George Baum

2 Nov 1829 - 16 Jul 1916

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George Baum

2 Nov 1829 - 16 Jul 1916
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Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized
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Life Information

George Baum

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Beloved one. Farewell., Day G. &E.A. Baum, Rest In Peace, Son of Sarah Eliziabeth Baum
Beloved one. Farewell, Daug Of H J Baum, Daughter of G. & H.J. Baum, Daughter of G.& E.A. Baum, Dau. G E,A, Baum

Headstone Description

George Baum and wives and children
wife 1 - Hannah Jane Cloward and their children Martha M,; Jane E.,
wife 2 - Eliza Ann Allen, and thier children: Eliza Isabelle,
wife 3 - Sarah Elizabeth (Carter) and children Earnest, Arthur.
, Daug. of G & H. J. Baum, No surname, Dau. G. & E.A. Baum
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History of George Baum

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 1852). She was born April 6, 1840 and died January 31, 1909 Provo, Utah. Their children: Rachel Ann born May 29, 1865 Married John Gatherum; Thomas J. born April 12, 1868 and John E. born February 5, 1869 died; Elizabeth born March 21, 1871 married Fred Ferguson; Malinda born June 18, 1873 Married Mads Jorgenson, Jane born September 19, 1876; Harmon David born December 18, 1877 married Susie Morre; William Harris born October 8, 1884 married Grace Ferguson. Member 45th quorum Seventies, special Missionary to bring immigrants to Utah; his health was ruined on this trip. Block teacher, Farmer. Died March 21, 1912 Gunnison, Utah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.tah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.

BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, Utah, com­ing here in 1850, about a year after the first families moved into the valley. He was born in Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., November 2, 1829. Brandywine was a very pretty place, about,thirty miles from Philadelphia. Just before the Revolutionary War, John C. Baum, fought in General Washington's army and was taken prisoner by the British.. Rather than surrender his sword, he broke it between two rocks and' gave the English officer the handle. George Baum is a descendent of John C. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn.. Grand­father and Grandmother Baum were weavers, but John spent most of his early days on the farm. Grandfather and Grandmother were baptized in the year 1842, by Lorenzo Barnes. They were converts to the Mormon Church. That same year they witnessed the falling of the Stars. They said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. Soon after they moved to Nauvoo where the father became a memprophet Joseph Smith prophesy that if the Saints would build the Temple at a certain time they would not be driven away. He hauled corn thirteen miles, making only one trip a day in order to donate and help build the Nauvoo Temple. The prophet Joseph 'helped him unload the corn. He also quarried rock along the Missouri river for the same cause. At this time Grandfather acted as body guard to the Prophet. Several times they attempted to kill Joseph, but was not allowed to harm him. Grandfather got back to Nauvoo two days before the fight at Nauvoo, November 1846. He was sent among the mobs to find out their plans and was surely blessed for they did not harm him in any way. The mob told the Saints to leave or do as they commanded. They then journeyed on to Co until Bluffs; staying there until Spring. They next moved to Missouri and spent three enjoyable years in farming. Grandfather told of going to dances five miles away with ox teams with just the few of their friends that were left.. From Nauvoo they moved to Garden Grove and continued to move until they got to Winter Quarters.. During their travels they nearly starved but felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs.. Grandfather was frightened by the Indians when three hundred miles from help, and feared for his life, but was not harmed in any way. He worked on the ferry boat on the Mississ­ippi River. At this time the Cholera was very bad and in 1850 he saw with his own eyes one hundred bodies who had died with the dreadful disease. They were buried'in graves along the roadside, only to be dug up and destroyed by the wolves.. Feather beds, quilts wagons, and most everything was seen scattered along the roadside, being left there by the dead. He says he will never forget that scene it was so heart rending. That year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning the eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They landed in Salt Lake City, September 1850, Father being nineteen years of age. From Salt Lake City he went to Janston and two days later came back to Conference in Salt Lake City. At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they build their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner Grove. Just below the old bridge they build the first Fort, this being too swampy they built another just across from Hooveres Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the X.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him. He was also acquainted with the Prohpet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a whole lot and said in 1857 forty-five Saints were captured the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as highh as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred. He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-opo Store where he lost a great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becoming a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 a the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four childred born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in july 191. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of Eighty-Seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. Geroge Baun befan early in life to experience the hardships incident tto the life of the early member of ther Mormon chruch. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of exen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mod drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid rememberance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he starte in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchasedland from time to time as he was able. At this time he own one hundred twenty acres.. He has devoted part of his time to live stock industry, buying and selling in early days, He did a considerable, amount of freighting over they country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri RIver as president and secretary of the Y.X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Wollen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a niamber of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captian Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers worked in the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which positioned he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jan, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A., and Orson. She Died. His thrid wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whome he was associated. He stand very high in his community as a business man and private citizen Written by Geroge Baum's Daughter, Mrs. Dora Baum Cluff.

BIOGRAPHY: Geroge Baum Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they built their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner grove. Just below the old bridge they built the first Fort, this be­ing too swampy they built another just across from Hoovers Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the Y.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him.. He was also acquainted with the Prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a. whole lot and said in 1857 forty ­five Saints were captured by the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as high as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred... He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-op Store where he lost a. great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becom­ing a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 at the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four children born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in July 1916. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of eighty--seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. George Baum began early in life to experience the hardships incident to the life of the early members of the Mormon church. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid remembrance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he started in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. At this time he owns one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to live stock indus­try, buying and selling in early days. He did a considerable amount of freighting over the country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri River as president and secretary of the Y. X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Woolen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captain Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers i n the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which posi­tion he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a. member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza. Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A.., and Orson. She died. His third wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whom he was associated. He stands very high in his community as a business man and private citizen. Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: SouthPawPhilly Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM (This is a compilation of several histories. One is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneer's, and one is found in a book of biographies entitled! "Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah", published in 1902; a copy of which I have in my possession. I am just putting the different histories together so that his history can be complete. This compilation made by his great granddaughter, Bessie Y. Keetch, who is the daughter of Mamie Penrod Young, who is the daughter of Melissa Baum Penrod, who is the daughter of Hannah Jane Cloward and George Baum. George Baum (son of John C. Baum, born March 18, 1804, and Hannah Crismon, born Dec. 8, 1806, Brandyvwine, Chester County, Pennsylvania) was born Nov. 2, 1829 at Brandywine in Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was a pretty town about thirty miles from Philadelphia. He is a descendent of Jacob Baum, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than sur­render his sword, he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subject's father, John, was so poor he was bound out until the age of twenty-one, when his brother, Jacob, then bought him back. (See history of John C. Baum, which completes this incident.) He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine. When George was four years old, about 1833, he and his parents witnessed the falling of the stars; they said it looked as if the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. When he was ten years old, abcat 1839, Elder Lorenzo Barnes came into the neighborhood preaching the gospel. His father, mother, and his uncle Jacob Baum and families immediately, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elder Barnes baptizing them. Persecution became so bad in Pennsylvania that the two families, (Jacob's and John's) decided to gather with the Saints at Nauvoo.John went first in about 1842 and became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm about five miles down the river from Nauvoo, where he lived until 1846. During the building of the Nauvoo Temple, he, George; hauled corn thirteen miles to donate to help build it, making one trip a day. Me told of the Prophet Joseph helping him to unload it. He also quarried rock along the Missouri River for the same purpose. A few days Before the trouble in Nauvoo in 1846, George arrived there and was sent among the mobs to find out their plans. He was surely blessed because they did not harm him in any way. He had a very vivid remembrance of those times, seeing the Body of the Prophet twice after he was murdered. He knew the nrophet personally and Believed he was a true prophet of God. He said the prophet was a tall, well-­built man, a Boy among boys; always jolly and full of fun. He also thought a great deal of Brigham Young Heber C. Kimball, and Mr. Edward Hunter, who were very dear friends of his. He was also acquainted with the prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Yale of Harmony, Pennsylvania. In 1846 they crossed the river at Fort Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, But the same year went on to Council Bluffs and remained there until March, 1847, when they took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri, where they did farming on a large scale until 1850. During their travels they nearly starved, But they felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Na uvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mobs driving the people from their homes. They spent three enjoyable years at Lindon, Missouri. He (George) told of their going to dances five miles away By ox-team with just a few of their crowd that were left. BIOGRAPHY: He worked on a ferry Boat on the Mississippi River; witnessed the suffer­ing when the Cholera broke out among the Saints. He saw more than one hundred dead bodies along the roadside and saw their feather Beds, quilts, wagons and possessions of the dead which were left Behind Because of the fear of the dreadful disease. BIOGRAPHY: In 1850 they crossed the plains in an Independent Ox-team, his father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 26 and attended the Conference then being held, camping on the bank's of the Jordon River. President Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo, which had been settled in 1849. Accordingly he and his parents moved to Provo, arriving Cctober 8 and took ur a home in old Fort Provo until the following spring and then moved to a farm on the river bottoms and built their first home on the place now owned (1934) by Sidney H. Cluff in Pleasant View Ward near Provo. However, the Indians became so bad that they were compelled to move into Provo where they took up several city lots. George remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 (married Hannah Jane Cloward of Payson, Utah) at the old Tithing Office. George A. Smith performed the ceremony. At this time he started out life for himself, taking a farm on the river bottoms which he owned up to the time of his death, and lived there until the Walker War. In 186

History of George Baum

Contributor: jdfelt7 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: jdfelt7 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

Contributor: jdfelt7 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

Contributor: jdfelt7 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 1852). She was born April 6, 1840 and died January 31, 1909 Provo, Utah. Their children: Rachel Ann born May 29, 1865 Married John Gatherum; Thomas J. born April 12, 1868 and John E. born February 5, 1869 died; Elizabeth born March 21, 1871 married Fred Ferguson; Malinda born June 18, 1873 Married Mads Jorgenson, Jane born September 19, 1876; Harmon David born December 18, 1877 married Susie Morre; William Harris born October 8, 1884 married Grace Ferguson. Member 45th quorum Seventies, special Missionary to bring immigrants to Utah; his health was ruined on this trip. Block teacher, Farmer. Died March 21, 1912 Gunnison, Utah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.tah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.

BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: jdfelt7 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, Utah, com­ing here in 1850, about a year after the first families moved into the valley. He was born in Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., November 2, 1829. Brandywine was a very pretty place, about,thirty miles from Philadelphia. Just before the Revolutionary War, John C. Baum, fought in General Washington's army and was taken prisoner by the British.. Rather than surrender his sword, he broke it between two rocks and' gave the English officer the handle. George Baum is a descendent of John C. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn.. Grand­father and Grandmother Baum were weavers, but John spent most of his early days on the farm. Grandfather and Grandmother were baptized in the year 1842, by Lorenzo Barnes. They were converts to the Mormon Church. That same year they witnessed the falling of the Stars. They said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. Soon after they moved to Nauvoo where the father became a memprophet Joseph Smith prophesy that if the Saints would build the Temple at a certain time they would not be driven away. He hauled corn thirteen miles, making only one trip a day in order to donate and help build the Nauvoo Temple. The prophet Joseph 'helped him unload the corn. He also quarried rock along the Missouri river for the same cause. At this time Grandfather acted as body guard to the Prophet. Several times they attempted to kill Joseph, but was not allowed to harm him. Grandfather got back to Nauvoo two days before the fight at Nauvoo, November 1846. He was sent among the mobs to find out their plans and was surely blessed for they did not harm him in any way. The mob told the Saints to leave or do as they commanded. They then journeyed on to Co until Bluffs; staying there until Spring. They next moved to Missouri and spent three enjoyable years in farming. Grandfather told of going to dances five miles away with ox teams with just the few of their friends that were left.. From Nauvoo they moved to Garden Grove and continued to move until they got to Winter Quarters.. During their travels they nearly starved but felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs.. Grandfather was frightened by the Indians when three hundred miles from help, and feared for his life, but was not harmed in any way. He worked on the ferry boat on the Mississ­ippi River. At this time the Cholera was very bad and in 1850 he saw with his own eyes one hundred bodies who had died with the dreadful disease. They were buried'in graves along the roadside, only to be dug up and destroyed by the wolves.. Feather beds, quilts wagons, and most everything was seen scattered along the roadside, being left there by the dead. He says he will never forget that scene it was so heart rending. That year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning the eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They landed in Salt Lake City, September 1850, Father being nineteen years of age. From Salt Lake City he went to Janston and two days later came back to Conference in Salt Lake City. At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they build their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner Grove. Just below the old bridge they build the first Fort, this being too swampy they built another just across from Hooveres Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the X.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him. He was also acquainted with the Prohpet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a whole lot and said in 1857 forty-five Saints were captured the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as highh as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred. He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-opo Store where he lost a great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becoming a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 a the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four childred born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in july 191. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of Eighty-Seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. Geroge Baun befan early in life to experience the hardships incident tto the life of the early member of ther Mormon chruch. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of exen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mod drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid rememberance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he starte in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchasedland from time to time as he was able. At this time he own one hundred twenty acres.. He has devoted part of his time to live stock industry, buying and selling in early days, He did a considerable, amount of freighting over they country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri RIver as president and secretary of the Y.X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Wollen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a niamber of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captian Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers worked in the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which positioned he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jan, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A., and Orson. She Died. His thrid wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whome he was associated. He stand very high in his community as a business man and private citizen Written by Geroge Baum's Daughter, Mrs. Dora Baum Cluff.

BIOGRAPHY: Geroge Baum Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

Contributor: jdfelt7 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they built their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner grove. Just below the old bridge they built the first Fort, this be­ing too swampy they built another just across from Hoovers Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the Y.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him.. He was also acquainted with the Prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a. whole lot and said in 1857 forty ­five Saints were captured by the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as high as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred... He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-op Store where he lost a. great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becom­ing a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 at the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four children born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in July 1916. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of eighty--seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. George Baum began early in life to experience the hardships incident to the life of the early members of the Mormon church. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid remembrance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he started in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. At this time he owns one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to live stock indus­try, buying and selling in early days. He did a considerable amount of freighting over the country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri River as president and secretary of the Y. X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Woolen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captain Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers i n the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which posi­tion he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a. member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza. Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A.., and Orson. She died. His third wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whom he was associated. He stands very high in his community as a business man and private citizen. Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: jdfelt7 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM (This is a compilation of several histories. One is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneer's, and one is found in a book of biographies entitled! "Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah", published in 1902; a copy of which I have in my possession. I am just putting the different histories together so that his history can be complete. This compilation made by his great granddaughter, Bessie Y. Keetch, who is the daughter of Mamie Penrod Young, who is the daughter of Melissa Baum Penrod, who is the daughter of Hannah Jane Cloward and George Baum. George Baum (son of John C. Baum, born March 18, 1804, and Hannah Crismon, born Dec. 8, 1806, Brandyvwine, Chester County, Pennsylvania) was born Nov. 2, 1829 at Brandywine in Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was a pretty town about thirty miles from Philadelphia. He is a descendent of Jacob Baum, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than sur­render his sword, he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subject's father, John, was so poor he was bound out until the age of twenty-one, when his brother, Jacob, then bought him back. (See history of John C. Baum, which completes this incident.) He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine. When George was four years old, about 1833, he and his parents witnessed the falling of the stars; they said it looked as if the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. When he was ten years old, abcat 1839, Elder Lorenzo Barnes came into the neighborhood preaching the gospel. His father, mother, and his uncle Jacob Baum and families immediately, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elder Barnes baptizing them. Persecution became so bad in Pennsylvania that the two families, (Jacob's and John's) decided to gather with the Saints at Nauvoo.John went first in about 1842 and became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm about five miles down the river from Nauvoo, where he lived until 1846. During the building of the Nauvoo Temple, he, George; hauled corn thirteen miles to donate to help build it, making one trip a day. Me told of the Prophet Joseph helping him to unload it. He also quarried rock along the Missouri River for the same purpose. A few days Before the trouble in Nauvoo in 1846, George arrived there and was sent among the mobs to find out their plans. He was surely blessed because they did not harm him in any way. He had a very vivid remembrance of those times, seeing the Body of the Prophet twice after he was murdered. He knew the nrophet personally and Believed he was a true prophet of God. He said the prophet was a tall, well-­built man, a Boy among boys; always jolly and full of fun. He also thought a great deal of Brigham Young Heber C. Kimball, and Mr. Edward Hunter, who were very dear friends of his. He was also acquainted with the prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Yale of Harmony, Pennsylvania. In 1846 they crossed the river at Fort Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, But the same year went on to Council Bluffs and remained there until March, 1847, when they took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri, where they did farming on a large scale until 1850. During their travels they nearly starved, But they felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Na uvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mobs driving the people from their homes. They spent three enjoyable years at Lindon, Missouri. He (George) told of their going to dances five miles away By ox-team with just a few of their crowd that were left. BIOGRAPHY: He worked on a ferry Boat on the Mississippi River; witnessed the suffer­ing when the Cholera broke out among the Saints. He saw more than one hundred dead bodies along the roadside and saw their feather Beds, quilts, wagons and possessions of the dead which were left Behind Because of the fear of the dreadful disease. BIOGRAPHY: In 1850 they crossed the plains in an Independent Ox-team, his father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 26 and attended the Conference then being held, camping on the bank's of the Jordon River. President Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo, which had been settled in 1849. Accordingly he and his parents moved to Provo, arriving Cctober 8 and took ur a home in old Fort Provo until the following spring and then moved to a farm on the river bottoms and built their first home on the place now owned (1934) by Sidney H. Cluff in Pleasant View Ward near Provo. However, the Indians became so bad that they were compelled to move into Provo where they took up several city lots. George remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 (married Hannah Jane Cloward of Payson, Utah) at the old Tithing Office. George A. Smith performed the ceremony. At this time he started out life for himself, taking a farm on the river bottoms which he owned up to the time of his death, and lived there until the Walker War. In 186

History of George Baum

Contributor: greytop Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: greytop Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

Contributor: greytop Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

Contributor: greytop Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 1852). She was born April 6, 1840 and died January 31, 1909 Provo, Utah. Their children: Rachel Ann born May 29, 1865 Married John Gatherum; Thomas J. born April 12, 1868 and John E. born February 5, 1869 died; Elizabeth born March 21, 1871 married Fred Ferguson; Malinda born June 18, 1873 Married Mads Jorgenson, Jane born September 19, 1876; Harmon David born December 18, 1877 married Susie Morre; William Harris born October 8, 1884 married Grace Ferguson. Member 45th quorum Seventies, special Missionary to bring immigrants to Utah; his health was ruined on this trip. Block teacher, Farmer. Died March 21, 1912 Gunnison, Utah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.tah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.

BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: greytop Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, Utah, com­ing here in 1850, about a year after the first families moved into the valley. He was born in Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., November 2, 1829. Brandywine was a very pretty place, about,thirty miles from Philadelphia. Just before the Revolutionary War, John C. Baum, fought in General Washington's army and was taken prisoner by the British.. Rather than surrender his sword, he broke it between two rocks and' gave the English officer the handle. George Baum is a descendent of John C. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn.. Grand­father and Grandmother Baum were weavers, but John spent most of his early days on the farm. Grandfather and Grandmother were baptized in the year 1842, by Lorenzo Barnes. They were converts to the Mormon Church. That same year they witnessed the falling of the Stars. They said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. Soon after they moved to Nauvoo where the father became a memprophet Joseph Smith prophesy that if the Saints would build the Temple at a certain time they would not be driven away. He hauled corn thirteen miles, making only one trip a day in order to donate and help build the Nauvoo Temple. The prophet Joseph 'helped him unload the corn. He also quarried rock along the Missouri river for the same cause. At this time Grandfather acted as body guard to the Prophet. Several times they attempted to kill Joseph, but was not allowed to harm him. Grandfather got back to Nauvoo two days before the fight at Nauvoo, November 1846. He was sent among the mobs to find out their plans and was surely blessed for they did not harm him in any way. The mob told the Saints to leave or do as they commanded. They then journeyed on to Co until Bluffs; staying there until Spring. They next moved to Missouri and spent three enjoyable years in farming. Grandfather told of going to dances five miles away with ox teams with just the few of their friends that were left.. From Nauvoo they moved to Garden Grove and continued to move until they got to Winter Quarters.. During their travels they nearly starved but felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs.. Grandfather was frightened by the Indians when three hundred miles from help, and feared for his life, but was not harmed in any way. He worked on the ferry boat on the Mississ­ippi River. At this time the Cholera was very bad and in 1850 he saw with his own eyes one hundred bodies who had died with the dreadful disease. They were buried'in graves along the roadside, only to be dug up and destroyed by the wolves.. Feather beds, quilts wagons, and most everything was seen scattered along the roadside, being left there by the dead. He says he will never forget that scene it was so heart rending. That year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning the eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They landed in Salt Lake City, September 1850, Father being nineteen years of age. From Salt Lake City he went to Janston and two days later came back to Conference in Salt Lake City. At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they build their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner Grove. Just below the old bridge they build the first Fort, this being too swampy they built another just across from Hooveres Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the X.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him. He was also acquainted with the Prohpet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a whole lot and said in 1857 forty-five Saints were captured the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as highh as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred. He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-opo Store where he lost a great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becoming a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 a the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four childred born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in july 191. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of Eighty-Seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. Geroge Baun befan early in life to experience the hardships incident tto the life of the early member of ther Mormon chruch. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of exen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mod drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid rememberance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he starte in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchasedland from time to time as he was able. At this time he own one hundred twenty acres.. He has devoted part of his time to live stock industry, buying and selling in early days, He did a considerable, amount of freighting over they country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri RIver as president and secretary of the Y.X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Wollen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a niamber of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captian Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers worked in the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which positioned he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jan, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A., and Orson. She Died. His thrid wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whome he was associated. He stand very high in his community as a business man and private citizen Written by Geroge Baum's Daughter, Mrs. Dora Baum Cluff.

BIOGRAPHY: Geroge Baum Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

Contributor: greytop Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they built their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner grove. Just below the old bridge they built the first Fort, this be­ing too swampy they built another just across from Hoovers Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the Y.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him.. He was also acquainted with the Prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a. whole lot and said in 1857 forty ­five Saints were captured by the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as high as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred... He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-op Store where he lost a. great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becom­ing a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 at the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four children born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in July 1916. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of eighty--seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. George Baum began early in life to experience the hardships incident to the life of the early members of the Mormon church. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid remembrance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he started in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. At this time he owns one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to live stock indus­try, buying and selling in early days. He did a considerable amount of freighting over the country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri River as president and secretary of the Y. X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Woolen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captain Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers i n the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which posi­tion he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a. member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza. Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A.., and Orson. She died. His third wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whom he was associated. He stands very high in his community as a business man and private citizen. Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: greytop Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM (This is a compilation of several histories. One is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneer's, and one is found in a book of biographies entitled! "Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah", published in 1902; a copy of which I have in my possession. I am just putting the different histories together so that his history can be complete. This compilation made by his great granddaughter, Bessie Y. Keetch, who is the daughter of Mamie Penrod Young, who is the daughter of Melissa Baum Penrod, who is the daughter of Hannah Jane Cloward and George Baum. George Baum (son of John C. Baum, born March 18, 1804, and Hannah Crismon, born Dec. 8, 1806, Brandyvwine, Chester County, Pennsylvania) was born Nov. 2, 1829 at Brandywine in Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was a pretty town about thirty miles from Philadelphia. He is a descendent of Jacob Baum, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than sur­render his sword, he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subject's father, John, was so poor he was bound out until the age of twenty-one, when his brother, Jacob, then bought him back. (See history of John C. Baum, which completes this incident.) He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine. When George was four years old, about 1833, he and his parents witnessed the falling of the stars; they said it looked as if the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. When he was ten years old, abcat 1839, Elder Lorenzo Barnes came into the neighborhood preaching the gospel. His father, mother, and his uncle Jacob Baum and families immediately, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elder Barnes baptizing them. Persecution became so bad in Pennsylvania that the two families, (Jacob's and John's) decided to gather with the Saints at Nauvoo.John went first in about 1842 and became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm about five miles down the river from Nauvoo, where he lived until 1846. During the building of the Nauvoo Temple, he, George; hauled corn thirteen miles to donate to help build it, making one trip a day. Me told of the Prophet Joseph helping him to unload it. He also quarried rock along the Missouri River for the same purpose. A few days Before the trouble in Nauvoo in 1846, George arrived there and was sent among the mobs to find out their plans. He was surely blessed because they did not harm him in any way. He had a very vivid remembrance of those times, seeing the Body of the Prophet twice after he was murdered. He knew the nrophet personally and Believed he was a true prophet of God. He said the prophet was a tall, well-­built man, a Boy among boys; always jolly and full of fun. He also thought a great deal of Brigham Young Heber C. Kimball, and Mr. Edward Hunter, who were very dear friends of his. He was also acquainted with the prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Yale of Harmony, Pennsylvania. In 1846 they crossed the river at Fort Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, But the same year went on to Council Bluffs and remained there until March, 1847, when they took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri, where they did farming on a large scale until 1850. During their travels they nearly starved, But they felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Na uvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mobs driving the people from their homes. They spent three enjoyable years at Lindon, Missouri. He (George) told of their going to dances five miles away By ox-team with just a few of their crowd that were left. BIOGRAPHY: He worked on a ferry Boat on the Mississippi River; witnessed the suffer­ing when the Cholera broke out among the Saints. He saw more than one hundred dead bodies along the roadside and saw their feather Beds, quilts, wagons and possessions of the dead which were left Behind Because of the fear of the dreadful disease. BIOGRAPHY: In 1850 they crossed the plains in an Independent Ox-team, his father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 26 and attended the Conference then being held, camping on the bank's of the Jordon River. President Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo, which had been settled in 1849. Accordingly he and his parents moved to Provo, arriving Cctober 8 and took ur a home in old Fort Provo until the following spring and then moved to a farm on the river bottoms and built their first home on the place now owned (1934) by Sidney H. Cluff in Pleasant View Ward near Provo. However, the Indians became so bad that they were compelled to move into Provo where they took up several city lots. George remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 (married Hannah Jane Cloward of Payson, Utah) at the old Tithing Office. George A. Smith performed the ceremony. At this time he started out life for himself, taking a farm on the river bottoms which he owned up to the time of his death, and lived there until the Walker War. In 186

History of George Baum

Contributor: aniton2000 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: aniton2000 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

Contributor: aniton2000 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

Contributor: aniton2000 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 1852). She was born April 6, 1840 and died January 31, 1909 Provo, Utah. Their children: Rachel Ann born May 29, 1865 Married John Gatherum; Thomas J. born April 12, 1868 and John E. born February 5, 1869 died; Elizabeth born March 21, 1871 married Fred Ferguson; Malinda born June 18, 1873 Married Mads Jorgenson, Jane born September 19, 1876; Harmon David born December 18, 1877 married Susie Morre; William Harris born October 8, 1884 married Grace Ferguson. Member 45th quorum Seventies, special Missionary to bring immigrants to Utah; his health was ruined on this trip. Block teacher, Farmer. Died March 21, 1912 Gunnison, Utah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.tah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.

BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: aniton2000 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, Utah, com­ing here in 1850, about a year after the first families moved into the valley. He was born in Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., November 2, 1829. Brandywine was a very pretty place, about,thirty miles from Philadelphia. Just before the Revolutionary War, John C. Baum, fought in General Washington's army and was taken prisoner by the British.. Rather than surrender his sword, he broke it between two rocks and' gave the English officer the handle. George Baum is a descendent of John C. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn.. Grand­father and Grandmother Baum were weavers, but John spent most of his early days on the farm. Grandfather and Grandmother were baptized in the year 1842, by Lorenzo Barnes. They were converts to the Mormon Church. That same year they witnessed the falling of the Stars. They said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. Soon after they moved to Nauvoo where the father became a memprophet Joseph Smith prophesy that if the Saints would build the Temple at a certain time they would not be driven away. He hauled corn thirteen miles, making only one trip a day in order to donate and help build the Nauvoo Temple. The prophet Joseph 'helped him unload the corn. He also quarried rock along the Missouri river for the same cause. At this time Grandfather acted as body guard to the Prophet. Several times they attempted to kill Joseph, but was not allowed to harm him. Grandfather got back to Nauvoo two days before the fight at Nauvoo, November 1846. He was sent among the mobs to find out their plans and was surely blessed for they did not harm him in any way. The mob told the Saints to leave or do as they commanded. They then journeyed on to Co until Bluffs; staying there until Spring. They next moved to Missouri and spent three enjoyable years in farming. Grandfather told of going to dances five miles away with ox teams with just the few of their friends that were left.. From Nauvoo they moved to Garden Grove and continued to move until they got to Winter Quarters.. During their travels they nearly starved but felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs.. Grandfather was frightened by the Indians when three hundred miles from help, and feared for his life, but was not harmed in any way. He worked on the ferry boat on the Mississ­ippi River. At this time the Cholera was very bad and in 1850 he saw with his own eyes one hundred bodies who had died with the dreadful disease. They were buried'in graves along the roadside, only to be dug up and destroyed by the wolves.. Feather beds, quilts wagons, and most everything was seen scattered along the roadside, being left there by the dead. He says he will never forget that scene it was so heart rending. That year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning the eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They landed in Salt Lake City, September 1850, Father being nineteen years of age. From Salt Lake City he went to Janston and two days later came back to Conference in Salt Lake City. At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they build their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner Grove. Just below the old bridge they build the first Fort, this being too swampy they built another just across from Hooveres Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the X.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him. He was also acquainted with the Prohpet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a whole lot and said in 1857 forty-five Saints were captured the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as highh as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred. He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-opo Store where he lost a great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becoming a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 a the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four childred born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in july 191. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of Eighty-Seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. Geroge Baun befan early in life to experience the hardships incident tto the life of the early member of ther Mormon chruch. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of exen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mod drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid rememberance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he starte in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchasedland from time to time as he was able. At this time he own one hundred twenty acres.. He has devoted part of his time to live stock industry, buying and selling in early days, He did a considerable, amount of freighting over they country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri RIver as president and secretary of the Y.X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Wollen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a niamber of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captian Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers worked in the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which positioned he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jan, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A., and Orson. She Died. His thrid wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whome he was associated. He stand very high in his community as a business man and private citizen Written by Geroge Baum's Daughter, Mrs. Dora Baum Cluff.

BIOGRAPHY: Geroge Baum Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

Contributor: aniton2000 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they built their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner grove. Just below the old bridge they built the first Fort, this be­ing too swampy they built another just across from Hoovers Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the Y.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him.. He was also acquainted with the Prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a. whole lot and said in 1857 forty ­five Saints were captured by the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as high as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred... He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-op Store where he lost a. great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becom­ing a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 at the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four children born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in July 1916. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of eighty--seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. George Baum began early in life to experience the hardships incident to the life of the early members of the Mormon church. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid remembrance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he started in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. At this time he owns one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to live stock indus­try, buying and selling in early days. He did a considerable amount of freighting over the country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri River as president and secretary of the Y. X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Woolen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captain Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers i n the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which posi­tion he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a. member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza. Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A.., and Orson. She died. His third wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whom he was associated. He stands very high in his community as a business man and private citizen. Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: aniton2000 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM (This is a compilation of several histories. One is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneer's, and one is found in a book of biographies entitled! "Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah", published in 1902; a copy of which I have in my possession. I am just putting the different histories together so that his history can be complete. This compilation made by his great granddaughter, Bessie Y. Keetch, who is the daughter of Mamie Penrod Young, who is the daughter of Melissa Baum Penrod, who is the daughter of Hannah Jane Cloward and George Baum. George Baum (son of John C. Baum, born March 18, 1804, and Hannah Crismon, born Dec. 8, 1806, Brandyvwine, Chester County, Pennsylvania) was born Nov. 2, 1829 at Brandywine in Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was a pretty town about thirty miles from Philadelphia. He is a descendent of Jacob Baum, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than sur­render his sword, he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subject's father, John, was so poor he was bound out until the age of twenty-one, when his brother, Jacob, then bought him back. (See history of John C. Baum, which completes this incident.) He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine. When George was four years old, about 1833, he and his parents witnessed the falling of the stars; they said it looked as if the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. When he was ten years old, abcat 1839, Elder Lorenzo Barnes came into the neighborhood preaching the gospel. His father, mother, and his uncle Jacob Baum and families immediately, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elder Barnes baptizing them. Persecution became so bad in Pennsylvania that the two families, (Jacob's and John's) decided to gather with the Saints at Nauvoo.John went first in about 1842 and became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm about five miles down the river from Nauvoo, where he lived until 1846. During the building of the Nauvoo Temple, he, George; hauled corn thirteen miles to donate to help build it, making one trip a day. Me told of the Prophet Joseph helping him to unload it. He also quarried rock along the Missouri River for the same purpose. A few days Before the trouble in Nauvoo in 1846, George arrived there and was sent among the mobs to find out their plans. He was surely blessed because they did not harm him in any way. He had a very vivid remembrance of those times, seeing the Body of the Prophet twice after he was murdered. He knew the nrophet personally and Believed he was a true prophet of God. He said the prophet was a tall, well-­built man, a Boy among boys; always jolly and full of fun. He also thought a great deal of Brigham Young Heber C. Kimball, and Mr. Edward Hunter, who were very dear friends of his. He was also acquainted with the prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Yale of Harmony, Pennsylvania. In 1846 they crossed the river at Fort Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, But the same year went on to Council Bluffs and remained there until March, 1847, when they took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri, where they did farming on a large scale until 1850. During their travels they nearly starved, But they felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Na uvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mobs driving the people from their homes. They spent three enjoyable years at Lindon, Missouri. He (George) told of their going to dances five miles away By ox-team with just a few of their crowd that were left. BIOGRAPHY: He worked on a ferry Boat on the Mississippi River; witnessed the suffer­ing when the Cholera broke out among the Saints. He saw more than one hundred dead bodies along the roadside and saw their feather Beds, quilts, wagons and possessions of the dead which were left Behind Because of the fear of the dreadful disease. BIOGRAPHY: In 1850 they crossed the plains in an Independent Ox-team, his father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 26 and attended the Conference then being held, camping on the bank's of the Jordon River. President Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo, which had been settled in 1849. Accordingly he and his parents moved to Provo, arriving Cctober 8 and took ur a home in old Fort Provo until the following spring and then moved to a farm on the river bottoms and built their first home on the place now owned (1934) by Sidney H. Cluff in Pleasant View Ward near Provo. However, the Indians became so bad that they were compelled to move into Provo where they took up several city lots. George remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 (married Hannah Jane Cloward of Payson, Utah) at the old Tithing Office. George A. Smith performed the ceremony. At this time he started out life for himself, taking a farm on the river bottoms which he owned up to the time of his death, and lived there until the Walker War. In 186

History of George Baum

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 1852). She was born April 6, 1840 and died January 31, 1909 Provo, Utah. Their children: Rachel Ann born May 29, 1865 Married John Gatherum; Thomas J. born April 12, 1868 and John E. born February 5, 1869 died; Elizabeth born March 21, 1871 married Fred Ferguson; Malinda born June 18, 1873 Married Mads Jorgenson, Jane born September 19, 1876; Harmon David born December 18, 1877 married Susie Morre; William Harris born October 8, 1884 married Grace Ferguson. Member 45th quorum Seventies, special Missionary to bring immigrants to Utah; his health was ruined on this trip. Block teacher, Farmer. Died March 21, 1912 Gunnison, Utah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.tah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.

BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, Utah, com­ing here in 1850, about a year after the first families moved into the valley. He was born in Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., November 2, 1829. Brandywine was a very pretty place, about,thirty miles from Philadelphia. Just before the Revolutionary War, John C. Baum, fought in General Washington's army and was taken prisoner by the British.. Rather than surrender his sword, he broke it between two rocks and' gave the English officer the handle. George Baum is a descendent of John C. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn.. Grand­father and Grandmother Baum were weavers, but John spent most of his early days on the farm. Grandfather and Grandmother were baptized in the year 1842, by Lorenzo Barnes. They were converts to the Mormon Church. That same year they witnessed the falling of the Stars. They said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. Soon after they moved to Nauvoo where the father became a memprophet Joseph Smith prophesy that if the Saints would build the Temple at a certain time they would not be driven away. He hauled corn thirteen miles, making only one trip a day in order to donate and help build the Nauvoo Temple. The prophet Joseph 'helped him unload the corn. He also quarried rock along the Missouri river for the same cause. At this time Grandfather acted as body guard to the Prophet. Several times they attempted to kill Joseph, but was not allowed to harm him. Grandfather got back to Nauvoo two days before the fight at Nauvoo, November 1846. He was sent among the mobs to find out their plans and was surely blessed for they did not harm him in any way. The mob told the Saints to leave or do as they commanded. They then journeyed on to Co until Bluffs; staying there until Spring. They next moved to Missouri and spent three enjoyable years in farming. Grandfather told of going to dances five miles away with ox teams with just the few of their friends that were left.. From Nauvoo they moved to Garden Grove and continued to move until they got to Winter Quarters.. During their travels they nearly starved but felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs.. Grandfather was frightened by the Indians when three hundred miles from help, and feared for his life, but was not harmed in any way. He worked on the ferry boat on the Mississ­ippi River. At this time the Cholera was very bad and in 1850 he saw with his own eyes one hundred bodies who had died with the dreadful disease. They were buried'in graves along the roadside, only to be dug up and destroyed by the wolves.. Feather beds, quilts wagons, and most everything was seen scattered along the roadside, being left there by the dead. He says he will never forget that scene it was so heart rending. That year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning the eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They landed in Salt Lake City, September 1850, Father being nineteen years of age. From Salt Lake City he went to Janston and two days later came back to Conference in Salt Lake City. At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they build their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner Grove. Just below the old bridge they build the first Fort, this being too swampy they built another just across from Hooveres Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the X.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him. He was also acquainted with the Prohpet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a whole lot and said in 1857 forty-five Saints were captured the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as highh as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred. He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-opo Store where he lost a great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becoming a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 a the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four childred born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in july 191. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of Eighty-Seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. Geroge Baun befan early in life to experience the hardships incident tto the life of the early member of ther Mormon chruch. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of exen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mod drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid rememberance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he starte in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchasedland from time to time as he was able. At this time he own one hundred twenty acres.. He has devoted part of his time to live stock industry, buying and selling in early days, He did a considerable, amount of freighting over they country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri RIver as president and secretary of the Y.X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Wollen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a niamber of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captian Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers worked in the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which positioned he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jan, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A., and Orson. She Died. His thrid wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whome he was associated. He stand very high in his community as a business man and private citizen Written by Geroge Baum's Daughter, Mrs. Dora Baum Cluff.

BIOGRAPHY: Geroge Baum Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they built their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner grove. Just below the old bridge they built the first Fort, this be­ing too swampy they built another just across from Hoovers Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the Y.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him.. He was also acquainted with the Prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a. whole lot and said in 1857 forty ­five Saints were captured by the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as high as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred... He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-op Store where he lost a. great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becom­ing a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 at the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four children born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in July 1916. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of eighty--seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. George Baum began early in life to experience the hardships incident to the life of the early members of the Mormon church. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid remembrance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he started in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. At this time he owns one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to live stock indus­try, buying and selling in early days. He did a considerable amount of freighting over the country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri River as president and secretary of the Y. X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Woolen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captain Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers i n the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which posi­tion he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a. member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza. Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A.., and Orson. She died. His third wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whom he was associated. He stands very high in his community as a business man and private citizen. Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: Shirley Created: 3 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM (This is a compilation of several histories. One is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneer's, and one is found in a book of biographies entitled! "Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah", published in 1902; a copy of which I have in my possession. I am just putting the different histories together so that his history can be complete. This compilation made by his great granddaughter, Bessie Y. Keetch, who is the daughter of Mamie Penrod Young, who is the daughter of Melissa Baum Penrod, who is the daughter of Hannah Jane Cloward and George Baum. George Baum (son of John C. Baum, born March 18, 1804, and Hannah Crismon, born Dec. 8, 1806, Brandyvwine, Chester County, Pennsylvania) was born Nov. 2, 1829 at Brandywine in Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was a pretty town about thirty miles from Philadelphia. He is a descendent of Jacob Baum, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than sur­render his sword, he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subject's father, John, was so poor he was bound out until the age of twenty-one, when his brother, Jacob, then bought him back. (See history of John C. Baum, which completes this incident.) He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine. When George was four years old, about 1833, he and his parents witnessed the falling of the stars; they said it looked as if the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. When he was ten years old, abcat 1839, Elder Lorenzo Barnes came into the neighborhood preaching the gospel. His father, mother, and his uncle Jacob Baum and families immediately, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elder Barnes baptizing them. Persecution became so bad in Pennsylvania that the two families, (Jacob's and John's) decided to gather with the Saints at Nauvoo.John went first in about 1842 and became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm about five miles down the river from Nauvoo, where he lived until 1846. During the building of the Nauvoo Temple, he, George; hauled corn thirteen miles to donate to help build it, making one trip a day. Me told of the Prophet Joseph helping him to unload it. He also quarried rock along the Missouri River for the same purpose. A few days Before the trouble in Nauvoo in 1846, George arrived there and was sent among the mobs to find out their plans. He was surely blessed because they did not harm him in any way. He had a very vivid remembrance of those times, seeing the Body of the Prophet twice after he was murdered. He knew the nrophet personally and Believed he was a true prophet of God. He said the prophet was a tall, well-­built man, a Boy among boys; always jolly and full of fun. He also thought a great deal of Brigham Young Heber C. Kimball, and Mr. Edward Hunter, who were very dear friends of his. He was also acquainted with the prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Yale of Harmony, Pennsylvania. In 1846 they crossed the river at Fort Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, But the same year went on to Council Bluffs and remained there until March, 1847, when they took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri, where they did farming on a large scale until 1850. During their travels they nearly starved, But they felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Na uvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mobs driving the people from their homes. They spent three enjoyable years at Lindon, Missouri. He (George) told of their going to dances five miles away By ox-team with just a few of their crowd that were left. BIOGRAPHY: He worked on a ferry Boat on the Mississippi River; witnessed the suffer­ing when the Cholera broke out among the Saints. He saw more than one hundred dead bodies along the roadside and saw their feather Beds, quilts, wagons and possessions of the dead which were left Behind Because of the fear of the dreadful disease. BIOGRAPHY: In 1850 they crossed the plains in an Independent Ox-team, his father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 26 and attended the Conference then being held, camping on the bank's of the Jordon River. President Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo, which had been settled in 1849. Accordingly he and his parents moved to Provo, arriving Cctober 8 and took ur a home in old Fort Provo until the following spring and then moved to a farm on the river bottoms and built their first home on the place now owned (1934) by Sidney H. Cluff in Pleasant View Ward near Provo. However, the Indians became so bad that they were compelled to move into Provo where they took up several city lots. George remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 (married Hannah Jane Cloward of Payson, Utah) at the old Tithing Office. George A. Smith performed the ceremony. At this time he started out life for himself, taking a farm on the river bottoms which he owned up to the time of his death, and lived there until the Walker War. In 186

History of George Baum

Contributor: ICT_CemProj Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: ICT_CemProj Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

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BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

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BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 1852). She was born April 6, 1840 and died January 31, 1909 Provo, Utah. Their children: Rachel Ann born May 29, 1865 Married John Gatherum; Thomas J. born April 12, 1868 and John E. born February 5, 1869 died; Elizabeth born March 21, 1871 married Fred Ferguson; Malinda born June 18, 1873 Married Mads Jorgenson, Jane born September 19, 1876; Harmon David born December 18, 1877 married Susie Morre; William Harris born October 8, 1884 married Grace Ferguson. Member 45th quorum Seventies, special Missionary to bring immigrants to Utah; his health was ruined on this trip. Block teacher, Farmer. Died March 21, 1912 Gunnison, Utah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.tah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.

BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM

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BIOGRAPHY: BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, Utah, com­ing here in 1850, about a year after the first families moved into the valley. He was born in Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., November 2, 1829. Brandywine was a very pretty place, about,thirty miles from Philadelphia. Just before the Revolutionary War, John C. Baum, fought in General Washington's army and was taken prisoner by the British.. Rather than surrender his sword, he broke it between two rocks and' gave the English officer the handle. George Baum is a descendent of John C. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn.. Grand­father and Grandmother Baum were weavers, but John spent most of his early days on the farm. Grandfather and Grandmother were baptized in the year 1842, by Lorenzo Barnes. They were converts to the Mormon Church. That same year they witnessed the falling of the Stars. They said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. Soon after they moved to Nauvoo where the father became a memprophet Joseph Smith prophesy that if the Saints would build the Temple at a certain time they would not be driven away. He hauled corn thirteen miles, making only one trip a day in order to donate and help build the Nauvoo Temple. The prophet Joseph 'helped him unload the corn. He also quarried rock along the Missouri river for the same cause. At this time Grandfather acted as body guard to the Prophet. Several times they attempted to kill Joseph, but was not allowed to harm him. Grandfather got back to Nauvoo two days before the fight at Nauvoo, November 1846. He was sent among the mobs to find out their plans and was surely blessed for they did not harm him in any way. The mob told the Saints to leave or do as they commanded. They then journeyed on to Co until Bluffs; staying there until Spring. They next moved to Missouri and spent three enjoyable years in farming. Grandfather told of going to dances five miles away with ox teams with just the few of their friends that were left.. From Nauvoo they moved to Garden Grove and continued to move until they got to Winter Quarters.. During their travels they nearly starved but felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs.. Grandfather was frightened by the Indians when three hundred miles from help, and feared for his life, but was not harmed in any way. He worked on the ferry boat on the Mississ­ippi River. At this time the Cholera was very bad and in 1850 he saw with his own eyes one hundred bodies who had died with the dreadful disease. They were buried'in graves along the roadside, only to be dug up and destroyed by the wolves.. Feather beds, quilts wagons, and most everything was seen scattered along the roadside, being left there by the dead. He says he will never forget that scene it was so heart rending. That year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning the eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They landed in Salt Lake City, September 1850, Father being nineteen years of age. From Salt Lake City he went to Janston and two days later came back to Conference in Salt Lake City. At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they build their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner Grove. Just below the old bridge they build the first Fort, this being too swampy they built another just across from Hooveres Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the X.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him. He was also acquainted with the Prohpet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a whole lot and said in 1857 forty-five Saints were captured the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as highh as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred. He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-opo Store where he lost a great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becoming a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 a the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four childred born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in july 191. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of Eighty-Seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. Geroge Baun befan early in life to experience the hardships incident tto the life of the early member of ther Mormon chruch. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of exen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mod drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid rememberance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he starte in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchasedland from time to time as he was able. At this time he own one hundred twenty acres.. He has devoted part of his time to live stock industry, buying and selling in early days, He did a considerable, amount of freighting over they country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri RIver as president and secretary of the Y.X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Wollen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a niamber of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captian Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers worked in the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which positioned he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jan, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A., and Orson. She Died. His thrid wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whome he was associated. He stand very high in his community as a business man and private citizen Written by Geroge Baum's Daughter, Mrs. Dora Baum Cluff.

BIOGRAPHY: Geroge Baum Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

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BIOGRAPHY: At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they built their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner grove. Just below the old bridge they built the first Fort, this be­ing too swampy they built another just across from Hoovers Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the Y.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him.. He was also acquainted with the Prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a. whole lot and said in 1857 forty ­five Saints were captured by the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as high as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred... He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-op Store where he lost a. great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becom­ing a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 at the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four children born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in July 1916. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of eighty--seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. George Baum began early in life to experience the hardships incident to the life of the early members of the Mormon church. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid remembrance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he started in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. At this time he owns one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to live stock indus­try, buying and selling in early days. He did a considerable amount of freighting over the country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri River as president and secretary of the Y. X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Woolen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captain Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers i n the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which posi­tion he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a. member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza. Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A.., and Orson. She died. His third wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whom he was associated. He stands very high in his community as a business man and private citizen. Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM

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BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM (This is a compilation of several histories. One is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneer's, and one is found in a book of biographies entitled! "Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah", published in 1902; a copy of which I have in my possession. I am just putting the different histories together so that his history can be complete. This compilation made by his great granddaughter, Bessie Y. Keetch, who is the daughter of Mamie Penrod Young, who is the daughter of Melissa Baum Penrod, who is the daughter of Hannah Jane Cloward and George Baum. George Baum (son of John C. Baum, born March 18, 1804, and Hannah Crismon, born Dec. 8, 1806, Brandyvwine, Chester County, Pennsylvania) was born Nov. 2, 1829 at Brandywine in Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was a pretty town about thirty miles from Philadelphia. He is a descendent of Jacob Baum, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than sur­render his sword, he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subject's father, John, was so poor he was bound out until the age of twenty-one, when his brother, Jacob, then bought him back. (See history of John C. Baum, which completes this incident.) He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine. When George was four years old, about 1833, he and his parents witnessed the falling of the stars; they said it looked as if the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. When he was ten years old, abcat 1839, Elder Lorenzo Barnes came into the neighborhood preaching the gospel. His father, mother, and his uncle Jacob Baum and families immediately, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elder Barnes baptizing them. Persecution became so bad in Pennsylvania that the two families, (Jacob's and John's) decided to gather with the Saints at Nauvoo.John went first in about 1842 and became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm about five miles down the river from Nauvoo, where he lived until 1846. During the building of the Nauvoo Temple, he, George; hauled corn thirteen miles to donate to help build it, making one trip a day. Me told of the Prophet Joseph helping him to unload it. He also quarried rock along the Missouri River for the same purpose. A few days Before the trouble in Nauvoo in 1846, George arrived there and was sent among the mobs to find out their plans. He was surely blessed because they did not harm him in any way. He had a very vivid remembrance of those times, seeing the Body of the Prophet twice after he was murdered. He knew the nrophet personally and Believed he was a true prophet of God. He said the prophet was a tall, well-­built man, a Boy among boys; always jolly and full of fun. He also thought a great deal of Brigham Young Heber C. Kimball, and Mr. Edward Hunter, who were very dear friends of his. He was also acquainted with the prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Yale of Harmony, Pennsylvania. In 1846 they crossed the river at Fort Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, But the same year went on to Council Bluffs and remained there until March, 1847, when they took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri, where they did farming on a large scale until 1850. During their travels they nearly starved, But they felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Na uvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mobs driving the people from their homes. They spent three enjoyable years at Lindon, Missouri. He (George) told of their going to dances five miles away By ox-team with just a few of their crowd that were left. BIOGRAPHY: He worked on a ferry Boat on the Mississippi River; witnessed the suffer­ing when the Cholera broke out among the Saints. He saw more than one hundred dead bodies along the roadside and saw their feather Beds, quilts, wagons and possessions of the dead which were left Behind Because of the fear of the dreadful disease. BIOGRAPHY: In 1850 they crossed the plains in an Independent Ox-team, his father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 26 and attended the Conference then being held, camping on the bank's of the Jordon River. President Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo, which had been settled in 1849. Accordingly he and his parents moved to Provo, arriving Cctober 8 and took ur a home in old Fort Provo until the following spring and then moved to a farm on the river bottoms and built their first home on the place now owned (1934) by Sidney H. Cluff in Pleasant View Ward near Provo. However, the Indians became so bad that they were compelled to move into Provo where they took up several city lots. George remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 (married Hannah Jane Cloward of Payson, Utah) at the old Tithing Office. George A. Smith performed the ceremony. At this time he started out life for himself, taking a farm on the river bottoms which he owned up to the time of his death, and lived there until the Walker War. In 186

History of George Baum

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

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BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 1852). She was born April 6, 1840 and died January 31, 1909 Provo, Utah. Their children: Rachel Ann born May 29, 1865 Married John Gatherum; Thomas J. born April 12, 1868 and John E. born February 5, 1869 died; Elizabeth born March 21, 1871 married Fred Ferguson; Malinda born June 18, 1873 Married Mads Jorgenson, Jane born September 19, 1876; Harmon David born December 18, 1877 married Susie Morre; William Harris born October 8, 1884 married Grace Ferguson. Member 45th quorum Seventies, special Missionary to bring immigrants to Utah; his health was ruined on this trip. Block teacher, Farmer. Died March 21, 1912 Gunnison, Utah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.tah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.

BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, Utah, com­ing here in 1850, about a year after the first families moved into the valley. He was born in Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., November 2, 1829. Brandywine was a very pretty place, about,thirty miles from Philadelphia. Just before the Revolutionary War, John C. Baum, fought in General Washington's army and was taken prisoner by the British.. Rather than surrender his sword, he broke it between two rocks and' gave the English officer the handle. George Baum is a descendent of John C. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn.. Grand­father and Grandmother Baum were weavers, but John spent most of his early days on the farm. Grandfather and Grandmother were baptized in the year 1842, by Lorenzo Barnes. They were converts to the Mormon Church. That same year they witnessed the falling of the Stars. They said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. Soon after they moved to Nauvoo where the father became a memprophet Joseph Smith prophesy that if the Saints would build the Temple at a certain time they would not be driven away. He hauled corn thirteen miles, making only one trip a day in order to donate and help build the Nauvoo Temple. The prophet Joseph 'helped him unload the corn. He also quarried rock along the Missouri river for the same cause. At this time Grandfather acted as body guard to the Prophet. Several times they attempted to kill Joseph, but was not allowed to harm him. Grandfather got back to Nauvoo two days before the fight at Nauvoo, November 1846. He was sent among the mobs to find out their plans and was surely blessed for they did not harm him in any way. The mob told the Saints to leave or do as they commanded. They then journeyed on to Co until Bluffs; staying there until Spring. They next moved to Missouri and spent three enjoyable years in farming. Grandfather told of going to dances five miles away with ox teams with just the few of their friends that were left.. From Nauvoo they moved to Garden Grove and continued to move until they got to Winter Quarters.. During their travels they nearly starved but felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs.. Grandfather was frightened by the Indians when three hundred miles from help, and feared for his life, but was not harmed in any way. He worked on the ferry boat on the Mississ­ippi River. At this time the Cholera was very bad and in 1850 he saw with his own eyes one hundred bodies who had died with the dreadful disease. They were buried'in graves along the roadside, only to be dug up and destroyed by the wolves.. Feather beds, quilts wagons, and most everything was seen scattered along the roadside, being left there by the dead. He says he will never forget that scene it was so heart rending. That year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning the eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They landed in Salt Lake City, September 1850, Father being nineteen years of age. From Salt Lake City he went to Janston and two days later came back to Conference in Salt Lake City. At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they build their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner Grove. Just below the old bridge they build the first Fort, this being too swampy they built another just across from Hooveres Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the X.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him. He was also acquainted with the Prohpet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a whole lot and said in 1857 forty-five Saints were captured the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as highh as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred. He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-opo Store where he lost a great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becoming a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 a the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four childred born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in july 191. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of Eighty-Seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. Geroge Baun befan early in life to experience the hardships incident tto the life of the early member of ther Mormon chruch. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of exen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mod drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid rememberance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he starte in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchasedland from time to time as he was able. At this time he own one hundred twenty acres.. He has devoted part of his time to live stock industry, buying and selling in early days, He did a considerable, amount of freighting over they country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri RIver as president and secretary of the Y.X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Wollen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a niamber of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captian Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers worked in the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which positioned he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jan, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A., and Orson. She Died. His thrid wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whome he was associated. He stand very high in his community as a business man and private citizen Written by Geroge Baum's Daughter, Mrs. Dora Baum Cluff.

BIOGRAPHY: Geroge Baum Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they built their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner grove. Just below the old bridge they built the first Fort, this be­ing too swampy they built another just across from Hoovers Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the Y.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him.. He was also acquainted with the Prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a. whole lot and said in 1857 forty ­five Saints were captured by the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as high as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred... He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-op Store where he lost a. great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becom­ing a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 at the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four children born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in July 1916. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of eighty--seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. George Baum began early in life to experience the hardships incident to the life of the early members of the Mormon church. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid remembrance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he started in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. At this time he owns one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to live stock indus­try, buying and selling in early days. He did a considerable amount of freighting over the country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri River as president and secretary of the Y. X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Woolen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captain Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers i n the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which posi­tion he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a. member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza. Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A.., and Orson. She died. His third wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whom he was associated. He stands very high in his community as a business man and private citizen. Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM (This is a compilation of several histories. One is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneer's, and one is found in a book of biographies entitled! "Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah", published in 1902; a copy of which I have in my possession. I am just putting the different histories together so that his history can be complete. This compilation made by his great granddaughter, Bessie Y. Keetch, who is the daughter of Mamie Penrod Young, who is the daughter of Melissa Baum Penrod, who is the daughter of Hannah Jane Cloward and George Baum. George Baum (son of John C. Baum, born March 18, 1804, and Hannah Crismon, born Dec. 8, 1806, Brandyvwine, Chester County, Pennsylvania) was born Nov. 2, 1829 at Brandywine in Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was a pretty town about thirty miles from Philadelphia. He is a descendent of Jacob Baum, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than sur­render his sword, he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subject's father, John, was so poor he was bound out until the age of twenty-one, when his brother, Jacob, then bought him back. (See history of John C. Baum, which completes this incident.) He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine. When George was four years old, about 1833, he and his parents witnessed the falling of the stars; they said it looked as if the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. When he was ten years old, abcat 1839, Elder Lorenzo Barnes came into the neighborhood preaching the gospel. His father, mother, and his uncle Jacob Baum and families immediately, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elder Barnes baptizing them. Persecution became so bad in Pennsylvania that the two families, (Jacob's and John's) decided to gather with the Saints at Nauvoo.John went first in about 1842 and became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm about five miles down the river from Nauvoo, where he lived until 1846. During the building of the Nauvoo Temple, he, George; hauled corn thirteen miles to donate to help build it, making one trip a day. Me told of the Prophet Joseph helping him to unload it. He also quarried rock along the Missouri River for the same purpose. A few days Before the trouble in Nauvoo in 1846, George arrived there and was sent among the mobs to find out their plans. He was surely blessed because they did not harm him in any way. He had a very vivid remembrance of those times, seeing the Body of the Prophet twice after he was murdered. He knew the nrophet personally and Believed he was a true prophet of God. He said the prophet was a tall, well-­built man, a Boy among boys; always jolly and full of fun. He also thought a great deal of Brigham Young Heber C. Kimball, and Mr. Edward Hunter, who were very dear friends of his. He was also acquainted with the prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Yale of Harmony, Pennsylvania. In 1846 they crossed the river at Fort Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, But the same year went on to Council Bluffs and remained there until March, 1847, when they took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri, where they did farming on a large scale until 1850. During their travels they nearly starved, But they felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Na uvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mobs driving the people from their homes. They spent three enjoyable years at Lindon, Missouri. He (George) told of their going to dances five miles away By ox-team with just a few of their crowd that were left. BIOGRAPHY: He worked on a ferry Boat on the Mississippi River; witnessed the suffer­ing when the Cholera broke out among the Saints. He saw more than one hundred dead bodies along the roadside and saw their feather Beds, quilts, wagons and possessions of the dead which were left Behind Because of the fear of the dreadful disease. BIOGRAPHY: In 1850 they crossed the plains in an Independent Ox-team, his father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 26 and attended the Conference then being held, camping on the bank's of the Jordon River. President Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo, which had been settled in 1849. Accordingly he and his parents moved to Provo, arriving Cctober 8 and took ur a home in old Fort Provo until the following spring and then moved to a farm on the river bottoms and built their first home on the place now owned (1934) by Sidney H. Cluff in Pleasant View Ward near Provo. However, the Indians became so bad that they were compelled to move into Provo where they took up several city lots. George remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 (married Hannah Jane Cloward of Payson, Utah) at the old Tithing Office. George A. Smith performed the ceremony. At this time he started out life for himself, taking a farm on the river bottoms which he owned up to the time of his death, and lived there until the Walker War. In 186

History of George Baum

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 1852). She was born April 6, 1840 and died January 31, 1909 Provo, Utah. Their children: Rachel Ann born May 29, 1865 Married John Gatherum; Thomas J. born April 12, 1868 and John E. born February 5, 1869 died; Elizabeth born March 21, 1871 married Fred Ferguson; Malinda born June 18, 1873 Married Mads Jorgenson, Jane born September 19, 1876; Harmon David born December 18, 1877 married Susie Morre; William Harris born October 8, 1884 married Grace Ferguson. Member 45th quorum Seventies, special Missionary to bring immigrants to Utah; his health was ruined on this trip. Block teacher, Farmer. Died March 21, 1912 Gunnison, Utah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.tah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.

BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, Utah, com­ing here in 1850, about a year after the first families moved into the valley. He was born in Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., November 2, 1829. Brandywine was a very pretty place, about,thirty miles from Philadelphia. Just before the Revolutionary War, John C. Baum, fought in General Washington's army and was taken prisoner by the British.. Rather than surrender his sword, he broke it between two rocks and' gave the English officer the handle. George Baum is a descendent of John C. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn.. Grand­father and Grandmother Baum were weavers, but John spent most of his early days on the farm. Grandfather and Grandmother were baptized in the year 1842, by Lorenzo Barnes. They were converts to the Mormon Church. That same year they witnessed the falling of the Stars. They said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. Soon after they moved to Nauvoo where the father became a memprophet Joseph Smith prophesy that if the Saints would build the Temple at a certain time they would not be driven away. He hauled corn thirteen miles, making only one trip a day in order to donate and help build the Nauvoo Temple. The prophet Joseph 'helped him unload the corn. He also quarried rock along the Missouri river for the same cause. At this time Grandfather acted as body guard to the Prophet. Several times they attempted to kill Joseph, but was not allowed to harm him. Grandfather got back to Nauvoo two days before the fight at Nauvoo, November 1846. He was sent among the mobs to find out their plans and was surely blessed for they did not harm him in any way. The mob told the Saints to leave or do as they commanded. They then journeyed on to Co until Bluffs; staying there until Spring. They next moved to Missouri and spent three enjoyable years in farming. Grandfather told of going to dances five miles away with ox teams with just the few of their friends that were left.. From Nauvoo they moved to Garden Grove and continued to move until they got to Winter Quarters.. During their travels they nearly starved but felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs.. Grandfather was frightened by the Indians when three hundred miles from help, and feared for his life, but was not harmed in any way. He worked on the ferry boat on the Mississ­ippi River. At this time the Cholera was very bad and in 1850 he saw with his own eyes one hundred bodies who had died with the dreadful disease. They were buried'in graves along the roadside, only to be dug up and destroyed by the wolves.. Feather beds, quilts wagons, and most everything was seen scattered along the roadside, being left there by the dead. He says he will never forget that scene it was so heart rending. That year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning the eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They landed in Salt Lake City, September 1850, Father being nineteen years of age. From Salt Lake City he went to Janston and two days later came back to Conference in Salt Lake City. At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they build their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner Grove. Just below the old bridge they build the first Fort, this being too swampy they built another just across from Hooveres Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the X.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him. He was also acquainted with the Prohpet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a whole lot and said in 1857 forty-five Saints were captured the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as highh as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred. He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-opo Store where he lost a great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becoming a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 a the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four childred born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in july 191. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of Eighty-Seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. Geroge Baun befan early in life to experience the hardships incident tto the life of the early member of ther Mormon chruch. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of exen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mod drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid rememberance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he starte in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchasedland from time to time as he was able. At this time he own one hundred twenty acres.. He has devoted part of his time to live stock industry, buying and selling in early days, He did a considerable, amount of freighting over they country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri RIver as president and secretary of the Y.X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Wollen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a niamber of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captian Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers worked in the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which positioned he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jan, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A., and Orson. She Died. His thrid wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whome he was associated. He stand very high in his community as a business man and private citizen Written by Geroge Baum's Daughter, Mrs. Dora Baum Cluff.

BIOGRAPHY: Geroge Baum Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they built their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner grove. Just below the old bridge they built the first Fort, this be­ing too swampy they built another just across from Hoovers Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the Y.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him.. He was also acquainted with the Prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a. whole lot and said in 1857 forty ­five Saints were captured by the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as high as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred... He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-op Store where he lost a. great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becom­ing a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 at the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four children born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in July 1916. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of eighty--seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. George Baum began early in life to experience the hardships incident to the life of the early members of the Mormon church. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid remembrance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he started in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. At this time he owns one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to live stock indus­try, buying and selling in early days. He did a considerable amount of freighting over the country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri River as president and secretary of the Y. X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Woolen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captain Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers i n the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which posi­tion he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a. member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza. Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A.., and Orson. She died. His third wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whom he was associated. He stands very high in his community as a business man and private citizen. Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: mobrien7810 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM (This is a compilation of several histories. One is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneer's, and one is found in a book of biographies entitled! "Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah", published in 1902; a copy of which I have in my possession. I am just putting the different histories together so that his history can be complete. This compilation made by his great granddaughter, Bessie Y. Keetch, who is the daughter of Mamie Penrod Young, who is the daughter of Melissa Baum Penrod, who is the daughter of Hannah Jane Cloward and George Baum. George Baum (son of John C. Baum, born March 18, 1804, and Hannah Crismon, born Dec. 8, 1806, Brandyvwine, Chester County, Pennsylvania) was born Nov. 2, 1829 at Brandywine in Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was a pretty town about thirty miles from Philadelphia. He is a descendent of Jacob Baum, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than sur­render his sword, he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subject's father, John, was so poor he was bound out until the age of twenty-one, when his brother, Jacob, then bought him back. (See history of John C. Baum, which completes this incident.) He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine. When George was four years old, about 1833, he and his parents witnessed the falling of the stars; they said it looked as if the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. When he was ten years old, abcat 1839, Elder Lorenzo Barnes came into the neighborhood preaching the gospel. His father, mother, and his uncle Jacob Baum and families immediately, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elder Barnes baptizing them. Persecution became so bad in Pennsylvania that the two families, (Jacob's and John's) decided to gather with the Saints at Nauvoo.John went first in about 1842 and became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm about five miles down the river from Nauvoo, where he lived until 1846. During the building of the Nauvoo Temple, he, George; hauled corn thirteen miles to donate to help build it, making one trip a day. Me told of the Prophet Joseph helping him to unload it. He also quarried rock along the Missouri River for the same purpose. A few days Before the trouble in Nauvoo in 1846, George arrived there and was sent among the mobs to find out their plans. He was surely blessed because they did not harm him in any way. He had a very vivid remembrance of those times, seeing the Body of the Prophet twice after he was murdered. He knew the nrophet personally and Believed he was a true prophet of God. He said the prophet was a tall, well-­built man, a Boy among boys; always jolly and full of fun. He also thought a great deal of Brigham Young Heber C. Kimball, and Mr. Edward Hunter, who were very dear friends of his. He was also acquainted with the prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Yale of Harmony, Pennsylvania. In 1846 they crossed the river at Fort Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, But the same year went on to Council Bluffs and remained there until March, 1847, when they took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri, where they did farming on a large scale until 1850. During their travels they nearly starved, But they felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Na uvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mobs driving the people from their homes. They spent three enjoyable years at Lindon, Missouri. He (George) told of their going to dances five miles away By ox-team with just a few of their crowd that were left. BIOGRAPHY: He worked on a ferry Boat on the Mississippi River; witnessed the suffer­ing when the Cholera broke out among the Saints. He saw more than one hundred dead bodies along the roadside and saw their feather Beds, quilts, wagons and possessions of the dead which were left Behind Because of the fear of the dreadful disease. BIOGRAPHY: In 1850 they crossed the plains in an Independent Ox-team, his father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 26 and attended the Conference then being held, camping on the bank's of the Jordon River. President Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo, which had been settled in 1849. Accordingly he and his parents moved to Provo, arriving Cctober 8 and took ur a home in old Fort Provo until the following spring and then moved to a farm on the river bottoms and built their first home on the place now owned (1934) by Sidney H. Cluff in Pleasant View Ward near Provo. However, the Indians became so bad that they were compelled to move into Provo where they took up several city lots. George remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 (married Hannah Jane Cloward of Payson, Utah) at the old Tithing Office. George A. Smith performed the ceremony. At this time he started out life for himself, taking a farm on the river bottoms which he owned up to the time of his death, and lived there until the Walker War. In 186

History of George Baum

Contributor: DONTHOMAS10 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: DONTHOMAS10 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

Contributor: DONTHOMAS10 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

Contributor: DONTHOMAS10 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 1852). She was born April 6, 1840 and died January 31, 1909 Provo, Utah. Their children: Rachel Ann born May 29, 1865 Married John Gatherum; Thomas J. born April 12, 1868 and John E. born February 5, 1869 died; Elizabeth born March 21, 1871 married Fred Ferguson; Malinda born June 18, 1873 Married Mads Jorgenson, Jane born September 19, 1876; Harmon David born December 18, 1877 married Susie Morre; William Harris born October 8, 1884 married Grace Ferguson. Member 45th quorum Seventies, special Missionary to bring immigrants to Utah; his health was ruined on this trip. Block teacher, Farmer. Died March 21, 1912 Gunnison, Utah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.tah. Baum, William Harris (son Jacob Hams Baum and Malinda Cummings) Born October 8, 1884 Provo, Utah. Married Grace Ferguson December 12, 1906, Provo, Utah (daughter of John Burkholder Ferguson and Mary Ann Ghantey of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and they came to Provo, Utah March 1905) She was born October 4, 1886. Their children, William Homer born January 4, 1908: Alva Grace born October 25, 1909: Mary Bernice born February 4, 1911. Family home Provo, Utah. Elder, Ward teacher, Farmer, Orchardist. Baum, Harmon David (son of Jacob Harris Baum and Malinda Cummings) born December 18, 1877 Provo, Utah. Married Susie Morre December 1 1903 Provo, Utah (daughter of George S. and Agnes Morse, pioneers, September 24, 1861) Joseph Young and Ansel, Harmon County) she was born March 19, 1877. Their children; Mildred born October 4, 1904; Altha born 8 May 1909/ He was farmer like his father.

BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: DONTHOMAS10 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: BIOGRAPHY RECORD OF GEORGE BAUM George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, Utah, com­ing here in 1850, about a year after the first families moved into the valley. He was born in Brandywine, Chester County, Pa., November 2, 1829. Brandywine was a very pretty place, about,thirty miles from Philadelphia. Just before the Revolutionary War, John C. Baum, fought in General Washington's army and was taken prisoner by the British.. Rather than surrender his sword, he broke it between two rocks and' gave the English officer the handle. George Baum is a descendent of John C. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn.. Grand­father and Grandmother Baum were weavers, but John spent most of his early days on the farm. Grandfather and Grandmother were baptized in the year 1842, by Lorenzo Barnes. They were converts to the Mormon Church. That same year they witnessed the falling of the Stars. They said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. Soon after they moved to Nauvoo where the father became a memprophet Joseph Smith prophesy that if the Saints would build the Temple at a certain time they would not be driven away. He hauled corn thirteen miles, making only one trip a day in order to donate and help build the Nauvoo Temple. The prophet Joseph 'helped him unload the corn. He also quarried rock along the Missouri river for the same cause. At this time Grandfather acted as body guard to the Prophet. Several times they attempted to kill Joseph, but was not allowed to harm him. Grandfather got back to Nauvoo two days before the fight at Nauvoo, November 1846. He was sent among the mobs to find out their plans and was surely blessed for they did not harm him in any way. The mob told the Saints to leave or do as they commanded. They then journeyed on to Co until Bluffs; staying there until Spring. They next moved to Missouri and spent three enjoyable years in farming. Grandfather told of going to dances five miles away with ox teams with just the few of their friends that were left.. From Nauvoo they moved to Garden Grove and continued to move until they got to Winter Quarters.. During their travels they nearly starved but felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs.. Grandfather was frightened by the Indians when three hundred miles from help, and feared for his life, but was not harmed in any way. He worked on the ferry boat on the Mississ­ippi River. At this time the Cholera was very bad and in 1850 he saw with his own eyes one hundred bodies who had died with the dreadful disease. They were buried'in graves along the roadside, only to be dug up and destroyed by the wolves.. Feather beds, quilts wagons, and most everything was seen scattered along the roadside, being left there by the dead. He says he will never forget that scene it was so heart rending. That year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning the eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They landed in Salt Lake City, September 1850, Father being nineteen years of age. From Salt Lake City he went to Janston and two days later came back to Conference in Salt Lake City. At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they build their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner Grove. Just below the old bridge they build the first Fort, this being too swampy they built another just across from Hooveres Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the X.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him. He was also acquainted with the Prohpet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a whole lot and said in 1857 forty-five Saints were captured the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as highh as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred. He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-opo Store where he lost a great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becoming a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 a the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four childred born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in july 191. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of Eighty-Seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. Geroge Baun befan early in life to experience the hardships incident tto the life of the early member of ther Mormon chruch. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of exen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mod drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid rememberance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he starte in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchasedland from time to time as he was able. At this time he own one hundred twenty acres.. He has devoted part of his time to live stock industry, buying and selling in early days, He did a considerable, amount of freighting over they country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri RIver as president and secretary of the Y.X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Wollen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a niamber of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captian Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers worked in the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which positioned he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jan, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A., and Orson. She Died. His thrid wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whome he was associated. He stand very high in his community as a business man and private citizen Written by Geroge Baum's Daughter, Mrs. Dora Baum Cluff.

BIOGRAPHY: Geroge Baum Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

Contributor: DONTHOMAS10 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: At Conference President Brigham Young advised the Saints to come to Provo. They arrived in Provo on October 8, 1850 and Father took up home in the Old Fort and lived there till the following Spring. When they went out to farm in the river bottoms they built their first home now owned by Bishop Calvin. They lived there until the Walker War of 1853. The Indians being so bad they were compelled to move into town where they took up several city lots, on what is now called Tanner grove. Just below the old bridge they built the first Fort, this be­ing too swampy they built another just across from Hoovers Mill. In 1857 Grandfather went back to Nauvoo to help the Handcart Company across the plains. They arrived in Salt Lake City one week before Christmas. The following year Grandfather was sent back with the Y.X. Co. Grandfather said he thought a great deal of Brigham Young, Brother Kimball, and Mr. Hunter - they were all good friends to him.. He was also acquainted with the Prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. He traded with the Indians a. whole lot and said in 1857 forty ­five Saints were captured by the Indians at Devils Gate, but none were harmed. Grandfather then built the home he now lives in, November 8. He paid as high as seventy-five cents a pound for nails and flour was being sold at fifty dollars a hundred... He helped to build the factory. He owned stock in the East Co-op Store where he lost a. great deal of money. He owned a large tract of land, and some mill property, becom­ing a very successful business man. He married Hannah Jane Cloward in 1852 at the Tithing Office by George Smith. There were four children born to them. When his wife passed away he married Eliza Ann Allen, they having five children. She died and so he married Sarah E. Carter - she having eight children. He is now the Father of Seventeen children, fifty-seven grandchildren. Up to the time of his first sickness grandfather had good health. On February 20, 1912 he had a paralytic stroke, not being able to get out of bed for seven weeks. He is now 82 years old. He is looking food in his old age. He was ill four and one-half years. Grandfather suffered four strokes, the last one in July 1916. He passed away at his old home in Pleasant View Ward at the age of eighty--seven years, nine months and four days, leaving his wife Sarah E. Baum, children, relatives, and beloved friends to mourn his loss. His wife passed away eighteen years later. George Baum began early in life to experience the hardships incident to the life of the early members of the Mormon church. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet Joseph Smith right after he had been killed and had very vivid remembrance of the horror of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward, at which time he started in life for himself, taking up farming on the river bottom which place he owns now, and lived there until the Walker War in 1853. His home and land consisted of eleven acres of well improved land and his home was good. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. At this time he owns one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to live stock indus­try, buying and selling in early days. He did a considerable amount of freighting over the country in 1857. He returned to the Missouri River as president and secretary of the Y. X. Co., and brought freight, arriving just in advance of Johnston's Army. He was one of the original ones to buy stock in the Provo Woolen Mills, which he assisted to build and which he owned the stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all early day troubles being in the Walker War. In 1866 under General Wells and Captain Page during the troubles in Sanpete County. Spent forty days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and the canyon while the farmers i n the fields, and did much towards making Utah safe for white people to live. He has since taken deep interest in building roads and canals. He was the first water master of the old union ditch which posi­tion he held for three years, was an officer of Provo for three years. He was a member and director of the West Union Canal Company, owning one quarter interest. He was a. member of the Pleasant View Ward and active in all church work giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. Mr. George Baum was married to his wife Hannah Jane Cloward who died leaving him to daughters Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. His second wife Eliza. Ann Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A.., and Orson. She died. His third wife was Sarah Carter. She is the mother of six children, Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith. Sophia Eldore, wife of William Cluff, and Jacob A., David Wallace., Lafayette, and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living Mr. Baum won the respect of all with whom he was associated. He stands very high in his community as a business man and private citizen. Written by George Baum's daughter, Mrs. Dora. Baum Cluff

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM

Contributor: DONTHOMAS10 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: HISTORY OF GEORGE BAUM (This is a compilation of several histories. One is on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneer's, and one is found in a book of biographies entitled! "Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah", published in 1902; a copy of which I have in my possession. I am just putting the different histories together so that his history can be complete. This compilation made by his great granddaughter, Bessie Y. Keetch, who is the daughter of Mamie Penrod Young, who is the daughter of Melissa Baum Penrod, who is the daughter of Hannah Jane Cloward and George Baum. George Baum (son of John C. Baum, born March 18, 1804, and Hannah Crismon, born Dec. 8, 1806, Brandyvwine, Chester County, Pennsylvania) was born Nov. 2, 1829 at Brandywine in Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was a pretty town about thirty miles from Philadelphia. He is a descendent of Jacob Baum, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than sur­render his sword, he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subject's father, John, was so poor he was bound out until the age of twenty-one, when his brother, Jacob, then bought him back. (See history of John C. Baum, which completes this incident.) He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine. When George was four years old, about 1833, he and his parents witnessed the falling of the stars; they said it looked as if the whole atmosphere was a glare of fire. When he was ten years old, abcat 1839, Elder Lorenzo Barnes came into the neighborhood preaching the gospel. His father, mother, and his uncle Jacob Baum and families immediately, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elder Barnes baptizing them. Persecution became so bad in Pennsylvania that the two families, (Jacob's and John's) decided to gather with the Saints at Nauvoo.John went first in about 1842 and became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm about five miles down the river from Nauvoo, where he lived until 1846. During the building of the Nauvoo Temple, he, George; hauled corn thirteen miles to donate to help build it, making one trip a day. Me told of the Prophet Joseph helping him to unload it. He also quarried rock along the Missouri River for the same purpose. A few days Before the trouble in Nauvoo in 1846, George arrived there and was sent among the mobs to find out their plans. He was surely blessed because they did not harm him in any way. He had a very vivid remembrance of those times, seeing the Body of the Prophet twice after he was murdered. He knew the nrophet personally and Believed he was a true prophet of God. He said the prophet was a tall, well-­built man, a Boy among boys; always jolly and full of fun. He also thought a great deal of Brigham Young Heber C. Kimball, and Mr. Edward Hunter, who were very dear friends of his. He was also acquainted with the prophet's wife, Emma Hale, daughter of Isaac Yale of Harmony, Pennsylvania. In 1846 they crossed the river at Fort Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, But the same year went on to Council Bluffs and remained there until March, 1847, when they took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri, where they did farming on a large scale until 1850. During their travels they nearly starved, But they felt they would rather starve than go back to Nauvoo and the persecuting mobs. While living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Na uvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mobs driving the people from their homes. They spent three enjoyable years at Lindon, Missouri. He (George) told of their going to dances five miles away By ox-team with just a few of their crowd that were left. BIOGRAPHY: He worked on a ferry Boat on the Mississippi River; witnessed the suffer­ing when the Cholera broke out among the Saints. He saw more than one hundred dead bodies along the roadside and saw their feather Beds, quilts, wagons and possessions of the dead which were left Behind Because of the fear of the dreadful disease. BIOGRAPHY: In 1850 they crossed the plains in an Independent Ox-team, his father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 26 and attended the Conference then being held, camping on the bank's of the Jordon River. President Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo, which had been settled in 1849. Accordingly he and his parents moved to Provo, arriving Cctober 8 and took ur a home in old Fort Provo until the following spring and then moved to a farm on the river bottoms and built their first home on the place now owned (1934) by Sidney H. Cluff in Pleasant View Ward near Provo. However, the Indians became so bad that they were compelled to move into Provo where they took up several city lots. George remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 (married Hannah Jane Cloward of Payson, Utah) at the old Tithing Office. George A. Smith performed the ceremony. At this time he started out life for himself, taking a farm on the river bottoms which he owned up to the time of his death, and lived there until the Walker War. In 186

History of George Baum

Contributor: Echo Taylor Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

Floyd Baum's Grandfather By Daughter, Dora Cluff My father, George Baum, was born at Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1829. It is a very pretty little town about 30 miles from Philadelphia. His parents were weavers, but he spent most of his early life on a farm. He was baptized along with his father and mother and one brother in 1839. That same year they witnessed the falling of the stars. He said it looked as though the whole atmosphere was a glaze of fire. In 1846 the family moved to Fort Madison; hence to Nauvoo. They were driven from Nauvoo They were driven from Nauvoo in 1847, when they had completed their home with the exception of the roof, and had plowed 40 acres of land. From here they moved to Garden Grove, and continued moving until they got to Winter Quarters. During their travels, they nearly starved, but would rather suffer starvation than to return to Nauvoo, and the persecutions of the mobs. Father was frightened of the Indians when 300 miles from help and feared for his life. Showing them a stove pipe which he had in his wagon, they took it and fled without harming him in any way. Father was acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and always revered him as such, describing him as a jolly man of pleasing personality. At 13 years of age, father heard Joseph Smith prophesy that all the saints would build the Temple at a certain time, they would not be driven away. George Baum hauled corn 13 miles making only one trip a day, to donate help to build the Nauvoo Temple. The Prophet helped him unload his corn. It was at this time, that our grandfather, John Baum, acted as bodyguard to the Prophet against mobs who sought his life. Father returned from Nauvoo two days before the historical flight in 1846. He was sent among the bob to find out their plans, and was surely blessed, as they did not harm him in any way. As the saints refused to do the bidding of the mob, they journeyed to Council Bluffs, and to Missouri when they spent three enjoyable years. Father told of going to dances, five miles with ox teams, with just a few in their crowd to make the best of it. He worked on a fairy boat on the MIssissippi. About this time the dreaded Cholera broke out among the Saints and Father saw with his own eyes the bodies of one hundred who had died from the scourge. They were buried hurriedly in roadside graves, only later to be dug up by wolves. Feather beds, quilts and wagons, were scattered along the roadside, left by the dead. He said he would never forget the pitiful sight. The company in which Father traveled landed in Salt Lake City in September 1848. The family at first, went to Johnston, but returned two days later to a conference in Salt Lake City at which Brigham Young advised them to settle in Provo. Accordingly, they came to Provo, and built their first home, in the river bottoms, on the place now owned by Bishop Calvin, however, the Indians were so unfriendly that they were compelled to move into town, where they took up several city lots on what is now called Tanners Grove. Here they built another fort on fourth north, just across from the old Hover Mill. In 1857, Father returned o Nauvoo, to assist in hand cart company, arriving back a week before Christmas. He was well acquainted with Brigham Young and Brother Kimball and Brother Hunter, how were dear friend o his. Father was also acquainted with Emma Hale, the Prophets wife was daughter of Isaac Hale of New York. Building his home he often paid as high as 75 cents a pound or ails. In 1859 he located at at his present home, now owned by the Provo Brick and Tile Company Company. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Father was one of the original owner of te Provo Woolen Mills. He served in the War of 1853, the "Walder War" and in the "Tintic War" under Toni Johnson in 1866. Also during the trouble.in Sanpete County. He was guard on Provo bench and in the canyon, and contributed largely toward making Utah County a safe place in which to live. He was the first water master of the East Union ditch, which positon he held for three years. He was a member of the company who built Provo canyon road, and a director up to the time the road was sold to this county. He was also a director in the Smith ditch, and West Union Canal, owning a great interest. He was interested at one time in a mill which stood near where the Provo Ice and Cold Storage plant now is. He helped build the Tabernacle, and contributed generously toward the ward house. Politically independent, he believed in voting for a an in the church. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of the Pleasant View Ward, giving hearty support to all worthy causes. He was married in 1852 t Hannah Cloward, who died, leaving to daughter. Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Niphi Penrod. He married a second time to Eliza Allen, who died, leaving four sons, George, John, Owen and Orson Baum. He married a third time to Sarah E Carter. They had the following children, Clara Elizabeth Smith, Sophia Eldora Cluff, Jacob a David Wallace, Layfayette and Elmer. George Baum won the respect of all with whom he associated, and stands high in his community, both as a hyusbandk a business man and a citizen. He suffered a stroke in 1912 and was confined to his bed until July 1916, when he passed away at the age of 87 years and 9 months, leaving a wife, three daughter, six sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss. George Baum was among the early settlers. The farmers chose the river bottoms because of it's accessability to water, but as the numbers of squatters increased, many of them took up land on the east bench. Some of these people were George Baum, John Mills, Oliver Haws, Nephi Penrod,, James York, Hans Poulson, Jacob Young, Autoni Peterson, George Ekins, John Winter, Samuel Cluff and Thonas Ashton. Some of the settlers would take up 160 acres a piece and the sage brush gave way to fields of grain and sugar cane. There are many intetesting stories connected with these events, but only a few can be told now. The river bottom was cool and shady - there were many native trees, cotonwoods, box elders, rough bark willows, ***** willows and hawthorne. There were also delicious fruits, fo fruit hungry peach, such as service berries, choke cherries, yellow and black native currants, wild grape vines, hop vines and wild pea vines that gave their peculiar odors to the air. The river banks were grass covered, also with violets and lady slippers. Pioneers treasured the river bottoms as a store house for medical herbs. Nearly every pioneer woman gathered and stored many different kinds of herbs, for use when winter sickness came. "When the mountains veil the suns' last rays And I sit in the twilight alone My thoughts turn back to the bye gone days To my childhoods' dear old home.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum

Contributor: Echo Taylor Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum George Baum came to Provo in 1850, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of Jacob Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and Settled Chester County before the Revolution. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English Officer the handle. Jacob's father, John, was born about 1804 and when he was a boy his brother Jacob bought his time until he was twenty-one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County near Brandywine. About 1839 himself, wife and son and George became converts to the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon moved to Nauvoo where the father became a member of the Nauvoo Legion. George owned a farm five miles down the river until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Fort Madison near Garden Grover and there built a home, but soon moved to Council Bluffs and remained until March 1847 when he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri until May 1850 on a large scale. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team, the father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses. They reached Salt Lake City in September and attended the conference then being held, camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8 and took up a home in the old fort till spring when they went onto a farm in the river bottom until the Walker War of 1853, when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. Father owned a large tract of land and some mill property becoming a very successful businessman. George began early in life to experience the hardships of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter, and during this trip had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive people from their homes. He saw the body of the Prophet twice after he had been killed and had a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After coming to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852. He started farming in the river bottom that he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home where he had eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land and at this time had one hundred twenty acres. He has devoted part of his time to the livestock industry, buying and selling, and in the early days did lot of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight arriving in advance of Johnston's army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills that he assisted to build and owned stock for a number of years. George took part in all the early troubles being in the Walker War of 1853 and the Tintic War, under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, Black Hawk War in 1877 under General Wells and Captain Page and during the trouble in San Pete County spent forty days in active service. He stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the canyons while part of the farmers worked in the fields and did much towards making Utah County a safe habitation for the white people. He has taken a deep interest in building good roads and canals. He was the first water master of the Old East Union Ditch and a police officer for three years. He helped build the Provo Canyon road and a Director until the road was sold to the County. He owned a quarter interest and was a Director in the Smith and West Union Canal Company. He is independent in politics, believing in voting for the best man. In Church he was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward and active in all Church work, giving his hearty support to all worthy causes. George married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852. She died leaving two daughters-Mary Jane, wife of William Wright, and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. He married a second time Eliza Allen who had three children-John W., Owen A., and Orson. His third wfe Sarah Carter daughter of John and Sophia Sweet Carter. She was the mother of six children-Lizzie, wife of J.T. Smith, Dora, wife of William Cluf~ Jacob A., Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. George died in 1880 at the advanced age of eighty-four. His wife Hannah Christman Baum is still living in Heber at the age of ninety-five. Five of her children are now living: Jane, wife of Gideon Bennett, of Nebraska City, George, Isaac, living in Heber, Mariah wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John. By his honorable and upright living George won the respect of all with whom he was associated and stands very high in his community both as a businessman and as a private citizen.

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King

Contributor: Echo Taylor Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: Biography and Sketch of the Life George Baum My Great Grandfather By Sally King George Baum was one of the early settlers of Provo, coming here in 1850 about a year after the first families came into the valley. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a descendent of John E. Baum who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn and settled in Chester County before the Revolutionary War. He fought in General Washington's Army and was taken prisoner by the British. Rather than surrender his sword he broke it between two rocks and gave the English officer the handle. Our subjects father, John Baum was born 18 March 1804. When he was a boy his brother, Jacob Baum bought his time until he was twenty one years of age and kept him until that time. He then married and settled in Chester County, near Brandywine about 1839. Himself; his wife, and son became converts to the teachings of the Mormon Church being baptized by Lorenzo Barnes and soon afterward moved to Nauvoo where the father became member of Nauvoo Legion. He owned a farm five miles down the river and lived there until 1846. In that year he crossed the river at Ford Madison, went to Garden Grove and there built a home, but the same year went onto Council Bluffs and remained there until March 1847. When he took up a farm near Lindon, Missouri and did farming until September 1850. In that year they crossed the plains in an independent ox team. The father owning eight yoke of cattle and three horses, they reached Salt Lake City in September of that year and attended Conference then being held camping on the Jordan River. They arrived in Provo on October 8th and the father took up a home in the old fort and lived there until the following spring. Then they went out to farm in the river bottom and lived there until the Walker War of 1853 when they were compelled to abandon the farm and seek protection in the settlement. The father spent the remainder of his life in Provo. He owned a large tract of land and also some mill property becoming a very successful business man. He died 1880 at the of 84. His wife and mother of our subject Hannah Crisman Baum is living in Heber at the age of 95. Five of her living children, Jane, wife of Gibeno Bennett of Nebraska City. George living in Provo, Isaac living in Heber. Marah, wife of Bishop Horn of Richfield and John, our subject, began early in life to exercise the hardships, incident to the lives of the early members of the Mormon Church. While in living in Council Bluffs he was sent back to Nauvoo with three yoke of oxen after flour and provisions for winter. During this trip he had many trying experiences and witnessed the mob drive the people from their homes. He saw the body of the prophet twice after he had been killed and has a very vivid remembrance of the horrors of those days. After come to Utah he remained with his father until his marriage in 1852 to Hannah Jane Cloward at which time he started in life for himself taking up farming on the river bottom which place he still owns and lived there until the Walker War. In 1869 he located at his present home, where he has eleven acres of well improved land and a good home. He continued to purchase land from time to time as he was able. He has at this time 120 acres. He devoted part of his time to livestock industry buying and selling in the early days and did a considerable amount of freighting over the country. In 1857 he returned to the Missouri River as President and Secretary of the Y.X. Company and brought back freight, arriving just in advance of Johnson's Army. He was one of the original owners of the Provo Woolen Mills when he helped to build in which he owned stock for a number of years. Mr. Baum took part in all of the early troubles, being in the Walker War in 1853 and the Tintic War under Tom Johnson in 1855-6, in the Black Hawk War in 1806 under General Wells and Captain Page during the trouble in Sanpete County. Spent 40 days in active service. He also stood guard on the Provo Bench and in the Canyon while part of the farmers worked in the field and did much toward making Utah County a safe habitation for white people. Since then he has taken a deep interest in the building of good roads and canal. He was the first Water master of the old East Union Ditch which position he held for 3 years. Was a police officer for 3 years in Provo. He was a member and director of the Provo Canyon road until was sold to the County. Was Director of the Smith and West Union Canal Company owning a quarter interest. He was a member of the Elders Quorum of Pleasant View Ward. Active in all church work giving his heart support to all worthy causes. Mr. Baum married Miss Hannah Cloward in 1852 who died leaving two daughters, Mary Jane, wife of William Wright and Melissa, wife of Nephi Penrod. Mr. Baum married the secon time to Eliza Allen who has three children, John W., Owen A. and Orson. She also died. His third wife was Sarah Carter, the mother of six children: Clara Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Jay Smith, Sophia Eldora, wife of William Cluff, Jacob A., David Wallace, Lafayette and Elmer. By his honorable and upright living, Mr. George Baum has won respect of all with whom he is associated and stands very high in his community both as business man and a private citizen. George Bai, was born in 2 November 1829. His father John C. Baum born March 1804 in Pennsylvania was the son of Jacob born in German. His wife the Mother of George Baum was also born in Pennsylvania 8 December 1808. Her maiden name was Hannah Crisman. The daughter of James and Jane Crisman. Her maternal Grandparents bore the name of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin. James Durfee, son of Perry Durfee and Anna Soulsburg of Trenton, Rhode Island and Broadalbin, New York. He was born at Braodelbin 16 September 1790. Died at Lima, Illinois 26 Jul 1844, his wife Cynthia Elizabeth Soule was born at Rhode Island 15 February 1800. They were married at Broadalbin, New York. She died at Council Bluffs 16 February 1847. George Baum had six teams of mules and three wagons that brought freight from Missouri to Utah, carrying his money in the end of his wagon tongue to prevent being robbed. George Baum and William Wright went out in the Strawberry Valley and took up a homestead. The valley being to high gave it up. William Wright having seen some of the authorities of the church using tobacco thought that gave him a license to us it. He got so he chewed a 25c plug a day. One day while he was up Provo Canyon after wood he said, "what a fool he was and what a waste of money it was to spend for tobacco." He took a big chew and threw the plug away and never touched it again. William Wright was also a director with George Baum in building Provo Canyon road in many places hauling dirt with wheelbarrows.

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742

Contributor: Echo Taylor Created: 2 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

BIOGRAPHY: George Baum Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p.742 Baum, George (son of John C. Baum born March 18 1804, and Hannah Crisman, born December 8 1808, Brandywine, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) He was born November 2 1829 at Brandywine. Came to Utah September 1850 Independent Company. Married Hannah Jane Cloward 1851 Provo, Utah (daughter of Jacob and hannah Cloward, pioneers 1851) She was born October 12, 1833 and died November 21, 1860. Their children: Jane Elizabeth born May 14, 1853 died infant; May Jane born April 25, 1854, married William Wright: Hannah Melissa born February 4 1856 married David Nephi Penrod; Martha Malinda born May 21, 1860 died. Married Eliza Ann Allen of Provo, Utah (daughter of Daniel and Eliza Allen) who was born July 5, 1842, and died January 20, 1875. Their children; Eliza Isabel born December 2 1863 and George Danile born March 7, 1866, died: John William born April 36,1868; Owen Abraham born January 10, 1872: Orson born January 12, 1875. Married Sarah Elizabeth Cirtes, November 21, 1875 Provo, Utah (daughter of John H. Certes and Sophia Sweet of Oxford County, Maine. Pioneers 1849). She was born August 14, 1851 Manti, Utah. Their children: Clara Elizabeth born July 24, 1876; Sophia Eldora born January 24, 1878; Jacob A. born November 7, 1879; David Wallace born February 25, 1882; Lafayette born April 15, 1884; Arthur born June 21, 1886 and Ernest born September 27, 1888 died: Elmer born October 21, 1892. Families resided Provo, Utah. High Priest. Settled in Provo 1850. Freighted form Leavenworth, Kansas to Salt Lake City 1856 for Y X Company. Assisted to bring immigrants to Utah. Fanner, Merchant and Manufacturer. Baum, Israel (son of John C. Baum and Hannah Crisman) born April 7 1832, Ukian Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Came to Utah 1850 Sudependnt. Married Melissa Sessions May 6, 1856, daughter of Richard Sessions and Lucretia Haws who was born March 11, 1838. Their children, Louisa Maria born April 26, 1857 Married Chauncey Lee, Jun 27, 1876 died October 27, 1896: Isaac Richard born August 17, 1860 married Gabriella Ivie Feburary 1890: Melissa Aralitta born December 25, 1862 Married William H. Murdock July 25m 1881: John William born June 3,1865, married Maria Hickens, Hannah Lucretia born May 23 1867, died August 25, 1883: Eliza Jane born December 30, 1869 died August 25, 1883: Sarah Emeline born January 3, 1876 married William G. Welke December 18, 1910; David Alexander born October 1, 1878 died November 17, 1879: Rachel Isabel born September 18, 1860. Assisted in bringing immigrants to Utah. Indian War Veteran, High Councilor. Baum, Jacob (son of Jacob Baum) came to Utah 1850 Independent Company. Married Agnes Nancy Harris October 12 1826 who died September 11, 1846, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their Children Jacob harris Born December 30, 1830; Jane born July 2 1832, Married Elisha Thomas. Elizabeth born January 27, 1834 Married George A. Bean, Jacob Harris born May 29, 1836 married Malinda Cummings: Jeanetta Rachel born July 17, 1837 Married Alexander Sessions. Baum, Jacob Harris (son of Jacob Baum and Agnes Nacy Harris) born May 29, 1836 in Pennsylvania, came to Utah 1852. Married Malinda Cummings July 24, 1864, Heber, Utah (daughter of John G and Rachel Cummungs of Gibson, County, Tennesse pioneers 18