Francis Sidney Hawkes

19 Apr 1889 - 7 Nov 1972

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Francis Sidney Hawkes

19 Apr 1889 - 7 Nov 1972
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Our Dad - Husband - Grandfather - Great-grandfather - was born April 19, 1889, in Panguitch, Garfield County, Utah to Sidney William Hawkes and Frances Jane Till Hawkes. He was the oldest child and was given the names of his mother and father - Francis Sidney Hawkes. He spent his early childhood yea
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Life Information

Francis Sidney Hawkes

Born:
Died:

Riverside Thomas Cemetery

939-949 State Highway 39
Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho
United States
Transcriber

MollyM

September 20, 2013
Photographer

Will

July 29, 2013

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Obituary of Francis Sidney Hawkes, given at his funeral service November 10, 1972. Written and delivered by Brent B Hawkes

Contributor: MollyM Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Our Dad - Husband - Grandfather - Great-grandfather - was born April 19, 1889, in Panguitch, Garfield County, Utah to Sidney William Hawkes and Frances Jane Till Hawkes. He was the oldest child and was given the names of his mother and father - Francis Sidney Hawkes. He spent his early childhood years in Panguitch, and began his early school there. Pioneer life was never easy, and Dad became accustomed to hard work very early. With four younger brothers and sisters, he soon learned to accept responsibility and to contribute much to the care of others. When he was seven years of age, as he was whittling on a stick, he hit a knot with the pocket knife. As he gave an extra hard tug against the knot, the knife slipped and entered his left eye, depriving him of the use of that eye for the remainder of his life. When Dad was about eleven, the family moved to Murray. He continued attending schools there and in the Holliday area, where they later moved. It was during these years that his path first crossed that of the flaming redhead who would later become his wife. Ever a tease, Dad had taken Uncle Joe's hat and tossed it to the roof of the schoolhouse. Mother let him know that she didn't approve of his action toward her brother in a way he would become well-acquainted with later. During his seventh year of school, it became necessary to go to work, so Dad dropped out of school to work full-time. He worked at the Bingham Copper Mine, and at the Murray Smelter, among other places. Many times he has told of working long days as a water boy, carrying full buckets of water uphill to the other workmen, for $1.00 a day. He also worked for his future father-in-law, delivering produce from the Gunn Ranch in Holliday, where Grandpa Goodwin was foreman, to the Hotel Utah. At about age 21, he set out to make his fortune in the world, and traveled to Los Angeles. He stayed only a short time, and retuned to Utah. He came to the Blackfoot area in 1914 with his two younger bothers, and they began working on the Greening Ranch. They formed their own little farming corporation, and called themselves "The Buzzard Brothers". The Lord also guided the Goodwin family to the Blackfoot area, and in February 1916, Dad took Genevieve Pearl Goodwin as his bride. The following December, they traveled to Salt Lake City to have their marriage solemnized in the temple there. Dad loved to work with the soil, and the major portion of his remaining life was spent in that labor. Constant struggle to succeed in the crops cost much toil, but Dad was always equal to the task and accepted his lot without complaint. It seems as though each seed he planted knew that here was a man who would give the best care possible, and it responded by growing in to beautiful, productive plant. Rent was paid on the land from each Fall's harvest. Dad loved flowers. He would love to see those that are here today. The comment was made just as we came here, that we hope the Lord has a beautiful garden for Dad to take care of in heaven. I'm sure He does, and Dad will be very useful there. Although the fare was meager, there was always food and clothing to satisfy the growing need. Dad sensed the responsibility of providing for his growing family. Trips to the lava beds, north of Blackfoot, to obtain the winter supply firewood by wagon-load, were part of the routine each fall. During these yard, Dad and Mother were fulfilling the Lord's command, and eventually provided bodies for nine of our Heavenly Father's spirit children. With the growing family came added responsibility, and Dad measured up to the task of teaching his children the value of hard work and concern for one's fellow man. He needed only to sense that someone was in need, and he immediately set out to help in a quiet, unobtrusive way. You might return home from an errand and find your field or garden plowed or irrigated. It seemed that Dad just couldn't find enough work to do. After approximately 40years of farming, Dad and Mother moved into town, where they settled on West Bridge Street, and he began to work for Melvin Wilcox in the Lumber Yard. He stayed there until he was legally forced to retire at age 65. Law or no law, Dad wasn't ready to retire, and continued to work for private individuals. His ability as a gardener continued to improve, and townsfolk soon began to look forward to summers, and some of Brother Hawkes' corn. Dad worked along with Austin Stover in his greenhouse and picked up a lot of gardening tips from him, and they worked together to provide corn for people during the summertime. Dad and Mother also served may years as custodians of this Church Building. Inn 1961, a life-long dream was fulfilled as they built a new home on Elaine Street. This building represent a lifetime of struggle, hard work,, and personal deprivation in order to succeed. Built by Dad and his family, under Mertin's direction, it stands as a sort of monument to this fine man. Dad never preached sermons with words. His life can be looked upon as one of finest examples available of Christian love and charity. He was truly a follower of Paul's sermon on charity. Success a was surely his in this endeavor. The honors of men were not his, but the please of a loving Heavenly Father, in the completing of his difficult task are surely Dad's today. On November 7, 1972, after a ten-week period of suffering, Dad left us here to rejoin his parents and two brothers in the Lord's kingdom. What a happy reunion that must have been for them! Along with his parents, two brothers, Harold David and Phillip Charles were waiting for him there. He is survived by his wife, Genevieve , nine children - Rowland Sidney, Mertin William, Frances Ruth, Virginia Pearl, Afton Catherine, Vernial Dean, Jay Leon, Orva Marie, and Brent B, 40 grandchildren, and 23 great-grandchildren. Also by two sisters, Grace Sanders and Elsie Colburn of Salt Lake City. Dad's face used to light up very much with joy and pride whenever his children. grandchildren or great-grandchildren would come to visit. He had great love for them all, and loved very much to be with them. He will be missed greatly, but we can all take comfort and courage in the lessons and examples he gave us. I'm sure that our Heavenly Father was happy to receive and to greet - Francis Sidney Hawkes.

Personal memory of Granddaughter, Francee

Contributor: MollyM Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

In 1963 my family moved to Blackfoot, Idaho and we lived in a house just a few blocks from my Grandparents, I was seven years old. Grandpa Hawkes would often come over and find projects to do around our house. One summer afternoon he was mowing the lawn and I was running around barefoot in the grass when I stepped on a bee. I screamed, howled and hopped around like I'd been shot. He dropped everything to run to my aid and scooped me up in his arms. He always had a strong smell of menthol from the salve that he put around his glass eye. After I calmed enough to tell him what had happened he took out his pocketknife, pulled out the stinger and put a big blob of mud from the flower bed on my foot then he told me I would live. I hopped around along time with that mud drying on my foot before I wondered if Grandpa was pulling-my-leg about mud being the best first-aid for bee-stings.

Life History - Marriage to age 65

Contributor: MollyM Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

This life history was written by Genevieve and Francis. It goes from the date they we married in 1916 to the time when she was 65 and he was 70 years of age. Genevieve Pearl Goodwin and Francis Sidney Hawkes were united in marriage on Feb. 23, 1916, in the town of Thomas Idaho, county of Bingham and the State of Idaho by Bishop John R. Williams, at the home of Florence and Ed Turpin. Our Sisters Florence Turpin & Grace Sanders cooked a nice big supper for us and relatives and friends. Our first home was the Greening Place in Thomas. Grace went back to Utah, and Phil and Harold continued to live with us, for one more year until Phil went to the army of World War I. Then the partnership was dissolved. Our marriage was sealed for Time and Eternity in the Salt Lake Temple on Dec. 21, 1917, following our civil marriage in Feb. We took active parts in the church; here I, Genevieve, joined the Cottonwood Relief Society at Wilson right after we were married. Bertha Noak was Pres. Marie Felsted and Florence Turpin were the Counslers. Mary Anderson was Sec.; I was put in as a visiting teacher and have served here in Thomas, Pingree and Blackfoot 3 rd ward. Our first child a son was born the following Feb. 5, 1917, at our home here at the Greening Place. My Mother and a sister in-law Rilba Goodwin were there to help our attending physician who was W. W. Beck Sr. We named him Roland Sidney Hawkes; we were very proud and happy with our new son, Sidney, after his Grandfather Hawkes & his father. But life has not been easy for him. He was a normal healthy baby until he was 13 days old, then he suddenly became ill, so ill in fact that we had to move to town for 10 days to be near the Doc. I, Genevieve, stayed with him constantly while Francis stayed at home to care for things there, but my thought, hope & prayers were always with him. This being winter time, Francis would ride a horse to Blackfoot every other day to see them and how the baby was getting along. The Dr. never seemed to do anything to help the baby, so we moved back home. We engaged the service of another Dr. (Dr Patrie) and he stated that he didn’t know what the matter was and asked that we consult some elderly women who had raised a family. We did and we used several old remedies, and the power of the priesthood through prayer circles and we had him administered to every day. Mother stayed constantly by our side. The neighbors would come and take turns sitting up at nights with him. One night when he was very sick and we didn’t expect him to live until morning, I, Genevieve, was lying on the foot of the bed and I thought to myself how could I expect our baby to get well if I didn’t keep the Lords Commandments. How could I expect the Lord to help me? So I made a promise to myself and vowed to the Lord I would never drink another cup of coffee if he would save my baby. And I never have started coffee to this day. He vomited every thing he ate, until he vomited the lining of his stomach. The Dr. gave us no hope for his life, but the power of the priesthood was exercised in faith and prayer until he was three months old, and his life was spared. He began to get well and made a quick recovery from skin and bones to a fat little butter ball in a short time. Many of the neighbors had been overheard gossiping about his funeral and he was still very much alive. This certainly strengthened our testimony and was a faith promoting experience for us. From there we moved to a farm north of Rockford where we lived one year, then we moved back to Thomas on the Parley Fackrell place. It was while living here that our baby (2 ½ years old) met with an awful accident. His father was stacking hay in the fields, he had Rowland with him & he was playing at the bottom of the stack when he grabbed hold of the steel rope that was pulling the hay to the top of the stack, his father heard a scream and he told the boy to back up thus pulling Rowland’s hand and arm through the pulley and back again mangling his hand terribly. He had to have three of his fingers taken off all on his right hand, which when he grew up he was left handed. While living here each winter, Francis with the other neighbors, would go to the lavas to bring home our winter’s supply of wood. They often stayed as long as three days and sometimes some of the men would stay three weeks while the others hauled the wood home. They would have to be very careful as it was dangerous out there; the horses and wagons might fall in a chasm. Once it took four men to lift out one of George Goodwin’s horses, many times we would have to come home with chains for tugs. Once I remember a north blizzard caught us and we had to walk thirty miles with a blizzard in our backs. It was while we lived here on Parley Fackrell’s place that our second son was born on August 28, 1919; we named him Mertin Williams Hawkes, Mertin from a book because we thought it different and William after his two grandfathers. Our next move was to the Bill Nelson’s place across from the Ed Turpin ranch. We lived here a year, then we built a 3 roomed frame house on Nate Goodwin’s lower 40 acres. This is where our first daughter, Ruth, was born January 5, 1922. We named her Frances Ruth Hawkes, Frances after her father and her Grandmother Hawkes. A good name with strength and ambition. She was a lovely little dark haired brown eyed girl, who stole everyone’s heart who knew her. We next rented the Crystal farm and while living here, I had my long red hair cut off by Bill Nelson. Mertin looked over and doubtfully said, “You don’t look like mama anymore.” It was while living here that we bought our first car which was a Chevrolet. It was black with a top which folded back like a buggy. It was while living here that our second little daughter was born not dark, but equally as lovely, we name her Virginia and she was born Oct 14, 1924. We named her Virginia Pearl Hawkes, Pearl after her very own Mother, a name of purity and virtue and truth. From here we moved to the Dance farm and life never seemed to be any different for us; we had many trials and tribulations and lots of hard work. It was here our third lovely blonde blue eyed daughter was born on October 5, 1926. We named her Afton Catherine Hawkes. Catherine after her great grandmother also her Grandmother Goodwin, for we could see even though a little girl, she would need a lot of guidance and a good example always before her. We moved to Pingree next in the year of 1927. When we made this move we also moved the house we had built on the Nate Goodwins lower 40. We moved this house on two wagons, we settled here on 160 acres of ground owned by the Utah Idaho Sugar factory. We broke this ground out of sage brush, built ditches, scraped ground, picked rocks and made fills, all with only our hands, a team of horses, and few pieces of machinery, and the will of the Lord. This farm was located only a mile from the Snake River and 3 miles from the nearest store. Our means of transportation was a team & wagon or on foot. It was here at this time we bought a Model T. Ford. We lived on this farm for 13 years and were then forced to move, so some of the relatives of the sugar company could have it. When we moved here we left the oldest children in Thomas with relatives to finish school at Wilson; it was the first of April when we moved to Pingree. In Dec. of the year our third son and sixth child was born. Vernial was born Dec. 28, 1928, at the home of Vera Woods. We named him Vernial Dean Hawkes, a name that could mean only one thing Work, Work, Work. These were years of hard work with very little profit to show for our efforts. But the Lord blessed us for we never went without food or shelter, and we were all blessed with good health, and for that we were very thankful. We always raised a big garden, did lots of canning, we killed our own pork and beef for our own use, and very little was bought at the store. Most of the groceries that were purchased at the store were paid for with eggs that we would take and exchange for them. We also milked several head of cows to help our finances. The children would usually ride horses or walk to school in the good weather and go by sleigh and team of horses in winter. We would heat rocks and wrap the children in blankets to keep them warm for this was a long cold 3 miles ride to school. Francis would usually go to the river with our neighbor Emmett Tow, to get our winter wood of cotton wood and we also made several trips to the lava’s for cedar wood to burn, we never had money to buy coal. I usually had enough wood chopped throughout the winter to last through the following summer with out running out when we were busy in the fields. I (Francis) owned a team of horses. Star & Roudy that were loaded with dynamite, I believe we could relate a run away with them every time we used them. Many were the time they have run away with the hay wagon and just about every other piece of machinery. Genevieve and the children had a run away coming home from church. One time Chase Rich stopped them. I think, too, she will remember the time she went to Riverside for groceries and ran over Rowland with a horse and buggy and never hurt him. Mertin had a run away with the horse and bean puller and was in bed for several days; he has a tendency to be a bleeder, anyway has had some severe nose bleeds, requiring medical attention to stop them. The kid even had run aways coming from school. We’d often get up at 4 o’clock in the morning and go to the field and pick buckets and tubs full of peas and beans for canning. The boys would milk the cows and separate the milk while the girls would shell peas or snap beans before breakfast & then go to the fields to help with the work. The Jack rabbits were so thick, we used to scatter out racks of poison hay to kill them off and keep them from destroying our crops. In 1930, I, Francis, worked 23 days at the Sugar Factory because we needed money so badly; I russled around about 5 or 6 days before getting the job. I boarded with George Goodwin at the time in Blackfoot leaving the family home to look after things. On April 26, 1933, Jay Leon Hawkes, our 4th son was born here in our home in Pingree. Our neighbor, Mrs. Bedwell, was in attendance and Dr. Hampton was our Dr. We named him Jay Leon, a name which has been a shield of strength to him for he has had many a misfortune but always came back with a fighting spirit. We bought our first tractor while we lived here, (about 1937) and paid $200.00 for it, a Frarmall F 12. I had more work for the neighbors than I could do as I was the only one around with a tractor. This was also the year that our 4th daughter was born, Orva Marie Hawkes, born Oct 9, 1937, at our home and a neighbor who was a registered nurse, June Tow helped us out. Virginia was big enough now that she did most of the house work. Speaking of Virginia, she also had a few incidents to remember. Once when she was very small she, got her hand caught in the ringer on the washing machine and had to have several stitches taken in it. Then, too, when she was walking home from school one night, she was hit by a car & had a terrible laceration on her left knee; she was taken to Aberdeen and was under Dr. care for several days. I, Genevieve, & Virginia stayed at the people’s home who had run into her until she was released from the Dr. care. Never will we forget Vernial holding his breath & Dad being called in from the back of the 160 acres to revive him. Now getting back to Orva, we named her Orva after one very good friend and school teacher. It has been a good name for her, one, of inspiration and guidance. While here in Pingree, we were very active in the church. I, Genevieve, held offices of teacher in kindergarten, chorister of Relief Society, President of Relief Society, President of the Young Women, Mutual, Theology teacher in Relief Society, Bee Hive Teacher and Visiting teacher in Relief Society. I was kept quite busy. I, Francis, held the office of counselor in the Young Men’s mutual association and ward teacher. In the year 1938, our oldest son was married to a very nice hard working girl. Roland & Nellie Floy Humpheries were married for time & eternity in the Logan Temple Nov. 1938. They moved to Livingston, Montana, to work for a Rancher. In 1939, we made our first trip to Yellowstone Park and on into Montana to visit Rowland & Floy. In 1940, our oldest daughter was married to a fine lad. Ruth and David Lamond Scott were married for time and eternity in the Logan Temple on April 19, 1939, her father’s birthday. Our children’s first school bus was horse & a camp wagon. In the spring of 1940, we moved from our home here, to a home closer to the Pingree town site, a log house & it was much closer to the school and church. Things were beginning to look a little better for us; the crops were even looking good, and we had a good crop of peas ready for harvest. The thrasher pulled in that night and it began to rain and it rained for two weeks so the ducks and rain got the harvest, but in spite of all this we managed to buy our first and only refrigerator which we’re still using. This, too, was the first electricity we had. Although we had a different team of horses, we still had run aways. One particular one here at the log house, I, Francis, was raking hay & they ran away with the rake several laps around the field, broke the tongue out of the rake, leaving me wound up in the hay under the tines of the rake and in the ditch. This was a very narrow escape for me as those tines could have been run clear through my body, but the Lord was good & I came out only stiff & sore for a few days. January 1941, we became grandparents and mighty proud ones too, for Roland & Ruth both presented us with our first granddaughters. In April 1942, we became the parents of our 5th son and 9th child Brent B. Hawkes was born April 8, 1942, at the Parson Maternity home, He was the only one of our children to be born in a hospital. Dr. Patrie was the attending Physician. We named him Brent because Virginia picked it out. It surely is a good name with firm determination & high ideals. Mertin entered the army in World War II while we lived here, in the year 1944. After 14 years in Pingree, we moved back to Rockford on the George Bankhead farm in Nov. 1942. We farmed this place for one season & two winters. We are still active in the church. I, Genevieve, served as a Primary teacher & Relief Society visiting teacher. Mother Goodwin also stayed with us for six weeks while here. The flood waters came in from the desert and completely covered our farm the second winter we were here, except the hill where the house was and a few rock piles. The neighbor children used to stop off at the porch and skate over to catch the school bus. We moved to Wapello in March 1944, and farmed for one season & left the 1st of Nov. of the same year. Seemed as though we couldn’t get away from those runaway horses. Once while here, Vernial had a runaway with the team and mowing machine, broke the tongue off the mower and one horse couldn’t get up for three days, and finally sold him for $5.00. We also couldn’t get away from this place fast enough, as we were never happy here. We sold our stock and pigs and bought our parents home in Blackfoot where we have lived ever since. We belonged to the first ward when we first moved here and went to the tabernacle to church, then it was divided. Our new church was built, and it is now the third ward & fifth wards chapel, we belong to the third ward. I loved to farm and couldn’t get it out of my system, so we farmed the old Dance place in Thomas from 1945 & 1946 inclusive. We both worked at the dehydration plant one winter. I, Francis, drove back & forth to work everyday while farming the Dance place. Finally after the cost of living rose so high & the price of farming commodities went down, I decided to give up farming. I started to work for Wilcox Lumber in the fall of 1946 and worked there for 8 long years, also we built a chicken coop and run chickens. In the fall of 1950, we took off and went to Arizona to bring Virginia home from her mission; she served in the Spanish American Mission with head quarters at El Paso Texas. The states we went through were Utah, Arizonia, New Mexico, Texas, also went over the border to Mexico. We went through the Mesa Temple and did sealings, our first. On our way home, we went through the temple at St. George, Utah, Manti & Logan. We also went through the Carlsbad Caverns. I retired at the age of 65 from the lumber yard and have taken up carpentry, having made several pieces of furniture and gave them away. In 1951, I remodeled our home. I also spend long hours each day raising and cultivating a large garden and taking care of a large flower garden. Seems as though we had hardly got settled at our home in Blackfoot when Jay had the misfortune of falling out of a tree at the neighbors and broke both of his arms. In 1949, April 22, Vernial married a lovely girl and expert homemaker, Doris Arlene Hall, at the home of her Aunts in Thomas and were later sealed for time and eternity in the Idaho Falls Temple in 1954. In 1950, Afton married Kenneth Clarence Shawver Jr., a pill of a dirt farmer if there ever was one; they were married at the home of his parents in Thomas, Mar. 12, 1950, and later they were sealed for time and eternity in the Idaho Falls Temple July 6, 1962. On June 6, Virginia married a nice young man, John Warren Charlesworth, in the Idaho Fall temple. In 1954, Mertin married Irene Beal, a very nice school teacher from Moore, Idaho. They were married in the Idaho Falls temple on June 16, 1954. In 1956, Orva married Jim Nelson at Elko, Nevada, on May 5, 1956. I, Genevieve, received my patriarchal blessing from Peter J. Williams, Aug. 17, 1949, one I hope I will be able to live up to. Jay also received his the same day. We have been custodians of the 3rd and 5th wards for the past 3 years. On April 28, 1959, we were honored by the Mutual for our services as custodians. Since living here in the 3rd ward, we have been have been active in the church. I, Genevieve, have held the offices of visiting teacher, chorister in Jr. S. S. and Coordinator in the Jr. S. S. and work leader in the Relief Society. I, Frances, have been a ward teacher with Brent as my partner. In 1956, I, Genevieve, went to Canada with the lady missionary’s tour. On our tour, we visited the Cardston Temple, and on our return home we toured through Glacier National Park. In 1959, I left for a church tour to the East visiting many church historical points and the Hill Camorah Pageant returning Aug 25, 1959. We have lived at our present home at 1030 West Bridge St. for the past 15 years. I, Francis, am now 70 yrs. and Genevieve is 65 years. We are both in good health and all nine children are. 7 of them married with a total of 29 grand children. The Lord has been good to us and for this we are very thankful and hope and pray that in our life time we are able to do good in return.

Francis Sidney Hawkes - History

Contributor: MollyM Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

This life history was written by Genevieve and Francis. It goes from the date they we married in 1916 to the time when she was 65 and he was 70 years of age. Genevieve Pearl Goodwin and Francis Sidney Hawkes were united in marriage on Feb. 23, 1916, in the town of Thomas Idaho, county of Bingham and the State of Idaho by Bishop John R. Williams, at the home of Florence and Ed Turpin. Our Sisters Florence Turpin & Grace Sanders cooked a nice big supper for us and relatives and friends. Our first home was the Greening Place in Thomas. Grace went back to Utah, and Phil and Harold continued to live with us, for one more year until Phil went to the army of World War I. Then the partnership was dissolved. Our marriage was sealed for Time and Eternity in the Salt Lake Temple on Dec. 21, 1917, following our civil marriage in Feb. We took active parts in the church; here I, Genevieve, joined the Cottonwood Relief Society at Wilson right after we were married. Bertha Noak was Pres. Marie Felsted and Florence Turpin were the Counslers. Mary Anderson was Sec.; I was put in as a visiting teacher and have served here in Thomas, Pingree and Blackfoot 3 rd ward. Our first child a son was born the following Feb. 5, 1917, at our home here at the Greening Place. My Mother and a sister in-law Rilba Goodwin were there to help our attending physician who was W. W. Beck Sr. We named him Roland Sidney Hawkes; we were very proud and happy with our new son, Sidney, after his Grandfather Hawkes & his father. But life has not been easy for him. He was a normal healthy baby until he was 13 days old, then he suddenly became ill, so ill in fact that we had to move to town for 10 days to be near the Doc. I, Genevieve, stayed with him constantly while Francis stayed at home to care for things there, but my thought, hope & prayers were always with him. This being winter time, Francis would ride a horse to Blackfoot every other day to see them and how the baby was getting along. The Dr. never seemed to do anything to help the baby, so we moved back home. We engaged the service of another Dr. (Dr Patrie) and he stated that he didn’t know what the matter was and asked that we consult some elderly women who had raised a family. We did and we used several old remedies, and the power of the priesthood through prayer circles and we had him administered to every day. Mother stayed constantly by our side. The neighbors would come and take turns sitting up at nights with him. One night when he was very sick and we didn’t expect him to live until morning, I, Genevieve, was lying on the foot of the bed and I thought to myself how could I expect our baby to get well if I didn’t keep the Lords Commandments. How could I expect the Lord to help me? So I made a promise to myself and vowed to the Lord I would never drink another cup of coffee if he would save my baby. And I never have started coffee to this day. He vomited every thing he ate, until he vomited the lining of his stomach. The Dr. gave us no hope for his life, but the power of the priesthood was exercised in faith and prayer until he was three months old, and his life was spared. He began to get well and made a quick recovery from skin and bones to a fat little butter ball in a short time. Many of the neighbors had been overheard gossiping about his funeral and he was still very much alive. This certainly strengthened our testimony and was a faith promoting experience for us. From there we moved to a farm north of Rockford where we lived one year, then we moved back to Thomas on the Parley Fackrell place. It was while living here that our baby (2 ½ years old) met with an awful accident. His father was stacking hay in the fields, he had Rowland with him & he was playing at the bottom of the stack when he grabbed hold of the steel rope that was pulling the hay to the top of the stack, his father heard a scream and he told the boy to back up thus pulling Rowland’s hand and arm through the pulley and back again mangling his hand terribly. He had to have three of his fingers taken off all on his right hand, which when he grew up he was left handed. While living here each winter, Francis with the other neighbors, would go to the lavas to bring home our winter’s supply of wood. They often stayed as long as three days and sometimes some of the men would stay three weeks while the others hauled the wood home. They would have to be very careful as it was dangerous out there; the horses and wagons might fall in a chasm. Once it took four men to lift out one of George Goodwin’s horses, many times we would have to come home with chains for tugs. Once I remember a north blizzard caught us and we had to walk thirty miles with a blizzard in our backs. It was while we lived here on Parley Fackrell’s place that our second son was born on August 28, 1919; we named him Mertin Williams Hawkes, Mertin from a book because we thought it different and William after his two grandfathers. Our next move was to the Bill Nelson’s place across from the Ed Turpin ranch. We lived here a year, then we built a 3 roomed frame house on Nate Goodwin’s lower 40 acres. This is where our first daughter, Ruth, was born January 5, 1922. We named her Frances Ruth Hawkes, Frances after her father and her Grandmother Hawkes. A good name with strength and ambition. She was a lovely little dark haired brown eyed girl, who stole everyone’s heart who knew her. We next rented the Crystal farm and while living here, I had my long red hair cut off by Bill Nelson. Mertin looked over and doubtfully said, “You don’t look like mama anymore.” It was while living here that we bought our first car which was a Chevrolet. It was black with a top which folded back like a buggy. It was while living here that our second little daughter was born not dark, but equally as lovely, we name her Virginia and she was born Oct 14, 1924. We named her Virginia Pearl Hawkes, Pearl after her very own Mother, a name of purity and virtue and truth. From here we moved to the Dance farm and life never seemed to be any different for us; we had many trials and tribulations and lots of hard work. It was here our third lovely blonde blue eyed daughter was born on October 5, 1926. We named her Afton Catherine Hawkes. Catherine after her great grandmother also her Grandmother Goodwin, for we could see even though a little girl, she would need a lot of guidance and a good example always before her. We moved to Pingree next in the year of 1927. When we made this move we also moved the house we had built on the Nate Goodwins lower 40. We moved this house on two wagons, we settled here on 160 acres of ground owned by the Utah Idaho Sugar factory. We broke this ground out of sage brush, built ditches, scraped ground, picked rocks and made fills, all with only our hands, a team of horses, and few pieces of machinery, and the will of the Lord. This farm was located only a mile from the Snake River and 3 miles from the nearest store. Our means of transportation was a team & wagon or on foot. It was here at this time we bought a Model T. Ford. We lived on this farm for 13 years and were then forced to move, so some of the relatives of the sugar company could have it. When we moved here we left the oldest children in Thomas with relatives to finish school at Wilson; it was the first of April when we moved to Pingree. In Dec. of the year our third son and sixth child was born. Vernial was born Dec. 28, 1928, at the home of Vera Woods. We named him Vernial Dean Hawkes, a name that could mean only one thing Work, Work, Work. These were years of hard work with very little profit to show for our efforts. But the Lord blessed us for we never went without food or shelter, and we were all blessed with good health, and for that we were very thankful. We always raised a big garden, did lots of canning, we killed our own pork and beef for our own use, and very little was bought at the store. Most of the groceries that were purchased at the store were paid for with eggs that we would take and exchange for them. We also milked several head of cows to help our finances. The children would usually ride horses or walk to school in the good weather and go by sleigh and team of horses in winter. We would heat rocks and wrap the children in blankets to keep them warm for this was a long cold 3 miles ride to school. Francis would usually go to the river with our neighbor Emmett Tow, to get our winter wood of cotton wood and we also made several trips to the lava’s for cedar wood to burn, we never had money to buy coal. I usually had enough wood chopped throughout the winter to last through the following summer with out running out when we were busy in the fields. I (Francis) owned a team of horses. Star & Roudy that were loaded with dynamite, I believe we could relate a run away with them every time we used them. Many were the time they have run away with the hay wagon and just about every other piece of machinery. Genevieve and the children had a run away coming home from church. One time Chase Rich stopped them. I think, too, she will remember the time she went to Riverside for groceries and ran over Rowland with a horse and buggy and never hurt him. Mertin had a run away with the horse and bean puller and was in bed for several days; he has a tendency to be a bleeder, anyway has had some severe nose bleeds, requiring medical attention to stop them. The kid even had run aways coming from school. We’d often get up at 4 o’clock in the morning and go to the field and pick buckets and tubs full of peas and beans for canning. The boys would milk the cows and separate the milk while the girls would shell peas or snap beans before breakfast & then go to the fields to help with the work. The Jack rabbits were so thick, we used to scatter out racks of poison hay to kill them off and keep them from destroying our crops. In 1930, I, Francis, worked 23 days at the Sugar Factory because we needed money so badly; I russled around about 5 or 6 days before getting the job. I boarded with George Goodwin at the time in Blackfoot leaving the family home to look after things. On April 26, 1933, Jay Leon Hawkes, our 4th son was born here in our home in Pingree. Our neighbor, Mrs. Bedwell, was in attendance and Dr. Hampton was our Dr. We named him Jay Leon, a name which has been a shield of strength to him for he has had many a misfortune but always came back with a fighting spirit. We bought our first tractor while we lived here, (about 1937) and paid $200.00 for it, a Frarmall F 12. I had more work for the neighbors than I could do as I was the only one around with a tractor. This was also the year that our 4th daughter was born, Orva Marie Hawkes, born Oct 9, 1937, at our home and a neighbor who was a registered nurse, June Tow helped us out. Virginia was big enough now that she did most of the house work. Speaking of Virginia, she also had a few incidents to remember. Once when she was very small she, got her hand caught in the ringer on the washing machine and had to have several stitches taken in it. Then, too, when she was walking home from school one night, she was hit by a car & had a terrible laceration on her left knee; she was taken to Aberdeen and was under Dr. care for several days. I, Genevieve, & Virginia stayed at the people’s home who had run into her until she was released from the Dr. care. Never will we forget Vernial holding his breath & Dad being called in from the back of the 160 acres to revive him. Now getting back to Orva, we named her Orva after one very good friend and school teacher. It has been a good name for her, one, of inspiration and guidance. While here in Pingree, we were very active in the church. I, Genevieve, held offices of teacher in kindergarten, chorister of Relief Society, President of Relief Society, President of the Young Women, Mutual, Theology teacher in Relief Society, Bee Hive Teacher and Visiting teacher in Relief Society. I was kept quite busy. I, Francis, held the office of counselor in the Young Men’s mutual association and ward teacher. In the year 1938, our oldest son was married to a very nice hard working girl. Roland & Nellie Floy Humpheries were married for time & eternity in the Logan Temple Nov. 1938. They moved to Livingston, Montana, to work for a Rancher. In 1939, we made our first trip to Yellowstone Park and on into Montana to visit Rowland & Floy. In 1940, our oldest daughter was married to a fine lad. Ruth and David Lamond Scott were married for time and eternity in the Logan Temple on April 19, 1939, her father’s birthday. Our children’s first school bus was horse & a camp wagon. In the spring of 1940, we moved from our home here, to a home closer to the Pingree town site, a log house & it was much closer to the school and church. Things were beginning to look a little better for us; the crops were even looking good, and we had a good crop of peas ready for harvest. The thrasher pulled in that night and it began to rain and it rained for two weeks so the ducks and rain got the harvest, but in spite of all this we managed to buy our first and only refrigerator which we’re still using. This, too, was the first electricity we had. Although we had a different team of horses, we still had run aways. One particular one here at the log house, I, Francis, was raking hay & they ran away with the rake several laps around the field, broke the tongue out of the rake, leaving me wound up in the hay under the tines of the rake and in the ditch. This was a very narrow escape for me as those tines could have been run clear through my body, but the Lord was good & I came out only stiff & sore for a few days. January 1941, we became grandparents and mighty proud ones too, for Roland & Ruth both presented us with our first granddaughters. In April 1942, we became the parents of our 5th son and 9th child Brent B. Hawkes was born April 8, 1942, at the Parson Maternity home, He was the only one of our children to be born in a hospital. Dr. Patrie was the attending Physician. We named him Brent because Virginia picked it out. It surely is a good name with firm determination & high ideals. Mertin entered the army in World War II while we lived here, in the year 1944. After 14 years in Pingree, we moved back to Rockford on the George Bankhead farm in Nov. 1942. We farmed this place for one season & two winters. We are still active in the church. I, Genevieve, served as a Primary teacher & Relief Society visiting teacher. Mother Goodwin also stayed with us for six weeks while here. The flood waters came in from the desert and completely covered our farm the second winter we were here, except the hill where the house was and a few rock piles. The neighbor children used to stop off at the porch and skate over to catch the school bus. We moved to Wapello in March 1944, and farmed for one season & left the 1st of Nov. of the same year. Seemed as though we couldn’t get away from those runaway horses. Once while here, Vernial had a runaway with the team and mowing machine, broke the tongue off the mower and one horse couldn’t get up for three days, and finally sold him for $5.00. We also couldn’t get away from this place fast enough, as we were never happy here. We sold our stock and pigs and bought our parents home in Blackfoot where we have lived ever since. We belonged to the first ward when we first moved here and went to the tabernacle to church, then it was divided. Our new church was built, and it is now the third ward & fifth wards chapel, we belong to the third ward. I loved to farm and couldn’t get it out of my system, so we farmed the old Dance place in Thomas from 1945 & 1946 inclusive. We both worked at the dehydration plant one winter. I, Francis, drove back & forth to work everyday while farming the Dance place. Finally after the cost of living rose so high & the price of farming commodities went down, I decided to give up farming. I started to work for Wilcox Lumber in the fall of 1946 and worked there for 8 long years, also we built a chicken coop and run chickens. In the fall of 1950, we took off and went to Arizona to bring Virginia home from her mission; she served in the Spanish American Mission with head quarters at El Paso Texas. The states we went through were Utah, Arizonia, New Mexico, Texas, also went over the border to Mexico. We went through the Mesa Temple and did sealings, our first. On our way home, we went through the temple at St. George, Utah, Manti & Logan. We also went through the Carlsbad Caverns. I retired at the age of 65 from the lumber yard and have taken up carpentry, having made several pieces of furniture and gave them away. In 1951, I remodeled our home. I also spend long hours each day raising and cultivating a large garden and taking care of a large flower garden. Seems as though we had hardly got settled at our home in Blackfoot when Jay had the misfortune of falling out of a tree at the neighbors and broke both of his arms. In 1949, April 22, Vernial married a lovely girl and expert homemaker, Doris Arlene Hall, at the home of her Aunts in Thomas and were later sealed for time and eternity in the Idaho Falls Temple in 1954. In 1950, Afton married Kenneth Clarence Shawver Jr., a pill of a dirt farmer if there ever was one; they were married at the home of his parents in Thomas, Mar. 12, 1950, and later they were sealed for time and eternity in the Idaho Falls Temple July 6, 1962. On June 6, Virginia married a nice young man, John Warren Charlesworth, in the Idaho Fall temple. In 1954, Mertin married Irene Beal, a very nice school teacher from Moore, Idaho. They were married in the Idaho Falls temple on June 16, 1954. In 1956, Orva married Jim Nelson at Elko, Nevada, on May 5, 1956. I, Genevieve, received my patriarchal blessing from Peter J. Williams, Aug. 17, 1949, one I hope I will be able to live up to. Jay also received his the same day. We have been custodians of the 3rd and 5th wards for the past 3 years. On April 28, 1959, we were honored by the Mutual for our services as custodians. Since living here in the 3rd ward, we have been have been active in the church. I, Genevieve, have held the offices of visiting teacher, chorister in Jr. S. S. and Coordinator in the Jr. S. S. and work leader in the Relief Society. I, Frances, have been a ward teacher with Brent as my partner. In 1956, I, Genevieve, went to Canada with the lady missionary’s tour. On our tour, we visited the Cardston Temple, and on our return home we toured through Glacier National Park. In 1959, I left for a church tour to the East visiting many church historical points and the Hill Camorah Pageant returning Aug 25, 1959. We have lived at our present home at 1030 West Bridge St. for the past 15 years. I, Francis, am now 70 yrs. and Genevieve is 65 years. We are both in good health and all nine children are. 7 of them married with a total of 29 grand children. The Lord has been good to us and for this we are very thankful and hope and pray that in our life time we are able to do good in return.

Francis Sidney Hawkes - Funeral Service

Contributor: MollyM Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Francis Hawkes Funeral Service Funeral services for Francis S. Hawkes were conducted at 1 p.m. Nov. 10, 1972, at the Third Ward LDS Church by Verl Horrocks, first counselor in the bishopric. Prayer with the family at Sandberg-Hill Funeral Home was offered by Mertin Hawkes. The prelude and prelude music was played by Elaine Madsen. Vernial Hawkes offered the invocation. Music selections were “Sometime We’ll Understand” and “I know That My Redeemer Lives” sung by Relief Society Chorus. They were directed Leloa Horrocks and accompanied by Debbie Draper. A violin solo “Oh My Father” was played by Susan Benson, accompanied by Lucille Benson. Dexter Gardner sang “I’m A Pilgrim.” Brent Hawkes gave the obituary and spoke of his father’s love for flowers and gardening. Harold Jones spoke on the plan of life and salvation, and bore testimony to the truth of the resurrection. Alva Lewis told of Mr. Hawkes’ honesty and integrity and told the family of the love their father had for them. Bishop Sterling Madsen said Mr. Hawkes loved the soil, had worked hard and had taught his family to work. The benediction was pronounced by Jay Hawkes. Casket bearers were grandsons, Donald Scott, Larry Nelson, Mark Shawver, Jon Hawkes, Reggie Charlesworth, Randy Charlesworth, Dennis Hawkes and Rusty Scott. Honorary bearers were Lynn Fackrell, Austin Stover, Kenneth Sproul, Clarence Pack, Hyrum Adams and Delbert Parkin. Flowers were arranged by the Third Ward Relief Society, Estella Adams, President, assisted by Verda Clark, Mary Walker, Carol Fackrell, Etta Bass, Velta Daniels, Magdalene Gardner, and Ruth Miller, and the granddaughters, Christie, Leigh Ann, Kelly, Debra Francie, Lori, Lisa, Robin and Pamela Hawkes, Troba Nelson, Nikki Nelson, DeAnn Shawver, Cindy Charlesworth, Jocelyn Scott, Jerry McBride, Sandra Hieb, Patricia Pugmire, and Annette Scott. Interment was in the Riverside-Thomas Cemetery with the dedication by Roland Hawkes.

Life History of Genevieve Pearl Goodwin Hawkes written by Genevieve concluding on 2 June 1964

Contributor: MollyM Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Genevieve Pearl Goodwin was born 24 March 1894 to John William Goodwin and Catherine Maria Staker; being the tenth child. She was born in Holliday, Big Cottonwood, Utah. Our home was a two room brick home with a slant room built on the back. I was just a little red-headed girl with brown eyes. I've spilled a lot of tears over my red hair but very proud of it now. I entered school at the age of 6 at the Irving School at Holliday. Our recreation was home dramatic shows, children dances, and Ward fairs at Thanksgiving. At about 12 years of age all of us children were playing and I fell on a harrow cutting my leg very badly on one of the harrow teeth. Mother treated it with turpentine. I carry a bad scar to this day. I was about the age of 15 when the Hawkes family moved up from Murray, Utah. I met Francis Sidney Hawkes at this time, and we went together like school kids do. I was about 17 when dad sold the farm at Holliday and bought a home in Winder Ward. I was active in all the church activities. I took piano lessons from Spencer Cornwall while living here, but I didn't stay with it. I picked berries and fruit in the summer to earn money and also worked in a small cafe. We lived for some time on the Gunn Ranch and we furnished all the fruit and vegetables for the Hotel Utah. Francis Hawkes worked for Dad on this ranch delivering the produce to the hotel which was just a mile from our home. While we lived here a family of negroes lived across the road from us. They were very good neighbors. Dad sold our home and we moved to Idaho in June 1914 settling in Thomas, Bingham, Idaho, on a small farm belonging to Ed Turpin. It is where LaVar Turpin lives at this time. Dad lived here in this small community until he died. We belonged to the Thomas Ward where my first office in the church was a Sunday School teacher with Millie Hennifer. I took part in dramatic plays and sang in the choir. Francis Hawkes moved to Idaho the last of March 1914, settling on the Greening place with a sister and two brothers. The day we arrived in Idaho he was cultivating beets for a brother, Avery, and came over to welcome us. We started going together and the 23rd of February 1916 we were married in Thomas by Bishop John R. Williams. We had our endowments and sealing in the Salt Lake Temple 21 December 1916. I joined the Cottonwood Relief Society at Wilson right after we were married. Our first son, Rowland, was born here 5 February 1917. When he was 13 days old, he became very ill and we thought we were going to lose him. We used several old remedies, prayer circles, and the power of the Priesthood, and when he was three months old, I made a promise to the Lord if he would spare our son, I would never drink another cup of coffee. He began to get better and I never touched coffee since. From here we moved to a dry farm north of Rockford, where we lived for one year, coming back to Thomas on the Parley Fackrell place where Mertin was born 29 August 1919. We next moved to the Bill Nelson place across from the Turpin Ranch. We then built us a new home on forty acres of my brother Nate's place, and here Ruth was born 5 January 1922. We next rented the Crystal farm and while living here Bill Nelson cut my long hair. Mertin, just a small boy at the time, made the remark "You don't look like Momma any more." Virginia was born here 14 October 1924. Then we moved to the Dance farm where Afton was born 5 October 1926. From there we moved to Pingree, Idaho April 1928 to a sugar factory farm. We left the three older children with relatives in Thomas to finish their school year. Vernial was born at this time 28 December 1928 at my sister Vera Wood's home in Thomas. Jay was born in Pingree 26 April 1933. Orva was also born at Pingree 9 October 1937. We lived at this farm until the spring of 1941, then moving to a farm closer to the Pingree townsite. It was a log house and Brent was born while living here. However he was born at the Parson's Hospital in Blackfoot on 8 April 1942. We lived in Pingree for 14 years, and I served as a Sunday School teacher, chorister, Relief Society President, President of the YWMIA, theology teacher in Relief Society, Visiting Teacher, and Beehive teacher in the MIA. We moved to the Bankhead farm in Rockford in November 1942. We farmed here for one season. I served there as a Primary teacher and Relief Society teacher. While living here flood waters came in from the desert and covered this farm. We moved to Wapello in March 1944, and farmed for one season. We left here the 1st of November selling all our stock and bought a home on West Bridge Street in Blackfoot, Idaho. While living in the Blackfoot Third Ward, I was a visiting teacher, chorister in Junior Sunday School, coordinator for Junior Sunday School and a teacher in Junior Sunday School, and work leader in the Relief Society. I had my Patriarchal blessing 17 August 1949 by Peter J. Williams, Patriarch. In the fall of 1950, we went to Arizona to bring Virginia home from her mission. We went to the Mesa Temple and performed some sealings. We visited in Old Mexico, and on our way home we went through the St. George, Manti, and Logan Temples. Had a wonderful time. In 1938, we went to Yellowstone National Park and into Livingston, Montana where our son Rowland and family were living at that time. In 1956 Brent and I went with the sister missionaries on a tour into Canada. I went through the Cardston Temple two sessions and we visited the Glacier National Park. In 1956 we were made custodians at the Third and Fifth Ward Chapel. We have worked under six Bishops, Arvel Draper, Clarence Cox, Lee S. Waters, Thomas Hemming, Sterling P. Madson, Ellis Oram, and Golden Elison of the new 10th Ward. This covered about eight years. I left on a church tour to the east on Friday 24 July 1959, and returned home 15 August 1959. Our tour took us to the Pageant at the Hill Cumorah, the Smith Farm, Reorganized Church, Carthage Jail, and other points of interest. In 1956 we went to Kansas City, Missouri to enter Jay in school. Since we built our new home, we have bought many flowers. Some from the east and most of our roses came from Portland, Oregon. We have spent many long hours beautifying our present home site. Now 2 June 1964 we are leaving to bring Brent home from his mission in Northern Mexico. We will meet him in El Paso, Texas since he has to fly out of Mexico. Then we will go back into Mexico and tour for a month. Mrs. Kesler will go with us to help with the driving and interpreting. On our way we hope to visit brother Roy in Ogden, Utah and a daughter, Virginia, in Kearns, Utah. On our way home we hope to visit all the temples. All of our children are married at this time except Brent. We have thirty-four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

History Written by Catherine Maria Staker Goodwin

Contributor: MollyM Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

My Mother, Ethel Hawker Crockett Park, gave me a copy of a handwritten history by her Grandmother, Catherine Maria Staker Goodwin. I thought perhaps I could type Catherine's personal history into Family Tree. She was self-taught about reading and writing so she could fulfill her church callings thus the early part of her personal history needs many corrections, and I thought "do I type it as written or correct the spelling and grammar?" Rather than waiting until I had time to do such a task, I decided to only include her memories about the 1918 flu epidemic. The story starts on 29 May 1918: "Our son A. L. Roy was married to Hazel Hemingway, and on 4 September 1918, he left for Camp Lewis Washington on his way to the World War I. He was released 29 May 1919, arriving home just a few days after their first baby boy (Duwayne) was born. At this time, Hazel was staying with us while Roy was gone. The flu broke out, and her mother contracted the disease and died. Hazel was also sick with the flu. I was down to the Bishop's working on her mother's burying clothes, and I told the folks I was going to see Hazel before I went home. I went and talked with her through the window. I told her I was coming to the funeral the next day, and then I would come in and stay until she got better. That was the first I went to work with the flu--mostly among my own family. My husband, John, and baby girl, Vera, were the next, and before they recovered, daughter Lois Hawker and family were all stricken with the disease, and they sent for me to come. But I had John (husband) and Vera down so I could not go. So I went and got George to go to Salt Lake and take care of them. When he got there, they were so bad that he sent right back for Rilla (his wife). It took them both, day and night, to take care of them. They were there quite awhile, and before they got over the flu, they contracted the measles and were quaranteed. Lois stayed in the house to care for the children, and Robert was outside doing the chores. The family just recovered from the measles when they were quaranteed again with Scarlet Fever. Their Bishop sent a telegram to say that someone would have to come to care for them as he could not get anyone to go into the house. So the next morning I took the train [from Thomas, Idaho] and arrived in a snow storm. Before I had gone to care for Lois and family, I had been out to Genevieve's to care for her and Francis and baby Roland; they also had the flu and were very sick for a while. As soon as i could leave Lois and family, I went home and found everything covered in snow drifts." From history of Robert and Lois Hawker: "Robert moved his family to Idaho on 1 April 1919. In June of that same year, the first boy was born to the family. Because of the difficult time Lois had with the flu, Samuel was born in a very weakened condition and was called a "blue baby" by the doctor. Lois' mother (Catherine Goodwin) left her family to come help care for Lois and the new baby." The following article from the Deseret News, March 22, 1997, may be of interest: "Source of Deadly 1918 Flu Pinpointed." By analyzing viral genes from lung tissue preserved for 79 years, researchers have determined that the 1918 flu epidemic that killed 20 million people worldwide was caused by a virus from American pigs. In a study published Friday in the journal Science, researchers at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology said they found the virus traces in tissue taken from the autopsy of an Army private who died of the flu in 1918. He was one of about 700,000 people killed by the epidemic in the United States. Dr. Jeffery K. Taubenberger, leader of the research team, said that the genetic pattern of the virus shows that although it is closely related to "swine" flu, the 1918 influenza virus is unlike any other flu bug. "This is the first time that anyone has gotten a look at this virus which killed millions of people in one year, making it the worse infectious disease episode ever," he said. "It does not match any virus that has been found since." Another expert praised the work and said that it may help science get ready for what some believe will be an inevitable return of the deadly form of flu. "Eventually we will have another influenza pandemic," said Robert Webster, a virologist and flu specialist at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis. Now we are in a better position to combat it. If it comes back, we can design a vaccine based on that genetic sequence." Analyzing the 1918 virus, he said, will help science learn why it was so deadly and virulent. Other researchers attempted to isolate the 1918 virus, but Taubenberger's team is the first to succeed. Although the disease that caused the worldwide epidemic was called "Spanish flu," the virus apparently was a mutation that evolved in American pigs and was spread around the globe by U.S. troops mobilized for World War I, said Taubenberger. The Army private whose tissue was analyzed contracted the flu at Fort Jackson, S.C. For that reason, Taubenberger and his colleagues suggested the virus be known as Influenza A/South Carolina. Army doctors in 1918 conducted autopsies on some of the 43,000 servicemen killed by the flu and preserved some specimens in formaldehyde and wax. Taubenberger said his team sorted through 30 specimens before finding enough cirus in the private's lung tissue to partially sequence the genes for hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, two key proteins in flu virus. "The hemagglutinin gene matches closest to swine influenza viruses, showing that this virus came into humans from pigs." The finding supports a wide-spread theory that flu viruses from swine are the most virulent for humans. Two other flu viruses spread all over the world since 1918--Asian flu in 1957 and the Hong Kong flu in 1968--and both mutated in pigs. Most experts believe that flu viruses reside harmlessly in birds, where they are genetically stable. Occasionally, a virus from birds will infect pigs. The swine immune system attacks the virus, forcing it to change genetically to survive. The result is a new virus. When this new bug is spread to humans, it can be devastating, said Taubenberger.

Life timeline of Francis Sidney Hawkes

1889
Francis Sidney Hawkes was born on 19 Apr 1889
Francis Sidney Hawkes was 5 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Francis Sidney Hawkes was 15 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Francis Sidney Hawkes was 28 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Francis Sidney Hawkes was 31 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Francis Sidney Hawkes was 50 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Francis Sidney Hawkes was 53 years old when World War II: The Imperial Japanese Navy made a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, intending to neutralize the United States Pacific Fleet from influencing the war Japan was planning to wage in Southeast Asia. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Francis Sidney Hawkes was 69 years old when Space Race: Launch of Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth. The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability. It had its origins in the missile-based nuclear arms race between the two nations that occurred following World War II, aided by captured German missile technology and personnel from the Aggregat program. The technological superiority required for such dominance was seen as necessary for national security, and symbolic of ideological superiority. The Space Race spawned pioneering efforts to launch artificial satellites, uncrewed space probes of the Moon, Venus, and Mars, and human spaceflight in low Earth orbit and to the Moon.
Francis Sidney Hawkes was 75 years old when John F. Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas, Texas; hours later, Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in aboard Air Force One as the 36th President of the United States. John Fitzgerald Kennedy, commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. He served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his presidency dealt with managing relations with the Soviet Union. As a member of the Democratic Party, Kennedy represented the state of Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate prior to becoming president.
Francis Sidney Hawkes died on 7 Nov 1972 at the age of 83
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Francis Sidney Hawkes (19 Apr 1889 - 7 Nov 1972), BillionGraves Record 5208990 Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho, United States

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