George Lionel Farrell

16 Feb 1829 - 21 Sep 1921

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George Lionel Farrell

16 Feb 1829 - 21 Sep 1921
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Grave site information of George Lionel Farrell (16 Feb 1829 - 21 Sep 1921) at Logan City Cemetery in Logan, Cache, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

George Lionel Farrell

Born:
Died:

Logan City Cemetery

Tenth East
Logan, Cache, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

George Farrell and his wives
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DdraigGoch

June 8, 2013
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MargieW

June 18, 2013
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OurFamilyBefore

May 31, 2013

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Life History of Charles Croshaw, brother of Thomas Croshaw

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

This history contains the life of Charles Croshaw, the brother of Thomas Croshaw. Though Thomas is not the exact subject of this sketch, he and his wife Louisa are mentioned various times throughout this history and therefore may be of great worth to his descendants. Charles Croshaw, son of James Avery Croshaw and Mary King was born 22 August 1839 in Bedworth Warwickshire, England. When Charles was nine years old his father died. When he was eleven years old he went to work in the coal mines in Warwickshire to help support the family of eight. When he was eighteen to twenty years old he went to work for a large construction company at Barrion Furnace. In the spring of 1860 Charles heard for the first time the gospel, as told by the Latter-Day Saints from a man whom he knew as John Lloyd. He was baptized 6 August 1868. During this time, Charles began keeping company with Hannah Atkins, a beautiful young lady with deep set eyes and long black shiny hair. She was the daughter of John Atkins and Elizabeth Vale. Hannah left the home to seek employment upon the death of her mother. She found employment at Hansley Hall, a part of the Kings Palace as the chief cook. She worked there for three years. Charles and Hannah were married on December 20, 1868 and began housekeeping in Barrion Furnace Hannah was not receptive to the gospel but Charles knew that he had heard the Gospel in its plainness and rather than give up what he knew to be true, it was decided that they should separate. The night before the separation was to take place, Hannah met her father in a dream. He told her that what her husband had done was the right thing and that the gospel was true. On the day they were to separate things were changed completely and they began to make arrangement to come to the United States. They set sail about August 1869 and arrived in New York early September 1869. About two weeks later their first child, Mary Elizabeth was born in Williamsburg, New York. Charles’ brother Thomas traveled with them from England but did not remain in New York. Rather, he came to Utah and spent time working on the Temple in Salt Lake City. Charles was unable to obtain employment in New York so he went to Pennsylvania to work in the coal mines. Hannah joined him there later. She was baptized on 1 January 1870 in the icy Pennsylvania River. She supported her husband in every way and she herself served in many positions in the Church. Early in the fall of 1870 they travelled by train to Ogden, Utah. Andrew Shumway, who became a close friend, led them to Mendon, Utah. Their first home was a dugout in the side of a hill. Here their second daughter Louisa was born on 14 October 1870. To help Hannah while she was confined, Louisa Lloyd, daughter of John Lloyd came to live with them. While here, she met Charles’ brother, Thomas Croshaw. They were married in the Endowment House about 1872 and moved into the dugout with Charles and Hannah. In the spring of 1872, Hannah gave birth to a son, Charles Edward. Two years later another son, John James joined the family. They were born in a log cabin with a dirt floor. About the time, Charles homesteaded 160 acres of land south of Oxford Idaho and built a log house 16 feet by 20 feet where they lived until a new home was built in 1881. In the years 1876 and 1877 Charles made two freight trips with ox teams and wagons from Corinne, Utah to the mines in Butte, Montana. On his return trip home in the early winter of 1877 Charles encountered temperatures of 60 degrees below zero and nearly froze to death but returned home safely. In 1878 Charles and Thomas decided to go into the sawmill business. That summer they built roads into Cottonwood Valley and set up two mills, a shingle mill and lumber mill. The building of the road into Cottonwood Valley was a very hard task. After crossing the main ridge of the mountain, they had a three mile dug way known as Croshaw’s Dug Way. All traffic traveled this road. Later a road was cut through the “narrows” which eliminated the trip over the hill. They began operation of the shingle mill first. In order to operate the lumber mill, a mill race was built out of the Cottonwood Creek and ran it about a quarter-of-a-mile where they had a drop sufficient to run a turbine that outdated the water-powered shingle mill. When they began to operate the mills thousands of board feet of lumber were sawed. This was hauled to northern Utah and southern Idaho. Many barns and buildings in those areas got their lumber and shingles from these mills. Charles’ brother Benjamin had come from England with his wife and eight children to help run the mills. They lived with Charles and family in the 16 x 20 home. During this time, Jim Grant from Virginia and Claude Hamilton, both with saw mill experience came to run the mills. These mills operated full blast for seven months of the year but the winters were too severe for logging or milling. In the fall of 1881 the mills were sold to a company by the name of Fielding and Ferguson. Thinking that all men were honest, no papers were signed and no money advanced. They turned over the mills but no money was ever received. They found themselves in debt for the mills and in order to satisfy their creditors, Charles sold a part of his farm and Thomas sold his place and moved to Grouse Creek, west of Oxford. On December 4, 1880 Hannah gave birth to a daughter, Annie Vale. She died in 1883. Charles Croshaw served faithfully in many Church positions and his contribution to Oxford were the planting of the tall poplar trees that surrounded each block and added shade and beauty to the once thriving town. He was a truck gardener and hauled his produce and fruit as far north as Pocatello and as far south as Logan, Utah selling it as he went. He was an agent for the Deseret News for 27 years and a subscriber for 38 years. He also, with his son-in-law Lionel Farrell introduced dry farming in that area. He reported to the Deseret News that his sons raised 3,000 bushels of grain on land that had grown nothing but sagebrush. Hannah Croshaw died in 1912. Charles remained in Oxford and continued his work until his death in 1917. Thomas and Benjamin eventually moved to Pocatello, Idaho where they established homes and raised their families.

Journal entries from: http://mormonmigration.lib.byu.edu/Search/showDetails/db:MM_MII/t:account/id:616

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Journal of George Lionel Farrell Tuesday, June 27, 1876 (Nottingham) I arose at 6:15 feeling tired but well. Got all things ready and started for Liverpool at 12:25 p.m., 100 miles. Arrived at 42 Islington at 4 o'clock p.m. Met Brother and Sister Carrington feeling well and pleased to see me. President [Albert] Carrington did not feel well about my having to go home for said he, "You are the very man we want here to help roll on the work and spread the gospel in parts unexplored by the elders." Said he intended to keep me here another year if this call had not come from President Young. He said was more than satisfied with my labors in the ministry and asked the Lord to bless me in all my labors and travels through life. All the elders in the mission felt very sorry to part with me, especially P. D. Lymon. He felt extremely bad about my having to leave. Wednesday, June 28, 1876 (Liverpool) I slept on the ship last night and rested well. I got up early and walked up to 42 Islington & settled up the emigration of Alfred Orton and Sarah Anne Astill and got them on the ship & gave them their berths. I [p.37] then went tp and berthed all the Saints from the British Isles, all feeling splendid. I then returned to "42" [Islington] and settled up my business. Left the draft I had in my possession for the emigration of Mrs. Emilia Hickling of 22 Richmond Street, Nottingham with Elder David McKenzie for Mrs. Hickling's emigration only. Then went out and bought a few presents for my children and returned to the ship and took the names of the following returning missionaries viz: N. C. Flygare, George L. Farrell, John U. Stucki, W. H. Maughn, Edward Snelgrove, Thomas D. Evans, Henry Eyring, V. L. Halliday, Knud Peterson, A. N. Anderson, Joseph H. Parry, William J. Lewis, Thomas C. Martell, John Anderson, C. J. Gustafsen, S. C. Hansen, N. P. Jeppsen, Fred Theurer, J. J. Walsen, H. C. Fowler, (20 in number). At 3 o'clock we set sail with 636 Saints on board the fine steamship Idaho viz: from Scandinavia 399, from Swiss & German mission 106, from the British Isles 111, and 20 returning missionaries. All in splendid health and spirits. As we sailed down the river we proceeded to make the following organization. N. C. Flygare for president with G. L. Farrell, J. U. Stucki, and William H. Maughn for his assistance. V. L. Halliday captain of guard with J. H. Parry for his assistant and G. L. Farrell secretary for the company. We divided the company into ten wards with a president over each ward. N. C. Flygare to take charge of the Saints [p.38]from Scandinavia with John Anderson and A. R. Anderson for chaplains and Knud Peterson captain of guard. John U. Stucki takes charge of the Swiss and German Saints, with J. J. Walsen for chaplain and F. Theurer captain of guard. George L. Farrell to take charge of the Saints from the British Isles, with W. J. Lewis for chaplain and William Hull captain of guard. The chaplains to have prayers in their wards at 7 o'clock a.m. and 9 o'clock p.m. each day and all hands are expected to be to bed at 10 o'clock p.m. and the guard are to see the above carried out. Captain Beddoe is a gentleman without paint and as far as I have learned his officers ditto. And with the blessings of the Lord we anticipate a speedy, prosperous, and jolly trip. Thursday, June 29 10:30 a.m. (Queenstown) We put in here for mail, passengers, and water. Stopped for an hour and then went on our way rejoicing. Sea beautifully smooth. Made 300 miles by 4:30 p.m. Enjoyed myself well today. Have had quite a talk to a gentleman by the name of Cross, a doctor. He says we have the Bible on our side and that our doctrines are reasonable. But he thought we could make more converts if we would do away with polygamy. I told him that we couldn't help it if we did not make any converts as the Lord had told us to teach certain principles and we dare not preach any other. We are in the same position that the [p.39] prophet Noah was and if the whole world reject our doctrine we cannot help it any more than Noah could. And Jesus has promised us that the people should be the same in the day of his coming as they were in the days of Noah which he admitted. I retired to rest at 10:50 p.m. Friday, June 30, 1876 (At sea) - I arose at 6:30 a.m. feeling well. After breakfast I went all around the ship with captain and chief steward and Brother N. C. Flygare and found all the berths clean and neat, and every person seemed to feel well. After dinner I had a good game of shuttle board on deck with Brother Flygare and [Joseph H.] Parry. The wind is ahead of us, but we are making good time. Have made 287 miles today with the prospect of fair weather for the next 24 hours. Retired at 10:30 feeling well. Saturday, July 1, 1876 (At sea) I arose at 7 o'clock feeling well. Ate a good breakfast. Visited all the Saints and encouraged them all I could. In the evening the weather became a little thick & signs of rain. The wind being ahead and pretty strong, impeded our progress materially. We have only made 249 miles today. At 9 p.m., I went down into the steerage and attended prayers with the Saints. [p.40] Sunday, July 2, 1876 (At sea) I arose at 6:30 feeling well. Wind strong. Sea rough and raining fast. Nearly all the Saints and elders are seasick. Brother [W.H,] Maughn & myself stands it bravely and we have been kept busy nearly all day waiting upon the sick. I attended meeting in the saloon today. The captain conducted the service in the old Church of England style. We made 261 miles today. I attended prayers with the Saints in the steerage & retired. Monday, July 3, 1876 (At sea) Weather fine this morning. Sea is smoothed down considerable. I have been very busy in getting the Saints up on deck in the fresh air. A great many are still sick. We have only made 246 miles today. After dinner the Saints felt much better. They sang hymns and songs most of the afternoon. I attended prayers in the steerage with the Saints & retired at 10:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 4, 1876 (At sea) Another fine day and most of the Saints feel splendid and are forgetting their seasickness. The deck is nearly covered with Saints feeling well. We have made 265 miles today. Sea smooth and weather fine but rather cold. I retired at 11 o'clock p.m. [p.41] Wednesday, July 5, 1876 (At sea) I arose early & went all round among the Saints, found them all improving. Attended prayers with them, then went to breakfast. It is very foggy this morning so that they have to sound the foghorn every few minutes all day. We have made 270 miles today. The sea is tolerable smooth and we are gliding along splendidly. We saw thousands of porpoises pass the ship, skipping out of the water every few minutes. In the evening, I, in company with Brother John Anderson went through the steerage and administered to four sick persons who were very low. Brother Anderson anointed them and I was mouth in prayer. They all felt immediate relief. I then attended prayers with the English Saints and retired at 10:30 p.m. Thursday, July 6, 1876 (At sea) We are now crossing the banks of Newfoundland and a beautiful morning. Sea smooth and the Saints feel well. We have made 245 miles today. I have just had a good sing on deck with Brother Griggs, Stucki, Halliday, Walser, and Fowler and am now going to dinner at 5 o'clock p.m. In the evening the wind blew up a stiff breeze from the northwest and the sea became pretty rough. I attended prayers in the steerage & retired. [p.42] Friday, July 7, 1876 (At sea) This is [so] far the roughest morning we have had. Scores of the folks are seasick. Some of them are very bad. Brother Anderson called upon me to administer to a sister who is very sick with fever. We have only made 214 miles today. After tea the wind fell and the sea smoothed down considerable. I went through all the passengers and administered to their wants until 10 o'clock, then retired. Saturday, July 8, 1876 (At sea) I arose at 6 o'clock feeling well. The sea is as smooth as oil this morning and the weather beautiful. All the people feel well & are out on deck. Met a steamship at 12 miles [probably Midday] with a great many emigrants on board. We have made 281 miles today. We are now four hundred 90 miles from Sandy Hook, New York and good prospects of fair weather. Captain Charles James Beddoe just presented me with a Guion Line Travelers Guide. Retired at 10:30 p.m. feeling well. Sunday, July 9, 1876 (At sea) - The pilot came on board at 5 o'clock a.m. Fine morning. Held sacrament meeting at 7:30 and public meeting at 2 o'clock p.m. Brother H. C. Fowler and G. L. Farrel each occupied 35 minutes and Brother Maughn [p.43] ten minutes. We then went to and organized each company into messes of 15 persons with a commissary over each mess. We have made 287 miles today. Smooth sea, wind fair; making good time. Monday, July 10th , 1876 8 o'clock a.m. (New York) We arrived in good health and had to land at pier number 46 in consequence of the Castle Garden taking fire at 5 o'clock last evening and burnt up. We only saw a few lone posts left standing and they were still smoking. We transferred our luggage at a barge and ferry boat and took them to pier number 1 and started the commissaries out to buy their provisions. We, Brother N. C. Flygare, W. H. Maughn, Henry Eyring, and G. S. L. Farrel, posted our letters, cashed our P.O. orders, and settled up our business with Brother [William] Staines. Then went to work and shipped the Saints over the river to New Jersey and put them on the cars at the Mantua Station on the Pennsylvania Railroad. Got the checks for our luggage and started for Utah at 10:12 o'clock p.m. in good order but feeling extremely tired. Tuesday, July 11th , 1876 (Harrisburg) We arrived here at 10:45 a.m. Bought some provisions and started on her way at 11:40. Reached Mifflin, the county seat of Mifflin County on the Juniata [p.44] River, Pennsylvania. Here we filled our water tanks and started out winding our way between the mountains reaching the town of Tuirone at 6 p.m. This town is situated in a beautiful bed of Juniata River. At a point where we leave it for Pittsburgh, we passed Altoona at 7 o'clock p.m. This is where the Pennsylvania Railroad Company shops are situated and they are very fine buildings in a very nice little town. Here we put on three engines and marched up the mountains towards the horseshoe bend with the passengers and another engine with the luggage. We passed the bend at eight o'clock a.m. and we had a good view of it. Arrived at Pittsburgh at 1:30 midnight and unloaded the people into the station and put up for the night. Wednesday, July 12, 1876 (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) Early in the morning I went to the station master and ask him when he was going to forward our company but could get no satisfaction. 3/4 of our people lay out in the open shed and a 1/4 in the street for 11 hours and were treated very poorly indeed; so much so that I think every person in the company will always remember Pittsburgh with unpleasant feelings. Several strangers observed that no other people but ours would stand such treatment. Myself & Brother William Maughn told the railroad manager that we would only wait half an hour longer for cars and if they were not forthcoming in that time [p.45] we should take measures to force them and we were furnished the cars forthwith. At 1 o'clock p.m. we started on our way rejoicing in 17 cars. We traveled on until midnight at good speed, when the train broke in two causing a heavy jar, waking up all the passengers. But we soon got a new link in and started on our way. Thursday, July 13, 1876 (Union City) 6 a.m. This city stands half in Ohio and half in Indiana. Filled water tanks and started on our way. . . . [JOURNAL ABRUPTLY ENDS] [p.46] BIB: Farrell, George Lionel. Journal (Ms 5671), fd. 3, vol. 3, pp. 38-44. (CHL)

Farrell, George Lionel, [Interview], in "Utah Pioneer Biographies," 44 vols., 10:16-17. https://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/sources/4868/farrell-george-lionel-interview-in-utah-pioneer-biographies-44-vols-10-16-17

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

9. At what place did you join the company or wagon train with which you came to Utah? 9. He joined captain James S. Brown's Company as assistant captain and captain of the guard. After they had been on the road for two weeks captain Brown was taken ill and Bishop Farrell was called to take his place. 10. What was the place of your destination in Utah? 10. Place arrived: On reaching Utah, August 12, 1859, they went to Farmington where he lived for a quarter of a year. 13. Method of travel (handcart, ox team, mule team, horseback, etc.) 13. Method of travel was by ox team.

Snippet from "The Improvement Era vol.25" pg 94

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

George Lionel Farrell, 92 years of age, passed away in his home at Smith field, Cache Co., September 21. The deceased was for many years prom inent in church and political activities, and he was a successful pioneer in the important work of dry farming. He was born at Howelsfield, Gloucester shire, England, February 16, 1829, the son of William and Alice Sadler (Bird) Farrell. After the death of his father he brought his mother and three sisters to Iowa, before he reached his majority, living there for a number of years, and then coming to Utah in 1859. The Farrells settled first at Farmington, where it is recorded that the young man took a con tract for getting out the winter’s wood for Amasa M. Lyman. In 1860 Cache county was opened to settlement, and Mr. Farrell left F armington and went to Logan, where his energy and ability soon identified him with the pioneer and growing community. He was tithing clerk of Cache stake from 1860 till 1880, county recorder of Cache county from 1860 till 1880, county recorder of Cache county from I860 till 1884, postmaster at Logan from 1862 till 1874, filled a mission to England, 1874-76, and was bishop of Smithfield from 1888 till 1900. It was about 1872 that Mir. Farrell was led to undertake his work in the development of dry-farming and, after years of experimenting, he made a success of it. Mr. Farrell attended every dry-farm congress since the organization of that body and was the author of numer ous pamphlets on various phases of the subject. Even after passing the age of 90. Mr. Farrell remained in good health save for failing eyesight, his sons and daughters declaring that, so far as they can remember, he was never sick a day in his life. W‘hen the summons came it was without pain; just a gradual fading out of the flame. So peaceful was the end that those who stood by his bed, where he slept saw no sign of struggle; they saw only that the breathing had ceased.

A Practical Lesson by George. From "The Improvement Era: Volume 25 pg 200"

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

A PRACTICAL LESSON ON THE WORTH OF A DOLLAR IN HOME INDUSTRY Speaking of the work a dollar does at home reminds me of an incident that I have related many times. Years ago there was a great drive in this section of the country to support home-made goods, and I was one who was deeply interested in it, being a member of several committees that were working to bring about this policy. I remember that during our conference we had a meeting‘ in the Assembly Hall one evening and on_e of the speakers on that occasion was the then bishop of Smithfield, George L. Farrell, Brother Farrell said that for twenty odd years, or perhaps he said thirty, he had been coming down to conference twice a year and, knowing that all the stock; in the railroad running through that country was owned by eastern capitalists, he had marked the money which he paid for his tickets to see if he ever got any of it back again. “I have also,” he said, “marked the money that I paid lfor home-made goods to see if I got any of that back again, I never got any of my railroad money back,” he con tinued, “but one reason that I always buy home-made goods is that I think a whole lot of George L. Farrell and I like to get my money back again, and time and time again when I have bought home made goods and marked the money, that identical money, staying in the community and circulating around, has come back to me. And it is because I think a great deal of myself, as well as my neighbors, that I buy shoes made at home for my children, that I buy home made cloth out of which to make clothes for those children.” Then he said: “To give you a practical illustration: When starting for this identical conference, standing at the depot at Smithfield I saw a man who had made some shoes for my children, and I walked up and handed him five_dollars to pay for those shoes; he saw somebody else in the group to whom he owed five dollars, and he handed him the five; this man saw another to whom he was indebted and handed him the same piece of money; and ‘he in tum saw another man and handed it to him until finally after five or six debts had been paid with the same piece of money the last man to receive it came up to me and said, ‘Brother Farrell, I owe you six dollars. Here is five on my account/—and I put my home-made shoes money back into my trousers pocket.” Twenty or thirty dollars’ worth of debts were thus paid by patronizing one shoe maker in Smithfield, the money was saved at home by circulating around, it paid these many debts and at length landed back into the pocket where it started from. That was a practical lesson, and a practical lesson that ought to count.

Biography from: History and Genealogy for Cache County, Utah Volunteers Dedicated to Free Genealogy http://genealogytrails.com/utah/cache/bios/bios_f.html

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

GEORGE LIONEL FARRELL George Lionel Farrell, one of the patriarchs of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and a resident of Smithfield, was born February 16, 1829, in Hewelsfield, Gloucestershire, England, being the third son of William and Alice Sadler (Bird) Farrell. The father died when the son was about nine years of age and therefore his opportunity for securing an education was very limited, as he had to assist in the support of the family. He was apprenticed to the tailor's trade and after seven years' work in the shop, believing it to be too confining, he found employment as a gardener and nurseryman. Becoming a convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he was baptized March 1. 1850, by Elder James Edmonds and in the following September was ordained to the priesthood and sent out to work as a missionary. In January, 1853, he was ordained an elder by John Van Cott and in February of that year sailed for America with his mother and three sisters on the ship International, while his affianced bride, Jane Williams, was also of the party. After his arrival on this side of the Atlantic he secured employment for his mother, his sister and himself. In March, 1854, the lady whom he expected to marry passed away. At Council Bluffs, Iowa, Mr. Farrell took up a half section of land, which he improved and cultivated for six years. By that time he and his mother had accumulated enough money to enable them to start for Utah, and after disposing of his property he joined Captain James S. Brown's company as assistant captain and captain of the guard. After they had been on the road for two weeks Captain Brown was taken ill and Bishop Farrell was called to take his place. On reaching Utah on the 12th of August, 1859, they went to Farmington, where he lived for a quarter of a year. In the fall of 1859, he removed to Logan, Cache County, where he proceeded to build a house. Apostle Ezra T. Ben- son and Orson Hyde visited Logan in November of that year and on the 9th of the month ordained and set apart William B. Preston as bishop and George L. Farrell as ward clerk. In December, 1859, the latter was chosen tithing clerk for Cache valley. From 1874 until 1876 he filled a mission to England, where he baptized one hundred and seven people and organized a number of branches and Sunday schools. He laboured in the Nottingham conference first as elder and afterward as conference president. On his return in 1876 he was ordained high priest and set apart to preside over the High Priests' Quorum of Cache stake and was also called to preside over the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association in the Cache Stake of Zion, filling the latter position for four years. In May, 1880, he was ordained a bishop and set apart to pre- side over the Smithfield ward, which position he filled until April 30, 1900, when he resigned and was ordained a patriarch by Apostle Francis M. Lyman and so continues. His military experience covers many years' service with the Nauvoo Legion, in which he rose from rank to rank until he became lieutenant colonel of the regiment. In 1860 he was elected county recorder of Cache county and so continued until 1874. He became a life member of the Deseret Agricultural and Manufacturing Society, July 1, 1864. He was appointed postmaster of Logan, January 4, 1867, and held that position until 1874. On the 29th of April, 1860, Mr. Farrell was married to Amanda A. Steel, a daughter of William and Margaret (Goodwin) Steel, who were pioneers, arriving August 12, 1859. On the llth of April, 1862, he married Mary Charlotte Lundburg, of Salt Lake City, daughter of Solomon and Christina (Anderson) Lundburg. On the 25th of June, 1878, Mr. Farrell was married in Salt Lake City to Lydia A. Anderson, daughter of Andrew and Sophia (Sorenson) Anderson,: On the 12th of May, 1887, he married Mary Elizabeth Groshaw, of Logan, Utah, daughter of Charles and Hannah (Atkins) Groshaw. The life record of Mr. Farrell has been a most active and interesting one, his activity covering military, civil and ecclesiastical service. He is today one of the venerable representatives of the church, having passed the ninetieth milestone on life's journey. Source: "Utah Since Statehood", Noble Warrum; Chicago :: S.J. Clarke Pub. Co.,1920 Contributed and transcribed by Wayne Cheeseman

Life History of Charles Croshaw, brother of Thomas Croshaw

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

This history contains the life of Charles Croshaw, the brother of Thomas Croshaw. Though Thomas is not the exact subject of this sketch, he and his wife Louisa are mentioned various times throughout this history and therefore may be of great worth to his descendants. Charles Croshaw, son of James Avery Croshaw and Mary King was born 22 August 1839 in Bedworth Warwickshire, England. When Charles was nine years old his father died. When he was eleven years old he went to work in the coal mines in Warwickshire to help support the family of eight. When he was eighteen to twenty years old he went to work for a large construction company at Barrion Furnace. In the spring of 1860 Charles heard for the first time the gospel, as told by the Latter-Day Saints from a man whom he knew as John Lloyd. He was baptized 6 August 1868. During this time, Charles began keeping company with Hannah Atkins, a beautiful young lady with deep set eyes and long black shiny hair. She was the daughter of John Atkins and Elizabeth Vale. Hannah left the home to seek employment upon the death of her mother. She found employment at Hansley Hall, a part of the Kings Palace as the chief cook. She worked there for three years. Charles and Hannah were married on December 20, 1868 and began housekeeping in Barrion Furnace Hannah was not receptive to the gospel but Charles knew that he had heard the Gospel in its plainness and rather than give up what he knew to be true, it was decided that they should separate. The night before the separation was to take place, Hannah met her father in a dream. He told her that what her husband had done was the right thing and that the gospel was true. On the day they were to separate things were changed completely and they began to make arrangement to come to the United States. They set sail about August 1869 and arrived in New York early September 1869. About two weeks later their first child, Mary Elizabeth was born in Williamsburg, New York. Charles’ brother Thomas traveled with them from England but did not remain in New York. Rather, he came to Utah and spent time working on the Temple in Salt Lake City. Charles was unable to obtain employment in New York so he went to Pennsylvania to work in the coal mines. Hannah joined him there later. She was baptized on 1 January 1870 in the icy Pennsylvania River. She supported her husband in every way and she herself served in many positions in the Church. Early in the fall of 1870 they travelled by train to Ogden, Utah. Andrew Shumway, who became a close friend, led them to Mendon, Utah. Their first home was a dugout in the side of a hill. Here their second daughter Louisa was born on 14 October 1870. To help Hannah while she was confined, Louisa Lloyd, daughter of John Lloyd came to live with them. While here, she met Charles’ brother, Thomas Croshaw. They were married in the Endowment House about 1872 and moved into the dugout with Charles and Hannah. In the spring of 1872, Hannah gave birth to a son, Charles Edward. Two years later another son, John James joined the family. They were born in a log cabin with a dirt floor. About the time, Charles homesteaded 160 acres of land south of Oxford Idaho and built a log house 16 feet by 20 feet where they lived until a new home was built in 1881. In the years 1876 and 1877 Charles made two freight trips with ox teams and wagons from Corinne, Utah to the mines in Butte, Montana. On his return trip home in the early winter of 1877 Charles encountered temperatures of 60 degrees below zero and nearly froze to death but returned home safely. In 1878 Charles and Thomas decided to go into the sawmill business. That summer they built roads into Cottonwood Valley and set up two mills, a shingle mill and lumber mill. The building of the road into Cottonwood Valley was a very hard task. After crossing the main ridge of the mountain, they had a three mile dug way known as Croshaw’s Dug Way. All traffic traveled this road. Later a road was cut through the “narrows” which eliminated the trip over the hill. They began operation of the shingle mill first. In order to operate the lumber mill, a mill race was built out of the Cottonwood Creek and ran it about a quarter-of-a-mile where they had a drop sufficient to run a turbine that outdated the water-powered shingle mill. When they began to operate the mills thousands of board feet of lumber were sawed. This was hauled to northern Utah and southern Idaho. Many barns and buildings in those areas got their lumber and shingles from these mills. Charles’ brother Benjamin had come from England with his wife and eight children to help run the mills. They lived with Charles and family in the 16 x 20 home. During this time, Jim Grant from Virginia and Claude Hamilton, both with saw mill experience came to run the mills. These mills operated full blast for seven months of the year but the winters were too severe for logging or milling. In the fall of 1881 the mills were sold to a company by the name of Fielding and Ferguson. Thinking that all men were honest, no papers were signed and no money advanced. They turned over the mills but no money was ever received. They found themselves in debt for the mills and in order to satisfy their creditors, Charles sold a part of his farm and Thomas sold his place and moved to Grouse Creek, west of Oxford. On December 4, 1880 Hannah gave birth to a daughter, Annie Vale. She died in 1883. Charles Croshaw served faithfully in many Church positions and his contribution to Oxford were the planting of the tall poplar trees that surrounded each block and added shade and beauty to the once thriving town. He was a truck gardener and hauled his produce and fruit as far north as Pocatello and as far south as Logan, Utah selling it as he went. He was an agent for the Deseret News for 27 years and a subscriber for 38 years. He also, with his son-in-law Lionel Farrell introduced dry farming in that area. He reported to the Deseret News that his sons raised 3,000 bushels of grain on land that had grown nothing but sagebrush. Hannah Croshaw died in 1912. Charles remained in Oxford and continued his work until his death in 1917. Thomas and Benjamin eventually moved to Pocatello, Idaho where they established homes and raised their families.

Journal entries from: http://mormonmigration.lib.byu.edu/Search/showDetails/db:MM_MII/t:account/id:616

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

Journal of George Lionel Farrell Tuesday, June 27, 1876 (Nottingham) I arose at 6:15 feeling tired but well. Got all things ready and started for Liverpool at 12:25 p.m., 100 miles. Arrived at 42 Islington at 4 o'clock p.m. Met Brother and Sister Carrington feeling well and pleased to see me. President [Albert] Carrington did not feel well about my having to go home for said he, "You are the very man we want here to help roll on the work and spread the gospel in parts unexplored by the elders." Said he intended to keep me here another year if this call had not come from President Young. He said was more than satisfied with my labors in the ministry and asked the Lord to bless me in all my labors and travels through life. All the elders in the mission felt very sorry to part with me, especially P. D. Lymon. He felt extremely bad about my having to leave. Wednesday, June 28, 1876 (Liverpool) I slept on the ship last night and rested well. I got up early and walked up to 42 Islington & settled up the emigration of Alfred Orton and Sarah Anne Astill and got them on the ship & gave them their berths. I [p.37] then went tp and berthed all the Saints from the British Isles, all feeling splendid. I then returned to "42" [Islington] and settled up my business. Left the draft I had in my possession for the emigration of Mrs. Emilia Hickling of 22 Richmond Street, Nottingham with Elder David McKenzie for Mrs. Hickling's emigration only. Then went out and bought a few presents for my children and returned to the ship and took the names of the following returning missionaries viz: N. C. Flygare, George L. Farrell, John U. Stucki, W. H. Maughn, Edward Snelgrove, Thomas D. Evans, Henry Eyring, V. L. Halliday, Knud Peterson, A. N. Anderson, Joseph H. Parry, William J. Lewis, Thomas C. Martell, John Anderson, C. J. Gustafsen, S. C. Hansen, N. P. Jeppsen, Fred Theurer, J. J. Walsen, H. C. Fowler, (20 in number). At 3 o'clock we set sail with 636 Saints on board the fine steamship Idaho viz: from Scandinavia 399, from Swiss & German mission 106, from the British Isles 111, and 20 returning missionaries. All in splendid health and spirits. As we sailed down the river we proceeded to make the following organization. N. C. Flygare for president with G. L. Farrell, J. U. Stucki, and William H. Maughn for his assistance. V. L. Halliday captain of guard with J. H. Parry for his assistant and G. L. Farrell secretary for the company. We divided the company into ten wards with a president over each ward. N. C. Flygare to take charge of the Saints [p.38]from Scandinavia with John Anderson and A. R. Anderson for chaplains and Knud Peterson captain of guard. John U. Stucki takes charge of the Swiss and German Saints, with J. J. Walsen for chaplain and F. Theurer captain of guard. George L. Farrell to take charge of the Saints from the British Isles, with W. J. Lewis for chaplain and William Hull captain of guard. The chaplains to have prayers in their wards at 7 o'clock a.m. and 9 o'clock p.m. each day and all hands are expected to be to bed at 10 o'clock p.m. and the guard are to see the above carried out. Captain Beddoe is a gentleman without paint and as far as I have learned his officers ditto. And with the blessings of the Lord we anticipate a speedy, prosperous, and jolly trip. Thursday, June 29 10:30 a.m. (Queenstown) We put in here for mail, passengers, and water. Stopped for an hour and then went on our way rejoicing. Sea beautifully smooth. Made 300 miles by 4:30 p.m. Enjoyed myself well today. Have had quite a talk to a gentleman by the name of Cross, a doctor. He says we have the Bible on our side and that our doctrines are reasonable. But he thought we could make more converts if we would do away with polygamy. I told him that we couldn't help it if we did not make any converts as the Lord had told us to teach certain principles and we dare not preach any other. We are in the same position that the [p.39] prophet Noah was and if the whole world reject our doctrine we cannot help it any more than Noah could. And Jesus has promised us that the people should be the same in the day of his coming as they were in the days of Noah which he admitted. I retired to rest at 10:50 p.m. Friday, June 30, 1876 (At sea) - I arose at 6:30 a.m. feeling well. After breakfast I went all around the ship with captain and chief steward and Brother N. C. Flygare and found all the berths clean and neat, and every person seemed to feel well. After dinner I had a good game of shuttle board on deck with Brother Flygare and [Joseph H.] Parry. The wind is ahead of us, but we are making good time. Have made 287 miles today with the prospect of fair weather for the next 24 hours. Retired at 10:30 feeling well. Saturday, July 1, 1876 (At sea) I arose at 7 o'clock feeling well. Ate a good breakfast. Visited all the Saints and encouraged them all I could. In the evening the weather became a little thick & signs of rain. The wind being ahead and pretty strong, impeded our progress materially. We have only made 249 miles today. At 9 p.m., I went down into the steerage and attended prayers with the Saints. [p.40] Sunday, July 2, 1876 (At sea) I arose at 6:30 feeling well. Wind strong. Sea rough and raining fast. Nearly all the Saints and elders are seasick. Brother [W.H,] Maughn & myself stands it bravely and we have been kept busy nearly all day waiting upon the sick. I attended meeting in the saloon today. The captain conducted the service in the old Church of England style. We made 261 miles today. I attended prayers with the Saints in the steerage & retired. Monday, July 3, 1876 (At sea) Weather fine this morning. Sea is smoothed down considerable. I have been very busy in getting the Saints up on deck in the fresh air. A great many are still sick. We have only made 246 miles today. After dinner the Saints felt much better. They sang hymns and songs most of the afternoon. I attended prayers in the steerage with the Saints & retired at 10:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 4, 1876 (At sea) Another fine day and most of the Saints feel splendid and are forgetting their seasickness. The deck is nearly covered with Saints feeling well. We have made 265 miles today. Sea smooth and weather fine but rather cold. I retired at 11 o'clock p.m. [p.41] Wednesday, July 5, 1876 (At sea) I arose early & went all round among the Saints, found them all improving. Attended prayers with them, then went to breakfast. It is very foggy this morning so that they have to sound the foghorn every few minutes all day. We have made 270 miles today. The sea is tolerable smooth and we are gliding along splendidly. We saw thousands of porpoises pass the ship, skipping out of the water every few minutes. In the evening, I, in company with Brother John Anderson went through the steerage and administered to four sick persons who were very low. Brother Anderson anointed them and I was mouth in prayer. They all felt immediate relief. I then attended prayers with the English Saints and retired at 10:30 p.m. Thursday, July 6, 1876 (At sea) We are now crossing the banks of Newfoundland and a beautiful morning. Sea smooth and the Saints feel well. We have made 245 miles today. I have just had a good sing on deck with Brother Griggs, Stucki, Halliday, Walser, and Fowler and am now going to dinner at 5 o'clock p.m. In the evening the wind blew up a stiff breeze from the northwest and the sea became pretty rough. I attended prayers in the steerage & retired. [p.42] Friday, July 7, 1876 (At sea) This is [so] far the roughest morning we have had. Scores of the folks are seasick. Some of them are very bad. Brother Anderson called upon me to administer to a sister who is very sick with fever. We have only made 214 miles today. After tea the wind fell and the sea smoothed down considerable. I went through all the passengers and administered to their wants until 10 o'clock, then retired. Saturday, July 8, 1876 (At sea) I arose at 6 o'clock feeling well. The sea is as smooth as oil this morning and the weather beautiful. All the people feel well & are out on deck. Met a steamship at 12 miles [probably Midday] with a great many emigrants on board. We have made 281 miles today. We are now four hundred 90 miles from Sandy Hook, New York and good prospects of fair weather. Captain Charles James Beddoe just presented me with a Guion Line Travelers Guide. Retired at 10:30 p.m. feeling well. Sunday, July 9, 1876 (At sea) - The pilot came on board at 5 o'clock a.m. Fine morning. Held sacrament meeting at 7:30 and public meeting at 2 o'clock p.m. Brother H. C. Fowler and G. L. Farrel each occupied 35 minutes and Brother Maughn [p.43] ten minutes. We then went to and organized each company into messes of 15 persons with a commissary over each mess. We have made 287 miles today. Smooth sea, wind fair; making good time. Monday, July 10th , 1876 8 o'clock a.m. (New York) We arrived in good health and had to land at pier number 46 in consequence of the Castle Garden taking fire at 5 o'clock last evening and burnt up. We only saw a few lone posts left standing and they were still smoking. We transferred our luggage at a barge and ferry boat and took them to pier number 1 and started the commissaries out to buy their provisions. We, Brother N. C. Flygare, W. H. Maughn, Henry Eyring, and G. S. L. Farrel, posted our letters, cashed our P.O. orders, and settled up our business with Brother [William] Staines. Then went to work and shipped the Saints over the river to New Jersey and put them on the cars at the Mantua Station on the Pennsylvania Railroad. Got the checks for our luggage and started for Utah at 10:12 o'clock p.m. in good order but feeling extremely tired. Tuesday, July 11th , 1876 (Harrisburg) We arrived here at 10:45 a.m. Bought some provisions and started on her way at 11:40. Reached Mifflin, the county seat of Mifflin County on the Juniata [p.44] River, Pennsylvania. Here we filled our water tanks and started out winding our way between the mountains reaching the town of Tuirone at 6 p.m. This town is situated in a beautiful bed of Juniata River. At a point where we leave it for Pittsburgh, we passed Altoona at 7 o'clock p.m. This is where the Pennsylvania Railroad Company shops are situated and they are very fine buildings in a very nice little town. Here we put on three engines and marched up the mountains towards the horseshoe bend with the passengers and another engine with the luggage. We passed the bend at eight o'clock a.m. and we had a good view of it. Arrived at Pittsburgh at 1:30 midnight and unloaded the people into the station and put up for the night. Wednesday, July 12, 1876 (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) Early in the morning I went to the station master and ask him when he was going to forward our company but could get no satisfaction. 3/4 of our people lay out in the open shed and a 1/4 in the street for 11 hours and were treated very poorly indeed; so much so that I think every person in the company will always remember Pittsburgh with unpleasant feelings. Several strangers observed that no other people but ours would stand such treatment. Myself & Brother William Maughn told the railroad manager that we would only wait half an hour longer for cars and if they were not forthcoming in that time [p.45] we should take measures to force them and we were furnished the cars forthwith. At 1 o'clock p.m. we started on our way rejoicing in 17 cars. We traveled on until midnight at good speed, when the train broke in two causing a heavy jar, waking up all the passengers. But we soon got a new link in and started on our way. Thursday, July 13, 1876 (Union City) 6 a.m. This city stands half in Ohio and half in Indiana. Filled water tanks and started on our way. . . . [JOURNAL ABRUPTLY ENDS] [p.46] BIB: Farrell, George Lionel. Journal (Ms 5671), fd. 3, vol. 3, pp. 38-44. (CHL)

Farrell, George Lionel, [Interview], in "Utah Pioneer Biographies," 44 vols., 10:16-17. https://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/sources/4868/farrell-george-lionel-interview-in-utah-pioneer-biographies-44-vols-10-16-17

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

9. At what place did you join the company or wagon train with which you came to Utah? 9. He joined captain James S. Brown's Company as assistant captain and captain of the guard. After they had been on the road for two weeks captain Brown was taken ill and Bishop Farrell was called to take his place. 10. What was the place of your destination in Utah? 10. Place arrived: On reaching Utah, August 12, 1859, they went to Farmington where he lived for a quarter of a year. 13. Method of travel (handcart, ox team, mule team, horseback, etc.) 13. Method of travel was by ox team.

Snippet from "The Improvement Era vol.25" pg 94

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

George Lionel Farrell, 92 years of age, passed away in his home at Smith field, Cache Co., September 21. The deceased was for many years prom inent in church and political activities, and he was a successful pioneer in the important work of dry farming. He was born at Howelsfield, Gloucester shire, England, February 16, 1829, the son of William and Alice Sadler (Bird) Farrell. After the death of his father he brought his mother and three sisters to Iowa, before he reached his majority, living there for a number of years, and then coming to Utah in 1859. The Farrells settled first at Farmington, where it is recorded that the young man took a con tract for getting out the winter’s wood for Amasa M. Lyman. In 1860 Cache county was opened to settlement, and Mr. Farrell left F armington and went to Logan, where his energy and ability soon identified him with the pioneer and growing community. He was tithing clerk of Cache stake from 1860 till 1880, county recorder of Cache county from 1860 till 1880, county recorder of Cache county from I860 till 1884, postmaster at Logan from 1862 till 1874, filled a mission to England, 1874-76, and was bishop of Smithfield from 1888 till 1900. It was about 1872 that Mir. Farrell was led to undertake his work in the development of dry-farming and, after years of experimenting, he made a success of it. Mr. Farrell attended every dry-farm congress since the organization of that body and was the author of numer ous pamphlets on various phases of the subject. Even after passing the age of 90. Mr. Farrell remained in good health save for failing eyesight, his sons and daughters declaring that, so far as they can remember, he was never sick a day in his life. W‘hen the summons came it was without pain; just a gradual fading out of the flame. So peaceful was the end that those who stood by his bed, where he slept saw no sign of struggle; they saw only that the breathing had ceased.

A Practical Lesson by George. From "The Improvement Era: Volume 25 pg 200"

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

A PRACTICAL LESSON ON THE WORTH OF A DOLLAR IN HOME INDUSTRY Speaking of the work a dollar does at home reminds me of an incident that I have related many times. Years ago there was a great drive in this section of the country to support home-made goods, and I was one who was deeply interested in it, being a member of several committees that were working to bring about this policy. I remember that during our conference we had a meeting‘ in the Assembly Hall one evening and on_e of the speakers on that occasion was the then bishop of Smithfield, George L. Farrell, Brother Farrell said that for twenty odd years, or perhaps he said thirty, he had been coming down to conference twice a year and, knowing that all the stock; in the railroad running through that country was owned by eastern capitalists, he had marked the money which he paid for his tickets to see if he ever got any of it back again. “I have also,” he said, “marked the money that I paid lfor home-made goods to see if I got any of that back again, I never got any of my railroad money back,” he con tinued, “but one reason that I always buy home-made goods is that I think a whole lot of George L. Farrell and I like to get my money back again, and time and time again when I have bought home made goods and marked the money, that identical money, staying in the community and circulating around, has come back to me. And it is because I think a great deal of myself, as well as my neighbors, that I buy shoes made at home for my children, that I buy home made cloth out of which to make clothes for those children.” Then he said: “To give you a practical illustration: When starting for this identical conference, standing at the depot at Smithfield I saw a man who had made some shoes for my children, and I walked up and handed him five_dollars to pay for those shoes; he saw somebody else in the group to whom he owed five dollars, and he handed him the five; this man saw another to whom he was indebted and handed him the same piece of money; and ‘he in tum saw another man and handed it to him until finally after five or six debts had been paid with the same piece of money the last man to receive it came up to me and said, ‘Brother Farrell, I owe you six dollars. Here is five on my account/—and I put my home-made shoes money back into my trousers pocket.” Twenty or thirty dollars’ worth of debts were thus paid by patronizing one shoe maker in Smithfield, the money was saved at home by circulating around, it paid these many debts and at length landed back into the pocket where it started from. That was a practical lesson, and a practical lesson that ought to count.

Biography from: History and Genealogy for Cache County, Utah Volunteers Dedicated to Free Genealogy http://genealogytrails.com/utah/cache/bios/bios_f.html

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 4 months ago

GEORGE LIONEL FARRELL George Lionel Farrell, one of the patriarchs of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and a resident of Smithfield, was born February 16, 1829, in Hewelsfield, Gloucestershire, England, being the third son of William and Alice Sadler (Bird) Farrell. The father died when the son was about nine years of age and therefore his opportunity for securing an education was very limited, as he had to assist in the support of the family. He was apprenticed to the tailor's trade and after seven years' work in the shop, believing it to be too confining, he found employment as a gardener and nurseryman. Becoming a convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he was baptized March 1. 1850, by Elder James Edmonds and in the following September was ordained to the priesthood and sent out to work as a missionary. In January, 1853, he was ordained an elder by John Van Cott and in February of that year sailed for America with his mother and three sisters on the ship International, while his affianced bride, Jane Williams, was also of the party. After his arrival on this side of the Atlantic he secured employment for his mother, his sister and himself. In March, 1854, the lady whom he expected to marry passed away. At Council Bluffs, Iowa, Mr. Farrell took up a half section of land, which he improved and cultivated for six years. By that time he and his mother had accumulated enough money to enable them to start for Utah, and after disposing of his property he joined Captain James S. Brown's company as assistant captain and captain of the guard. After they had been on the road for two weeks Captain Brown was taken ill and Bishop Farrell was called to take his place. On reaching Utah on the 12th of August, 1859, they went to Farmington, where he lived for a quarter of a year. In the fall of 1859, he removed to Logan, Cache County, where he proceeded to build a house. Apostle Ezra T. Ben- son and Orson Hyde visited Logan in November of that year and on the 9th of the month ordained and set apart William B. Preston as bishop and George L. Farrell as ward clerk. In December, 1859, the latter was chosen tithing clerk for Cache valley. From 1874 until 1876 he filled a mission to England, where he baptized one hundred and seven people and organized a number of branches and Sunday schools. He laboured in the Nottingham conference first as elder and afterward as conference president. On his return in 1876 he was ordained high priest and set apart to preside over the High Priests' Quorum of Cache stake and was also called to preside over the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association in the Cache Stake of Zion, filling the latter position for four years. In May, 1880, he was ordained a bishop and set apart to pre- side over the Smithfield ward, which position he filled until April 30, 1900, when he resigned and was ordained a patriarch by Apostle Francis M. Lyman and so continues. His military experience covers many years' service with the Nauvoo Legion, in which he rose from rank to rank until he became lieutenant colonel of the regiment. In 1860 he was elected county recorder of Cache county and so continued until 1874. He became a life member of the Deseret Agricultural and Manufacturing Society, July 1, 1864. He was appointed postmaster of Logan, January 4, 1867, and held that position until 1874. On the 29th of April, 1860, Mr. Farrell was married to Amanda A. Steel, a daughter of William and Margaret (Goodwin) Steel, who were pioneers, arriving August 12, 1859. On the llth of April, 1862, he married Mary Charlotte Lundburg, of Salt Lake City, daughter of Solomon and Christina (Anderson) Lundburg. On the 25th of June, 1878, Mr. Farrell was married in Salt Lake City to Lydia A. Anderson, daughter of Andrew and Sophia (Sorenson) Anderson,: On the 12th of May, 1887, he married Mary Elizabeth Groshaw, of Logan, Utah, daughter of Charles and Hannah (Atkins) Groshaw. The life record of Mr. Farrell has been a most active and interesting one, his activity covering military, civil and ecclesiastical service. He is today one of the venerable representatives of the church, having passed the ninetieth milestone on life's journey. Source: "Utah Since Statehood", Noble Warrum; Chicago :: S.J. Clarke Pub. Co.,1920 Contributed and transcribed by Wayne Cheeseman

Life timeline of George Lionel Farrell

1829
George Lionel Farrell was born on 16 Feb 1829
George Lionel Farrell was 3 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
George Lionel Farrell was 11 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
George Lionel Farrell was 31 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
George Lionel Farrell was 40 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
George Lionel Farrell was 46 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
George Lionel Farrell was 59 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
George Lionel Farrell was 63 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
George Lionel Farrell was 80 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
George Lionel Farrell was 83 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
George Lionel Farrell died on 21 Sep 1921 at the age of 92
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for George Lionel Farrell (16 Feb 1829 - 21 Sep 1921), BillionGraves Record 4108023 Logan, Cache, Utah, United States

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