Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons)

25 Jun 1857 - 20 Jun 1950

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Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons)

25 Jun 1857 - 20 Jun 1950
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Grandma(Emily Sophia Gibbons Dilworth) came to Carey in 1905 from Utah. Her husband, Joseph Dilworth, had died in Utah in 1904. Her daughter, Ruth, and her husband, Albert Park, were living in Carey. Her oldest sons, Joe and Will, brought her and the other children from Utah in horse-drawn wagons. T

Life Information

Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons)

Born:
Died:

American Fork Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Mother

Headstone Description

Wife of Joseph Dilworth Sr
Transcriber

cd2009

July 24, 2011
Transcriber

sls1966

June 14, 2012
Transcriber

10131307t@gmail.com

October 21, 2014
Transcriber

Celique

December 25, 2018
Photographer

shuskey

July 23, 2011

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  • Joseph Dilworth
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Grandma Dilworth coming to Carey

Contributor: cd2009 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Grandma(Emily Sophia Gibbons Dilworth) came to Carey in 1905 from Utah. Her husband, Joseph Dilworth, had died in Utah in 1904. Her daughter, Ruth, and her husband, Albert Park, were living in Carey. Her oldest sons, Joe and Will, brought her and the other children from Utah in horse-drawn wagons. That would be about a 300 hundred mile trip.

Written by Emily Sophia Gibbons on December 11, 1945

Contributor: cd2009 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

My parents were members of the church when I was born. In my early childhood days when I heard the missionaries talk in our meetings, it seemed to create a desire within me to want to gather to Zion, as we called it, As I grew older it still stayed with me and when some of the members were leaving for Utah, as they did every month in the summer, I wished I could go with them. So when I was thirteen years old, I went to work in the nearest town. Some Sundays I could go home and attend meetings in the branch where I was then a member, but had a long way to walk. Sometimes, my mother would accompany me half the distance so it would not seem so far. As years passed on I moved from one place to another where I could get a little better wage, so by the time I was 22 I was ready to leave for Utah. I left home, 28 of June, three days after my birthday and went to Liverpool and set sail on the old ship, Wyoming. We had a pleasant voyage and reached New York about the 9 of July and arrived in Salt Lake City on the 16 of July 1879. I was well pleased with the City. It was larger than I thought it could be in the time the saints had been there. The Temple was up to the square and stores from the Temple block down to the 3rd South street and business houses east and west for about two blocks away. The buildings were small. I don't think there are many standing today. The depot was a little low room. When I arrived some friends that had come over the summer before met me and took me to their home. I had been writing to their son and we were to be married the next month but I did not feel right about it so I told them I would rather wait awhile. I was praying all the time that I might be guided right, so I left. I left their home and went to work for a Jewish family, and in the fall, October Conference, Brother Joseph Dilworth came to see me. He had read my name in the News, so he found out the people from England where I stayed so he called to see me. I told him I was going to the two o'clock meeting so he said he would walk up with me as he would like to hear some news from his home in England. We went to the meeting and after the service he accompanied me back to my work. I told him I would see him again the next day. It was Sunday and we walked to the meeting again so he told me about losing his wife just one year after he arrived in Utah leaving him with four little girls, one a baby nine months old. So after the death of their mother, there was a kind sister in the ward said she would like to take that baby so she did and took care of her till she was old enough to get married. That is Aunt Ada Wootton. There a Brother Mott and three wives and no children but was always kind and ready to take motherless children so they wanted Fanny, the oldest. I think she was about 7 years old. They took care of her till she married Fon Chipman in the Salt Lake Temple. He is a brother to Steven L. Chipman in the Salt Lake Temple. Pa left the other two in care of a woman he thought would take care of them and went to the mines to work, but when he came back to see them, they did not seem very happy. He felt he had to find another place for them as he had to make a living for them, and so on for sometime till he met a widow who was willing to take the children and him, too. She had four children--one married and the others in their teens so they got along better after that. She was a very reasonable woman and had lived in polygamy before so she didn't object to him taking another wife. Of course, this is a few years later. His first wife died in 1870 and I did not come to Utah until 1879. This all happened in American Fork, Utah before I came to Utah. So after our meeting at Conference I did not see him again till sometime in November he came up to the City to prove up on a Homestead. So he called me again and as I believed in the teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith and that he had more wives, also Brigham Young. I had left my parents and home for the sake of the gospel of Jesus Christ restored in these last days That would be my next step to take plural marriage. So we talked at some length on that subject but never without the consent of the first wife, so I went along till Spring Conference then he brought his wife with him, also Fanny his oldest daughter, then a girl of 16. So we had a nice visit together and seemed quite congenial. She was willing for it to be so it was settled. We would marry on the 8 of July, 1880. Persecution was raging. If we were found out it meant imprisonment. So many of the Brethren had been in prison but if others could endure, I could. I stayed in the City and did not go to American Fork until November and on the 6 of January, went to live on a Homestead 6 miles out of town, so we had real pioneer life. The officers never bothered us till Milton was a baby. Then they came and took us to court but our case didn't come up that day so they did not come back till Sadie was a baby six weeks old. Then we were called again, but neither of us women went into the courtroom. Pa was sentenced to one month imprisonment and I went back home to my family. They were all right. A neighbor girl that was older than Ruth had stayed with them all night, but they were disappointed when they found out their father had not come back with me, so I told them where he had gone and we went on with our work as usual, and my burdens really seemed lighter as we were in suspense all the time, not knowing when they would come night or day and take him from us and now it was settled and just a short sentence. When most of the men were put in for six months or more I felt that the Lord was watching over us and had over-ruled things for our good. The month seemed a long one, but the end came and Pa was home to attend April Conference with us. He went to the President of the Church and asked him if it would be best to stay away from us so he would not have to be taken away again and he said,"Go home to your family and the law of the land will never trouble you anymore." So he listened to the Propeht's voice and came home and we had three more children born after that. Later, when we went to President John Taylor to have our recommend to the Temple signed, he said he was pleased as we had faith and courage enough in such troublesome times to enter into the Covenant of Celestial marriage that we would be blessed and I have watched it. Although things that looked like it was awful trouble was passed and have been a blessing in disguise. Sometime after this, Aunt Sinah, as we called her, died and since then two daughters and a son. I think her youngest daughter is still living. I went to see her the last time I was in Provo, Utah. They were always nice to me as I could expect them to be. Dear Sarah and Will, it has been a long time since I commenced to write this to you and I quit writing because we were advised not to say anything about such things, but I know that you know all about it. It is past now. Fanny's husband is the only on of the Chipman brothers living. He was President of the Salt Lake Temple for a long time but died last February. Fawn is the only one left now and is over 80 years old. I don't feel like writing anymore on this so perhaps you had better destroy it so that other people don't see it. (written by Emily Sophia Gibbons Dilworth to her son, William Frederick and his wife Sarah, December 11, 1945, when she was 88 years old.)

Grandma Dilworth coming to Carey

Contributor: sls1966 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Grandma(Emily Sophia Gibbons Dilworth) came to Carey in 1905 from Utah. Her husband, Joseph Dilworth, had died in Utah in 1904. Her daughter, Ruth, and her husband, Albert Park, were living in Carey. Her oldest sons, Joe and Will, brought her and the other children from Utah in horse-drawn wagons. That would be about a 300 hundred mile trip.

Written by Emily Sophia Gibbons on December 11, 1945

Contributor: sls1966 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

My parents were members of the church when I was born. In my early childhood days when I heard the missionaries talk in our meetings, it seemed to create a desire within me to want to gather to Zion, as we called it, As I grew older it still stayed with me and when some of the members were leaving for Utah, as they did every month in the summer, I wished I could go with them. So when I was thirteen years old, I went to work in the nearest town. Some Sundays I could go home and attend meetings in the branch where I was then a member, but had a long way to walk. Sometimes, my mother would accompany me half the distance so it would not seem so far. As years passed on I moved from one place to another where I could get a little better wage, so by the time I was 22 I was ready to leave for Utah. I left home, 28 of June, three days after my birthday and went to Liverpool and set sail on the old ship, Wyoming. We had a pleasant voyage and reached New York about the 9 of July and arrived in Salt Lake City on the 16 of July 1879. I was well pleased with the City. It was larger than I thought it could be in the time the saints had been there. The Temple was up to the square and stores from the Temple block down to the 3rd South street and business houses east and west for about two blocks away. The buildings were small. I don't think there are many standing today. The depot was a little low room. When I arrived some friends that had come over the summer before met me and took me to their home. I had been writing to their son and we were to be married the next month but I did not feel right about it so I told them I would rather wait awhile. I was praying all the time that I might be guided right, so I left. I left their home and went to work for a Jewish family, and in the fall, October Conference, Brother Joseph Dilworth came to see me. He had read my name in the News, so he found out the people from England where I stayed so he called to see me. I told him I was going to the two o'clock meeting so he said he would walk up with me as he would like to hear some news from his home in England. We went to the meeting and after the service he accompanied me back to my work. I told him I would see him again the next day. It was Sunday and we walked to the meeting again so he told me about losing his wife just one year after he arrived in Utah leaving him with four little girls, one a baby nine months old. So after the death of their mother, there was a kind sister in the ward said she would like to take that baby so she did and took care of her till she was old enough to get married. That is Aunt Ada Wootton. There a Brother Mott and three wives and no children but was always kind and ready to take motherless children so they wanted Fanny, the oldest. I think she was about 7 years old. They took care of her till she married Fon Chipman in the Salt Lake Temple. He is a brother to Steven L. Chipman in the Salt Lake Temple. Pa left the other two in care of a woman he thought would take care of them and went to the mines to work, but when he came back to see them, they did not seem very happy. He felt he had to find another place for them as he had to make a living for them, and so on for sometime till he met a widow who was willing to take the children and him, too. She had four children--one married and the others in their teens so they got along better after that. She was a very reasonable woman and had lived in polygamy before so she didn't object to him taking another wife. Of course, this is a few years later. His first wife died in 1870 and I did not come to Utah until 1879. This all happened in American Fork, Utah before I came to Utah. So after our meeting at Conference I did not see him again till sometime in November he came up to the City to prove up on a Homestead. So he called me again and as I believed in the teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith and that he had more wives, also Brigham Young. I had left my parents and home for the sake of the gospel of Jesus Christ restored in these last days That would be my next step to take plural marriage. So we talked at some length on that subject but never without the consent of the first wife, so I went along till Spring Conference then he brought his wife with him, also Fanny his oldest daughter, then a girl of 16. So we had a nice visit together and seemed quite congenial. She was willing for it to be so it was settled. We would marry on the 8 of July, 1880. Persecution was raging. If we were found out it meant imprisonment. So many of the Brethren had been in prison but if others could endure, I could. I stayed in the City and did not go to American Fork until November and on the 6 of January, went to live on a Homestead 6 miles out of town, so we had real pioneer life. The officers never bothered us till Milton was a baby. Then they came and took us to court but our case didn't come up that day so they did not come back till Sadie was a baby six weeks old. Then we were called again, but neither of us women went into the courtroom. Pa was sentenced to one month imprisonment and I went back home to my family. They were all right. A neighbor girl that was older than Ruth had stayed with them all night, but they were disappointed when they found out their father had not come back with me, so I told them where he had gone and we went on with our work as usual, and my burdens really seemed lighter as we were in suspense all the time, not knowing when they would come night or day and take him from us and now it was settled and just a short sentence. When most of the men were put in for six months or more I felt that the Lord was watching over us and had over-ruled things for our good. The month seemed a long one, but the end came and Pa was home to attend April Conference with us. He went to the President of the Church and asked him if it would be best to stay away from us so he would not have to be taken away again and he said,"Go home to your family and the law of the land will never trouble you anymore." So he listened to the Propeht's voice and came home and we had three more children born after that. Later, when we went to President John Taylor to have our recommend to the Temple signed, he said he was pleased as we had faith and courage enough in such troublesome times to enter into the Covenant of Celestial marriage that we would be blessed and I have watched it. Although things that looked like it was awful trouble was passed and have been a blessing in disguise. Sometime after this, Aunt Sinah, as we called her, died and since then two daughters and a son. I think her youngest daughter is still living. I went to see her the last time I was in Provo, Utah. They were always nice to me as I could expect them to be. Dear Sarah and Will, it has been a long time since I commenced to write this to you and I quit writing because we were advised not to say anything about such things, but I know that you know all about it. It is past now. Fanny's husband is the only on of the Chipman brothers living. He was President of the Salt Lake Temple for a long time but died last February. Fawn is the only one left now and is over 80 years old. I don't feel like writing anymore on this so perhaps you had better destroy it so that other people don't see it. (written by Emily Sophia Gibbons Dilworth to her son, William Frederick and his wife Sarah, December 11, 1945, when she was 88 years old.)

Life timeline of Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons)

1857
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was born on 25 Jun 1857
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was 5 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was 17 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was 31 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was 34 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was 46 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was 55 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was 63 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was 73 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) was 85 years old when World War II: The Imperial Japanese Navy made a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, intending to neutralize the United States Pacific Fleet from influencing the war Japan was planning to wage in Southeast Asia. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) died on 20 Jun 1950 at the age of 93
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Emily Sophia Dilworth (Gibbons) (25 Jun 1857 - 20 Jun 1950), BillionGraves Record 66250 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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