Gayle Thurman (Hillyard)

10 Nov 1927 - 4 Jan 1997

Change Your Language

close

You can change the language of the BillionGraves website by changing the default language of your browser.

Learn More
English
Register

Gayle Thurman (Hillyard)

10 Nov 1927 - 4 Jan 1997
edit Edit Record
photo Add Images
group_add Add Family
description Add a memory

Grave site information of Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) (10 Nov 1927 - 4 Jan 1997) at American Fork Cemetery in American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Gayle Thurman (Hillyard)

Born:
Married: 12 Aug 1947
Died:

American Fork Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

trishkovach

June 27, 2011
Transcriber

JDixon

June 26, 2011
Transcriber

Rittar

May 22, 2012
Transcriber

Celique

February 24, 2019
Transcriber

TerriBuchanan

October 15, 2014
Photographer

PapaMoose

June 26, 2011

Nearby Graves

See more nearby graves
Upgrade to BG+

Family

Relationships on the headstone

add
  • Byron McCombs Thurman
    Buried here
    26 Aug 1926 - Not Available
  • Leslie Thurman
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Lucinda Thurman
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Susan Thurman
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Reita Thurman
    Child
    Others not buried here
  • Nancy Thurman
    Child
    Others not buried here

Relationships added by users

add

Grave Site of Gayle

edit

Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) is buried in the American Fork Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

Download the free BillionGraves mobile app for iPhone and Android before you go to the cemetery and it will guide you right to the gravesite.
android Google play phone_iphone App Store

Memories

add

Ada Elizabeth Wood Hillyard

Contributor: TerriBuchanan Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

I was born April 29, 1897 at Auburn, Lincoln County, Wyoming on the place my father homesteaded. My father, Daniel Thomas Wood and my mother Susie May Walton had 13 Children, I was the second child. My sister, Bertha, was 17 months older. She was dark complexion and I was light. There were three other girls, Ila, Inla, and Elgin, and eight boys, Russell, Percy, Jesse, Von, Denzel, Earl, Verl, Tom. Being on of the oldest of this large family, I had many responsibilities, which was good for me. At a very young age I always made the yeast and mixed the bread. When I was born the snow was belly deep to the horses. My father had a hard time going for Aunt Sarah Walton, the midwife. There were no doctors in the valley at that time. I remember when Bertha started to school father was the teacher. I wanted to go too. Mother and I stood in the door way as they stared to walk to the school which was about 2 ½ blocks away. When we were children, we had more boy play mates than girl. I remember so well Oswell and Ross Jenkins, Earnest Foss, Delbert Leavitt, Delbert Sessions, Maybelle and Ruby Ross, Marinda Hyde, Myrtle Lehmberg and many others. Some of my school teachers were, Orlando ? , James Allen, Edith Walton Jenkins, Earnest Joyce, Roy Harrison. When I was in the 7th grade I quit school and stayed out for two years. I wanted to graduate so I went back to school and graduated the same year as my younger brother and sister, Ila and Russell. The time I should Have gone to high school father was called to the Southern States on a mission. We all had to work and help keep the family and father on his mission. When he came home I went to high school one year. Money was hard to get. There were eight children in the family at this time. Elgin, my youngest sister, was just a baby. We all loved her very much. Mother worked outside a great deal. Russell, my oldest brother was only 12 years old. We girls did the house work, also worked away from hoe to help out. I remember sawing plenty of wood in the deep snow. Father had been home less than a year when Don was born. He weighed 12 lbs. I went out and worked for Carrie and Rosel Hyde when I was 15 years old. They had two little girls and Sister Hyde was in bed with another baby girl. I cooked for three hay men, picked peas, dug potatoes, picked strawberries, did all the washing for $3.00 a week. I saved my money and bought red material for Bertha and I dresses. It was during this summer that I met my prince charming, Leslie Hillyard. The Hillyards had moved from Smithfield to the ranch out to Rosel Hyde. Leslie came over to hydes to buy a loaf of bread. That was the first time I saw him. I met him the next Sunday at Sunday School. Will Sessions introduced us. He sure was a wonderful, good looking guy. The first car ride I ever had was with Les and Dell Sessions. They hired Alfred Toland to take us to the show in Afton. We really thought we were smart. The next spring Densel was born. Mother had inlamitory rheumatism and had to stay in bed all the time. The baby was very cross. While mother nursed him we had to hod him to her. We didn’t know any better than to let him nurse when mother was so sick and running such a fever, no wonder he was cross, a wonder he didn’t die “poor kid.” Bertha was married to Delbert Leavitt, so I had the responsibility, but was able to handle it. Ila was lots of help. She had bad eyes and didn’t feel good. After they found out it was her eyes, she got glasses and was much better. The next summer Uncle Carl Walton, mother’s youngest brother, wife Lillian had to have an operation. I went to their ranch on the west hills to keep house and care for three little girls, Leona, Eva, Leota. Violet Foss was there too. Aunt Lillian stood the operation and they thought all would be well, when she suddenly passes away. They had a baby girl just a few months old. Sister Leavitt, our neighbor, took her. It was an awful shock to everyone. Especially Uncle Carl. I stayed and kept house and cared for the girls for four months. I was keeping company with my sweetheart Leslie Hillyard, but I was determined not to get married until I was twenty years old. Father promised Bertha and me a gold watch if we would wait until we were twenty to get married. After I left Uncle Carl’s, I went to Chesterfield, Idaho with Grandpa Walton, also to Pocatello. I had a great time at Lava Hot springs with my Call cousins. I worked awhile for Aunt Annie Call. I also went to Thomas and stayed with him and father Wood and Aunt Maggie, his second wife. They had three children near my age, ?, ?, and Andrew. Edna and I went to Blackfoot to Aunt Lizzie’s and Uncle George Parrish. They were away from home, but they said we could pick raspberries. I canned 36 quart of berries. The best I ever tasted. I went back home by way of Lanes Creek where Uncle William and Uncle Hank and families lived. The folks came and got me in the white top buggy. I was secretary in the Sunday School for three years and never missed a Sunday. Many times I didn’t feel like going but didn’t want to break my record. At one time I had a real bad reng worm over my eye but wouldn’t stay home. I worked for Clarence Holbrook. Bertha and I took turns working there and at home, one week at a time. I also worked for Jodi and Lola Holbrook. I liked thiem very much. They had a real good riding horse that they let me ride. Newell Jenkins wored for them too and we had many good times together. I did washing and cleaning for Hepsabah Leavitt, Fannie Bigler, Cora Wheelock and many others. While Russell and Ila went to high school, I worked outside as well as inside. Mother wasn’t very well. Heman Hyde wanted Les and I to go to Blowout, Idaho and work on Keyser ranch for him the spring of 1917. So even tho I wasn’t quite 20 years old and probably wouldn’t get the watch my father promised me, we were married April 12, 1917, seventeen days before my birthday. Dad gave Ila one the next spring. She was teaching school. On the 10th of April at 4'o’clock in the morning we left home to go to Montpelier while the snow was still frozen. It would get soft through the day and was very deep and hard to travel in. Enoch, Leslie’s brother, took us. We went part way in a sleigh and part way in a buggy. Brother and Sister Chet Sessions and Mother Hillyard went with us. We stayed in Montpelier that night and the next morning went on to Logan by train. After we arrived in Logan we took a street car to Smithfield. Mother Hillyard and I stayed at Aunt Lizzy Raymond’s and Les stayed with his Uncle Will Hillyard. Early the next morning we went back to Logan on the street car. We went in the temple at 7:30 a.m. and didn’t get out until 4:30 p.m. Brother Noble married us. It was a beautiful ceremony. He told us to wait until he did some sealings, then we showed us through the temple and gave us a wonderful talking to. It snowed that day, but the grass was green and real beautiful. One sister said “Happy is the bride the snow falls on.” We bought flowers and each of us a ring. We did it on borrowed money but we were happy. We had a job for $50.00 a month and knew we could pay it back. In a day or two we went through the temple again. We visited in Utah with the Hillyard relatives for about a week. The first of May we went to work. It was a wonderful summer. I think the best in my life. We had loads of fun and the people we worked for were so good to us. Clomania Robinson and Jim Killean were our best friends. We rode horses, swam, and every Friday night danced all night. Music by an accordian. We had lunch at midnight. My folks came down to see us one Sunday. I thought I wanted to go home, so I left for a week. Les was to come for me on the following Sunday. I got so home sick I cried all day. I thought my sweetheart would never get there. I never wanted to leave my own home and Les again. We stayed at the Keyser ranch until January. Mr. Keyser enlisted in the army so the folks all moved to Salt Lake City. Mrs. Keyser planned on us staying all winter. She was going to care for me when our baby came. We moved into the big house and were very happy, but we were also glad to get closer to the doctor. We moved back to Auburn in an old house of Delbert and Bertha Leavitt’s. In February the doctor put Les to bed for ten days because of a bad stomach. The house was cold, the snow deep and rather miserable March 16, 1918 was a very cold night but Dr. Reese made it to our home and worked all night to bring our first son, Demar, into the world. Doctor stood with his feet wrapped in a blanket the floor was so cold. He was a big baby. Weighed 10 pounds. Doctor offered Les $1,000.00 for him, He was in bad shape when he got here. His head was so pointed his father wondered if he would ever be all right. I had a bad hemmorage. I felt like I was drifting away on a stream. Wouldn’t have been much longer if the doctor hadn’t have gotten it stopped. Mother Hillyard stayed awhile and then Maggie Bruce worked for us. Les was a good nurse and helped with everything. Del and Bertha had been working for Linfords. They came home so we moved to the homestead. We didn’t have any furniture, bare floors, woodwork not painted. All of the Hillyard brothers moved out with us to work on the farm. There were four men to care for besides Les. Demar was a cross baby and I was nervous and high strung. I really had my hands full but we got by and were happy. Angus, Leslie’s youngest brother, died with the flu that next December 19, 1918. We lived in town with the folks until spring, then back to the homestead. The next spring we bought new furniture. We ordered it from Sears catalog. We went to Montpelier with a team to get it. Les used to haul freight and do most anything to make a little money. In the spring of 1919 Demar was one year old and Les received a call to the Northern States Mission. It was surely a surprise to us. My Father was the Bishop. We didn’t have any money, but we felt if the Lord needed him and we did our part a way would be provided. We had a team and three cows. We sold the team to Wall Barber and the cows to Grandpa Hillyard. They said they would help. Les fixed a room upstairs in my Father’s house. We moved most of our things there. The rest we stored. On the 10th of June 1919 we left for Salt Lake City. Hillyards had bought a Ford car, the first one they ever owned and the car I learned to drive. Leslie’s Father and Mother and Elmer (a brother) Les and I and Demar started out. We stayed in Centerfield the first night with some friends of the family. It was with a very heavy heart I left Les in Salt Lake and came back home. We stayed with my folks most of the time, but the first winter Demar and I stayed at Jodi Holbrook’s home and took care of him and his two little boys. Mrs. Holbrook had to stay in Afton most of the time to be close to the doctor because of her health. I was working in the MIA and the only way I had to get anywhere was by horse back. I put Demar on back of the horse with me and we would ride about three miles to Auburn. I worked in the hay fields, cleaned houses and anything I could find to make a dime. We had a pretty rugged time but the Lord blesses us. Les had a rough time in the mission field. He was ill so much of the time. He had ulcers all our married life. He was a silent sufferer and never complained. When he had been gone 18 months trouble came into the family again. Elmer died with the flu in February 1920. Enoch had been in the army (World War I), but came home about the time Les left for his mission. Les missed the drat as we were living in Idaho when he registered. It was hard to lose Elmer. I loved him as my own brother. He was so good to Demar and I. Was terribly hard on his poor crippled Father and his Mother. Sometime maybe we will understand. Everthing seemed to go wrong. Enn wanted to have Grandpa pay him for the cattle and everthing he owned when he went into the army. They had to have Les come home. Grandma wrote for him to come. They couldn’t help him anymore. They were as good to me as they possibly could be under the circumstances. En got married so that made it necessary for a settlement. They gave Les an honorable release after 18 months. I had won a bet from dear old Grandpa Walton and he gave me a $50.00 war bod. I bought me some clothes and went to Salt Lake to meet my Sweetheart for Christmas. I went to Montpelier on the stage, a sleigh, then from there on the train. Osh Walton from Star Valley was on the same stage and train. He was good to me and insisted on me going to their home in Salt Lake. It was Christmas Eve. Les didn’t come that day and was I blue. I had left my little boy, Demar, home with mother. Walton’s had a little girl and when I saw their Christmas tree and all her gifts I cried and cried. I made it through the night and about 12:00 on Christmas Day he came. When I looked through the window and saw my darling coming upp the path, it was the happiest moment I ever experiences. After we had dinner with these fine people, the Waltons, we took our things and went to a hotel. We then pent a few days in Bountiful with the Woods, Father’s people. WE came home and moved into the Chet Sessions home now the Heman Hyde home. In the spring we moved up to the homestead. En was married to Elona Gardner and we all loved there until haying time. Then Ene and Elona moved to the ranch. . . What an awful summer! Ene built a house on the meadow. We moved to Auburn winters and back to the homestead in the spring. I remembered living in nine different houses. One winter we did the janitor work for the church for $50.00 a month. Loved on that plus the milk we sold from two cows. On February 5, 1922 another big baby boy came to love with us. He weighed 10 3/4 lbs. We had a girl ordered but when we got the boy wouldn’t have traded him for the best girl in the world. We really love him. WE were living in Hon Hurd’s old house at this time. His calf shed or grannery had a lean to on it and this was our bedroom. It was another cold night and a blizzard on. The stove smoked and we could hardly stand it. It was decided the ed had to be moved into the other room. While this was going on I was suffering terribly with labor pains. We were late calling the doctor and Ronald was born an hour before the doctor came. Les was the doctor. I was ton very badly and even though the doctor sewed me I never healed properly and had trouble the rest of my life. Life went on about the same, moving both spring and fall. On December 29, 1924, while living in Keith Hyde’s house, a lovely brown eyed boy came to gladden our home. He weighed 9 lbs. He was always a joy to have around, tried to please us. He was a good scholar. Not quite the athletes that Demar and Ronald were, but did play some football. His studies always came first. He received a four year scholarship to University of Wyoming, but went in the service on the V12 program instead. Les was to MIA the night Vern was born. They were having a party for Del and Bertha and I was afraid he was to be born before I got any help. Dr. West was my doctor this time. When they asked Demar where his baby sister was, he said, “I guess she is up in heaven.” My sister Ila came and stayed with me a while, four months before her first child, Thelma, was born. We moved back to the homestead in the spring. Les was road supervisor for two years. In the fall of 1927, we decided to stay on the hill all winter. Demar and Ronald had scarlet fever and Demar was very ill for ten days. Ronald was not quite so bad and was hard to keep in bed. Heman Hyde lived at the sulphur springs. They drove a school wagon, the first one to be out that way. The first fall Demar started to school, he rode a horse back and forth until we moved, and again in the spring. This was the fall our first baby girl was born. We were surely happy with her. The boys loved her very dearly. Mother was with me that night. Dr. West was the doctor. Les’s folds lived with Ene and Elona part of that winter as Elona had lost another baby. Grandma wouldn’t believe we had a girl until she came up and took her diaper off. Lucy Hurd stayed the ten days I was in bed. We named her Gayle. While she was very young, the boys got the whooping cough. Poor little Vern was the sick one this time. Our baby girl’s eyes and face was so swollen she could hardly see. The older boys were no so bad. It surely lasted a long time. That was a bad winter and so far from town or anyone. That is the only winter we lived on the homestead. Gayle was born November 10, 1927 and Bertha and Delbert go a baby girl the following December. They were always good friends and we spent many pleasant days together. We had good times as we raised our children. Sometimes on week ends we would take our little families and do down to Bedford and stay over night with Russell and Ila. Eventho we were married, we tried to spend at least two days a week helping our mother. Mother still had a large family at home and a lot of work to do. I am glad I was able to help her. She has done so many things for me. The winter 1928 we lived in Auburn again. Les word in canyon for three winters to get lumber to build a home. We did well to live and pay our debts. He worked as county road supervisor for two years. He was the first man to use a tractor and to build a graded road. We were living in a house owned by Ora George close to Delbert and Bertha. In the spring of 1929, April 19, another lovely baby girl came to gladden our hearts. Bertha was with me and the first thing she said after I came to was “You have another little girl with long dark eye lashes.” We were juts as happy as when our first daughter came. When I first found out we were to have another baby, I felt badly because Gayle was still so young. But it was wonderful to have two girls so close together. They loved each other so much and got along very well. Gayle took care of LaRue like a little mother. They were married the same day and I felt a little cheated to only have one wedding. In the spring of 1929 we started our home on the ranch. Les did most of the work himself. Delbert helped with the foundation. It was built out of sawed logs. We had to put as much house as possible under the same roof as we didn’t have much money to build with. I helped shingle and the boys helped a lot too. They were always good workers and very ambitious. We moved back in town and Les worked as much as possible. He always had to go to the ranch for hay to feed the few cows we had. We bought the ranch from Grandpa Hillyard. Ene got the best part and was able to build much sooner than we. They only raised two children but lost several shortly after birth. It was a bad spring, The roads were almost impassible. Bertha had sinus trouble very badly. She put off going to a doctor thinking they couldn’t afford it. We were unable to go into town for two weeks then we went to Sunday School. I sat by Will Walton, a dear friend, and he told me Bertha was in Soda Springs and they had operated on her and she was very sick. I nearly fainted to think how no one had bothered to come out and let me know. We were so close and I loved her so dearly,. Mother was out there with her. She got a little better and Del came home. Infection set in and we took her children and went out to see her. Her fever went to 108 and of course she never recovered. She passed away My 23, 1930 leaving four children. It was a great sorrow for some time. The greatest loss I had felt up to this time. That fall we moved into our new house. We didn’t have any water and had to go to the slew in the field with a team and cart and get water in big barrels for washing, bathing, etc. We went to a spring on the Johnson property for our drinking water. We were so happy to have a home we could live in the year round. The school bus came to the end of the lane. The boys had to catch it up there for a while. Then it started coming past the home. We had two bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room. We loved our new home to say the least. When Demar was a sophomore in high school, he had pneumonia. He surely was sick. All he wanted you to do for him when he was sick was to let him alone. Ronald was mor the nervous type and wanted you to be doing something for him all the time. He also had pneumonia when he was a sophomore but wasn’t sick as long as Demar was. When Vern was a sophomore he became very sick with an absess in his back behind his heart above his diaphragm. He became ill soon after school started in the fall. He kept running a fever and taking chills. They took many blood tests, x-rays, Dr. Worthen couldn’t decide what was causing it all. He decided to operated. They gave him a blood transfusion before starting. He reacted so negative to it they decided not to operate. Dr. Told us to take him home. It might be a week, month or a year before he could get out of bed. We felt terrible. It a few days Dr. Worthen came over to the house to check him. He was going to take a blood test and send it to Idaho Falls, but when he examined him he said to take him to Salt Lake. This was the thing we had been praying for. Estella Orton came and helped me get ready and we left the next day. Many doctors worked on him and their decision was to operate. The night before the operation, Les went to the Church office to get someone to help administer to Vern. Richard L. Evans came, Oh how he talked to the Lord. He asked a blessing on the nurses and doctors that they would know what to do. The next morning when Dr. Hatch came out of the operating room with a dish of thick yellow puss, he said we found it Mr. Hillyard. I do not know when I ever knew less what to do, but felt surer of doing the right thing and finding the trouble. We knew it was an answer to prayers and administration, a blessing from the Lord. Vern was a very sick boy for a long time. I stayed with him night and day. He never slept more than a half hour at a time. We stayed for six weeks and he still had a fever and couldn’t eat, but the doctors decided to let us take him home. That sure was a happy moment. He put his arms around my neck and we laughed and cried together. Les came for us and we were all so happy to get home. Jim was only three and the girls very young. We prayed constantly and our prayers were answered. Ven finally got well and graduated from high school with honors. He was always a good student. He was a wonderful boy, always trying to please us. He took tests and was admitted into the V12 Program of the service. He also got a scholarship for four years to the University of Wyoming, but world war II broke out and he went to the University of Minnesota in the V12 Program. He graduated from there as a Mechanical Engineer. He spent four months on the water and at Bermuda as a navy officer. Ronald left about the same time. He was drafted in the armed service. He was on his way to training camp. His father was binding grain with four horses. He had a run away and they pulled him from the binder and broke his shoulder. Dr. Called the draft board and Ronald was able to come home long enough to finish the fall work. They we took him to Salt lake and he enlisted int the Air Force. He wanted to be a pilot but couldn’t make it because of his eyes. He went into mechanical school. Demar was married but was also called up for his physical. He had blood pressure and a hernia and didn’t have to go into the service. About this time we built onto the house, making the kitchen bigger and a living room. What used to be the living room we used for a dining room. We got electricity and plumbed for water. We bought a bathroom outfit and a sink. Put new carpet in the living room and linoleum on the rest of the floors. We really thought we had a lovely home and enjoyed it very much. We enjoyed out two daughter and the had many friends. We bought a piano and they learned to play it quite well. They were good students in high school. They both played in the band. LaRue the clarinet and Gayle the saxophone. It was war time and many sports were canceled. They both had a care free life and we loved it and them very much. After graduation Gayle worked in Salt Lake for a while and was engaged to a fine young man, but when Byron Thurman came home from the army and was called to serve a mission she decided she would rather have him if the opportunity came and it did. LaRue and her high school sweetheart, Von Leavitt, decided to get married after graduation. I think Gayle didn’t want her to get married first so she and Byron were married before he went on his mission. They had a double wedding 12 August 1947. LaRue and Von went to Idaho Falls to live, We bout them a bedroom set and took them down. Gayle worked a the Star Valley Creamer C. while Byron was gone. She bought a car and many other things. When Byron came home they lived in Grover in a house they bought from Byron’s father. Les spent a lot of time fixing it up. They went to California to visit Von and LaRue who had moved down there. They got a job with Save On and Moved down. Both families have lived there ever since. The year my brother Jesse had his 50th birthday party we went to California in November. I took care of LaRue’s Children While she worked. Les worked a little at Save On for Dee Gardner doing carpenter work. He enjoyed it and we planned on selling the ranch and Les was going to be care taker in Same On Store for Dee Gardner. While we were there, Les got very sick with his stomach ulcers and he hemorraged real bad. We took him to the hospital and they operated on him. Took 3/4 of his stomach out. He had 13 blood transfusions. When he got well enough to leave the hospital, we took him to my sister’s place, the Johnsons. It the spring we went home. That summer I went to the canyon and got out fence posts. Les got well enough to work for my brother Don at the tractor company. They were fixing a heavy piece of metal which fell and hit Les on the head, giving him a brain concussion. He suffered all winter with one thing and another. The following summer he went to Idaho Falls and had a prostate gland operation. The next winter we went back to California. I worked for Ted Hall in Laundromat. We lived with the Thurmans. Jim was in Australia at this time on a mission. We came back home again in the spring. Les worked for Don. This summer he had a real bad heart attack. He was in the hospital for four weeks. When Jim’s mission was over, he had planned on going around the world. His Father had been ill so much I though he should come home but Les said, “No, I have got to be a lot worse than I am now before I would have him not go.” Jim and three other Elders got on the boat. They started out and in a very short time they had hear of a ship crew going on strike. Jim was impressed that he shouldn’t go so he got his luggage, got on a plane to Hawaii and then a boat on to the states. He was only home five week when his father passed away. After the funeral and all was over, it was terrible. I felt there was nothing to live for. Jim and I took Vern and his family to Green River to catch the train to Houston, Texas where they lived. Jim and I went to Salt Lake where he enrolled at the University of Utah to finish his schooling. In the summer we came home and Jim guided for Ted Hale and cooked for the hunters. It was good to be in the mountains. We went back to Salt Lake when school started. We lived in the 33rd ward. I made many wonderful friends there. I worked at Excelsis Beauty Factory for 3 ½ months. I also worked in the kitchen of the temple. This was a lovely experience. I made the pies, mashed potatoes and cut the meat. Here I met a cousin, Mabel Goodfellow. We spent many happy times together. In the spring we came home and I worked at the Silver Stream Café, went to the hunting camp in the fall. I also cared for my Mother for quite some time. In the fall jim went back to school and I went to Texas and stayed with Vern and family. I came back to Salt Lake when Jim graduated. Jim had to go to Army camp and he had graduated from ROTC 2nd Leutenant. I stayed with Mabel and worked in Bountiful Community Hospital for three months. When I came home Bishop Hurd asked me if I would except a mission call. I was taking care of Mother at the time and felt like I was in prison. Pres. ElRay Christenson interviewed me and said it would be hard to find a companion for an older lady. I said don’t worry, maybe I could work in the temple. He said, “You would make a lovely temple worker. Later I went back to Houston because Phillis was expecting a new baby, Tena Beth. I hadn’t been there long when the call came for me to serve in the Texas mission. I didn’t dare refuse, as I felt the all came of the Lord. I went to Dr. Walker in Houston and he said, “I never hear of such a thing as sending a woman 64 years old into the mission field.” The baby came in about ten days and I came home for a week and then to the mission home. I spent 18 months in the Texas Mission. I arrived home June 10, 1963. I lived on the ranch one summer and the we decided to move the house to Afton. I took care of Mother for some time again and it was very trying after being in the mission field. I sold the homestead, paid off mortgage, paid for the house to be moved. I have held many positions in the church. One of the high lights was my call as Visiting Teacher instructor in the stake Relief Society. President Winters gave me a lovely blessing when he set me apart. I enjoyed my trips to Salt Lake with the Stake Board to General conference. They were all so lovely to me. I served for 5 years, was released fall of 1973. I am now Ward representative for mutual interest group for 2nd Ward. I enjoy it too. I am also leader of High Priest group of ladies who are widows. Responsible for having home evening with them. They are Leona Hyde, Luella Gardner, Gene Broadbent, Bertha Colby and myself. I now have 25 Grandchildren and eleven great grandchildren, all of whom I love very dearly. We had so many good time together when the children were young. We always went to Sunday School together also Sacrament Meeting. They were very good children. Demar always took the responsibility with his father in getting the work done. All three of the older boys got up and milked a few cows before they went to school. They always had something to do so they learned to work and help to make a living. Demar Loved to play football and kept the training rules to the letter. When he was sick with pnuemonia, Viola Miller fixed him a toddy, but he wouldn’t take it because it had liquor in it. Many times he walked from Afton after ball practice. He didn’t want to stay away from home. He was a very good player. He was noted as the toughest, ruffest, best football player Star Valley ever had up to that time. When he graduated, he was offered scholarships to several different colleges. But he didn’t want to go to college. He loved the farm and especially the horses. Ronald was a good ball player too. He played basketball and football all four years of high school. He was offered scholarships and finally accepted one to University of Wyoming. We were disappointed he only went one quarter but he wasn’t happy there. He got to chasing around with fellows who had mor money than we could give him and it didn’t work out. In 1935 we bought a bus to haul the high school students to Afton. This was the year a little brown eyed baby boy came to make his home with us. We named him James Wood Hillyard, born November 23, 1935. WE all enjoyed him. He grew very fast, was the smallest baby I had. Dr. Worthen said, “I thought your said you had big babies. This one isn’t going to be very big.” My sister in law Elvon was expecting about the same time. Les went up town about two weeks before Jim was born I went up town and found out Elvon had her baby. I told Les to call the doctor, that Elvon wasn’t suppose to have her baby before me. The doctor gave me some medicine to start me. It was a hard delivery. Took all night but Dr. Worthen stayed with me. It was Thanksgiving day the next day. Grandma and Grandpa Hillyard came down and Ene’s family came over and had dinner with us. I had had so much dope I felt like I was floating on air. Demar and Russell went hunting the next day. Ron was so anxious to hold the baby. He was quite a play thing. He slept with Ron. Demar and Vern slept together. Those were wonderful years. In February, Ron and Vern were skiing on the hill north of the house. I called to them to come in, their dad wanted to cut their hair. Ron said just one more jump. They tied Vern’s skis on and just one more jump he fell and broke his leg. The snow was so deep and soft we couldn’t get up to him. Les and Demar built a slip and crawled on their hands and knees to get him. There was so much snow that year we couldn’t get the car out, so we had to take Vern to town in the school wagon and team. It was a long way. They girls went into Auburn to stay with Grandma Hillyard. It was past midnight before Dr. Worthen got the leg set. Francis and Elgin lived in Afton then so we stayed at their house because it was so expensive to stay in the hospital. Vern was strapped to the bed with weights on his leg and over the foot of the bed to pull the muscles out so the bone could go into place. He lay on his back for six weeks. He learned his requirements for a deacon. Bishop George came to see him often and always brought him something to eat. He was in a cast for 6months, learned to get around real well. When his dad cut the cast off he screamed, “You have cut my leg off.” All the time we were in town, Les and the boys kept house and drove the school bus. The girls came over some weekends. WE were all happy to get back home again together. It was a long winter. On March 13, 1942, Demar broke the family circle by getting married. We were very proud of him and the sweet girl he married. They had to make a living the hard way. They worked for Ene and lived on his ranch the first few years. On August 28, 1959, 5:00 am my heart was torn with grief in the passing of my dear companion. It was so terrible to be parted from one you shared all your joys and sorrows. For nearly forty three years I never said anything, never heard anything, never saw anything, never did anything, that I didn’t share with him. Then all of a sudden there was no one to love you, to feel sorry for you, no one to depend on to lean upon. It was a sick, lonely experience. My only comforting thought was of a brighter tomorrow when we will surely meet in a better place. Where sorrow and parting is not know. I had to redirect my desires thoughts, ambitions and aspirations. It is an empty looking life before you, but must go on. I am very thankful for the wonderful life we had together and for our lovely family including our grandchildren. James, our youngest son, had just been home from Australia five weeks when his father was taken away. Les was so proud of Jim, his accomplishments in the mission field and his schooling. He got to go to stake priesthood meeting with him and hear him bear his testimony. There are many things in life we can’t do anything about and we just have to go on and make the best of our lives. It was hard on all the children. It about broke Gayle’s heart. Her “Daddy” was something special to her. Poor Vern, who had been away from home for so long and had been our most home loving child, felt he had been cheated by not being with his father more. Demar, the oldest one, on whom so much responsibility fell and who had learned to love and respect his father so much. He made the remark that Jim had been cheated for he would never know his Dad like he did. Also our big boy Ronald, who had such pretty golden curls and was always a joy to us. Oh, how his Father would loved to love to see time take his family to the temple and have them sealed to him. I surely hope some day it will happen. Fred, their youngest son, was the last one the “Pop” ever baptized and confirmed. We surely did enjoy that evening also the sacrament meeting when he confirmed Fred. LaRue really felt badly. She says her father was always so tolerant with Von’s shortcomings and always gave him the benefit of the doubt and said he knew that time would come when all would be well with him. He felt Von would overcome his weaknesses and work in the church. I often think of Roger, our oldest grandson, whom we are so proud of, saying to his grandfather, “With your brains grandpa and my strength we can do anything.” Les loved his grandchildren so much. I which he could have know all of them and also these lovely great grandchildren. I’m sure he does know them all and rejoices in their many accomplishments, as I do. I have always loved the gospel and don’t know how I could stand up to trials in life without it. I have enjoyed serving in different capacities. Some of the position I have held I will try to list below: Secretary in the Sunday School- 1912-1915 Secretary in the Relief Society- 1919-1929 Counselor to Eliza Cranney in the Primary- 1930 Sustained as President- 1931-1935 Counselor to Verba Taylor- 1936 Sustained as President-1937-1941 Counselor to Mabel Lindberg in the Relief Society- Dec 7, 1941 Counselor to Estella Orton- 1944 Sustained as President of the Relief Society- May 5, 1946-1950 Stake Relief Society as Magazine Agent Theology class leader in the Stake Bee Hive Teacher in the MIA for five years Junior Sunday Coordinator for five years 1 964 moves to Afton 2nd ward Trecker teacher two years Top Pilot Teacher for one year in the Primary Visiting Teacher in 2nd ward Visiting Teacher class leader September 1969- was set apart by President Winters as Stake Relief Society Visiting Teacher Leader. I was given a lovely blessing at this time. Special Interest Leader in 2nd Ward 1971 Leader of the High Priest Group of Ladies who are widows to hold Home Evening

Demar Wood Hillyard

Contributor: TerriBuchanan Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

I was born at Auburn, Lincoln, Wyoming, 16 Mar. 1918 in an old house located where Fay Nelson now lives. Dr. Lafayette Reese brought me into the world. It was a very cold night and the house was open and drafty. Dr. Reese stood with Dad’s sheep skin coat wrapped around his feet to keep warm while waiting for me to arrive. Mother was terribly sick at the time and nearly died from hemorrhage. I was a big baby, weighing 10 pounds. Dr. Reese thought I was a fine baby. He offered mother 1000 dollars for me. He had no children of his own. I was a healthy baby and all through my childhood, but took most of the children diseases as they came along. My parents are Leslie Hillyard and Ada Elizabeth Wood. I have two sisters, Gayle and LaRue and three brothers, Ronald, Vern and James, all younger than myself. I was 15 months old when my father went on a mission to the Northen States. Mother and I lived with Grandmother Wood most of the time he was gone. Mother worked very hard at different places to earn money for us. About this time there was an epidemic of the flu. Both mother and I got it. We were very sick and the Elders were called to administer to us. I was taught the principals of the gospel from infancy. As soon as I learned to talk my Mother taught me to say my prayers. I am very thankful for the religious training I received in my home. When I was three years old I fell from a load of hay and broke my arm. I loved the farm and horses. I harnessed the horses for Dad when I was so small I had to stand on the mangers to reach their necks. I had the wood to carry and helped milk the cows. Mother said I was always willing to work and do y share around the home. Homes were rather poor at that time. We had none of the modern conveniences provided by electricity. We had only the necessities of life, but were happy and thankful. We lived at the homestead in the summer and moved down town through the coldest part of winter. When I stared school, I rode a horse from the homestead to Auburn every morning (3 miles) and back at night. I was fourteen years old when Father built our new home on the ranch. We were all thrilled with it. There would be no more moving twice a year. I loved my home and liked to be there, especially when night came. Even after I was in high school and had to stay up for the athletics I would walk home (10 miles) rather than stay in Afton or Auburn. I was a bashful boy and refused to dance or mix with the other children in their fun and games. This was always a worry to my Mother, who wanted me to have a good time. Most of my good times were riding horses and calves. My playmates were my Mother’s brother Denzel and my cousin Ellis Leavitt. At the age of 10 I had scarlet fever. When I was a sophomore in high school I had pneumonia Both times I was very sick and was administered to. I graduated from high school in 1936. I was very active in sports, mainly football and track. I won a trophy in track for the 440 yard dash and a metal for the 220. I enjoyed very much the trips we took in competition with other schools. Recreation I like best are ball games and movies. I met my future wife when I was a freshman in high school. She was still in grade school, 7th grade. Even tho she lived neighbors to me, I didn’t have much association wit her until after graduation from high school. She was a beautiful young lady named Virginia Anderson. There is a saying “Behind every successful man there is a great woman.” That turned out to be the case with me. I owe much of my success to her, especially my spiritual growth. She is a lady of great faith and lives up to her convictions and dedication to the Gospel. Whenever I talked about her, I told them, “She is the best thing that ever happened to me. We have had a wonderful 56 years together. We have five children. All of whom I take great pride in. They are all educated for a profession in life. Irene graduated from LDS Business College so she can enter the business world. Roger has a maters as a business major and is employed as a professor at SUU. Debra graduated from Ricks College in the field of nursing. Trudy graduated from a dental school as a dentist assistant and also a graduate from SUU. Kevan received a masters from Utah State University as a music major. They are all active in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and are temple worthy. What greater blessings could anyone have. Virginia and I served a 15 month mission in San Jose, California, a wonderful experience. Demar Died of a stroke 1 March 1998.

Ada Elizabeth Wood Hillyard

Contributor: Celique Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I was born April 29, 1897 at Auburn, Lincoln County, Wyoming on the place my father homesteaded. My father, Daniel Thomas Wood and my mother Susie May Walton had 13 Children, I was the second child. My sister, Bertha, was 17 months older. She was dark complexion and I was light. There were three other girls, Ila, Inla, and Elgin, and eight boys, Russell, Percy, Jesse, Von, Denzel, Earl, Verl, Tom. Being on of the oldest of this large family, I had many responsibilities, which was good for me. At a very young age I always made the yeast and mixed the bread. When I was born the snow was belly deep to the horses. My father had a hard time going for Aunt Sarah Walton, the midwife. There were no doctors in the valley at that time. I remember when Bertha started to school father was the teacher. I wanted to go too. Mother and I stood in the door way as they stared to walk to the school which was about 2 ½ blocks away. When we were children, we had more boy play mates than girl. I remember so well Oswell and Ross Jenkins, Earnest Foss, Delbert Leavitt, Delbert Sessions, Maybelle and Ruby Ross, Marinda Hyde, Myrtle Lehmberg and many others. Some of my school teachers were, Orlando ? , James Allen, Edith Walton Jenkins, Earnest Joyce, Roy Harrison. When I was in the 7th grade I quit school and stayed out for two years. I wanted to graduate so I went back to school and graduated the same year as my younger brother and sister, Ila and Russell. The time I should Have gone to high school father was called to the Southern States on a mission. We all had to work and help keep the family and father on his mission. When he came home I went to high school one year. Money was hard to get. There were eight children in the family at this time. Elgin, my youngest sister, was just a baby. We all loved her very much. Mother worked outside a great deal. Russell, my oldest brother was only 12 years old. We girls did the house work, also worked away from hoe to help out. I remember sawing plenty of wood in the deep snow. Father had been home less than a year when Don was born. He weighed 12 lbs. I went out and worked for Carrie and Rosel Hyde when I was 15 years old. They had two little girls and Sister Hyde was in bed with another baby girl. I cooked for three hay men, picked peas, dug potatoes, picked strawberries, did all the washing for $3.00 a week. I saved my money and bought red material for Bertha and I dresses. It was during this summer that I met my prince charming, Leslie Hillyard. The Hillyards had moved from Smithfield to the ranch out to Rosel Hyde. Leslie came over to hydes to buy a loaf of bread. That was the first time I saw him. I met him the next Sunday at Sunday School. Will Sessions introduced us. He sure was a wonderful, good looking guy. The first car ride I ever had was with Les and Dell Sessions. They hired Alfred Toland to take us to the show in Afton. We really thought we were smart. The next spring Densel was born. Mother had inlamitory rheumatism and had to stay in bed all the time. The baby was very cross. While mother nursed him we had to hod him to her. We didn’t know any better than to let him nurse when mother was so sick and running such a fever, no wonder he was cross, a wonder he didn’t die “poor kid.” Bertha was married to Delbert Leavitt, so I had the responsibility, but was able to handle it. Ila was lots of help. She had bad eyes and didn’t feel good. After they found out it was her eyes, she got glasses and was much better. The next summer Uncle Carl Walton, mother’s youngest brother, wife Lillian had to have an operation. I went to their ranch on the west hills to keep house and care for three little girls, Leona, Eva, Leota. Violet Foss was there too. Aunt Lillian stood the operation and they thought all would be well, when she suddenly passes away. They had a baby girl just a few months old. Sister Leavitt, our neighbor, took her. It was an awful shock to everyone. Especially Uncle Carl. I stayed and kept house and cared for the girls for four months. I was keeping company with my sweetheart Leslie Hillyard, but I was determined not to get married until I was twenty years old. Father promised Bertha and me a gold watch if we would wait until we were twenty to get married. After I left Uncle Carl’s, I went to Chesterfield, Idaho with Grandpa Walton, also to Pocatello. I had a great time at Lava Hot springs with my Call cousins. I worked awhile for Aunt Annie Call. I also went to Thomas and stayed with him and father Wood and Aunt Maggie, his second wife. They had three children near my age, ?, ?, and Andrew. Edna and I went to Blackfoot to Aunt Lizzie’s and Uncle George Parrish. They were away from home, but they said we could pick raspberries. I canned 36 quart of berries. The best I ever tasted. I went back home by way of Lanes Creek where Uncle William and Uncle Hank and families lived. The folks came and got me in the white top buggy. I was secretary in the Sunday School for three years and never missed a Sunday. Many times I didn’t feel like going but didn’t want to break my record. At one time I had a real bad reng worm over my eye but wouldn’t stay home. I worked for Clarence Holbrook. Bertha and I took turns working there and at home, one week at a time. I also worked for Jodi and Lola Holbrook. I liked thiem very much. They had a real good riding horse that they let me ride. Newell Jenkins wored for them too and we had many good times together. I did washing and cleaning for Hepsabah Leavitt, Fannie Bigler, Cora Wheelock and many others. While Russell and Ila went to high school, I worked outside as well as inside. Mother wasn’t very well. Heman Hyde wanted Les and I to go to Blowout, Idaho and work on Keyser ranch for him the spring of 1917. So even tho I wasn’t quite 20 years old and probably wouldn’t get the watch my father promised me, we were married April 12, 1917, seventeen days before my birthday. Dad gave Ila one the next spring. She was teaching school. On the 10th of April at 4'o’clock in the morning we left home to go to Montpelier while the snow was still frozen. It would get soft through the day and was very deep and hard to travel in. Enoch, Leslie’s brother, took us. We went part way in a sleigh and part way in a buggy. Brother and Sister Chet Sessions and Mother Hillyard went with us. We stayed in Montpelier that night and the next morning went on to Logan by train. After we arrived in Logan we took a street car to Smithfield. Mother Hillyard and I stayed at Aunt Lizzy Raymond’s and Les stayed with his Uncle Will Hillyard. Early the next morning we went back to Logan on the street car. We went in the temple at 7:30 a.m. and didn’t get out until 4:30 p.m. Brother Noble married us. It was a beautiful ceremony. He told us to wait until he did some sealings, then we showed us through the temple and gave us a wonderful talking to. It snowed that day, but the grass was green and real beautiful. One sister said “Happy is the bride the snow falls on.” We bought flowers and each of us a ring. We did it on borrowed money but we were happy. We had a job for $50.00 a month and knew we could pay it back. In a day or two we went through the temple again. We visited in Utah with the Hillyard relatives for about a week. The first of May we went to work. It was a wonderful summer. I think the best in my life. We had loads of fun and the people we worked for were so good to us. Clomania Robinson and Jim Killean were our best friends. We rode horses, swam, and every Friday night danced all night. Music by an accordian. We had lunch at midnight. My folks came down to see us one Sunday. I thought I wanted to go home, so I left for a week. Les was to come for me on the following Sunday. I got so home sick I cried all day. I thought my sweetheart would never get there. I never wanted to leave my own home and Les again. We stayed at the Keyser ranch until January. Mr. Keyser enlisted in the army so the folks all moved to Salt Lake City. Mrs. Keyser planned on us staying all winter. She was going to care for me when our baby came. We moved into the big house and were very happy, but we were also glad to get closer to the doctor. We moved back to Auburn in an old house of Delbert and Bertha Leavitt’s. In February the doctor put Les to bed for ten days because of a bad stomach. The house was cold, the snow deep and rather miserable March 16, 1918 was a very cold night but Dr. Reese made it to our home and worked all night to bring our first son, Demar, into the world. Doctor stood with his feet wrapped in a blanket the floor was so cold. He was a big baby. Weighed 10 pounds. Doctor offered Les $1,000.00 for him, He was in bad shape when he got here. His head was so pointed his father wondered if he would ever be all right. I had a bad hemmorage. I felt like I was drifting away on a stream. Wouldn’t have been much longer if the doctor hadn’t have gotten it stopped. Mother Hillyard stayed awhile and then Maggie Bruce worked for us. Les was a good nurse and helped with everything. Del and Bertha had been working for Linfords. They came home so we moved to the homestead. We didn’t have any furniture, bare floors, woodwork not painted. All of the Hillyard brothers moved out with us to work on the farm. There were four men to care for besides Les. Demar was a cross baby and I was nervous and high strung. I really had my hands full but we got by and were happy. Angus, Leslie’s youngest brother, died with the flu that next December 19, 1918. We lived in town with the folks until spring, then back to the homestead. The next spring we bought new furniture. We ordered it from Sears catalog. We went to Montpelier with a team to get it. Les used to haul freight and do most anything to make a little money. In the spring of 1919 Demar was one year old and Les received a call to the Northern States Mission. It was surely a surprise to us. My Father was the Bishop. We didn’t have any money, but we felt if the Lord needed him and we did our part a way would be provided. We had a team and three cows. We sold the team to Wall Barber and the cows to Grandpa Hillyard. They said they would help. Les fixed a room upstairs in my Father’s house. We moved most of our things there. The rest we stored. On the 10th of June 1919 we left for Salt Lake City. Hillyards had bought a Ford car, the first one they ever owned and the car I learned to drive. Leslie’s Father and Mother and Elmer (a brother) Les and I and Demar started out. We stayed in Centerfield the first night with some friends of the family. It was with a very heavy heart I left Les in Salt Lake and came back home. We stayed with my folks most of the time, but the first winter Demar and I stayed at Jodi Holbrook’s home and took care of him and his two little boys. Mrs. Holbrook had to stay in Afton most of the time to be close to the doctor because of her health. I was working in the MIA and the only way I had to get anywhere was by horse back. I put Demar on back of the horse with me and we would ride about three miles to Auburn. I worked in the hay fields, cleaned houses and anything I could find to make a dime. We had a pretty rugged time but the Lord blesses us. Les had a rough time in the mission field. He was ill so much of the time. He had ulcers all our married life. He was a silent sufferer and never complained. When he had been gone 18 months trouble came into the family again. Elmer died with the flu in February 1920. Enoch had been in the army (World War I), but came home about the time Les left for his mission. Les missed the drat as we were living in Idaho when he registered. It was hard to lose Elmer. I loved him as my own brother. He was so good to Demar and I. Was terribly hard on his poor crippled Father and his Mother. Sometime maybe we will understand. Everthing seemed to go wrong. Enn wanted to have Grandpa pay him for the cattle and everthing he owned when he went into the army. They had to have Les come home. Grandma wrote for him to come. They couldn’t help him anymore. They were as good to me as they possibly could be under the circumstances. En got married so that made it necessary for a settlement. They gave Les an honorable release after 18 months. I had won a bet from dear old Grandpa Walton and he gave me a $50.00 war bod. I bought me some clothes and went to Salt Lake to meet my Sweetheart for Christmas. I went to Montpelier on the stage, a sleigh, then from there on the train. Osh Walton from Star Valley was on the same stage and train. He was good to me and insisted on me going to their home in Salt Lake. It was Christmas Eve. Les didn’t come that day and was I blue. I had left my little boy, Demar, home with mother. Walton’s had a little girl and when I saw their Christmas tree and all her gifts I cried and cried. I made it through the night and about 12:00 on Christmas Day he came. When I looked through the window and saw my darling coming upp the path, it was the happiest moment I ever experiences. After we had dinner with these fine people, the Waltons, we took our things and went to a hotel. We then pent a few days in Bountiful with the Woods, Father’s people. WE came home and moved into the Chet Sessions home now the Heman Hyde home. In the spring we moved up to the homestead. En was married to Elona Gardner and we all loved there until haying time. Then Ene and Elona moved to the ranch. . . What an awful summer! Ene built a house on the meadow. We moved to Auburn winters and back to the homestead in the spring. I remembered living in nine different houses. One winter we did the janitor work for the church for $50.00 a month. Loved on that plus the milk we sold from two cows. On February 5, 1922 another big baby boy came to love with us. He weighed 10 3/4 lbs. We had a girl ordered but when we got the boy wouldn’t have traded him for the best girl in the world. We really love him. WE were living in Hon Hurd’s old house at this time. His calf shed or grannery had a lean to on it and this was our bedroom. It was another cold night and a blizzard on. The stove smoked and we could hardly stand it. It was decided the ed had to be moved into the other room. While this was going on I was suffering terribly with labor pains. We were late calling the doctor and Ronald was born an hour before the doctor came. Les was the doctor. I was ton very badly and even though the doctor sewed me I never healed properly and had trouble the rest of my life. Life went on about the same, moving both spring and fall. On December 29, 1924, while living in Keith Hyde’s house, a lovely brown eyed boy came to gladden our home. He weighed 9 lbs. He was always a joy to have around, tried to please us. He was a good scholar. Not quite the athletes that Demar and Ronald were, but did play some football. His studies always came first. He received a four year scholarship to University of Wyoming, but went in the service on the V12 program instead. Les was to MIA the night Vern was born. They were having a party for Del and Bertha and I was afraid he was to be born before I got any help. Dr. West was my doctor this time. When they asked Demar where his baby sister was, he said, “I guess she is up in heaven.” My sister Ila came and stayed with me a while, four months before her first child, Thelma, was born. We moved back to the homestead in the spring. Les was road supervisor for two years. In the fall of 1927, we decided to stay on the hill all winter. Demar and Ronald had scarlet fever and Demar was very ill for ten days. Ronald was not quite so bad and was hard to keep in bed. Heman Hyde lived at the sulphur springs. They drove a school wagon, the first one to be out that way. The first fall Demar started to school, he rode a horse back and forth until we moved, and again in the spring. This was the fall our first baby girl was born. We were surely happy with her. The boys loved her very dearly. Mother was with me that night. Dr. West was the doctor. Les’s folds lived with Ene and Elona part of that winter as Elona had lost another baby. Grandma wouldn’t believe we had a girl until she came up and took her diaper off. Lucy Hurd stayed the ten days I was in bed. We named her Gayle. While she was very young, the boys got the whooping cough. Poor little Vern was the sick one this time. Our baby girl’s eyes and face was so swollen she could hardly see. The older boys were no so bad. It surely lasted a long time. That was a bad winter and so far from town or anyone. That is the only winter we lived on the homestead. Gayle was born November 10, 1927 and Bertha and Delbert go a baby girl the following December. They were always good friends and we spent many pleasant days together. We had good times as we raised our children. Sometimes on week ends we would take our little families and do down to Bedford and stay over night with Russell and Ila. Eventho we were married, we tried to spend at least two days a week helping our mother. Mother still had a large family at home and a lot of work to do. I am glad I was able to help her. She has done so many things for me. The winter 1928 we lived in Auburn again. Les word in canyon for three winters to get lumber to build a home. We did well to live and pay our debts. He worked as county road supervisor for two years. He was the first man to use a tractor and to build a graded road. We were living in a house owned by Ora George close to Delbert and Bertha. In the spring of 1929, April 19, another lovely baby girl came to gladden our hearts. Bertha was with me and the first thing she said after I came to was “You have another little girl with long dark eye lashes.” We were juts as happy as when our first daughter came. When I first found out we were to have another baby, I felt badly because Gayle was still so young. But it was wonderful to have two girls so close together. They loved each other so much and got along very well. Gayle took care of LaRue like a little mother. They were married the same day and I felt a little cheated to only have one wedding. In the spring of 1929 we started our home on the ranch. Les did most of the work himself. Delbert helped with the foundation. It was built out of sawed logs. We had to put as much house as possible under the same roof as we didn’t have much money to build with. I helped shingle and the boys helped a lot too. They were always good workers and very ambitious. We moved back in town and Les worked as much as possible. He always had to go to the ranch for hay to feed the few cows we had. We bought the ranch from Grandpa Hillyard. Ene got the best part and was able to build much sooner than we. They only raised two children but lost several shortly after birth. It was a bad spring, The roads were almost impassible. Bertha had sinus trouble very badly. She put off going to a doctor thinking they couldn’t afford it. We were unable to go into town for two weeks then we went to Sunday School. I sat by Will Walton, a dear friend, and he told me Bertha was in Soda Springs and they had operated on her and she was very sick. I nearly fainted to think how no one had bothered to come out and let me know. We were so close and I loved her so dearly,. Mother was out there with her. She got a little better and Del came home. Infection set in and we took her children and went out to see her. Her fever went to 108 and of course she never recovered. She passed away My 23, 1930 leaving four children. It was a great sorrow for some time. The greatest loss I had felt up to this time. That fall we moved into our new house. We didn’t have any water and had to go to the slew in the field with a team and cart and get water in big barrels for washing, bathing, etc. We went to a spring on the Johnson property for our drinking water. We were so happy to have a home we could live in the year round. The school bus came to the end of the lane. The boys had to catch it up there for a while. Then it started coming past the home. We had two bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room. We loved our new home to say the least. When Demar was a sophomore in high school, he had pneumonia. He surely was sick. All he wanted you to do for him when he was sick was to let him alone. Ronald was mor the nervous type and wanted you to be doing something for him all the time. He also had pneumonia when he was a sophomore but wasn’t sick as long as Demar was. When Vern was a sophomore he became very sick with an absess in his back behind his heart above his diaphragm. He became ill soon after school started in the fall. He kept running a fever and taking chills. They took many blood tests, x-rays, Dr. Worthen couldn’t decide what was causing it all. He decided to operated. They gave him a blood transfusion before starting. He reacted so negative to it they decided not to operate. Dr. Told us to take him home. It might be a week, month or a year before he could get out of bed. We felt terrible. It a few days Dr. Worthen came over to the house to check him. He was going to take a blood test and send it to Idaho Falls, but when he examined him he said to take him to Salt Lake. This was the thing we had been praying for. Estella Orton came and helped me get ready and we left the next day. Many doctors worked on him and their decision was to operate. The night before the operation, Les went to the Church office to get someone to help administer to Vern. Richard L. Evans came, Oh how he talked to the Lord. He asked a blessing on the nurses and doctors that they would know what to do. The next morning when Dr. Hatch came out of the operating room with a dish of thick yellow puss, he said we found it Mr. Hillyard. I do not know when I ever knew less what to do, but felt surer of doing the right thing and finding the trouble. We knew it was an answer to prayers and administration, a blessing from the Lord. Vern was a very sick boy for a long time. I stayed with him night and day. He never slept more than a half hour at a time. We stayed for six weeks and he still had a fever and couldn’t eat, but the doctors decided to let us take him home. That sure was a happy moment. He put his arms around my neck and we laughed and cried together. Les came for us and we were all so happy to get home. Jim was only three and the girls very young. We prayed constantly and our prayers were answered. Ven finally got well and graduated from high school with honors. He was always a good student. He was a wonderful boy, always trying to please us. He took tests and was admitted into the V12 Program of the service. He also got a scholarship for four years to the University of Wyoming, but world war II broke out and he went to the University of Minnesota in the V12 Program. He graduated from there as a Mechanical Engineer. He spent four months on the water and at Bermuda as a navy officer. Ronald left about the same time. He was drafted in the armed service. He was on his way to training camp. His father was binding grain with four horses. He had a run away and they pulled him from the binder and broke his shoulder. Dr. Called the draft board and Ronald was able to come home long enough to finish the fall work. They we took him to Salt lake and he enlisted int the Air Force. He wanted to be a pilot but couldn’t make it because of his eyes. He went into mechanical school. Demar was married but was also called up for his physical. He had blood pressure and a hernia and didn’t have to go into the service. About this time we built onto the house, making the kitchen bigger and a living room. What used to be the living room we used for a dining room. We got electricity and plumbed for water. We bought a bathroom outfit and a sink. Put new carpet in the living room and linoleum on the rest of the floors. We really thought we had a lovely home and enjoyed it very much. We enjoyed out two daughter and the had many friends. We bought a piano and they learned to play it quite well. They were good students in high school. They both played in the band. LaRue the clarinet and Gayle the saxophone. It was war time and many sports were canceled. They both had a care free life and we loved it and them very much. After graduation Gayle worked in Salt Lake for a while and was engaged to a fine young man, but when Byron Thurman came home from the army and was called to serve a mission she decided she would rather have him if the opportunity came and it did. LaRue and her high school sweetheart, Von Leavitt, decided to get married after graduation. I think Gayle didn’t want her to get married first so she and Byron were married before he went on his mission. They had a double wedding 12 August 1947. LaRue and Von went to Idaho Falls to live, We bout them a bedroom set and took them down. Gayle worked a the Star Valley Creamer C. while Byron was gone. She bought a car and many other things. When Byron came home they lived in Grover in a house they bought from Byron’s father. Les spent a lot of time fixing it up. They went to California to visit Von and LaRue who had moved down there. They got a job with Save On and Moved down. Both families have lived there ever since. The year my brother Jesse had his 50th birthday party we went to California in November. I took care of LaRue’s Children While she worked. Les worked a little at Save On for Dee Gardner doing carpenter work. He enjoyed it and we planned on selling the ranch and Les was going to be care taker in Same On Store for Dee Gardner. While we were there, Les got very sick with his stomach ulcers and he hemorraged real bad. We took him to the hospital and they operated on him. Took 3/4 of his stomach out. He had 13 blood transfusions. When he got well enough to leave the hospital, we took him to my sister’s place, the Johnsons. It the spring we went home. That summer I went to the canyon and got out fence posts. Les got well enough to work for my brother Don at the tractor company. They were fixing a heavy piece of metal which fell and hit Les on the head, giving him a brain concussion. He suffered all winter with one thing and another. The following summer he went to Idaho Falls and had a prostate gland operation. The next winter we went back to California. I worked for Ted Hall in Laundromat. We lived with the Thurmans. Jim was in Australia at this time on a mission. We came back home again in the spring. Les worked for Don. This summer he had a real bad heart attack. He was in the hospital for four weeks. When Jim’s mission was over, he had planned on going around the world. His Father had been ill so much I though he should come home but Les said, “No, I have got to be a lot worse than I am now before I would have him not go.” Jim and three other Elders got on the boat. They started out and in a very short time they had hear of a ship crew going on strike. Jim was impressed that he shouldn’t go so he got his luggage, got on a plane to Hawaii and then a boat on to the states. He was only home five week when his father passed away. After the funeral and all was over, it was terrible. I felt there was nothing to live for. Jim and I took Vern and his family to Green River to catch the train to Houston, Texas where they lived. Jim and I went to Salt Lake where he enrolled at the University of Utah to finish his schooling. In the summer we came home and Jim guided for Ted Hale and cooked for the hunters. It was good to be in the mountains. We went back to Salt Lake when school started. We lived in the 33rd ward. I made many wonderful friends there. I worked at Excelsis Beauty Factory for 3 ½ months. I also worked in the kitchen of the temple. This was a lovely experience. I made the pies, mashed potatoes and cut the meat. Here I met a cousin, Mabel Goodfellow. We spent many happy times together. In the spring we came home and I worked at the Silver Stream Café, went to the hunting camp in the fall. I also cared for my Mother for quite some time. In the fall jim went back to school and I went to Texas and stayed with Vern and family. I came back to Salt Lake when Jim graduated. Jim had to go to Army camp and he had graduated from ROTC 2nd Leutenant. I stayed with Mabel and worked in Bountiful Community Hospital for three months. When I came home Bishop Hurd asked me if I would except a mission call. I was taking care of Mother at the time and felt like I was in prison. Pres. ElRay Christenson interviewed me and said it would be hard to find a companion for an older lady. I said don’t worry, maybe I could work in the temple. He said, “You would make a lovely temple worker. Later I went back to Houston because Phillis was expecting a new baby, Tena Beth. I hadn’t been there long when the call came for me to serve in the Texas mission. I didn’t dare refuse, as I felt the all came of the Lord. I went to Dr. Walker in Houston and he said, “I never hear of such a thing as sending a woman 64 years old into the mission field.” The baby came in about ten days and I came home for a week and then to the mission home. I spent 18 months in the Texas Mission. I arrived home June 10, 1963. I lived on the ranch one summer and the we decided to move the house to Afton. I took care of Mother for some time again and it was very trying after being in the mission field. I sold the homestead, paid off mortgage, paid for the house to be moved. I have held many positions in the church. One of the high lights was my call as Visiting Teacher instructor in the stake Relief Society. President Winters gave me a lovely blessing when he set me apart. I enjoyed my trips to Salt Lake with the Stake Board to General conference. They were all so lovely to me. I served for 5 years, was released fall of 1973. I am now Ward representative for mutual interest group for 2nd Ward. I enjoy it too. I am also leader of High Priest group of ladies who are widows. Responsible for having home evening with them. They are Leona Hyde, Luella Gardner, Gene Broadbent, Bertha Colby and myself. I now have 25 Grandchildren and eleven great grandchildren, all of whom I love very dearly. We had so many good time together when the children were young. We always went to Sunday School together also Sacrament Meeting. They were very good children. Demar always took the responsibility with his father in getting the work done. All three of the older boys got up and milked a few cows before they went to school. They always had something to do so they learned to work and help to make a living. Demar Loved to play football and kept the training rules to the letter. When he was sick with pnuemonia, Viola Miller fixed him a toddy, but he wouldn’t take it because it had liquor in it. Many times he walked from Afton after ball practice. He didn’t want to stay away from home. He was a very good player. He was noted as the toughest, ruffest, best football player Star Valley ever had up to that time. When he graduated, he was offered scholarships to several different colleges. But he didn’t want to go to college. He loved the farm and especially the horses. Ronald was a good ball player too. He played basketball and football all four years of high school. He was offered scholarships and finally accepted one to University of Wyoming. We were disappointed he only went one quarter but he wasn’t happy there. He got to chasing around with fellows who had mor money than we could give him and it didn’t work out. In 1935 we bought a bus to haul the high school students to Afton. This was the year a little brown eyed baby boy came to make his home with us. We named him James Wood Hillyard, born November 23, 1935. WE all enjoyed him. He grew very fast, was the smallest baby I had. Dr. Worthen said, “I thought your said you had big babies. This one isn’t going to be very big.” My sister in law Elvon was expecting about the same time. Les went up town about two weeks before Jim was born I went up town and found out Elvon had her baby. I told Les to call the doctor, that Elvon wasn’t suppose to have her baby before me. The doctor gave me some medicine to start me. It was a hard delivery. Took all night but Dr. Worthen stayed with me. It was Thanksgiving day the next day. Grandma and Grandpa Hillyard came down and Ene’s family came over and had dinner with us. I had had so much dope I felt like I was floating on air. Demar and Russell went hunting the next day. Ron was so anxious to hold the baby. He was quite a play thing. He slept with Ron. Demar and Vern slept together. Those were wonderful years. In February, Ron and Vern were skiing on the hill north of the house. I called to them to come in, their dad wanted to cut their hair. Ron said just one more jump. They tied Vern’s skis on and just one more jump he fell and broke his leg. The snow was so deep and soft we couldn’t get up to him. Les and Demar built a slip and crawled on their hands and knees to get him. There was so much snow that year we couldn’t get the car out, so we had to take Vern to town in the school wagon and team. It was a long way. They girls went into Auburn to stay with Grandma Hillyard. It was past midnight before Dr. Worthen got the leg set. Francis and Elgin lived in Afton then so we stayed at their house because it was so expensive to stay in the hospital. Vern was strapped to the bed with weights on his leg and over the foot of the bed to pull the muscles out so the bone could go into place. He lay on his back for six weeks. He learned his requirements for a deacon. Bishop George came to see him often and always brought him something to eat. He was in a cast for 6months, learned to get around real well. When his dad cut the cast off he screamed, “You have cut my leg off.” All the time we were in town, Les and the boys kept house and drove the school bus. The girls came over some weekends. WE were all happy to get back home again together. It was a long winter. On March 13, 1942, Demar broke the family circle by getting married. We were very proud of him and the sweet girl he married. They had to make a living the hard way. They worked for Ene and lived on his ranch the first few years. On August 28, 1959, 5:00 am my heart was torn with grief in the passing of my dear companion. It was so terrible to be parted from one you shared all your joys and sorrows. For nearly forty three years I never said anything, never heard anything, never saw anything, never did anything, that I didn’t share with him. Then all of a sudden there was no one to love you, to feel sorry for you, no one to depend on to lean upon. It was a sick, lonely experience. My only comforting thought was of a brighter tomorrow when we will surely meet in a better place. Where sorrow and parting is not know. I had to redirect my desires thoughts, ambitions and aspirations. It is an empty looking life before you, but must go on. I am very thankful for the wonderful life we had together and for our lovely family including our grandchildren. James, our youngest son, had just been home from Australia five weeks when his father was taken away. Les was so proud of Jim, his accomplishments in the mission field and his schooling. He got to go to stake priesthood meeting with him and hear him bear his testimony. There are many things in life we can’t do anything about and we just have to go on and make the best of our lives. It was hard on all the children. It about broke Gayle’s heart. Her “Daddy” was something special to her. Poor Vern, who had been away from home for so long and had been our most home loving child, felt he had been cheated by not being with his father more. Demar, the oldest one, on whom so much responsibility fell and who had learned to love and respect his father so much. He made the remark that Jim had been cheated for he would never know his Dad like he did. Also our big boy Ronald, who had such pretty golden curls and was always a joy to us. Oh, how his Father would loved to love to see time take his family to the temple and have them sealed to him. I surely hope some day it will happen. Fred, their youngest son, was the last one the “Pop” ever baptized and confirmed. We surely did enjoy that evening also the sacrament meeting when he confirmed Fred. LaRue really felt badly. She says her father was always so tolerant with Von’s shortcomings and always gave him the benefit of the doubt and said he knew that time would come when all would be well with him. He felt Von would overcome his weaknesses and work in the church. I often think of Roger, our oldest grandson, whom we are so proud of, saying to his grandfather, “With your brains grandpa and my strength we can do anything.” Les loved his grandchildren so much. I which he could have know all of them and also these lovely great grandchildren. I’m sure he does know them all and rejoices in their many accomplishments, as I do. I have always loved the gospel and don’t know how I could stand up to trials in life without it. I have enjoyed serving in different capacities. Some of the position I have held I will try to list below: Secretary in the Sunday School- 1912-1915 Secretary in the Relief Society- 1919-1929 Counselor to Eliza Cranney in the Primary- 1930 Sustained as President- 1931-1935 Counselor to Verba Taylor- 1936 Sustained as President-1937-1941 Counselor to Mabel Lindberg in the Relief Society- Dec 7, 1941 Counselor to Estella Orton- 1944 Sustained as President of the Relief Society- May 5, 1946-1950 Stake Relief Society as Magazine Agent Theology class leader in the Stake Bee Hive Teacher in the MIA for five years Junior Sunday Coordinator for five years 1 964 moves to Afton 2nd ward Trecker teacher two years Top Pilot Teacher for one year in the Primary Visiting Teacher in 2nd ward Visiting Teacher class leader September 1969- was set apart by President Winters as Stake Relief Society Visiting Teacher Leader. I was given a lovely blessing at this time. Special Interest Leader in 2nd Ward 1971 Leader of the High Priest Group of Ladies who are widows to hold Home Evening

Demar Wood Hillyard

Contributor: Celique Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I was born at Auburn, Lincoln, Wyoming, 16 Mar. 1918 in an old house located where Fay Nelson now lives. Dr. Lafayette Reese brought me into the world. It was a very cold night and the house was open and drafty. Dr. Reese stood with Dad’s sheep skin coat wrapped around his feet to keep warm while waiting for me to arrive. Mother was terribly sick at the time and nearly died from hemorrhage. I was a big baby, weighing 10 pounds. Dr. Reese thought I was a fine baby. He offered mother 1000 dollars for me. He had no children of his own. I was a healthy baby and all through my childhood, but took most of the children diseases as they came along. My parents are Leslie Hillyard and Ada Elizabeth Wood. I have two sisters, Gayle and LaRue and three brothers, Ronald, Vern and James, all younger than myself. I was 15 months old when my father went on a mission to the Northen States. Mother and I lived with Grandmother Wood most of the time he was gone. Mother worked very hard at different places to earn money for us. About this time there was an epidemic of the flu. Both mother and I got it. We were very sick and the Elders were called to administer to us. I was taught the principals of the gospel from infancy. As soon as I learned to talk my Mother taught me to say my prayers. I am very thankful for the religious training I received in my home. When I was three years old I fell from a load of hay and broke my arm. I loved the farm and horses. I harnessed the horses for Dad when I was so small I had to stand on the mangers to reach their necks. I had the wood to carry and helped milk the cows. Mother said I was always willing to work and do y share around the home. Homes were rather poor at that time. We had none of the modern conveniences provided by electricity. We had only the necessities of life, but were happy and thankful. We lived at the homestead in the summer and moved down town through the coldest part of winter. When I stared school, I rode a horse from the homestead to Auburn every morning (3 miles) and back at night. I was fourteen years old when Father built our new home on the ranch. We were all thrilled with it. There would be no more moving twice a year. I loved my home and liked to be there, especially when night came. Even after I was in high school and had to stay up for the athletics I would walk home (10 miles) rather than stay in Afton or Auburn. I was a bashful boy and refused to dance or mix with the other children in their fun and games. This was always a worry to my Mother, who wanted me to have a good time. Most of my good times were riding horses and calves. My playmates were my Mother’s brother Denzel and my cousin Ellis Leavitt. At the age of 10 I had scarlet fever. When I was a sophomore in high school I had pneumonia Both times I was very sick and was administered to. I graduated from high school in 1936. I was very active in sports, mainly football and track. I won a trophy in track for the 440 yard dash and a metal for the 220. I enjoyed very much the trips we took in competition with other schools. Recreation I like best are ball games and movies. I met my future wife when I was a freshman in high school. She was still in grade school, 7th grade. Even tho she lived neighbors to me, I didn’t have much association wit her until after graduation from high school. She was a beautiful young lady named Virginia Anderson. There is a saying “Behind every successful man there is a great woman.” That turned out to be the case with me. I owe much of my success to her, especially my spiritual growth. She is a lady of great faith and lives up to her convictions and dedication to the Gospel. Whenever I talked about her, I told them, “She is the best thing that ever happened to me. We have had a wonderful 56 years together. We have five children. All of whom I take great pride in. They are all educated for a profession in life. Irene graduated from LDS Business College so she can enter the business world. Roger has a maters as a business major and is employed as a professor at SUU. Debra graduated from Ricks College in the field of nursing. Trudy graduated from a dental school as a dentist assistant and also a graduate from SUU. Kevan received a masters from Utah State University as a music major. They are all active in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and are temple worthy. What greater blessings could anyone have. Virginia and I served a 15 month mission in San Jose, California, a wonderful experience. Demar Died of a stroke 1 March 1998.

Life timeline of Gayle Thurman (Hillyard)

Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) was born on 10 Nov 1927
Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) was 12 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) was 17 years old when World War II: The Allied invasion of Normandy—codenamed Operation Overlord—begins with the execution of Operation Neptune (commonly referred to as D-Day), the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy in France. The Allied soldiers quickly break through the Atlantic Wall and push inland in the largest amphibious military operation in history. The Allies of World War II, called the United Nations from the 1 January 1942 declaration, were the countries that together opposed the Axis powers during the Second World War (1939–1945). The Allies promoted the alliance as a means to control German, Japanese and Italian aggression.
Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) was 25 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) was 37 years old when Thirty-five hundred United States Marines are the first American land combat forces committed during the Vietnam War. The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.
1977
Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) was 50 years old when Star Wars is released in theaters. Star Wars is a 1977 American epic space opera film written and directed by George Lucas. It is the first film in the original Star Wars trilogy and the beginning of the Star Wars franchise. Starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, Alec Guinness, David Prowse, James Earl Jones, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, and Peter Mayhew, the film focuses on the Rebel Alliance, led by Princess Leia (Fisher), and its attempt to destroy the Galactic Empire's space station, the Death Star.
Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) was 55 years old when Michael Jackson's Thriller, the best-selling album of all time, was released. Michael Joseph Jackson was an American singer, songwriter, and dancer. Dubbed the "King of Pop", he was one of the most popular entertainers in the world, and was the best-selling music artist during the year of his death. Jackson's contributions to music, dance, and fashion along with his publicized personal life made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades.
Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) died on 4 Jan 1997 at the age of 69
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Gayle Thurman (Hillyard) (10 Nov 1927 - 4 Jan 1997), BillionGraves Record 27404 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

Loading