobson. About this time Grandfather’s suit wore out. All that was left of it was the lining, so he had to have a new one. It did not take him long to choose something for a new one. Anything was in style, just so it was a good suit. On the next Sunday he came out in his new suit made of bed ticking. Sometimes they traded two pounds of butter for two spools of thread. Grandfather had to have something to shave by, so he used a shiny tin plate for a mirror. At first they had no soap for their washing and no iron to iron clothes, as they had no room to bring those thing along. They later moved to north Willard, where the family farm and home still stands. There were slaves on the place, owned by a Mr. Bankhead, who then moved to Wellsville, Cache County, Utah. The new bishop told Grandfather not to buy the place, but he did and worked it well. One year he had a good crop of wheat which brought 50 cents per bushel. They were troubled very much by Indians at their home. They would come when Grandfather was away. One day Grandfather was out in the field at work and two Indians came. One went inside while the other stayed outside. The one on the outside put his hand in the window and took a beautiful pin that Grandfather had given Grandmother on their wedding day. As soon as the Indians had gone, Grandmother discovered the pin was gone. That night at a dance, Grandmother saw her pin on a Sister Cardon. Grandfather inquired of Brother Cardon where they got it and he was told from an Indian that day. Brother Cardon gave it back to Grandmother. One other time Grandmother was baking bread with the last of their flour when three other Indians came into the house. They saw the bread cooking and “wanted bread.” They sat down in front of the fireplace to wait for the bread to cook. They sat quite sometime and Grandmother didn't know what to do, when suddenly a big spider came down from the ceiling right in front of the Indians. They jumped up and hollered and left saying the house was haunted. Later on Grandfather became a friend of the Indians, some of them being very savage and always on the war path, but he had very little trouble with them. He could speak enough of their language to make them understand that he was their friend and to his dying day, he never met one but what they had to shake hands with him, and always told him that he was “heap”good man. George was a man of faith and integrity. Very clean in person and language; true to living oracles or authorities, strictly honest and trustworthy. He was firm in his testimony of the gospel. Very careful in his dress. He had a head of curly hair and always wore a mustache. He was about 5 feet 8 inches in height and weighed about 165 pounds. He was intelligent, a good provider, and a good economist. Grandfather (George) was ordained a Seventy the 23rd of September 1860 by J. T. Brewerton and ordained a High Priest, on the 9th of September 1877. He was endowed in the Endowment House in November 1863. He and Mary were sealed in the Salt Lake Temple in November of 1863 by H. C. Kimball. He received three patriarchal blessings. The first on 27 September 1860 by Isaac Morley, the second on 10 May 1871 by C. W. Hyde, and the third by John Smith, date unknown. George Facer was set apart as first counselor to Bishop Ward of the Willard, Utah ward on September 9, 1877. He held this position until December 3, 1882, when he was called as Bishop of the Willard ward, and ordained by Apostle Lorenzo Snow. He continued as bishop for a number of years, then he was released to fill other duties in the Church. After a few years, he was called again to be Bishop over the his ward. Grandfather was a farmer by trade and also a sheep man. He was one of the Directors of the Logan Temple, a director of the First National Bank, Brigham City, Utah, head man of the Cooperative Sheep Company of Box Elder County, and a school trustee for several terms. Many times when he was being hunted by law officers for having more than one wife, he would use his mother’s maiden name of Jarvis, and stay safely near home. He was the father of 26 children, there being more wives than Mary Prior. Six of his sons served missions for the Church, two of them to his native land of England. Four sons have been Bishops in various wards of the Church. Grandfather was Bishop of the Willard Ward until two weeks before his death, at which time he got up from his sick bed and went to meeting, as the Willard Ward was to be reorganized, and he wanted to thank the people who had so loyally supported him during the 30 years that he hd been Bishop. He died February 22, 1903 at his home in Willard, Utah. Mary Prior, was called to work in the Church Relief Society and Primary organizations. She walked many, many miles delivering the Relief Society message and checking on the welfare of their neighbors. It required a lot of faith and courage to do this for so many years. Grandmother was the mother of twelve children. Four of them died in childhood, and one daughter, Dove, died when she was 18 years of age. Another of Grandfather’s wives died, leaving two little children, whom Grandmother took into her home and raised. Grandmother was interesting to talk with, had a sense of humor, even though her life had its share of sorrow and trials. She often entertained us with stories. She always enjoyed a good joke, one of which she told about Grandfather, Which was, once in their later life, when he used a mirror instead of the shiny tin plate to shave by, Grandfather was standing by the dresser shaving; all of a sudden the glass turned over and he turned to Grandmother and said, “Mother, I have cut my head off”. Grandmother was always very thrifty, and many grand children remember her sitting at the table with the loaf of bread in her arm, cutting off just enough as each person wanted it, spreading it lightly with butter and giving it to the person. Grandmother often talked about their first days in Willard and how she traded her only corset for a hen and a brood of chicks. One granddaughter (Alida Dixon) remembers Grandmother first from when she was little and went to visit their home. We were down in the fruit yard, when a big snake crawled across the path where we were playing. We were scared, but Grandmother assured us it was just a blow snake and was harmless. The next time I remember seeing her was when she came to Rigby, Idaho on a visit. I was about 11 or 12, and she annoyed me because when we ate she would start clearing up the dishes as soon as the first person was through eating. She also saw to it that we didn't run out to play until the dishes were washed. Mother had four boys younger that I and their capers and laziness were quite an annoyance. Mother used to say to Grandmother, “leave them alone Mother, they will get their work done.” I don’t remember seeing Grandmother again until she came to my mother’s (Dove) funeral. She took this death awfully hard. The day after I was married, my husband and I spent the night with Grandmother and had a nice visit with her. I saw her once again when my first baby was a year old. I have been told many times that I (Alida Dixon) looked like her, and since my hair has turned white, I can see a strong resemblance in build and features. The Facer home was a central stopping place for people traveling through Willard, going north or south on a trip. Many of the General Authorities of the Church spent overnight at the Facer home on their way to speaking assignments. In fact it is said the Facers never turned away any person who was hungry without giving them something to eat. One reason may have been, in Grandfather Facer’s Patriarchal Blessing, he was promised that if he lived a righteous life, that he would be visited by one of the “Three Nephites”. One story relates to this. One early evening, Just before supper, a knock came on the Facer door. When they opened it, a tall man with white hair and translucent skin stood there. He was dressed differently than anyone who had ever been to their door. He asked if he could have something to eat. He came in and ate with them at their table. It was not related what they talked about, when he was ready to leave, they walked to the door with him. He left, and a couple of minutes later, they went outside to see which way he had gone, and, looking up and down the roan they could see no one. There was not a person in sight. Had this been his promised “Nephite?” Grandmother was a widow for 27 years after Grandfather’s death. After Grandfather died several children cared for their mother. Joseph lived with his mother for four years. Willard then moved in the little house, farmed the land and cared for his mother until about August 1923. Willard and his family moved to salt Lake City after the Willard flood. Grandmother then moved to Brigham City and lived with her daughter Elizabeth and family until Elizabeth moved to Garfield to be with her husband. `Grandmothers remaining years she lived with her son George and his wife Caroline, where she died on December 12, 1930 at the age of 90 years. She stated as pioneers, they had much trial and tribulation to pass through, but they did it for the Gospel’s sake. They had many hardships, but were made better men and women for it.

Short Life Sketch of George Facer (handwritten by a granddaughter Ethel Dawn Eliason)

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

This is a short sketch of the life of my maternal grandfather George Facer who died before I was born. He was born July 4th 1834 in Eynesbury Huntingdonshire, England son of Henry Facer & Mary Jarvis. He was baptised into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints August 5, 1854. His childhood was uneventful. He was one of several and they were poor. He could not attend school and in his whole life had only six days of schooling. He married Mary Prior September 6 1857. Their first child George H was born November 13 1858. With his wife and small son he sailed from Liverpool for America in the early part of 1860. After arriving in New York they traveled by train to Council Bluffs. In Council Bluffs he assisted in building handcarts. In the spring of 1860 they put all their belonging in a handcart and started on an 1100 mile trek to Utah - George pulling and Mary pushing and their sixteen month old son riding. They encountered many of the hardships that were prevalent to all the pioneers. Their company was captained by Daniel Robinson and was made up of 233 persons, 43 handcarts and 6 wagons. My grandfather was a sub captain over 10 handcarts. The company arrived August 27, 1860 in Salt Lake City. After a few days in SLC my grandfather, wife and son moved on the South Willard. Here they lived 3 years on a farm belonging to a Mr Davis. Then Bankhead farm. This farm be purchased and it still remain in the family. In this family there was eleven children born. He married Sarah Thompson November 1863 in Salt Lake City. They had three children. He married my grandmother on Sept 6 1875 in Salt Lake City. She was Susanna Nebeker, daughter of Peter Nebeker and Elizabeth Davis and was born in Salt Lake City April 9 1848. They had seven daughters and one son. Of these only two lived to maturity. My mother Ethel Rose who died in 1944 at the age of 64 and my Aunt Susanna who died when she was in her early forties. His fourth wife was Hattie Shumway whom he married April 9 1885 in Logan Utah. They had 4 children. He was the father of 26 children. He was prominent in religious, civic and business of Willard of Box Elder County. He was a director of Brigham City Co Op, Director First National Bank of Brigham Manager of Box Elder Co Op Sheep Company and trustee of school district several times. At the time the Indians were given land in Northern Box Elder, he was called to help establish them on the farms. He was called to be bishop of Willard Dec 3 1882. Served for 8 years and was released. Shortly after at the request of the people he was called to be bishop again. Held this position for another 3 years and was released just 2 weeks prior to his death which occurred Feb 22, 1903 at the age of 68 years, 8 months and 18 days. He lived for 3 years on the underground. At this time the church was taking tithes in kind. He led 300 cattle & horse, and was called to take them to Treasureton, Idaho. On his return trip he & son Joseph camped on the Bear River where they had left a cow. He went to look for it while Joseph was making camp. On a bridge nearby he encountered a man whom he asked if he had seen any stray animals. On returning Joseph asked him if he didn’t recognize the man. His answer was no. Joseph informed him it was U. S. Marshall Steele. Grandfather was very surprised. This was the man who had been looking for him so long. Had been to the house many times to search for him. On March 21st 1889 he gave himself up - was sentenced by Judge Henderson to 4 months imprisonment and an a 50 dollar fine. He was released July 1st 1889. He was a man who wouldn’t tolerate profanity. On his land he had a small granary. He insisted that if the men who worked for him smoked they would have to do it in the granary and no place else. He wouldn’t rent any land unless the man promised to pay tithes. In 1920 David O. McKay testified on his tithing record as follows quote “No man had a better record than he had. Sanctified the land by the honest paying of tithing”.

A Sketch of the Life of James Jarvis Facer

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

A SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF JAMES JARVIS FACER He was born in Willard, Utah, June 10, 1866, to George and Sarah Thompson Facer, in a house that was behind the Facer home located on the "North String" of Willard. They lived on the farm that George Facer bought from a man by the name of Bankhead; known as the "Bankhead Homestead.” When a small boy, he moved into Cache Valley to a little town called Paradise; his Mother, Joh, Lizzie, (two children by a former marriage) and Emma, an older sister. This home was in the Western part of Paradise, on land owned by George Facer, his father. Here he grew up as other boys. Harry Shaw was his pal. The Shaw family lived close by and his early life was more or less connected with this family. His education was very meager, and as they were poor he had to go to work that they might live, which seems to have been the lot of most every family. Early in life his father and mother had trouble; and a "step father" moved in by the name of Charles Littlewood, and he was an Englishman of the Old School. They could not see eye to eye, so at an early age he left home. In this early age in Paradise, there was nothing for a poor boy to do except farm in summer and canyon work in the winter. So he found himself in Beaver Canyon working for William M. Thomas, a mill-man. Here he worked for four years in almost every kind of a position found around a saw mill. He learned the art of using an ax, skidding logs, even freighting supplies; he told of this "five yoke team of bulls and three wagons" many times to me. He learned all the tricks of a "Bull Whacker" such as the use of a "Bull-whip," to "drop-a-link," and the art of raising "a hoop on a barrel." In this line of work you have to be "all man" and at the end of his stay in Beaver Canyon, he came back to Willard to work for his Father, something that was new to him. He had become six feet three inches tall and weighing around 175 lbs., with (as he told me) fear of no man and a lot of guts, and did not know what it was to be tired. (And I believe this to be true for I saw him in action many times in my early life, and to say the least "he was all man. ") While in Willard, he made his home with Susanah, another wife of his father. Here he became a pal of Pete, son of Susanah, "Brig" Nebeker, and Steve White. They seemed to have done about everything that young men of their age did in Utah at this time. Their work seemed to have been on the “Bp's farm,” handling of Church cattle. (A story related to me by father) Brig, Steve and I were sent to Cache Valley for a heard of cattle and while going up Box Elder Canyon, (being sons of Polygamists) and knowing the work of the "Depts”. we thought it would be a lot of fun to be a “dept” and look for the “Brethren” with more than one wife; so, when we got to the little settlement of Mantua we noised it around “who we were” and in no time we could see several horsemen going over the “Old Indian Trail” back into the hills. In fact there were very few men left in the Valley. Note: Maybe father will not thank me for keeping this story alive; however, the many times we went through Mantua, in latter years, father almost always thought of this prank of his youth, and we had a good laugh. His father having more than one wife he was on the “underground". Many was the night father said he “stood watch.” He told me one night they made a "call" and as they always stopped at Johnie Barker’s, the local watering place, he, Barker, always notified the "Brethren" of these gentlemen being in town. "So, father went “under-ground" and I stood watch. The "Depts" came, left their horses and searched father's home. While they were, I removed the bridles and rapped them on the rumps and started them all loose back toward home. When those gentlemen returned and found they were left a foot they used language that cannot, appear in this story. “The Mormon so and so that had done this was spoken of as a very low character, and, so, the only thing to do now was to go back to Barker’s and make a night of it. “Well, this was but one of the times I helped Father during this period of time. I remember a time when I drove team with Father from Willard through Cache Valley over Bear River Pass into Box Elder Co. and while we were stopped at the Bear River Ford, I was watering the team and who should show but a group of “Depts.” Father was sitting on the seat of the rig, so he pulled an old slough hat on and put an old "corn-cob pipe in his mouth and set there and answered their questions; if he had seen some of those Dam Mormons they mentioned by name that they were out looking for. While living at Susanah's I met Myrtle, a beautiful daughter of Susanah' s whom I latter married. We lived the first year of our married life in Joe Jones' home across the street from Myrtle' s mother's home in Willard, where our first child, Vere. was born. During this year Myrtle's brother. Pete, Will Renshaw, my brother-in-law, and I were in the business of making bricks and driving wells. The following year Myrtle, our only child, and myself left Willard, and moved into Cache Valley, with all we had in the world in a team and wagon; and located in Avon in the south end of Cache Valley. Here I bought the Allen homestead. Our first home was up on the bench; this later was moved down in the valley and became the home of Will Weeds. In this home George Lester was born; however, he only lived a few days. We next moved down in the valley in what was known as the Old Log House, where we lived until I returned from my mission, when I wrecked this home and built a “new” home where we made home until Myrtle' s health broke down in 1905; then we moved to Ogden. During this time our family had grown to a group of four children, Vere, Fay, Wanda, and Ethel, a little girl adopted at the age of two weeks. During our stay in Avon we had lost five other children. We had worked very hard to gather together what we had when we left Avon. Myrtle was the main stay when it came to faith in Mormonism in our early married life. (Note: by James V. “ Mother often told of the time they were married in the Salt Lake Temple. It seems there was a question in her mind as to father's worthiness, and when they had got to the meeting just before they were to go through the Temple, one in charge got up and asked if James J. Facer would step forward. She thought ‘Well its all over now. He and the woman of his choice next move would be Out.’ However, Mother said, when Father returned to her there was a twinkle in his eye, and when she could ask him what the man wanted, Father said: 'He wanted to know what the ' J' stood for.” Father very seldom ever used his Grand-Mother's maiden name Jarvis. Mother said this took a load off her heart. ) When I was a boy, Mother used to walk and drag us kids to Sunday School, Primary, and Relief Society while Father stayed home and mended harness so he could go to the Canyon the following week, or playing base-ball. Early in the spring Father was away from home shearing sheep as long as this job lasted. It took a "Call" from “Bex B.” to wake him up to Mormonism. I well remember when this letter came; and when Father asked Mother, what he should answer. And Mother spoke up with these words: "Jim you set down and tell them you will accept the "Call" and we will start and figure out how soon." Which he did and they figured out that they could get their affairs in shape by the following fall. “The farm had to be rented, I had some cattle, a nice bunch of sheep; those sheep were the beginning of a dream I had for years. And while not a great herd, a good foundation to build upon. We had just got our heads above water; what we had around us was ours, a lot of hard work. Now this "Call" meant to let go of most of the reward for our hard work and efforts.” Father told me he felt his other brothers were getting along much better than he, and his main desire was to show them he had it in himself to make good. He had an idea that he was considered not the most promising Facer. In his own words, “I felt I hadn't been given a glowing start in life.” However, when the news got around that he had been "called," and was going; and when he told his father, he felt that nothing he could have done, or accomplished, could have given him more joy. “I will never forget the six or eight months I was getting ready to go. I so1d my sheep that I might have money enough to fulfill this mission and right when I was, as I thought, the Jackson Meadow came up for sale; a forty acre plot that joined us on the East, and a parcel of ground I had dreamed of owning." I well remember when this happened and Mother and Father talked it over. Father saying, 'look now what is happened, I've turned over heaven and earth to get ready for this mission, now the Jackson Meadow comes up for sale and I'm going on a mission." Much was said about this seemingly 'lost opportunity;' it took Mother to settle the matter when she said: "We have the money, why not go down to Paradise and see Aunt Bessie Jackson tomorrow and buy this meadow. We will get along while you are away;" which he did in the morning. Well, father left in the fall for a mission in the Southern States, where he labored under Ben E. Rich for two years. When he was released and came home to find us, the family was in Brigham at Aunt Lizzie's where Hazel Renshaw had the small-pox. We had to get a permit to go home to the ranch where the whole family took the small-pox, while in time we got over with it. The Avon Ward now gave a homecoming party to which we all went. Being shut in all winter, Bessie, our baby took cold and it developed into pneumonia and she passed away in a short time. Fay also took pneumonia and laid at death's door for days. During those trying days we found out how many friends we had--there was never a moment when someone was not in our home giving a helping hand. (Their names will never leave my memory.) Father for days hung on to Fay's life--when it was s loosing battle; however, he would not give up, even when his sister Lizzie begged him to give up and let the boy die in peace. Fay began to mend. The winter went, and spring came at last. (Note: Along with all this trouble during the winter we “run out of hay" and I will never forget the name of Lefthouse. Father went to Bro. Lefthouse for some hay, enough to pull our stock through; and when father told him he was broke, Bro. Lefthouse said: “You are welcome to all the hay you need and don't worry about the money.” ) (Note: Another name comes to me that I think Father would be to have mention in this. I do not remember the date, but it was shortly after Bessie's death; and about the time Fay was mending. It was snowing very hard. About eight o' clock at night our spirits were very low, we were alone at the time, when out of the night came a Hello and going to the door found Uncle Dave James, as he was known to us as a family, on horse back carrying a sack. When he got in the house and the snow off and opened the sack, there were the largest apples to this day I ever remember seeing. The company, the feeling of lonesomeness, and the fact he had come five miles in a storm, and that I was just a kid; his act of kindness has never left my mind. ) The next five years are eventful; father drained the "Jackson Meadow" made a very good meadow, got a living stream of water (about 50 inches) which was the making of the land on the River Bottoms, the surroundings around the house and barn yard. This made it possible for a large garden, trees, both shade and fruit, a large lawn, to say nothing of the value of a live stream of water around the yard for stock winter and summer. Father later sold a half interest to a neighbor on the West, Bro. Sam Knowles. It was during this time that the house was built, the barn (24 x 60, a slope on the south side, that had stable room for 15 cows, five head of horses.) More cattle, sheep, horses and many acres were added to his holdings. There was section 13, the Berry place in East Canyon, 60 acres dry farm, known as the Henry Jackson place, and as I remember now about 1000 acres of range land. Father was interested in every thing that started in Avon, such as getting out Pole Canyon water, the cattlemens organization. It was also during this time in his life that he was put in as Bishop of Avon Ward. Mother's health began to break; hard work while father was away on his mission, the trying time of the first year father got home, the death and sickness of Bessie and Fay, the loss of more children, all this did not help her condition. We rented the ranch and moved to Ogden; in my work as buying cattle I was away from home a good deal of the time. We lived in Ogden but a few months when we moved back to Cache County, Logan. Mother' s mother and two sisters lived in Logan and they thought it would be better for mother to be close to her own. Father's work was more or less in Cache Valley and North. In this move he bought the “Green House" a home owned by Myrtle' s mother, which he soon sold to a Brickmore family, moving around the corner to the Gablisome Place. It was in this home that Mother passed away, Sept 1906; the spring of 1907 we moved back to the ranch in Avon. After Mother's death, Grandma was with us most of the time; so she, father, and we kids all started over again on the Avon Ranch. Father was a combination cattle buyer and rancher. It was during this summer that Father was called to be Bishop of the 3rd Ward in Hyrum. I well remember this; if there was ever a time when father was hard to get along with, it was from Thursday to the second Sunday. We were all in the dark until Grandma read of a new Bishop that was being put in the Hyrum 3rd Ward; and asked, "Jim are they calling you for this job?" and his answer was, “You are a good Yankee!" We were hauling hay and I remember he asked me what I thought of him going to Hyrum and I guess my answer was not much help to him, being young and with little experience I spoke up and said, “I would soon give Pres. Parkson his answer and it would be NO!" I even gave my reasons, first he was alone with us kids on his hands, also his business of buying cattle was Picking up and I'd be damned if I'd give that up.” You see I had lived with him while he was Bp. of Avon Ward, and I know what a job of this kind entailed. He did not take my advise; however, he did ask if I would accompany him the following Sunday to Conference at Hyrum. He also told me he was a total stranger in the 3rd Ward with the exception of Bill Squires. So Sunday we went to Hyrum; the evening meeting was when his name was presented to the people. Now I see why it was wise that they did it at a stake meeting for his name came as a surprise to the 3rd warders. By the time they got their breath the rest of the Stake members had voted for him; however, when the opposing vote was asked for, with few exceptions, they all voted No. Had it been only the members of the 3rd Ward that was given a vote, I am sure we would never have made the move to Hyrum, and the Church would have had a selected bishop on their hands, that the people wouldn't have. Dad, however, was declared elected and let me say it was not long before he had the love and the support of all; being Bp in the 3rd Ward was the outstanding mark of his success. And while I was worried about his trading business, well, I was wrong again. With all the work of running the Ward, yet his business grew by leaps and bounds. Also, it was during his sojourn in Hyrum that he entered the game of politics, he ran for commissioner of the County of Cache and held this position for a number of years. It was while in office that the Consolidation of Schools question came up and to say the least his name was often in the local paper, and feelings ran high. It was shortly after he was put in as Bp. in Hyrum that he married Emma Jackson in Aug. 1907, and they had a boy, Elden J. During the ten years he lived in Hyrum, he bought several homes. In 1920, he bought a ranch in Tyhee, Bannock Co., Idaho, from Stewart which he ran in connection with buying Cattle. This ranch cost $33,000 which he cut in several smaller places. Also, a ranch at Fairfield, Idaho, also a ranch at Kilgore, Idaho, and one at McCammon, Idaho. This he held until his death which was deeded to us kids. A few years before his death, he left Pocatello and moved to Hyrum again and built a nice new home on East Main Street, which was left to Aunt Emma. While he was in Tyhee, he served as Bp, of North Pocatello Ward, this making three wards he was Bp. of. He was, both in Hyrum Stake and Pocatello Stake, on the High Council. . He lived out his days in Hyrum well respected and loved by a host of friends, passing away Feb. 3rd, 1947, and was laid to rest in the Paradise cemetery along side of Myrtle and five children. He ended this life in almost the point where his life began. On his road of life he left many marks, he became known for being on the side of the right. One outstanding virtue of his was his desire to help some soul who was down on his or her uppers. I can not remember a time when he did not have someone around; these were not always his type. For example, a Bp. and the town drunkard going around together was just something some people could not understand. I could insert names, there were many, he felt and spoke of it, that they had something, and in giving them a helping hand, he in return got well paid for his efforts. In my walks in life I often meet men that never fail to mention these kind of virtues in my father. Perhaps I know him best for I was with him longer than anyone living today, and as I look back over his life, I see many things that made him what he was. He was very loyal to his father and mother; while a boy he never had a good home, or the benefit of the guiding hand of a father. While his father was living he often went to Willard to see his father; however, I feel he felt more or less alone in the world. This no doubt accounts for his overdose of Independence; which carries the Spirit “that’s the way I think is right” and that the way is right. He had a hard time to compromise; to put over what he thought should be, he put in his all. Early in his life he entered every battle to win and the people where he made his home can thank him for many of the things they are enjoying today. While he made his home in Willard, in helping his father, his father being Bp. in those days the Mormons paid their tithing in kind and father must of received tithing for his father such as hay, spuds, cattle, sheep; in fact everything that was raised, and as it needed someone to be a caretaker, he fell heir to the nickname of tithing Jim. I remember well that many of the older people of Willard knew father by this nickname, Tithing Jim. Sketch of the life of James J. Facer as he Dictated to his Granddaughter, Nadine Dunn Gray, June 10, 1943. I was born in Willard June 10, 1866, son of George Facer and Sarah Thompson Facer. I came to Cache Valley as a small boy. We lived in Paradise where my father had land. I went to Beaver Canyon and worked for several years for W. N. Thomas. My first school teacher was Mrs. Oldham, another, Miss Price: and another was Harry Shaw. I didn't get very far in school as I threw too many snow balls. It was early in my teens when I went to work in the Canyon. May 1, 1888 I was married to Myrtle Lechtenberg (Conyngham) of Willard, daughter of Paul Lechtenberg (Conynghm) and Susanah Nebeker. They were the parents of three children; Peter, Myrtle,, and Karl. Susanah Nebeker had earlier married my father. We resided in Willard until after James Vere was born May 28, 1889, and then we moved to Avon, Cache county, Utah. George Lester was born June 10, 1891, Redmond Fay was born March 16, 1896, Myrtle Rose was born June 15, 1903. George Lester died June 11, 1891; Elizabeth (Bessie) died Feb. 26, 1901; Myrtle Rose died June 16, 1903; after the death of this baby Myrtle and I adopted Ethel, who was born April 2, 1903. I was sustained as Bishop of Avon Ward, 1904. I was released in 1906 temporarily on account of my wife, Myrtle's illness and we moved to Ogden. We later moved to Logan and on Sept. 6, 1906, Myrtle passed away. We went to Avon in the next spring as I had some property there. That spring Andrew M. Israelson came to see me at Avon and approached me as to being Bishop of Hyrum Third Ward. So I accepted and we moved to Hyrum Sept., 1907. I was an alternate High Councilman of the Hyrum Stake before I was made Bishop. On Aug. 14, 1907, I married Emma Jackson of Avon, daughter of Bishop Almo 0. Jackson, Sr. We first lived at the home of Zachariah Israelsen, then later moved to the home by Mrs. Estel Smith one block north of the Third Ward meeting house. I then bought the home of Soran Hansen and the house where Bishop Maughan lives, next house east of the Hanson place and also the home of Jacob Allgaire. I was Bishop of Hyrum Third Ward from 1907 to 1917. Z. W. Israelsen, Louis T. Miller and Niels J. Nielsen were my counselors. Fred Ralph and John A. Israelsen and Hans Mikelsen were my ward clerks. We moved to Idaho in 1919 where I bought a ranch in Tyhee. There I was called to serve as Bishop. The name was changed to North Pocatello while I was Bishop. I served on the High Council after being released as Bishop. I bought the Chauncy Stewart place then sold that home and built a home. I divided the farm into small acreages. I built the store on the corner of the farm which is known as the Bringhurst store. Up to 1943 there are over thirty families who have lived on this Stewart property. I later traded my home in Tyhee with Swessey for his home in Pocatello City on 1256 E. Clark Street. I sold it and built a home in Hyrum in 1939, on the west part of Algernon Petersen’s property between 1st and 2nd East on Main Street in Hyrum. I built a modern five room home with an attached garage where I now reside at the time. I served as Precinct Constable in Avon Cache County. This was my first turn in politics. In 1912, I served as Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners for four years. My associate commissioners were Oluf Cronquist and James Meikle, Ephrain Bergesen and Eli Bell. After moving to Pocatello I was again elected on the Democratic Ticket as a member of the Board of County Commissioners for one two year term. At this time I am the only living member of the former Commissioners with whom I served. On June 10, 1943, I celebrated my 77 birthday and still enjoy good health and I operate the farm in Idaho. I am serving as group leader of the High Priest Quorum of the Hyrum Third Ward; an active member of the Gospel Doctrine Class. For a number of years I have directed the Ward Teaching in the 3rd Ward. At present I am a member of the Hyrum Stake Melchizedik Priesthood committee, visiting all the Wards of the Stake encouraging the Brethern to support the Church Welfare Program and be active in their Quorum duties.

George Facer = A biographical compilation from histories written by his descendants

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

GEORGE FACER A biographical compilation from histories written by his descendants George Facer, son of Henry and Mary Jarvis Facer, was born July 4th, 1834 at Eynesbury, Huntingtonshire, England. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, August 5, 1854. On September 6, 1857, he married Mary Prior, daughter of James and Dove Brown Prior. After joining the Church, he was put in as Presiding Elder over the Branch, oft times walking many miles. George worked on the farm of Edward Peck. He paid monthly payments to an emigration fund, preparing for the journey to Zion. He gave all of their funds to the Church, by request, then he sorted onions for Mr. Peck to get more money to come to Zion. March 28, 1860, he, his wife and 16 month old son, George H., left England to come west. They arrived in New York May 2, 1860, after being six weeks on the ocean. There was much sickness on the boat, and George was of much assistance. From New York they went to Florence, Nebraska, on the Missouri River by boat and also traveled by rail. Here they made a handcart ready for their journey West. They had lots of good clothes and bedding, but owing to their mode of travel, it was impossible to take but very little of it along, so the rest was burned. June 14, 1860, the Company started. Captain Dan Robinson was President of the Company. The handcart was a two-wheeled outfit with a tongue at which two could pull. The box was about six feet long, three feet wide with a cover. It contained the bedding and one-weeks provisions for five people. It was the first company of the season, consisting of 233 people, 43 handcarts, six wagons, 30 oxen and 10 tents. During the journey their hands were blistered, feet bleeding; their food was exhausted due to feeding the Indians. It was either feed or fight. Father shot and wounded a buffalo, they did not get it. The Indians were determined to have Mary and Sister Hannah Slater. They offered three ponies; they caused the company much trouble. The company arrived in Salt Lake City, August 27, 1860. In Salt Lake City they stayed with Mark Lindsay one night, and left for Centerville on August 28 and stayed with John Ford Sr. They arrived in Willard August 30, 1860. Father worked for Bishop Virl Dives. George Q. Cannon told father to go to North Willard and he would succeed. On Dives farm, known later as the O. H. Dudley farm they lived in a one room house. Wm. J. Facer was born there July 13, 1861. They had no change of clothes. Mother washed them at night so they would be dry in the morning. Mary went into the fields to glean some wheat and husked corn to buy a pair of shoes for their little boy. When they went to Church the first time, she had a pretty good dress, but no shoes. There were many who came barefoot. They picked up potatoes in the field to buy each one a pair of shoes for winter. Benjamin Taylor gave them their Christmas dinner. They had no shoes or boots but wrapped their feet in burlap and tied it on with a string. Prices of goods at that time were: factory $1.25 per yard, tea $3.00 per pound, sugar $1.25 per pound. They had no soap and no matches. How did they make a fire? They wrapped a cloth right on a stick, then went to the neighbors, set it on fire and carried it home. Sarah Ann was born March 26, 1863. At this time sewing cotton .25 a spool They traded two pounds of butter for two spools of thread. Bishop Dives gave them a cow. Mary said it was a good one. Father bought the Bankhead property in North Willard, the old homestead. The new bishop told George not to buy the place, but he did and worked it well. He had a good crop of wheat at $5.00 per bushel. George’s suit wore out until all that was left was the lining, so he must have a new one. It did not take him so long to choose it, as it does today, as most anything was very much in style just so it was a good suit. So on Sunday he came out in his new attire made of bed ticking. They were troubled very much by Indians at their home. They would come when George was away. One day when George was out in the field at work, two Indians came; one came inside, while the other stayed outside. The one on the outside put his hand in the window and took a beautiful pin George had given to Mary on their wedding day. As soon as they had left, Mary found the pin was gone. That night at a dance, Mary saw her pin on a Sister Cardon. George asked Brother Cardon where they got it. He gave it back to George. One other time Mary was baking bread with the last of their flour, three Indians came into the house. They saw the bread cooking and “wanted bread.” They sat down in front of the fireplace to wait for the bread to cook. They sat quite sometime and Mary didn’t know what to do, when suddenly a big spider came down from the ceiling right in front of the Indians. They jumped up and hollered and left saying the house was haunted. Later on George became a friend of the Indians, some of them being very savage and always on the warpath, but he had very little trouble with them. He could speak enough of their language to make them understand he was their friend and to his dying day, he never met one but what they had to shake hands with him, and always told he that he was a “heap” good man. George was a man of faith and integrity. Very clean in person and language; true to living oracles or authorities, strictly honest and trustworthy. He was firm in his testimony of the gospel. Very careful in his dress. He had a head of curly hair, always wore a mustache. He was about 5 feet 8 inches in height, weighing about 165 pounds. He was intelligent, a good provider and a good economist. George was set apart to act as first counselor to Bishop Ward of the Willard Ward, September 9, 1877. He held this position until December 3, 1882, when he was chosen Bishop and ordained by Apostle Lorenzo Snow. This office he held for a number of years, then he was released to fulfill other duties. After a few hears he was again called to be Bishop over his ward. His health had begun to fail and he tried to be let off, but was told that he had been called to this position by a Higher Power and that he would be blessed if he would do so. He held this position until failing health caused his release two weeks before he died. He held many different offices, such as Director of the First National Bank, Director of the Brigham Co-op Store, Manager of Box Elder Sheep Company, School Trustee for several terms and a Director of the Logan Temple. Lorenzo Snow taught George the celestial order of marriage, or polygamy. He was instructed to marry more women. He married three more. He married Sarah Thompson in November, 1863, in the Endowment House. He married Susannah Nebeker September 6, 1875 also in the Endowment House, and then married Hattie Shumway, April 9, 1885 in the Logan Temple. From these unions were born 26 children. Six of his sons went on Missions, two of them to his native land, England. Four have been Bishops in various wards. Many times when he was being hunted for polygamy, he would take his mother’s name of Jarvis, and stay safely near home. He spent three years on the Underground. It was during this time that the Church was receiving tithing in kind. After feeding about 300 horses and cattle at Willard, Bishop Facer was ordered to deliver them to the Church ranch at Treasureton, Idaho. On the return trip he and his son Joseph camped on the Bear River west of Collingston, where they had left a cow on their way to the ranch. While Joseph cleared up after breakfast George walked over to the bridge over Bear River to inquire from a man he saw there of the whereabouts of the cow. Neither man recognized the other and no inquiry was made. When Joseph drove over the bridge and his father climbed into his accustomed place under cover in the back of the wagon, he said, “Father, didn’t you know that man?” George answered that he did not. Joseph said, “That man was the United States Marshall Steele!” Naturally George was greatly surprised for this same man had been looking for him for such a long time, had been to the family home and had searched everywhere for him. On March 21, 1889 George gave himself up to the Federal Officers and was sentenced by Judge Henderson of Ogden First District Court to four months imprisonment and $50.00 fine. He was discharged from the Penitentiary July 1, 1889. George passed away February 22, 1903 at the age of 68 years, 8 months, and 18 days.

History of Pioneer George Facer, of Eynesbury Huntingdonshire, England -- Written by his Granddaughter Wanda Facer Dunn

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

My Grandfather, George Facer, was the son of Henry Facer and Mary Jarvis Facer. He was born at Fynesbury, Huntingdonshire, England, July 4, 1834. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, August 5, 1854. He married Mary Pryor, daughter of James and Dove Brown September 6, 1857, of Eynesbury, Huntingdonshire, England. They immigrated to America with their small son George who was 16 months old. They set sail in March 1860, arriving in New York in June, 1860. Traveling by train, they landed in Council Bluffs, Iowa, which was the end of the railroad at that time. Here he assisted in building handcarts for the journey across the plains for Utah. All their belongings were put in one handcart, and they began their 1100 mile trek, which distance they walked; George pulling and Mary pushing the cart in which their small son rode. They crossed the Plains in the Captain Daniel Robinson Company of Saints. Grandfather was a Sub-captain over 10. They arrived in August, 1860 at Salt Lake City. After a few days’ rest, they left SLC, and settled in South Willard, on a farm belonging to a Mr. Davies, where they lived for three years, they moved to North Willard, on a farm known as the Bankhead Farm. Grandfather purchased this farm. He married Sarah Thompson, my Father’s mother, November 1863, in the Salt Lake Temple. He married Susannah Nebeker September 6, 1875 in the Salt Lake Temple. Susannah was my Mother’s Mother by a previous marriage. Grandfather married Hattie Shumway April 9, 1885 in the Logan Temple. From these unions were born 26 children. Grandfather was active in religious and civic affairs in Willard Ward and Box Elder County. He was set apart as 1st Counselor to Bishop George W. Ward, of the Willard Ward, September 9, 1877; he was ordained Bishop of Willard by Lorenzo Snow, December 3, 1882. This position he held for 8 years. By special call, three years later, President Snow again called him to serve as Bishop of the Willard Ward. This call was made because of the request of his ward members that he be returned as their Bishop. This time he served for three years. He was released two weeks prior to his death. Grandfather was a Director of the First National Bank of Brigham City; Manager of the Co-op Sheep Company of Box Elder Country; served as School Trustee for three terms. During the Crusade against Polygamists Grandfather spent three years on the Underground. It was during this time that the Church was receiving tithing in kind. After feeding about 300 horses and cattle at Willard, Bishop Facer was ordered to deliver them to the Church ranch at Treasureton, Idaho. On the return trip, he and his son Joseph camped on the Bear River west of Collingston, where they had left a cow on their way to the Ranch. While Joseph cleared up after breakfast, Grandfather walked over to the bridge over Bear River to inquire from a man he saw there of the whereabouts of the cows. Neither man recognized the other and no inquiry was made. When Joseph drove over the bridge and his father climbed into his accustomed place under cover in the back of the wagon, he said, “Father, didn’t you know that man?” Grandfather answered that he did not. Joseph said, “That man was United States Marshall Steele.” Naturally, Grandfather was much surprised (greatly surprised) for this same man had been looking for him for such a long time; had been to the family home, and had searched everywhere for him. The Washakie Indians were given land in Northern Box Elder County, and Grandfather was asked to help establish the Indians on the farms there. On March 21, 1889, Grandfather gave himself up to the Federal Officers, and was sentenced by Judge Henderson of Ogden First District Court to four months imprisonment and $50 fine. He was discharged from the Penitentiary July 1, 1889. Grandfather would not tolerate any profanity from the man who worked on his place. He consented to rent a portion of his farm at one time, with the stipulation that the man pay a tithe from the produce from this land. In 1920, President David O. McKay testified of his record as follows: “No man had a better record-that he had sanctified the land by the honest payment of tithing.” Grandfather passed away February 22, 1903, at the age of 68, 8 months and 18 days.

The History of George Facer, written by his granddaughter Wanda Marie Facer Dunn

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

My Grandfather, George Facer, was the son of Henry Facer and Mary Jarvis Facer. He was born at Eynesbury, Huntingdonshire, England, July 4, 1834. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, August 5, 1854. He married Mary Pryor, daughter of James and Dove Brown September 6, 1857, of Eynesbury, Huntingdonshire, England. They immigrated to America with their small son George who was 16 months old. They set sail in March 1860, arriving in New York in June, 1860. Traveling by train, they landed in Council Bluffs, Iowa, which was the end of the railroad at that time. Here he assisted in building handcarts for the journey across the plains for Utah. All their belongings were put in one handcart, and they began their 1100 mile trek, which distance they walked; George pulling and Mary pushing the cart in which their small son rode. They crossed the Plains in the Captain Daniel Robinson Company of Saints. Grandfather was a Sub-captain over 10. They arrived in August, 1860 at Salt Lake City. After a few days’ rest, they left SLC, and settled in South Willard, on a farm belonging to a Mr. Davies, where they lived for three years, they moved to North Willard, on a farm known as the Bankhead Farm. Grandfather purchased this farm. He married Sarah Thompson, my Father’s mother, November 1863, in the Salt Lake Temple. He married Susannah Nebeker September 6, 1875 in the Salt Lake Temple. Susannah was my Mother’s Mother by a previous marriage. Grandfather married Hattie Shumway April 9, 1885 in the Logan Temple. From these unions were born 26 children. Grandfather was active in religious and civic affairs in Willard Ward and Box Elder County. He was set apart as 1st Counselor to Bishop George W. Ward, of the Willard Ward, September 9, 1877; he was ordained Bishop of Willard by Lorenzo Snow, December 3, 1882. This position he held for 8 years. By special call, three years later, President Snow again called him to serve as Bishop of the Willard Ward. This call was made because of the request of his ward members that he be returned as their Bishop. This time he served for three years. He was released two weeks prior to his death. Grandfather was a Director of the First National Bank of Brigham City; Manager of the Co-op Sheep Company of Box Elder Country; served as School Trustee for three terms. During the Crusade against Polygamists Grandfather spent three years on the Underground. It was during this time that the Church was receiving tithing in kind. After feeding about 300 horses and cattle at Willard, Bishop Facer was ordered to deliver them to the Church ranch at Treasureton, Idaho. On the return trip, he and his son Joseph camped on the Bear River west of Collingston, where they had left a cow on their way to the Ranch. While Joseph cleared up after breakfast, Grandfather walked over to the bridge over Bear River to inquire from a man he saw there of the whereabouts of the cows. Neither man recognized the other and no inquiry was made. When Joseph drove over the bridge and his father climbed into his accustomed place under cover in the back of the wagon, he said, “Father, didn’t you know that man?” Grandfather answered that he did not. Joseph said, “That man was United States Marshall Steele.” Naturally, Grandfather was much surprised (greatly surprised) for this same man had been looking for him for such a long time; had been to the family home, and had searched everywhere for him. The Washakie Indians were given land in Northern Box Elder County, and Grandfather was asked to help establish the Indians on the farms there. On March 21, 1889, Grandfather gave himself up to the Federal Officers, and was sentenced by Judge Henderson of Ogden First District Court to four months imprisonment and $50 fine. He was discharged from the Penitentiary July 1, 1889. Grandfather would not tolerate any profanity from the man who worked on his place. He consented to rent a portion of his farm at one time, with the stipulation that the man pay a tithe from the produce from this land. In 1920, President David O. McKay testified of his record as follows: “No man had a better record-that he had sanctified the land by the honest payment of tithing.” Grandfather passed away February 22, 1903, at the age of 68, 8 months and 18 days. Written by his granddaughter, Wanda Marie Facer Dunn

Life timeline of George Facer

1834
George Facer was born on 4 Jul 1834
George Facer was 6 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
George Facer was 25 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
George Facer was 27 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
George Facer was 40 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
George Facer was 49 years old when Krakatoa begins to erupt; the volcano explodes three months later, killing more than 36,000 people. Krakatoa, or Krakatau, is a volcanic island situated in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in the Indonesian province of Lampung. The name is also used for the surrounding island group comprising the remnants of a much larger island of three volcanic peaks which was obliterated in a cataclysmic 1883 eruption.
George Facer was 64 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
George Facer died on 22 Feb 1903 at the age of 68
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for George Facer (4 Jul 1834 - 22 Feb 1903), BillionGraves Record 4279164 Willard, Box Elder, Utah, United States

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