Finis P Fife

31 Aug 1844 - 15 May 1923

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Finis P Fife

31 Aug 1844 - 15 May 1923
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Grave site information of Finis P Fife (31 Aug 1844 - 15 May 1923) at Providence City Cemetery in River Heights, Cache, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Finis P Fife

Born:
Died:

Providence City Cemetery

900 River Heights Blvd
River Heights, Cache, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Rex Hicks

June 8, 2012
Photographer

richardrobyn@comcast.net

June 7, 2012

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History of Finis (Patterson) Hemenway Fife - written by her daughter, Elizabeth (Libbie) Fife Thorpe

Contributor: Rex Hicks Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Born: August 31, 1844 near Danville, Dixon Olge County, State of Illinois. Died: May 15, 1923 at Weston, Idaho with daughter Carey Thorpe. Buried at Logan, UT Her father was Luther S. Hemenway. He was born on the 10th day of March, 1811. Her mother was Elvira Day Hemenway. She was born on the 26th day of February, 1811 in Kenne, New Hampshire. Luther and Elvira were living in New Hampshire when converted. Finis tells this part of her history: My parents joined the church about 1844 and moved to Illinois in 1844 where they lived near Danville for seven years. My parents were anxious to go to Utah to be with the saints so they joined a company on the 6th of April, 1852. This company was led by Captain Cook. We had a light wagon drawn by horses for the family to ride in, and a baggage wagon drawn by a yoke of oxen with a hired man to drive them. We took two good milk cows with us. There were eight in the family--father, mother, four girls, and two boys. The eldest, Eleanor; then Amy and Ada, twins; Finis, Lachoneous, and Nephi. It took us a week to reach Florence. We stayed there for some time to repair the wagons and outfits to go on with the journey. When we camped, it was the children's task to gather wood or buffalo chips for the camp fires. Father would drive forked sticks about three feet apart to hold an iron rod with hooks on to hold the kettles. We had an iron with three legs and bars across to lay wood on so it would burn better; and a fire shovel and frying pan with long handles so we wouldn't burn our hands; and a bake oven to bake our bread in. Mother had a baby six months old when we started across the plains. She would ride most of the time with the baby as she was not very strong. We children walked most of the time so the team wouldn't get so tired. When it would storm and we couldn't cook we had a barrel of crackers which we ate with our milk. We carried the milk in a large can and the shaking of the wagon would churn the milk into butter. A man and his family by the name of Mayfield, who traveled next to us, had a sick oxen and couldn't travel, so the company went on leaving them behind. Father couldn't stand to see them left alone, so we stayed with them. The oxen died the next day. The second day a band of Indians surrounded the camp on all sides and we were powerless to do anything but trust in the Lord to save us. Brother Mayfield could talk some of the Indian languages and he talked to them for some time. They finally rode away. We were frightened many times by Indians and stampeding buffalo. The men yoked one of the cows in with the oxen and we joined another company to go on with our journey. We had a hard time crossing the rivers, and when it stormed we would have to lay over a day or so to get our clothes and bedding dry. Then we would bake bread, wash clothes and prepare to go on again. One Sunday morning the company decided to travel til they found a better camping place and then stop for the day. After we had started, a terrible wind began to blow and clouds gathered in the sky. Rain came in torrents. Some of the wagons were blown over. The saints thought the Lord had sent this as a punishment for traveling on Sunday. We had to camp for some time after this to repair and dry our bedding. Our provisions were very low the last month of the journey. We ate our last bit of food the night before we reached the valley. We were just six months on the journey across the plains. We had some sickness and a great many hardships. We arrived in Salt Lake City on the afternoon of October 6, 1852. My father brought seeds and some plants with us and with these he started a nursery. He was one of the first nursery men in Salt Lake City (if not the first). He sold all kinds of trees and flowers and shrubs. He couldn't hire men to do some of the work for him, so he had Ada and me help him all through the Summer. He taught us to graft and bud the trees and do all kinds of work. This was a great benefit to us as we grew older. In the cold weather, we were kept busy carding, spinning wool, making stockings, and weaving blankets. We made linsie cloth for men and women's dresses. When I married, Father gave me the spinning wheel and loom. We were taught to make yard and dye it all colors. My family shared in the hardships of the grasshopper war, and flour was very very expensive to buy. We never tasted bread for six weeks, living on roots, nettle, and pig-wood greens until the peas, turnips, and potatoes got large enough to eat. Flour was $25 a barrel. When the grain got ripe we gleaned a little from around the edge of the patch, shelled it out by hand, and ground it in a coffee mill and made bread which seemed better than any we had ever tasted. We were so weak while we lived on greens and salt we could hardly walk to school. We had no shoes to wear, and Mother made us some out of the wagon cover. The cover was also used for dresses since cloth was a dollar or more a yard. My mother was very neat and sewed everything by hand. By hard work and good management we were pretty well to do when we grew up. Ada married Bishop Robert Davidson and moved to Logan. I went to help take care of her when her baby was born. At that time I met William Fife, who was living in Providence with his mother. He was one of the first settlers of that place. We became sweethearts and were afterwards married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City on Dec. 7, 1865. I lived in the same house with his mother and shared all they had for many years. Libbie Fife Thorpe gave details from her on: There were eleven children born to Finis and William Fife. Namely: Finis, Margaret, William John, Elvira and Eleanor (twins), Elizabeth (Libbie), Carrie, Abigail (Abbie) and Albert (twins), Walter D., and Luther. While mother was bearing the oldest children, Margaret (Father's sister) died and left two children--Ella and William Bowen. Mother took these children and they shared equally in everything we had until they were grown. Their father remarried and moved to Beaver Dam. When the twins, Elvira and Eleanor were born they looked so near alike they couldn't tell them apart, so a string was tied around one's wrist until they were six months old. Then a vein showed plainer in one's forehead to make the difference. They lived to be nine months old when one of them took sick with pneumonia and died. The other died the next day. Both were buried in the same coffin. Mother wove cloth, carded, spun yarn, knit stockings, wove hundreds of yards of carpet for people for ten cents a yard, and tried in every way to help raise her family. Father was very active in the church work. He was often called out at all hours of the night to administer to the sick. He worked so hard getting out wood for two families and helping widowed and other families in the church. He held so many important offices and worked so hard that he took sick in 1889. Mother had him to care for and the family for twenty years. When her brothers and sisters were all married but the youngest boy, Nephi, her father Luther S. Hemenway, was called by Brigham Young to go to Fillmore, Utah. Her mother was a weakly woman and her family were all married and settled near her around Salt Lake City. She felt she couldn't go and start over again. Luther gave her a comfortable home and means. He married two young wives and spent the rest of his days in Fillmore and Dixie raising grapes and flax, as well as a family of twelve. He died there at about 64 years of age. Grandma (Elvira Day Hemenway) got too old and sick to stay in her home in Salt Lake City, so Mother (Finis) took her in about 1890. She and her sistersin Logan took care of her until she died. Soon after this a man by the name of Andrew Basset lost his wife and left a baby about a year old. He asked Mother to take the baby, and she cared for him, Roy Basset, about five years, then his father took him to Kansas City. The father took sick at the brother's home and before he died he asked his brother, a gambler, to send a letter to Mother asking if she would raise the boy. She consented and Roy was went back to Mother. He was about eight years old and then she cared for him until he was sixteen years old. He was a very mean boy and very difficult to handle. With all this work and worry she found time to help with the sick. Sister Bassett, and old mid-wife of Providence, used to take her with her on many confinement cases, and taught her many things, and in later year when she was living on a farm on the Portneuf River in Idaho (with son William at Topaz) she brought many babies to the poor settlers who couldn't get better help. She stayed for weeks at homes and cared for the sick and nursed many back to health when doctors couldn't be gotten. Often when doctors said there was no chance of recovery, she brought them through. She was always prayerful and would ask the Lord what to do, and He told her or prompted her just what to do to make them better. She did not like doctors; she trusted in the Lord. She kept the Word of Wisdom, paid an honest tithing and always looked on the bright side. She was always thankful for every blessing. She taught her children to be honest and industrious and to do what was right. She tried to make the best of everything. She did the work in the Temple for 900 souls, with a little help from her family, doing only one name a day and driving to and from Providence. She performed a faithful duty as a teacher of the Relief Society for many years. She was an invalid for 10 years, from a slight stroke. She was always patient and never complained. She died in 15th of May, 1923.

History of Finis Patterson Hemenway by Alice Gayle Fife Jensen

Contributor: Rex Hicks Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

My Grandmother, Finis Patterson Hemenway, was born the 31st August 1844 at Daysville, Ogle County, Illinois. Daysville is where Finis' parents came to live after joining the Church and leaving Gilsom, Cheshire, New Hampshire. They went to live on her Uncle Luke's farm. In 1852 the family prepared to move to Utah and on the 6th of April 1852 they left with Captain Cook's Company. They had a heavy wagon drawn by horses, a lighter wagon drawn by a yoke of oxen with a hired man to drive for them. The family consisted of eight members - Luther, the father; Elvira, the mother; Elena, Ada, Amy, Finis, Lachoneus and Nephi six months old. It took them a week to reach Florence, Illinois. They repaired their equipment and then continued their trip to Salt Lake Valley. The children walked as much as they were able to relieve the weary horses and oxen. When they camped the children gathered wood and buffalo chips for the campfire. They were six months on their journey across the plains. Their last food was eaten the night before they reached Salt Lake Valley. They arrived the 6th of October 1852. The family had ten acres located in the Fourth Ward where they started the first nursery in Salt Lake City. By the year 1855, the family had 14,000 apple and peach trees ready for the market. The family shared in hardships of the winter of 1856 after being ravaged by grasshoppers and draught. For six weeks they were without bread, living on roots, nettles and pig weed greens, until the peas and potatoes were ready to eat. The children were in such a weakened condition while living on this diet that it was difficult for them to walk to school. When their shoes were worn out they had no money to buy new ones so their mother took the canvas from their covered wagon and made shoes for them. Finis Hemenway and William Fife were married on the 7th of December 1865 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah from there they move to Providence, Utah. Finis became active in Relief Society and Temple work, she was proxy for more than nine hundred of her ancestors. Her husband was ill for a number of years before he died so Finis and her three sons, Walter, William and Luther went with her to Blazer, Idaho during the summer months to take their cattle for summer feed. My father stated that they had a small log house on the Portnauf River that they lived in during the summer months. (There is a family picture of it.) Finis was the mother of eleven children, Finis, Margaret, William, Elvira, Eleanore, Elizabeth, Abigail, Albert, Carry, Walter and Luther. Grandmother was known for service she gave to the sick, she helped to bring a great number of babies into this world. Finis died the 15th of May 1923 in Weston, Idaho where she had been living with her daughter Carry for a number of years due to poor health. She was buried in the Providence, Utah Cemetery.

History of Finis Patterson Hemenway by Bonnie Fife Nielsen from other histories

Contributor: Rex Hicks Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Finis Patterson Hemenway Fife was born 31 August 1844 at Daysville, (now Dixon), Ogle County, Illinois. A daughter of Luther Singleton Hemenway and Elvira Day. He was the first nurseryman in Salt Lake City. Early in 1844, Luther and Elvira and three daughters left Gilsum, New Hampshire with other Mormon converts. They arrived at Daysville, Illinios where Luther’s sister Cynthia and her husband, Jehriel Day lived. The family stayed there seven years, three children were born there, Finis 1844, Lachoneous 1849, and Nephi 1851. In 1852 the family prepared to move to Utah and on the 6th of April 1852 they left with Captain Cook’s Company. They had a heavy wagon drawn by horses, a lighter wagon drawn by a yoke of oxen, with a hired man to drive them. The family consisted of eight members – Luther, the father; Elvia, the mother; Elena, Ada, Finis, Lachoneus and Nephi, six months old. It took them a week to reach Florence, Illinios. They repaired their equipment and then continued their trip to the Salt Lake Valley. The children walked as much as they were able, to relieve the weary horses and oxen. When they camped the children gathered wood and buffalo chips for the campfire. One Sunday morning, the company decided to travel until it found a camping place that afforded a comfortable respite for the day. After they started a terrible wind began to blow and clouds gathered, the rain came down in torrents. Some of the wagons were blown over. The Saints thought the Lord had sent this storm as a punishment for traveling on Sunday. They had to camp some time after this to repair and dry their bedding. Their provisions were very low the last month of the journey. The last bit food was eaten the night before they reached the valley. They were six months on the journey across the plains, having some sickness and a great many hardships. The date of their arrival was October 6, 1852. As Luther had brought seeds and some plants, he started a nursery which was the first in Salt Lake City. The family gained possession of a ten acre tract of land located in the Forth Ward. The Grant School was later erected on that property. In 1855, Luther with the aid of his daughters had ready for market, 14,000 apple and peach trees. He had taught his daughters Ada, Amy and Finis the art of grafting and budding trees, and the girls helped him with all kinds of work in caring for the nursery. He grafted the pear tree on native thorn roots, which grew a sturdy stock. Also, peach trees on pear tree roots and pear trees to peach tree roots with equal success. His wife, Elvira and daughters were kept very busy, as were other pioneer women during the fifties and subsequent years following. In cold weather, the task of carding and spinning wool, knitting stockings, and weaving blankets and linsey for men’s shirts and women’s dresses. The family shared in the hardships of the winter of 1856, when flour sold for a dollar a pound, not enough could be had at any price due to the ravages of grasshoppers and drought. For six weeks they were without bread, living on roots, nettles and pigweed greens, until the peas and the potatoes were ready to eat the following summer. When the grain was matured a little it was gleaned by hand and ground in the coffee mill, a few hot cakes were made which tasted better than anything they had ever eaten. The children were in such a weakened condition while living on roots and greens, that it was difficult for them to walk to school. Their shoes had worn out, and there was not any money to replace them, but Elvira came to the rescue. The wagon covers were still intact, and she made them all some canvas shoes. William Fife who resided in Providence met Finis when she came to Logan to help take care of her sister and baby, when she met William Fife, they became sweethearts and were later married in the Endowment House December 7, 1865 in Salt Lake City, Utah. They lived in the same house as William’s mother, Margaret Matheson Fife, and shared all they had for many years. Finis’s first twins were so near alike that they had difficulty telling them apart. At six months a vain shown plainer in the baby girl’s forehead. When nine months old one took sick with pneumonia, the other baby twin took sick and died the following day. Both were buried in the same coffin. Finis wove cloth and spun yarn, knit stockings, wove hundreds of yards of carpet for people at 10 cents per yard. She tried in every way to help support her family. The spinning wheel and loom were wedding gifts from her father and mother, Luther S. and Elvira Day Hemenway. Finis set up her carpet loom in the granary where she wove many yards of cloth called Linsey, made of sheep wool, this material was creamy white, which was made into sheets, underwear, dresses and other clothing. This material was dyed. Other useful articles of clothing were made. A dress was worn for a week then washed clean on Saturday to be worn on Sunday. When they went to Sunday School an egg was carried by each of the children to be placed in a basket by the door to help build the Logan Temple. Everything in the orchard was taken care of, the fruit was dried and sold in Logan to help keep the family, together with fresh apples and berries. Grandfather William worked hard to get out wood for two families and supplying their needs, also working in the L.D. S. Church holding many responsible positions. He also helped build a community school and first meeting house, both built from rock taken from the hills. They are both in use today having been enlarged. He built his home in Providence out of rock, two stories with five rooms. While working on the farm, William took a sun stroke in 1884 and was ill for many years. William’s mother and her growing family besides his own wife and eleven children, his mother being ill for many years (Margaret Matheson Fife). With all this work and worry Finis had time to care for the ill, and act as midwife in many confinement cases. She would stay for weeks at a time with those who were not expected to live, and nurse them back to health. Later with her oldest son William John, who was yet too young to homestead, Finis went to Dempsey near Lava Hot Springs, Idaho. While here, she brought many babies for poor settlers who could not get help, she was always prayerful and ask the Lord what to do. She strictly kept the Word of Wisdom, paid an honest tithing and always looked on the bright side, and was thankful for every blessing. She taught her children to be honest, industrious and to do what was right. She tried to make the best of everything. She had a large fruit orchard, berries, made her own soap. She canned and preserved and stored in large crocks, placing them in a large cellar under the granary where apples and vegetables were stored for winter. In 1870 Census of Providence, Cache, Utah, it shows “Wm Fife 32, his wife Finis 25, daughter Finis 4, Margaret 1 and his mother and a niece Ellen Bowen age 4.” Her husband was ill for a number of years before he died so Finis and her three sons, Walter, William and Luther went with her to Blazer, Idaho during the summer months to take their cattle for summer feed. They had a small log house on the Portneuf River that they lived in during the summer months. William and Finis had eleven children, Finis, Margaret, William, Elvira, Eleanore, Elizabeth, Abigail, Albert, Carry, Walter and Luther. William died the 24th of February 1919 and was buried in the Providence City Cemetery. Later in life Finis worked in the Logan Temple and did work for over 900souls, with little help from kinfolk and her family. She did chores early each morning and then drove her little horse, Blacky, pulling a buggy on very frosty mornings two miles to the temple. Near nightfall, she would come to see her daughter in Logan on her way home. For eight years Finis was an invalid on account of a stroke. She was at her home in Providence and when not able to take care of herself, she lived for years at her daughter Elizabeth’s in Logan. Her throat was affected by the stroke, she became very thin at the last of her illness, Mother would pick her up gently place her in an old rocking chair while she made her bed. She was always so patient and happy when any of we girls went in her room to see and visit her. Finis was known for service she gave to the sick, she helped to bring a great number of babies into this world. Finis died at Carry Fife Thorpe’s home in Weston, Idaho after being there only a week, 15 May 1923. Her funeral was held in the same rock meeting house in Providence that William helped build. Many, many beautiful tributes were paid for her life of service. She was buried in Providence, Utah Cemetery. NOTE: I combined parts of three histories into one to read at The Sego Lily Camp Daughters of Utah Pioneers, Hyrum Utah. BFN

Grandmother Finis Hemenway Fife by Marie Thorpe Ralphs

Contributor: Rex Hicks Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Born 31 August 1844 at Daysville now Dixon, Ogle County, Illinois. Early pioneers to settle Providence, Cache, Utah. Finis Hemenway’s father was Luther Singleton Hemenway, her mother was Elvira Day. He was the first nurseryman in Salt Lake City, Utah. There was eleven children born to Finis and William, Finis the older, Margaret, William, John, Elvira and Eleanor (twins), Elizabeth Ann (my mother), Carry, Abigail and Albert (twins), Walter and Luther. William Fife who resided in Providence met Finis when she came to Logan to help take care of her sister and baby, when she met William Fife, they became sweethearts and was later married in the Endowment House 7 December 1865 in Salt Lake City, Utah, They lived in the same house with William’s mother, Margaret Mathison Fife, and shared all they had for many years. Grandmother’s first twins were so near alike that they had difficulty telling them apart. At six months a vain shown plainer in the baby girl’s forehead. When nine months old one took sick with the pneumonia, the other baby twin girl took sick and died the following day. Both were buried in the same coffin. Grandmother wove cloth and spun yarn, knit stockings, wove hundreds of yards of carpet for people at 10 cents per yard. She tried in every way to help support her family. The spinning wheel and loom were wedding gifts from her father and mother, Luther S. and Elvira Day Hemenway for a wedding present. Grandfather William worked so hard to get out wood for two families and supplying their needs, also working in the L.D.S. Church, holding many responsible positions, also helping to build a community school house and first meeting house, both built from rock taken from the hills. They are both in use today having been enlarged. While working on the farm he took a sun stroke in 1884 and was ill for many years. Grandfather’s mother and her growing family besides his own wife and eleven children. His mother being ill for many years (Margaret Mathison Fife). With all this work and worry she had time to care for the ill, and act as midwife in many confinement cases. She would stay for weeks at a time with those who were not expected to live, and nurse them back to health. Later her oldest son William John, who was yet too young to homestead, Finis, my grandmother, went to Dempsey near Lava Hot Springs [Idaho]. While there she brought many babies for poor settlers who could not get help, she was always prayerful and asked the Lord what to do. She strictly kept the Word of Wisdom, paid an honest tithing and always looked on the bright side, and was thankful for every blessing. She taught her children to be honest, industrious and to do what was right. She tried to make the best of everything. She had a large fruit orchard, berries and made her own soap. She canned and preserved and stored in large crocks, placing them in a large cellar under the granary where apples and vegetables were stored for winter. Grandmother’s carpet loom was set up in the granary, where she wove many yards of cloth called Linsey, made of sheep wool, this material was creamy white, which was made into sheets, underwear, dresses, and other clothing. This material was dyed. Other articles of clothing were made. My Mother Elizabeth Ann said that a dress was worn for a week then washed clean on Saturday to be worn on Sunday clean. She said when they went to Sunday School an egg was carried by each of the children to be placed in a basket by the door to help build the Logan Temple. My Mother said everything in the orchard was taken care of. The fruit was dried and was sold in Logan to help keep the family, together with fresh apples and berries. In later life she worked in the Logan Temple and did work for over 900 souls, with a little help from kinfolk and her family. She did chores early each morning and then drove her little horse (Blackie) pulling a buggy on very frosty mornings two miles to the temple. She would come near nightfall to see us, in Logan, on her way home. For eight years my grandmother Finis Fife was an invalid on account of a stroke. She was at her home in Providence, and when she was not able to take care of herself, she lived for years at our home in Logan. Her throat was affected by the stroke, she became very thin at the last of her illness. Mother would pick her up and gently place her in an old rocking chair while she made her bed. She was always so patient and happy when any of we girls went in her room to see and visit her. She died at Carry Thorpe’s home in Weston, Idaho after being there only a week, 15 May 1923. Her funeral was held in the same rock meeting house in Providence that my Grandfather helped build. Many, many beautiful tributes were paid for a life of service. She was buried in Providence, Utah Cemetery.

Life timeline of Finis P Fife

1844
Finis P Fife was born on 31 Aug 1844
Finis P Fife was 15 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Finis P Fife was 25 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Finis P Fife was 33 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Finis P Fife was 45 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Finis P Fife was 49 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
Finis P Fife was 64 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Finis P Fife was 73 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Finis P Fife died on 15 May 1923 at the age of 78
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Finis P Fife (31 Aug 1844 - 15 May 1923), BillionGraves Record 1377939 River Heights, Cache, Utah, United States

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