Emery Barrus

8 Apr 1809 - 6 Oct 1899

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Emery Barrus

8 Apr 1809 - 6 Oct 1899
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HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS Author Unknown(Possibly Benjamin Franklin Barrus) Emery Barrus was born in Chautauqua County, New York, in 1809. He was the only one of his father's family who was baptized in New York. In 1839, he with his wife and year old son, Benjamin Franklin Barrus, went to Jefferson Ci

Life Information

Emery Barrus

Born:
Died:

Grantsville City Cemetery

N West St
Grantsville, Tooele, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Emery Barrus
Wife - Hulda Nickerson
Wife - Jane Baker
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MargieW

May 4, 2013
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imtsmith98

July 6, 2020
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WHatch

July 20, 2020
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jorobi

April 27, 2013

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Emery Barrus, pioneer, 1809-1899 (KWJ6-SH1)

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS Author Unknown(Possibly Benjamin Franklin Barrus) Emery Barrus was born in Chautauqua County, New York, in 1809. He was the only one of his father's family who was baptized in New York. In 1839, he with his wife and year old son, Benjamin Franklin Barrus, went to Jefferson City, Missouri, and in the spring of 1840 settled in Nauvoo, where they lived until after the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith. Following the perse[#$@^!]tion of the Saints, preparations were made for the never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery had a shingle mill on an island in the Mississippi river, and in 1845 they moved to the island, where, with the assistance of his wife, he would get the timber, saw it into suitable lengths, and fix the different parts of the wagons. He would store the wood in the shop to season. Preparatory to starting west from Nauvoo in the spring, he made 15 wagons right from the stumps of the trees that winter. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville October 1853, just two years after Grantsville was settled, which was in 1851. Samuel Steele arrived with the first seven families. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in the early days. We had to herd our stock in the day time on the range and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. Not a fruit or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1853. Mr. Sceva, John Clark, and James McBride were the first to plant trees. Emery Barrus built the first barns and some good houses in Grantsville. Thomas H. Clark was the first Bishop of Grantsville, Timothy Parkinson and John B. Walker were his counselors. In 1855 the grasshoppers came so thick that they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. 1856 was the year of the famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour and we were without bread for months, living on sego bulbs, thistle roots, etc. John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856. William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, threshed it with a flail and cleaned it with the wind. Each family received one-half bushel and ground it in coffee mills to make cakes for the Fourth of July dinner. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and each family received a part of family had a flour cake and beef steak for dinner July 24, 1856. Emery Barrus was Mayor of Grantsville City and attended to the surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charles Herman. EMERY BARRUS From History of Tooele County by Tooele County Daughters of Utah Pioneers, pp 415,416 A picture of him and his wife is found on page 613. Emery Barrus, son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins, was born 8 APR 1809 in Chautauqua County, New York. He came to Utah 9 OCT 1853 in the Appleton Harmon Company. He married Huldah Abigail Nickerson. Their children were: (1) Lydia, (2) Betsy N., (3) Benjamin Franklin, (4) Emery Freeman, (5) Mary Huldah, (6) Orrin Eleazer, (7) Emery Alexander, (8) Ruel Michael, (9) Owen Henry, (10) Sarah Abigail, (11) John Nickerson, (12) Eliza Alvira. He married Jane Zerilda Baker, who was a daughter of Benjamin Baker. Their children were: (1) Emeline Abigail, (2) James Baker, (3) William Taylor, (4) Thomas, (5) Freeman, (6) Chauncy Baker, (7) Catherine Rozena.\ The family home was in Grantsville, Utah. He was a High Priest, a Patriarch, a carpenter, stock raiser, farmer and, wheelwright. He died 5 OCT 1899. Esther Warner -- researcher

Emery Barrus 1809-1899

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

By McClain Barrus I regret that I did not think to ask my father (Ezra Barrus) to tell me all that he remembered about his grandfather Emery Barrus. He must have been intimately acquainted with Emery because they lived for twenty years in the same town. How I wish Dad had told me stories concerning that great man. Perhaps we could all learn the lesson that we should take opportunities to interview our aging parents or grandparents and obtain all the knowledge we can about our ancestors. The information gained in such interviews would be precious to those who come after us, provided it was written in family histories. I wonder if Emery told Dad about the time he was courting Freeman Nickerson's 17-year-old daughter. It was in 1833 when Freeman returned to his home in New York from a mission in Ohio, and brought with him the Prophet Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon. Emery was twenty-four years old and was working on the Nickerson farm. He was engaged to marry Huldah Abigail Nickerson. The Prophet was there in October and they were married about two months later. I can imagine how awed Emery must have been to see the Prophet, and it was at that time he was baptized. He must have been aware that Joseph Smith had received a revelation from the Lord in Freeman's home, which later became the 100th section of the Doctrine Covenants. Surely he must have told Dad that inspiring story. Dad didn't get to meet his grandmother, Huldah Abigail, because she died seven years before he was born. How I admire my great-grandmother, the daughter of Freeman Nickerson. She witnessed the persecution in Nauvoo when men were whipped, houses burned, and crops destroyed. It was there that she gave birth to my grandfather. She worked with her husband in his shingle mill and would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for shingles. When wagons were needed for the use of the Saints who were fleeing Nauvoo, she helped her husband saw wood into suitable lengths for different parts of the wagons. She and Emery made fifteen wagons right from stumps of trees. Esther Warner tells us in her booklet, "Emery Barrus, Pioneer". "The home of mother Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. When a carding machine arrived in Provo, Hulda Barrus would take the wool there, driving a pair of colts they brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of cheese and butter. Huldah Abigail Nickerson was the first president of the Grantsville Ward Relief Society." In addition to all of the hard physical work she accomplished, she bore her husband twelve children. She died at the age of fifty-six. What a remarkable woman! Emery didn't experience the Missouri persecutions, as did Thomas and James McBride because at that time he was still living in New York. He moved to Nauvoo in 1844 after the Saints had been driven out of Missouri. But he was among those who were driven from Nauvoo after the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were martyred. He must have been acquainted with the Prophet who was a good friend and missionary companion of his father-in-law. Esther Warner pointed out: "Many found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track it until they could find an easier way to worship God." When Emery saw the lowering clouds on the horizon, the tribulations and calamities, the spirit of hell raging in the hearts of their persecutors, even though he must have been in a state of great uneasiness and fear, he had a foundation which anchored his life. It was his faith in the gospel of Jesus Christ. I get the impression that Emery was a hard-working out-of-doors type of man. He must have been a fine marksman with a gun because he was appointed hunter for the Appleton Harmon Company when they were crossing the plains. He was a fine craftsman and built many wagons. He also built many good houses and was the first in Grantsville to erect a barn. He must have been a. sort of politician because he was the first mayor of Grantsville City. Perhaps it was he who appointed my grandfather a peace officer in that town. The Salt Lake Temple was dedicated in 1893, six years he before Emery died and was a faithful worker in that House of the Lord. I remember hearing my father tell about the dedication of the Salt Lake Temple. I received the impression that he was in Salt Lake City at the time it took place. If he wasn't personally in attendance at the meeting when Wilford Woodruff offered the dedicatory prayer, he was aware of what was taking place. Perhaps he rode to Salt Lake with his grandfather, Emery Barrus. Emery was a devout and faithful man, and was ordained a patriarch in the Grantsville Stake. It is remarkable that he was able to continue working in the temple up until two weeks before he died at the age of ninety. He opened the door to great rewards and joy unspeakable. He, like Freeman Nickerson, Thomas McBride, and James McBride, made his greatest contribution to the cause of Zion by being the ancestor of numerous posterity, among whom are many faithful Latter-day Saints who meet the strictest requirements of righteousness. These four men whose lives I have outlined in this "book, are filled with the light that will show us the way to God. Conclusion In this writing I have tried to point out that our ancestors: Thomas McBride, Freeman Nickerson, James McBride, Emery Barrus, and their faithful wives, with sincere conviction and unflinching courage, remained steadfast in the Faith. They passed the acid test of character; and they have stirred our sense of the heroic. We have seen their bitter strivings and glorious achievements. They choose the high way, undaunted and undismayed. Their hilltop hour came after many dark valleys. The Lord consecrated their afflictions for their gain. (2 Ne. 2:2). They had their lofty goals clearly in mind, with Divine assurance in their hearts, and were able to withstand the world's scorn. Their lives shine and they "became noble in the sight of God. Now we their descendants, after possibly a century has gone by number in the thousands, and a large portion of our number are devout Latter-day Saints. We hold high places of honor and respect in the world. When I read about those days in Church history when the air was heavy with despair, I wondered; would I have had the courage and strength of character so that I could stand to be really put through the wringer? If enemies were building fires all around me, would I be able to carry the great crushing load? Would I have given up the ghost of all my hopes and be tinged with foreboding because of the terror of the hour? Would I have been numbered among the apostates who were cut off the Church because of their unwillingness to sacrifice? The answer is, only God knows. It could very well be that the age in which we live is just as hazardous and the trials of our faith will be just as severe as it was for our pioneer forbearers. It is true that at the present time Mormons are not usually despised and hated. Mobs are not trying to destroy our homes and drive us from the areas in which we live. The devil is trying to destroy us in different ways. All around us there is so much evil that could lead us from the true path.We should evaluate our personal testimonies and commitments. This may also be a time of refiner's fire for us. Let us not be among the weak who fall by the wayside. Let us all shine and also become noble in the sight of God.

The Nauvoo Period

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The Nauvoo Period Freeman Nickerson and Emery Barrus bought land in Nauvoo next to each other on the northeast section of Bluff Street and Hubbard Street. Here they built their houses and planted fruit trees. Life was busy in the new and bustling town of Nauvoo. After the swamps were drained, the wretched sickness subsided, and life went on at a rapid pace. New members of the Church were arriving almost every day and the town was growing rapidly. Emery and Huldah Abigail were happy to finally live in a home among the Saints, and loved to gather for church meetings with the Prophet Joseph Smith and others. Emery helped build the Nauvoo Temple, and Huldah Abigail sewed and cooked for the men also Huldah Abigail and Emery Barrus’ three little children were growing. Life was good and they soon looked forward to the birth of a baby. In the spring they were blessed with a little boy who they named Emery Freeman after his father and grandfather Emery had always been good with wood and with the great growth Nauvoo was experiencing; there was a great demand for building materials. Emery Barrus built a shingle mill on an island in the middle of the Mississippi River. This very island once served as a hiding place for the Prophet. In May of 1842, Joseph Smith was accused of an assassination attempt on the life of former Governor Boggs of Missouri. He knew that if he were returned to Missouri, he would surely be killed. So, the Prophet sought seclusion there on the island where Emery constructed his shingles. Life seemed to move along happily until September came. Little Emery had only been sick a short time, but things did not look good. They prayed with faith for the little lad, but finally their tiny baby died in their arms. This was a devastating blow to the family. Huldah Abigail’s arms ached for her son. Her mother and father were a comfort to her, but it was so hard. It would be two long years until Huldah Abigail would hold another baby in her arms, this one a little girl they named Mary. She was a joy to the family and a consolation after little Emery’s death. The doctrine of Baptism for the Dead was introduced into the church and Huldah Abigail’s parents, Freeman and Huldah Nickerson, were grateful to have the opportunity to do many proxy baptisms for their deceased relatives in the Mississippi River. Freeman Nickerson was called on a mission to the Eastern States including Boston. He was gone for about two and a half years, returning in 1844. At the time returned, the Prophet Joseph Smith declared his intentions as a candidate for the President of the United States. Freeman was soon called on another mission to travel around the United States campaigning for the Prophet Joseph Smith to become President of the United States. Life went on in Nauvoo, but because of the continued tormenting from the Missouri mobs, relations with the people in Illinois were deteriorating. The Prophet Joseph Smith was continually being harassed with lawsuits. Some of the Saints living in outlying areas around Nauvoo were being forced from their homes by mobs. There were even problems of conspiracy among the leadership of the Church. By June of 1844, Joseph Smith had declared Martial Law in Nauvoo. It was a critical time, and Emery felt the weight of caring for his young family and the Nickersons with such upheaval in the church. They had to be continually on the alert because of all the threats. On June 27th, 1844, a runner came to Nauvoo with the dreadful news that the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum had been shot and killed in the Carthage Jail. It was a time when every heart felt as if it would break. The next day was gloomy as Emery and Huldah Abigail gathered their family and joined the Saints as they lined the streets when the bodies of their beloved leaders were brought back to Nauvoo. As the wagons slowly passed in front of the unfinished temple, thousands of the saints stood in mourning. It was hard to adjust to life without the Prophet. Emery and Huldah Abigail had known him well. The Prophet had been in their home many times and they loved him as a friend as well as a Prophet of God. By August, Emery and Huldah Abigail and their family had rallied under the leadership of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and felt the need to finish the Temple and prepare to leave their beloved city of Nauvoo. Work on the temple continued at a rapid pace, and finally at the end of 1845, they began to do Temple Work in the portions of the temple which had been finished and dedicated. Huldah Abigail’s parents Freeman and Huldah Nickerson received their Endowments in the Nauvoo Temple on December 15th, 1845. On the bitter cold day of February 3, 1846 Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus were at the Nauvoo Temple to receive their endowments. That day, President Brigham Young recorded in his diary: “Notwithstanding that I had announced that we would not attend to the administration of the ordinances, the House of the Lord was thronged all day. … I also informed the brethren that I was going to get my wagons started and be off. I walked some distance from the Temple supposing the crowd would disperse, but on returning I found the house filled to overflowing. Looking upon the multitude and knowing their anxiety, as they were thirsting and hungering for the word, we continued at work diligently in the House of the Lord.” And so the temple work continued until 1:30 A.M. Huldah Abigail and Emery were overjoyed with the blessings of the Temple and deeply grateful that they were able to receive these ordinances that day. This great blessing would give them strength in the time of trial ahead. Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Caroline Nickerson, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, Terrance, Utah, 6 February 1881, (DFH/N78-81). Freeman Nickerson (1779-1847), in the possession of Jolene Dew (DFH/N16-18). “Freeman Nickerson,” September 2005, www.shafferweb.com, (DFH/N157-159). 1173. Huldah Abigail Nickerson, a history found in The Nickerson Family, The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689 Part 4 Nicholas 110. (DFH/B44) The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, “Huldah Abigail Nickerson,” and “Nicholas,” 1173, 110, (DFH/B44). Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B2). Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 267, 316-321. Ensign, “Eternity Lies Before Us,” by James E. Faust, May 1997, 18. (DFH/B47).

The Battle of Nauvoo

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The Battle of Nauvoo Since the devastating day when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his beloved brother Hyrum were murdered by the hands of an angry mob at the Carthage Jail, Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus had realized with the other Saints that their days in Nauvoo were numbered. Several months after the martyrdom, Emery and his family joined with the body of the Saints as they rallied behind the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles as the leaders of the Church. Under their direction families made plans to leave their homes in Nauvoo. Emery moved his family from their home in Nauvoo, across the Mississippi River to the island where his shingle mill was located. Emery now started building wagons instead of shingles, and it would be easier to work with his family on the island where they would be nearer to the source of the timber. Huldah Abigail gave birth to another son, there on the island. They named him Orrin Eleazer after her grandfather. There was so much to be done. Wagons took several months to build because the wood must be dried in stages. When she was well enough, Huldah Abigail helped in the process, holding one end of the cross cut saw as they sawed the trees into blocks ready to cut planks for the wagons. She also helped to saw the wood into suitable lengths for different parts of the wagon. Emery would then put the planks in the rafters of the shop to allow the wood to season. Throughout the winter, they built fifteen wagons right from the stumps of the trees. Everyone was working so hard to prepare to leave their homes. In the bitter cold of February, the first large group of the Saints to leave Nauvoo made their way down Parley Street and crossed the great Mississippi River which had frozen solid with the cold. The Saints were leaving Nauvoo every day throughout the spring and early summer of 1846. Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus had prepared their wagons and were gathering the supplies they would need to join the Saints in their exodus. However, Huldah Abigail’s father, Freeman Nickerson had not returned from his mission, and they felt they must wait along with the other Nickerson’s to leave. Meanwhile, things were getting progressively worse in Nauvoo. When the opponents of the Church realized that not all the Saints were going to leave Nauvoo by summer, persecution began anew. Men and women harvesting grain were attacked and some were severely beaten. This type of harassment lasted all summer and into the fall of 1846. Finally in August, Freeman Nickerson returned. The previous year, Freeman had married a second wife in polygamy, Huldah Howes from Yarmouth, who was actually his cousin. They had been married in Nauvoo. Now he brought with him a woman by the name of Eliza Kent, whom he had married in Boston. She had an eight-year-old son, Christopher. Freeman was not well, as he had been ill during this last mission to the Boston area. He really needed time to gather his strength if they were to leave their home to live in a wagon and cross the Mississippi River into the wilderness of Iowa. When Freeman returned from his mission, Emery and Huldah Abigail gathered with the family, leaving behind their island home. The family needed to band together to prepare for the time they could leave the city. About this time, Freeman’s daughter, Caroline Eliza Grover, arrived in Nauvoo with her children. She had left Nauvoo during the first exodus in the early spring and had traveled to Mount Pisgah, where she left the group and returned to Nauvoo. She was expecting a baby at any moment, and the group felt it would be wise to wait for the baby to be born before they left. They continued to make their preparations, but things were not good in Nauvoo. Huldah Abigail’s brother, Levi Nickerson told of fighting in the Battle of Nauvoo. No doubt, Emery Barrus and Freeman Nickerson did also. By the second week in September, the anti-Mormons were determined to drive the Saints out of Nauvoo. Approximately eight hundred men equipped with six cannons prepared to lay siege to the city. Most of the Saints who were left in Nauvoo were old, feeble, or unwell, like the Nickerson family. Emery Barrus and Levi Nickerson, Huldah Abigail’s brother, joined with the Saints and some few citizens, numbering only about 150 fighting men, as they prepared to defend the city. The Battle of Nauvoo began on September 10th, with sporadic firing. During the following two days there were minor skirmishes. On September 13th, an anti-Mormon column advanced in an attempt to rout the defenders. Emery and Levi joined a spirited counter attack led by Daniel H. Wells which saved the day, but there were casualties on both sides. The battle continued the next day, which was the Sabbath. Gratefully no one in the Nickerson and Barrus families was hurt but it was a terrible time. On September 16th, the “Quincy Committee,” which had helped keep the peace in previous months, interceded once again. The Saints were forced to surrender unconditionally in order to save their lives and gain a chance of escaping across the river. Only five men and their families were allowed to stay in Nauvoo to dispose of property. Those who could quickly crossed the river without provisions or additional clothing. Finally, the mob entered the city, looted homes, and desecrated the temple. Some of the Saints, who were not able to escape fast enough, were beaten and thrown into the river by the mob. Emery and Levi discussed the situation. Father Nickerson was sick; they had two older women in their family; Caroline was about to give birth; and there were so many little ones. They were a sad looking lot. After prayer, they decided to wait out the birth of Caroline’s baby, as they knew they would not have a better place to deliver a baby while on the trail. Finally, on September 27th, Caroline gave birth to a baby boy whom she named Marshall Hubbard Grover, and the families hurriedly left the city the very next day while the mobs descended. As they slowly made their way toward the river, they looked back to see angry men ransacking their home and finally lighting a fire to it. It was a devastating sight. By the time they made it down Parley Street to the river it was evening. The town seemed to be in all-out confusion. They were finally picked up by friends and that night crossed the river by the light of the burning city. The crossing of the river in the darkness of night was treacherous. Everything got wet. Even the wagon in which the new mother and babe reclined was water soaked, and Caroline feared for the life of the little one she held. Through the blessings of the Lord, they all made it through the ordeal. Their group consisted of: Freeman and Huldah Nickerson; their son Levi, his wife Mary Ann and his family; Freeman and Huldah’s daughter Caroline and her four children including her newborn son; Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus and their four children; and Freeman’s new wives, Huldah and Eliza and her son Christopher. Across the river Emery and Levi looked around and were dismayed at the sad shape they found things in. Refugee camps of five to six hundred dispossessed men, women, and children, including those who had been left as too sick to travel, were scattered along two miles of riverbank above Montrose, Iowa. Most people had only blankets or bowers made of brush for shelter and little more than boiled or parched corn to eat. Father Nickerson was not well after the ordeal of being forced from his home and the perilous and wet crossing of the Mississippi River. Emery and Huldah Abigail knew they must stop for a time and let him rest. Though there were people dying in the camp because of exposure, they feared for his life if they continued on. A few days later, Bishop Newel K. Whitney showed up with some flour he had purchased and distributed it among the poor camps. This was a great blessing to many who were starving. Huldah Abigail joined with the others of her little group to help alleviate the suffering they saw around them, but they were not in good shape themselves. Prayers ascended to their Father in Heaven for help and relief from the suffering. On the 9th of October, when food was in especially short supply, several large flocks of quail flew into camp and landed on the ground and even on tables. Huldah Abigail’s children along with Emery and the other Saints were able to catch many of them. These Quail were then cooked and eaten by the hungry Saints. To The Nickerson and Barrus families, it was a sign of God’s mercy to modern Israel as a similar incident had been to ancient Israel, and they gave great thanks to their Father in Heaven for his tender mercies. Finally, Emery and Levi felt they could prolong their stay on the banks of the Mississippi River no longer. It was a wretched camp, and the time was fleeting. Sickness and death stalked the camps of the Saints. The hasty exodus from Nauvoo, the exhausting trek across Iowa, the storms, insufficient provisions, inadequate and impoverished shelter, and the unhealthy riverbank environments all took their toll. Many of the travelers suffered from the exposure-related diseases of malaria, pneumonia, and tuberculosis. Each night the weather got colder, and despite the sickness in their little group, they felt they must push on and try to find better shelter for the upcoming winter. Father Nickerson was not yet well, and now his two wives, Huldah and Eliza, were sick also. But, there was no other way than to press on. The families continued their journey westward, but finally, they were forced to halt seven miles west of Bonaparte, Iowa, on account of sickness. There, Freeman’s second wife, Huldah Howes, died and was buried. It was a low blow to the family who loved her dearly. Late in November, the families continued their journey to the Chariton River. At Soap Creek, about 30 miles above Whiskey Point, Emery and Levi, with the help of their wives and children, erected temporary cabins for shelter during the winter. The livestock survived by eating tree buds and limbs of small trees that they felled for that purpose. It was a cold winter, and without proper shelter and food, there was much sickness in the family. Toward the end of December, Freeman’s third wife, Eliza died and six days later her little son followed her in death. Freeman was not well. He was 69 years old now, and over the past fourteen years since his baptism into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, his life had not been easy. He had served four-full time missions, besides several short-term missions. He had marched as a member of Zion’s Camp. He had survived the winter on the frozen riverbanks of the Allegheny River while on his way to live with the Saints. He had then made his way to Commerce which would become the city of Nauvoo, only to contract malaria and struggle for his life in the swampy fields of that fledgling city. And now he had been forced from his comfortable home in Nauvoo to these cold and impoverished conditions on the banks of yet another river. This time the odds would prove too much, and with his family gathered around him in their makeshift shelter, Freeman Nickerson, one of the Lords truly valiant men of the kingdom, slipped from this life to return to the God who gave him life. Surely he soon heard the words, “Well done thou good and faithful servant.” Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Caroline Nickerson, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, Terrance, Utah, 6 February 1881, (DFH/N78-81). Freeman Nickerson (1779-1847), in possession of Jolene Dew (DFH/N16-18). “Freeman Nickerson,” September 2005, www.shafferweb.com, (DFH/N157-159). Huldah Abigail Nickerson, a history found in The Nickerson Family. The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689 Part 4 Nicholas, page 110. (DFH/B44) The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, “Huldah Abigail Nickerson,” and “Nicholas,” 1173, 110, (DFH/B44). Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B2). Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 267, 316-321. Ensign, “Eternity Lies Before Us,” by James E. Faust, May 1997, 18, (DFH/B47).

On Our Way to Zion

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

On Our Way to Zion After being forced from their home by mobs in Nauvoo in 1846, Emery Barrus and his family crossed part of Iowa before the snows halted their travel and they were forced to build small cabins and winter over. The exposure was great and their Grandfather, Freeman Nickerson died on the banks of the Chariton River during that hard winter. In the spring they had traveled on to Kanesville, which is where Council Bluffs is today. They settled in the small community of Ferryville, Iowa, where they had lived for the five years as they tried to gather provisions to cross the plains to Utah. Two children had been born while they lived in Iowa, a son Emery, who was now five years old and a son Ruel, who was two years old. They also had three other children, seven-year-old son, Orrin, ten-year-old Mary, and fifteen-year-old Benjamin. Finally in 1853 the Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus family were ready to leave and joined the Appleton Harmon Company which was due to leave that summer. About 200 individuals and about 22 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa. The company crossed the Missouri River on a ferry boat on July 14, 1853. (The Appleton Harmer Company had with them 55 wagons that were part of the Perpetual Emigration Fund. It is possible that through this program the Emery Barrus family was able to come to Utah after such a long layover in Iowa.) The Barrus family was happy to finally be on their way to Zion. The Indians were on the warpath, so the company had to stay together as much as possible for safety. One day as the wagons were rolling, a large group of Indians stopped the company. Huldah Abigail quickly gathered her small ones around her. The situation did not look good; there were so many of them. Emery stood ready with his hunting rifle as the leaders of the company went forward to talk with the Indians. Much time went by as they tried to make a peaceful settlement. Finally, the Indians agreed to let the company pass if they were given a substantial amount of the company’s provisions. The pioneers would feel the need of these provisions later on, but Huldah Abigail and Emery joined with the others in prayers of gratitude for the peaceful ending to such a frightening situation. When they started out, the children had wondered what kinds of animals they would see on the plains. It was not long until their wagon train was stopped for a huge herd of buffalo. There were so many of the large wooly creatures that the company had to stop completely and let them pass. It was quite a site and one that the children would remember and talk about for years to come. Being a pretty good shot, Emery was appointed as a hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train, and when he could find a buffalo close to the road, he would shoot it and then wait for the company to catch up so he could divide it up among the Saints. At night, it was the practice of the company to circle the wagons making a corral where the people could stay inside for safety. There were always chores to do around the camp and Benjamin was a great help to his father, Emery, in taking care of the animals. Mary would help her mother with the meals as well as take care of her little brothers. Huldah Abigail was grateful for the help as she was finding it harder each day to accomplish all of her duties as a baby grew within her. In the evening after supper and when the animals were taken care of, Emery and Huldah would sit around the campfire with their children and the others from the company and sing songs or tell stories. One brother among them had a violin, and he would begin with a rousing tune for those who were not too tired would dance. Benjamin was just the right age to enjoy a moment to kick up his heels. By the time the company made it to the Sweetwater River, it was September and their provisions were running low. Brother Harmon, the company commander, sent a message on ahead with a Brother Babbit to let the Brethren in Salt Lake City know of their progress. In the letter they said that the company of nearly 400 persons had 23 days rations among them. They had counted all the provisions and were sharing with each other to make them last. They had also made a count of their guns. They said that in case of an attack by the Utah Indians, they could muster only about 40 guns, all of which were common English fowling pieces, not many rifles and balls. He felt that they were poorly prepared for war and hoped that they would not have any difficulty. He finished the letter saying that despite the shortage in food and weapons, the Saints were generally in good spirits and anxious to reach the Valley before the snow would. They would endeavor to bear all that came with patience. It would be another 29 days before the wagon train would roll down the mountain and into the Salt Lake Valley. Gratefully, three days before they arrived, a few wagons met them with a load of flour, meat, and vegetables, which the Saints felt was a true blessing having already run out of food. Emery and Huldah Abigail were grateful to see the Salt Lake Valley after such a long trek. After talking with some of the Saints about a good place to settle, they made their way toward the Great Salt Lake and around the mountain to the west finally settling in the fledgling town of Grantsville. Huldah Abigail was big with child at that time and it would not be long before her son, Owen Henry would be born. Owen Henry always considered himself a pioneer saying that his mother had carried him all the way across the plains. Ever after, when the call was made for original pioneers, Owen Henry would stand among the group who had come across the plains to live with the Saints in Zion. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B3). Treasures of Pioneer History; Journal of Lucina Mecham Boren, Vol. 6; 306-308. 1173. Huldah Abigail Nickerson, a history found in The Nickerson Family, The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689 Part 4 Nicholas 110. (DFH/B44) The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, “Huldah Abigail Nickerson,” and “Nicholas,” 1173, 110, (DFH/B44).

Indian Trouble

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Indian Trouble Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus had crossed the plains and were now settling with their little family in the small community of Grantsville. It was a little oasis in the west desert just south of the banks of the Great Salt Lake where the creeks from the Stansbury Mountains made a grove of Willows. At first it had been known as Willow Creek, but the name had been changed in honor of Major George D. Grant who had helped the community with the Indian trouble they were having. The Indians were a constant problem to the settlers because they not only stole cattle and horses, but did a lot of malicious mischief. The cattle had to be kept under constant guard both day and night. Even though the pioneers gave the Indians meats and grain, they could not afford the raids that seemed to be a form of sport to the Indians. The pioneers decided to build a fort for their protection. Emery helped in its construction which consisted of making mud and pounding it hard and letting it dry. Huldah Abigail marveled at the size of the Fort which was about four acres square. The walls were five feet thick at the bottom and stood twelve feet high. It was a very large fort with homes built on the insides and a stockade of cedar logs to hold the cattle at night. Emery was grateful for a place to bring his cattle at night and took his turns at the night watch. Even with all of their preparations, the Indians were still troublesome. Finally it was proposed that the little group of Saints would fast and pray for divine guidance that someone would be able to talk to the Indians and persuade them that the settlers were their friends. The answer to their prayers came in a miraculous way. One day, William Lee, one of the Saints, was building a chimney on the outside of his cabin which he had erected in the fort, when an Indian appeared and began making signs to him that he wished to help him. William was afraid and retreated inside the cabin, but the Indian kept making signs and finally began carrying rock to the chimney site and mixing up the mud that was used to cover up the rock. William watched for a while and finally gathered up his courage and came out to continue his labor of building the chimney. The Indian assisted him all day. In the evening, William gave the Indian his supper and a blanket on which to sleep Early the next morning, Lee let the Indian know through signs that he was going to the canyon for wood and would like his company as it was not safe to go alone. The Indian agreed to go, so they yoked up the oxen and started for the canyon. William Lee was on the front bolster with the Indian on the rear bolster. About half way to the canyon, William found himself facing the Indian and talking to him in the Indian language. So engrossed was he in his talk with the Indian that he paid no attention to the oxen and, left to themselves, they circled around and William found himself entering the fort with his oxen, wagon, and the Indian but with no wood. It was such a surprise to see William Lee riding with an Indian, and the incident was immediately made known to the little band of settlers. Emery and Huldah Abigail joined the group as they gathered around the Indian listening intently as Brother Lee interpreted what the Indian said and asked him questions in his own language. The Indian’s name was Ship-rus. They asked him if he would bring his people to the fort so that they could have a talk with them. Emery and Huldah Abigail marveled along with the rest of the saints as they witnessed how the Lord had answered their prayers by revealing the Indian Language to William Lee. In two days, Huldah Abigail stared as a group of Indians walked into the fort. It was such a sight and one she thought she would never see. William Lee was there and stood on an old chair and talked to them in their own language for an hour, telling them of their origin, that the settlers were their friends, and that they would teach them how to till the ground to supply themselves with the necessities of life. The Indians listened to all he had to say and then replied, “The Mountains are ours, the water, the woods, the grass, and the game all belongs to us, but the Mormons are our brothers. We will share with them and smoke the pipe of peace. This ended the trouble with the Indians and the settlers were able to move out of the Fort and build homes of their own. Emery and Huldah Abigail would always remember the miracle of the Lord which they had witnessed in answer to their fasting and prayers. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B3). History of Tooele County, by the Tooele County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 215-222.

The Utah War

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The Utah War When the dreadful news arrived in Grantsville, Huldah and Emery Barrus were stunned. The United States was sending an army to subdue the “rebellious Mormons.” Governor Brigham Young had issued a call for the Territorial Militia, known at that time as the Nauvoo Legion, to come to Salt Lake City to mobilize for active duty. The call was for every able-bodied man. Huldah knew that her son, Benjamin, who was now twenty years old would answer the call and this, stirred her heart. Of course she realized the danger that the Mormons were in and also that this call came from a Prophet as well as their Governor. Still, it was hard to send her son into harm’s way. Benjamin joined with his Uncle Ruel Barrus who had been a member of the Mormon Battalion some ten years earlier. Together they joined the group of thirty-five men from Grantsville and marched to Salt Lake City. Once in the city, they met up with men from all over the territory. It was late fall as the Legion, under the command of General Daniel H. Wells, made its way east to Echo Canyon. These soldiers built walls and dug trenches from which they could act as snipers. They loosened huge boulders that could easily be sent crashing down on the moving troops. They also constructed ditches and dams that could be opened to flood the enemy’s path. It was so cold, especially at night. Benjamin and his Uncle Ruel joined with the others as they built big campfires and stayed up around them as long as they could to keep warm. They would pull the hot embers to one side and lay on the warm ground, turning frequently the first hour to keep from being scorched. Despite the cold, the Legion did what it had come to do. Another group of forty-four men were sent farther on to find the actual troops and to proceed at once to annoy them in every possible way. Their instructions were to “Use every exertion to stampede their animals, and set fire to their trains. Burn the whole country before them and on their flanks. Keep them from sleeping by night surprises…Take no life, but destroy their trains, and stampede or drive away their animals at every opportunity.” These tactics succeeded so well that the army was indeed delayed and was forced to winter over in the burned-out Fort Bridger. Back in Grantsville, it was a winter of anxiety for Huldah and Emery as they gathered their family together to pray for Benjamin and Uncle Ruel. In April, the instructions came for the people to leave their homes and travel south. The Saints had been through much persecution in Missouri and in Nauvoo at the hand of angry mobs. They had been forced from their homes with only what they could carry while their property was taken over by their assailants. Now, they vowed, they were not about to let the same thing happen in this new land. They would rather burn their homes to the ground than let them be taken over by the army. Emery helped place the cattle in a large church herd with men left to guard them from the Indians and the army. Huldah gathered what she could and they packed a wagon with the bare necessities that they could take and closed the door to their home, not knowing if they would ever see it again. It was a great trial to once again follow the Prophet’s council and leave their home behind them. A small group of men was left behind with instructions to burn the buildings and the fields should the Army try to invade. Most of the people from Grantsville went south to Spring Creek just past Payson. There they camped as best they could throughout the summer. Negotiations with the Army started in the spring as the Saints were deserting their homes. Thomas Kane, who had always been a friend to the Saints throughout their trials and persecutions, came to help with the relations between the Army and Brigham Young. He finally talked the new governor who was sent by the U.S. Federal Government, into coming to Salt Lake City for talks. There was quite an entourage which accompanied the governor. Porter Rockwell joined the column as well as many other Mormons as the procession continued toward Salt Lake City. Benjamin and his Uncle Ruel were still in the mountains of Echo Canyon. They helped stage a show one evening as the governor’s train continued late into the night through the gloomy clutches of Echo Canyon. Several times hidden sentries surrounded his carriage and challenged the official party. They only waved them on after conversations with Rockwell. As the train proceeded down the canyon, they saw bonfires in the hills, one after another, which were surrounded by riflemen silhouetted against the tall rocks. By the time the governor reached the west end of the canyon, he guessed that from two to three thousand Mormons manned its fortifications. Had Rockwell been able to read the governor’s thoughts, he would have been tremendously pleased. The governor could not have known that he had been a victim of a gigantic hoax, for in truth fewer than one hundred and fifty Mormons occupied the canyon’s defenses. Each time the party had been challenged, the sentries raced back to repeat the performance. As for the campfires, they had been lighted and left unguarded, except for the handful of men who had deliberately exposed themselves to the Governor’s view. The trick even surpassed Brigham Young’s expectations of what the Mormon Army could do. Through this elaborate ruse, the Governor was convinced that an overwhelmingly hostile force faced Johnston’s command and that any attempt to penetrate the canyon would be suicidal. Finally, in the fall, nearly a year later, a joyous end came to their suffering. A treaty with the government representatives called a halt to the “Utah War.” The army, under the direction of General Johnston, peacefully traveled through the deserted streets of Salt Lake City, to Cedar Valley, 40 miles south of Salt Lake City and made camp. Pres. Brigham Young sent word that the refugees could return to their homes. Emery and Huldah were tired, but very grateful as they traveled back to their homes to find everything as they had left it. It was an added pleasure when shortly thereafter, their son Benjamin, along with Uncle Ruel, were released from the Nauvoo Legion and returned home safe. Together again as a family, they knelt in a prayer of gratitude to their Father in Heaven for a peaceful outcome to this terrible ordeal. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B4). History of Tooele County, by the Tooele County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 224-225. Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 368-379. Ensign, “The Temple, the Priesthood,” by Boyd K. Packer, May 1993, 18. (DFH/Hu89-90). Orrin Porter Rockwell Man of God Son of Thunder, by Harold Schindler 285-286.

The Seagulls and the Crickets

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The Seagulls and the Crickets Huldah Abigail worked hard at carding wool. In this new land where the Saints had come after being forced to leave their homes in Nauvoo, there was much to do with little resources. She was able to obtain the wool from a flock of sheep in the community. She would card it, spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn, the yarn into cloth or stockings, and the cloth into clothing for her little family and neighbors. She also made pounds of cheese and butter which she could trade for things they needed. Emery worked with the 46 head of loose stock he had brought to this place besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons as they crossed the plains. Emery was a hard worker and a carpenter and woodworker besides. He constructed the first barn in Grantsville as well as some good houses. Things seemed to be going well for the little family now that the Indian trouble had subsided, all until the trouble started with the crickets. The years of 1855 and 1856 would long be remembered as the years of famine. One day Huldah Abigail looked into the sky only to see that the sun was darkened by hordes of crickets. They were like a cloud as they descended upon the lake and then the fields. They seemed to stretch for miles along the lake in some places almost six feet deep. The settlers contrived a roller that they had the oxen drag over the creatures to kill them. Emery and Huldah joined with the others as they tried to drown the crickets in irrigation ditches and burn them with brush fires, all to no avail. With all their work, they had not saved enough grain to plant their fields again the next spring. Things indeed looked desperate. Huldah and Emery united with the other settlers in special prayers in behalf of their crops. Following their faith and prayers, a great horde of seagulls came in from the Great Salt Lake in flocks to feed on the crickets and disgorge and feed again, and at times the wind blew so hard the crickets were blown out onto the lake and were drowned. The Barrus’ looked on in amazement as the hand of the Lord was evident in this miracle. They gathered their children around them to give thanks to the Lord for his goodness to them in their desperate time of need. Although the crickets had been cleared from the land, the effects of their damage was long lasting. Even the cows and livestock were affected because of the loss of grass. What little milk, Huldah could get, she gave to her children. They tried to live on boiled greens, sego lily roots, and thistles. Emery tried to shoot what game he could, but there was very little if any, as the crickets had starved the rabbits and other wildlife, too. Finally one of the settlers had a small patch of barley ripen, and he gathered every bit he could and distributed it to all the families. Huldah almost cried for joy as she ground hers in a coffee mill and cooked it into mush for the family. It was so delicious to all that they remembered it as a banquet. In the winter months, they were able to eat the potatoes that the crickets didn’t get, but hunger seemed to be the rule. In the summer of 1856, a patch of barley was harvested by hand and cleaned up in the wind. Emery and the others would use rakes to toss the barley over and over as the wind carried off the hulls covering the grains of barley. Every morsel was saved and each family got half a bushel. Huldah joined with the other women in grinding it in a coffee mill to make cake for the 4th of July celebration. By the end of the month, there was another bunch of grain, and Emery helped to harvest it, delivering each family a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery provided one of his animals for beef, and each family in the little community was blessed with a flour cake and a beef stake for their celebration. The summer of 1856 continued to be a poor time for crops, but Emery noticed that there was cooperation among the settlers which proved that while everyone was hungry no one starved. Through the miracle of the seagulls given at the hand of the Lord, the little community made it through this time of famine, and they had banded together in a time of trial to help each other. This good will strengthened the community for years to come. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B4). History of Tooele County, by the Tooele County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 223-224.

On a Mission with the Prophet

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

In about 1832 Freeman Nickerson’s family met Elders from a new religion known to many as “the Mormons.” Elder Zerubbabel Snow and Amasa Lyman taught them the Gospel, and it had not taken long for Freeman and his wife Huldah to recognize the Spirit of God in these missionaries’ words. The Nickersons had eagerly shared what they were learning with those of their children who still lived close to them, and they had also embraced the new teachings. Each of them had entered the cool spring waters of baptism thus joining themselves with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Freeman was a 7 foot tall, agile, 55-year-old man who had a happy disposition. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, seven of whom were still living. Their daughters, Caroline and Data, both joined the Church along with their husbands. Chittendon, twenty three, Levi, nineteen and Huldah Abigail, seventeen also joined the new church. Huldah Abigail who was soon to be married to Emery Barrus, a young man who had been working as a farm hand at their home, also joined the Church as did Emery. Freeman felt sad that his other two boys were living in Canada with their families and were not able to hear the glad tidings of the Gospel. Freeman had a great desire to meet the Prophet Joseph Smith about whom he had heard so much. He made the wagon trip southwest the one hundred miles from his home in Perrysville, New York, to the town of Kirtland, Ohio, where Joseph was living with many of the Saints. Freeman was very impressed with this prophet of God, and this meeting only increased his conviction that this truly was Christ’s Church on the earth. Freeman felt a great desire for his sons in Canada to hear the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and asked if the Prophet if he would accompany him on a trip to Canada where he wanted to teach his sons. Joseph inquired of the Lord and was given direction to go on the mission to Canada and to take Sidney Rigdon, his first counselor, with him. Freeman, or Father Nickerson as the Prophet Joseph affectionately called him, was elated, and the three men were soon on their way north. With a team and conveyance provided by Freeman, the three started eastward from Kirtland on October 5, 1833. They stopped at various towns along the way, visiting with Saints and preaching the gospel each evening to anyone who came to listen. After a week on the road, they arrived at Freeman Nickerson’s own home, in Perrysville, New York. Huldah was a gracious hostess to the Prophet and Bro. Rigdon, and eagerly welcomed the neighbors when they were invited to her home to hear the Prophet speak. A large congregation gathered and they were richly blessed by the words they heard. The Prophet wrote in his journal that “the Lord gave His spirit in a remarkable manor.” While at the Nickerson’s home, Joseph felt a little concern for his family so far away. He wrote in his journal that he had “much anxiety about my family.” In answer to his concerns, Joseph received a comforting revelation which became Section 100 of the Doctrine and Covenants. In the revelation he is told. “…your families are well; they are in my hands, and I will do with them as seemeth me good…” The Lord continued “I have much people in this place, in the regions round about and an effectual door shall be opened in the regions round about in this eastern land. Therefore I have suffered you to come unto this place…lift up your voices unto this people…for it shall be given you in the very hour, yea, in the very moment, what ye shall say.” (D&C 100: 1-6) This has become a great missionary scripture, being received at Freeman Nickerson’s home. When the Prophet and Sidney Rigdon continued their journey northward to Canada, Freeman brought along his wife, Huldah, and their son, Levi. She couldn’t miss an opportunity to visit her grandchildren. The group stopped every evening and taught the gospel to those who would listen. Finally, after almost a week on the road they arrived at the home of their son, Eleazer Nickerson, at Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada, and were pleasantly received, and of course, Huldah was ecstatic about being near the grandchildren. The very next Sunday Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon preached to an attentive congregation in the morning and a large gathering that evening. Joseph said that “they gave good heed to the things which were spoken. What may be the result we cannot tell but the prospect is flattering.” With their spirits lifted from their first two meetings, the Nickersons joined with the Prophet and Sidney for another meeting on Tuesday evening although this meeting did not turn out so well. It was snowing hard that night, but they went ahead and held their meeting by candlelight. They were about half way through their talks when a Wesleyan Methodist stood up and began to attack them with hot words. As they tried to quiet him and proceed with the meeting, the man became more vehement in his manner. He exhibited a great lack of reason, knowledge, and wisdom and gave them no opportunity to reply. The meeting was broken up and all went home in the snow. During the week, Freeman and Huldah spoke with their sons, Eleazer and Moses about their feelings of this new religion. They bore their testimonies to it’s truthfulness with the hopes that they too would pray and study and gain a witness for themselves. Joseph and Sidney continued their preaching, and the Nickersons attended again and again. Thursday was a very wet day and their preaching at the town of Weathersford drew only a small congregation. But at Mount Pleasant that evening a fine meeting developed. The Spirit was strong and it was during this meeting that Freeman’s son Eleazer declared his full belief in the truth of the work. Huldah and Freeman were gratified with his testimony and even more so when his wife also agreed to be baptized the following Sunday. At this time, Eleazer Nickerson had a young woman by the name of Lydia Bailey living with his family who was influenced greatly by the Prophet. She had a sad history and when Eleazer met her, she was living with her parents, following the death of her two children and after being deserted by her husband because of his drinking. Eleazer offered her a place to stay with his family, feeling that the change may do her good. Lydia had met the Prophet Joseph Smith when he came to stay at the Nickerson home. She had attended many of the meetings where he and Sidney Rigdon had preached. She spoke of her feelings saying, “The Prophet commenced by relating the scenes of his early life. He told how the angel visited him, of his finding the plates, the translation of them, and gave a short account of the matter contained in the Book of Mormon.” She added that he “bore a faithful testimony that the Priesthood was again restored to the earth, and that God and His son had conferred upon him the keys of the Aaronic and Melchizedek Priesthoods.” She was deeply touched. When Sunday came, Eleazer Nickerson was joined by his family in the waters of baptism, and to the joy of Freeman and Huldah, their son Moses also asked for baptism. What a beautiful day this was for the Nickerson family. All their prayers had been answered. They truly felt to praise the Lord for his Spirit which had rested upon their family. Lydia Bailey also joined the group in the waters of baptism. That evening, they held another meeting for confirmations. Joseph and Sidney broke bread for the administration of the sacrament and following that they laid their hands on the heads of those who had been baptized and blessed them with the Gift of the Holy Spirit. The following evening, Eleazer Nickerson was ordained an elder and set apart as a branch president in charge of all the new converts. During this meeting the Spirit was very strong and Lydia Bailey arose and spoke in tongues. It was said that the Spirit was so strong upon her, that she was clothed in a shining light as she spoke. It was a powerful and humbling meeting and one which made the Saints rejoice. It was soon time for the Prophet to return to Kirtland, and preparations were made for their departure. It was decided that they would return by crossing Lake Erie. Eleazer paid for the crossing for the group thus saving them about 250 miles of travel. Freeman and Huldah and their son Levi joined with Joseph and Sidney on the return trip. It was with grateful and full hearts that the Nickersons bid farewell to their two sons and their families who had accepted the newly restored Gospel of Jesus Christ. A new light seemed to glow in their eyes, and surely a new flame of truth burned in their hearts. Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: The Papers of Joseph Smith Volume ! Autobiographical and Historical Writings, Edited by Dean C. Jessee, 4-11, (DFH/M6-9). Freeman Nickerson, by E. McClain Barrus, (DFH/N49-53). New Era, “Joseph Smith’s Missionary Journal,” by Dean C. Jessee and William G. Hartley, Feb. 1974, 34, (DFH/N89-90). The History of the Church, Vol. 1, 416-423. A Genealogy in Part of Caroline Eliza Hubbard's Parentage and Family, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, (DFH/N33 Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

Stuck in the Ice

Contributor: MargieW Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The Nickerson family was on their way to live in Missouri with the Saints. They had packed up their belongings from their home in Perrysburg, New York, and were headed south toward the Allegheny River. They had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints five and a half years before and had enjoyed their association with the Saints who came through regularly from the Church headquarters in Kirtland, Ohio, just 150 miles away. They had become good friends with the Prophet Joseph Smith and had even accompanied him on a mission to Canada where their two sons, Eleazer and Moses were also converted to the Church. Freeman and his sons had already been on several missions for the church including the trek referred to as “Zion’s Camp” where they accompanied the Prophet as they went to Missouri to help the beleaguered Saints there. That had been a hard but overall spiritually uplifting time as they associated daily with the Prophet of God. Now, Freeman and his wife Huldah had made the decision to uproot their family and move to Missouri where the Lord had said was the place to build Zion. Besides Freeman and Huldah, their company included their daughter Huldah and her husband Emery Barrus, with their three small children; their two sons, Uriel Chittenden, and Moses along with their wives and Moses’ infant son; and their daughter Caroline and her four children. Caroline’s husband had recently died of congestive chills while they were living in Lenawee, Ogden Township, Michigan. She had come home to New York to be with her family, and now joined the group on their way to Missouri. Freeman drove his wagon along with the others as the group traveled as far as the Allegheny River where they boarded a raft and drifted down the river. It was November of 1838 and very cold. They got as far as Armstrong County, just 30 miles from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. One night the men of the group maneuvered the large raft to the bank and tied it up for the night as was their usual practice. In the morning the group was disheartened to find that the raft was frozen to the shore. Try as they might, they could not release the raft. They worked all day at the project but finally had to concede that the river had won, and they were not going to move the raft until spring. Freeman and the other men decided they would have to find wood and build shanties along the riverbank to live in until the weather became warmer and they could break the raft free. This was a dismal prospect, but there truly was nothing more to be done since they did not have the provisions and equipment necessary to continue on foot during the hard winter. The families worked hard and finally had suitable shelters to live in. They found work they could do to provide food for the families and somehow eked out an existence there on the river bank. It was very cold that winter living in their shanties along the riverbank. They did the best they could, especially with the little ones who suffered greatly for warmth and proper food. Huldah Abigail had three small children, little Lydia who was four years old, Betsy was two years old and little Benjamin was just six months old, but it was Betsy who they worried aboutShe grew weaker as the winter months progressed. The new year of 1839 had just arrived as their dear little Betsy could not brave the adversity any longer and died. They laid her to rest on a cold January day in an unfamiliar town, becoming another grave in the Nickerson family marking the way to Zion. Despite the hardships, Freeman was not one to pass by an opportunity, and he began to preach the gospel to the people in the vicinity. Freeman was a very tall man, nearly seven feet tall and robust. He had a commanding voice and could really give a sermon, especially when he was preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ which he loved so dearly. At one of the missionary meetings, he met William Hickenlooper, a man who had heard so much ill spoken of the Mormons that he confessed to being surprised at finding Freeman to be “an ordinary mortal” and “an intelligent man.” He invited Freeman to spend an evening at their home so they could discuss the gospel. The Pennsylvanian asked what the difference was between the Mormons and other sects. Freeman’s reply was direct, “We believe the Bible, and they do not.” Hickenlooper disputed his contention, but admitted that he “was forced to yield point after point to the Mormon.” Freeman knew his scriptures, and he carried the Spirit with him because of his great faith. It was difficult to catch him without an answer to a religious question. Hickenlooper went back often to hear Freeman preach. Each time he went he was prepared to debate points of doctrine with him. Each time, he came away impressed that Freeman was “strictly truthful in his statements and correct in his references.” But it wasn’t through argumentation that Hickenlooper and his family became converted to the Church. Sarah Hawkins, Sister Hickenlooper’s rheumatism-afflicted mother, had a spiritual experience that prompted her to ask Freeman Nickerson for a blessing. Bro. Nickerson knelt down with the family and prayed, then laid hands upon Mrs. Hawkins, rebuking her sickness in the name of the Lord.The rheumatism left her body. This was such a sacred experience that the family was convinced of the spiritual power manifested through the priesthood, and having already understood the Church’s doctrine, the Hickenlooper's were baptized. Before the Nickerson’s left in the spring, there was a branch of about forty members in this town near Pittsburgh. Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Caroline Nickerson, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, Terrance, Utah, 6 February 1881, (DFH/N78-81). Freeman Nickerson (1779-1847), (DFH/N16-18). The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, "Moses Chapman Nickerson," by Nicholas, 105, (DHF/N147). Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

Emery Barrus, pioneer, 1809-1899 (KWJ6-SH1)

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS Author Unknown(Possibly Benjamin Franklin Barrus) Emery Barrus was born in Chautauqua County, New York, in 1809. He was the only one of his father's family who was baptized in New York. In 1839, he with his wife and year old son, Benjamin Franklin Barrus, went to Jefferson City, Missouri, and in the spring of 1840 settled in Nauvoo, where they lived until after the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith. Following the perse[#$@^!]tion of the Saints, preparations were made for the never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery had a shingle mill on an island in the Mississippi river, and in 1845 they moved to the island, where, with the assistance of his wife, he would get the timber, saw it into suitable lengths, and fix the different parts of the wagons. He would store the wood in the shop to season. Preparatory to starting west from Nauvoo in the spring, he made 15 wagons right from the stumps of the trees that winter. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville October 1853, just two years after Grantsville was settled, which was in 1851. Samuel Steele arrived with the first seven families. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in the early days. We had to herd our stock in the day time on the range and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. Not a fruit or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1853. Mr. Sceva, John Clark, and James McBride were the first to plant trees. Emery Barrus built the first barns and some good houses in Grantsville. Thomas H. Clark was the first Bishop of Grantsville, Timothy Parkinson and John B. Walker were his counselors. In 1855 the grasshoppers came so thick that they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. 1856 was the year of the famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour and we were without bread for months, living on sego bulbs, thistle roots, etc. John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856. William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, threshed it with a flail and cleaned it with the wind. Each family received one-half bushel and ground it in coffee mills to make cakes for the Fourth of July dinner. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and each family received a part of family had a flour cake and beef steak for dinner July 24, 1856. Emery Barrus was Mayor of Grantsville City and attended to the surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charles Herman. EMERY BARRUS From History of Tooele County by Tooele County Daughters of Utah Pioneers, pp 415,416 A picture of him and his wife is found on page 613. Emery Barrus, son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins, was born 8 APR 1809 in Chautauqua County, New York. He came to Utah 9 OCT 1853 in the Appleton Harmon Company. He married Huldah Abigail Nickerson. Their children were: (1) Lydia, (2) Betsy N., (3) Benjamin Franklin, (4) Emery Freeman, (5) Mary Huldah, (6) Orrin Eleazer, (7) Emery Alexander, (8) Ruel Michael, (9) Owen Henry, (10) Sarah Abigail, (11) John Nickerson, (12) Eliza Alvira. He married Jane Zerilda Baker, who was a daughter of Benjamin Baker. Their children were: (1) Emeline Abigail, (2) James Baker, (3) William Taylor, (4) Thomas, (5) Freeman, (6) Chauncy Baker, (7) Catherine Rozena.\ The family home was in Grantsville, Utah. He was a High Priest, a Patriarch, a carpenter, stock raiser, farmer and, wheelwright. He died 5 OCT 1899. Esther Warner -- researcher

Emery Barrus 1809-1899

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

By McClain Barrus I regret that I did not think to ask my father (Ezra Barrus) to tell me all that he remembered about his grandfather Emery Barrus. He must have been intimately acquainted with Emery because they lived for twenty years in the same town. How I wish Dad had told me stories concerning that great man. Perhaps we could all learn the lesson that we should take opportunities to interview our aging parents or grandparents and obtain all the knowledge we can about our ancestors. The information gained in such interviews would be precious to those who come after us, provided it was written in family histories. I wonder if Emery told Dad about the time he was courting Freeman Nickerson's 17-year-old daughter. It was in 1833 when Freeman returned to his home in New York from a mission in Ohio, and brought with him the Prophet Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon. Emery was twenty-four years old and was working on the Nickerson farm. He was engaged to marry Huldah Abigail Nickerson. The Prophet was there in October and they were married about two months later. I can imagine how awed Emery must have been to see the Prophet, and it was at that time he was baptized. He must have been aware that Joseph Smith had received a revelation from the Lord in Freeman's home, which later became the 100th section of the Doctrine Covenants. Surely he must have told Dad that inspiring story. Dad didn't get to meet his grandmother, Huldah Abigail, because she died seven years before he was born. How I admire my great-grandmother, the daughter of Freeman Nickerson. She witnessed the persecution in Nauvoo when men were whipped, houses burned, and crops destroyed. It was there that she gave birth to my grandfather. She worked with her husband in his shingle mill and would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for shingles. When wagons were needed for the use of the Saints who were fleeing Nauvoo, she helped her husband saw wood into suitable lengths for different parts of the wagons. She and Emery made fifteen wagons right from stumps of trees. Esther Warner tells us in her booklet, "Emery Barrus, Pioneer". "The home of mother Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. When a carding machine arrived in Provo, Hulda Barrus would take the wool there, driving a pair of colts they brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of cheese and butter. Huldah Abigail Nickerson was the first president of the Grantsville Ward Relief Society." In addition to all of the hard physical work she accomplished, she bore her husband twelve children. She died at the age of fifty-six. What a remarkable woman! Emery didn't experience the Missouri persecutions, as did Thomas and James McBride because at that time he was still living in New York. He moved to Nauvoo in 1844 after the Saints had been driven out of Missouri. But he was among those who were driven from Nauvoo after the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were martyred. He must have been acquainted with the Prophet who was a good friend and missionary companion of his father-in-law. Esther Warner pointed out: "Many found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track it until they could find an easier way to worship God." When Emery saw the lowering clouds on the horizon, the tribulations and calamities, the spirit of hell raging in the hearts of their persecutors, even though he must have been in a state of great uneasiness and fear, he had a foundation which anchored his life. It was his faith in the gospel of Jesus Christ. I get the impression that Emery was a hard-working out-of-doors type of man. He must have been a fine marksman with a gun because he was appointed hunter for the Appleton Harmon Company when they were crossing the plains. He was a fine craftsman and built many wagons. He also built many good houses and was the first in Grantsville to erect a barn. He must have been a. sort of politician because he was the first mayor of Grantsville City. Perhaps it was he who appointed my grandfather a peace officer in that town. The Salt Lake Temple was dedicated in 1893, six years he before Emery died and was a faithful worker in that House of the Lord. I remember hearing my father tell about the dedication of the Salt Lake Temple. I received the impression that he was in Salt Lake City at the time it took place. If he wasn't personally in attendance at the meeting when Wilford Woodruff offered the dedicatory prayer, he was aware of what was taking place. Perhaps he rode to Salt Lake with his grandfather, Emery Barrus. Emery was a devout and faithful man, and was ordained a patriarch in the Grantsville Stake. It is remarkable that he was able to continue working in the temple up until two weeks before he died at the age of ninety. He opened the door to great rewards and joy unspeakable. He, like Freeman Nickerson, Thomas McBride, and James McBride, made his greatest contribution to the cause of Zion by being the ancestor of numerous posterity, among whom are many faithful Latter-day Saints who meet the strictest requirements of righteousness. These four men whose lives I have outlined in this "book, are filled with the light that will show us the way to God. Conclusion In this writing I have tried to point out that our ancestors: Thomas McBride, Freeman Nickerson, James McBride, Emery Barrus, and their faithful wives, with sincere conviction and unflinching courage, remained steadfast in the Faith. They passed the acid test of character; and they have stirred our sense of the heroic. We have seen their bitter strivings and glorious achievements. They choose the high way, undaunted and undismayed. Their hilltop hour came after many dark valleys. The Lord consecrated their afflictions for their gain. (2 Ne. 2:2). They had their lofty goals clearly in mind, with Divine assurance in their hearts, and were able to withstand the world's scorn. Their lives shine and they "became noble in the sight of God. Now we their descendants, after possibly a century has gone by number in the thousands, and a large portion of our number are devout Latter-day Saints. We hold high places of honor and respect in the world. When I read about those days in Church history when the air was heavy with despair, I wondered; would I have had the courage and strength of character so that I could stand to be really put through the wringer? If enemies were building fires all around me, would I be able to carry the great crushing load? Would I have given up the ghost of all my hopes and be tinged with foreboding because of the terror of the hour? Would I have been numbered among the apostates who were cut off the Church because of their unwillingness to sacrifice? The answer is, only God knows. It could very well be that the age in which we live is just as hazardous and the trials of our faith will be just as severe as it was for our pioneer forbearers. It is true that at the present time Mormons are not usually despised and hated. Mobs are not trying to destroy our homes and drive us from the areas in which we live. The devil is trying to destroy us in different ways. All around us there is so much evil that could lead us from the true path.We should evaluate our personal testimonies and commitments. This may also be a time of refiner's fire for us. Let us not be among the weak who fall by the wayside. Let us all shine and also become noble in the sight of God.

The Nauvoo Period

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Nauvoo Period Freeman Nickerson and Emery Barrus bought land in Nauvoo next to each other on the northeast section of Bluff Street and Hubbard Street. Here they built their houses and planted fruit trees. Life was busy in the new and bustling town of Nauvoo. After the swamps were drained, the wretched sickness subsided, and life went on at a rapid pace. New members of the Church were arriving almost every day and the town was growing rapidly. Emery and Huldah Abigail were happy to finally live in a home among the Saints, and loved to gather for church meetings with the Prophet Joseph Smith and others. Emery helped build the Nauvoo Temple, and Huldah Abigail sewed and cooked for the men also Huldah Abigail and Emery Barrus’ three little children were growing. Life was good and they soon looked forward to the birth of a baby. In the spring they were blessed with a little boy who they named Emery Freeman after his father and grandfather Emery had always been good with wood and with the great growth Nauvoo was experiencing; there was a great demand for building materials. Emery Barrus built a shingle mill on an island in the middle of the Mississippi River. This very island once served as a hiding place for the Prophet. In May of 1842, Joseph Smith was accused of an assassination attempt on the life of former Governor Boggs of Missouri. He knew that if he were returned to Missouri, he would surely be killed. So, the Prophet sought seclusion there on the island where Emery constructed his shingles. Life seemed to move along happily until September came. Little Emery had only been sick a short time, but things did not look good. They prayed with faith for the little lad, but finally their tiny baby died in their arms. This was a devastating blow to the family. Huldah Abigail’s arms ached for her son. Her mother and father were a comfort to her, but it was so hard. It would be two long years until Huldah Abigail would hold another baby in her arms, this one a little girl they named Mary. She was a joy to the family and a consolation after little Emery’s death. The doctrine of Baptism for the Dead was introduced into the church and Huldah Abigail’s parents, Freeman and Huldah Nickerson, were grateful to have the opportunity to do many proxy baptisms for their deceased relatives in the Mississippi River. Freeman Nickerson was called on a mission to the Eastern States including Boston. He was gone for about two and a half years, returning in 1844. At the time returned, the Prophet Joseph Smith declared his intentions as a candidate for the President of the United States. Freeman was soon called on another mission to travel around the United States campaigning for the Prophet Joseph Smith to become President of the United States. Life went on in Nauvoo, but because of the continued tormenting from the Missouri mobs, relations with the people in Illinois were deteriorating. The Prophet Joseph Smith was continually being harassed with lawsuits. Some of the Saints living in outlying areas around Nauvoo were being forced from their homes by mobs. There were even problems of conspiracy among the leadership of the Church. By June of 1844, Joseph Smith had declared Martial Law in Nauvoo. It was a critical time, and Emery felt the weight of caring for his young family and the Nickersons with such upheaval in the church. They had to be continually on the alert because of all the threats. On June 27th, 1844, a runner came to Nauvoo with the dreadful news that the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum had been shot and killed in the Carthage Jail. It was a time when every heart felt as if it would break. The next day was gloomy as Emery and Huldah Abigail gathered their family and joined the Saints as they lined the streets when the bodies of their beloved leaders were brought back to Nauvoo. As the wagons slowly passed in front of the unfinished temple, thousands of the saints stood in mourning. It was hard to adjust to life without the Prophet. Emery and Huldah Abigail had known him well. The Prophet had been in their home many times and they loved him as a friend as well as a Prophet of God. By August, Emery and Huldah Abigail and their family had rallied under the leadership of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and felt the need to finish the Temple and prepare to leave their beloved city of Nauvoo. Work on the temple continued at a rapid pace, and finally at the end of 1845, they began to do Temple Work in the portions of the temple which had been finished and dedicated. Huldah Abigail’s parents Freeman and Huldah Nickerson received their Endowments in the Nauvoo Temple on December 15th, 1845. On the bitter cold day of February 3, 1846 Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus were at the Nauvoo Temple to receive their endowments. That day, President Brigham Young recorded in his diary: “Notwithstanding that I had announced that we would not attend to the administration of the ordinances, the House of the Lord was thronged all day. … I also informed the brethren that I was going to get my wagons started and be off. I walked some distance from the Temple supposing the crowd would disperse, but on returning I found the house filled to overflowing. Looking upon the multitude and knowing their anxiety, as they were thirsting and hungering for the word, we continued at work diligently in the House of the Lord.” And so the temple work continued until 1:30 A.M. Huldah Abigail and Emery were overjoyed with the blessings of the Temple and deeply grateful that they were able to receive these ordinances that day. This great blessing would give them strength in the time of trial ahead. Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Caroline Nickerson, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, Terrance, Utah, 6 February 1881, (DFH/N78-81). Freeman Nickerson (1779-1847), in the possession of Jolene Dew (DFH/N16-18). “Freeman Nickerson,” September 2005, www.shafferweb.com, (DFH/N157-159). 1173. Huldah Abigail Nickerson, a history found in The Nickerson Family, The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689 Part 4 Nicholas 110. (DFH/B44) The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, “Huldah Abigail Nickerson,” and “Nicholas,” 1173, 110, (DFH/B44). Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B2). Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 267, 316-321. Ensign, “Eternity Lies Before Us,” by James E. Faust, May 1997, 18. (DFH/B47).

The Battle of Nauvoo

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Battle of Nauvoo Since the devastating day when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his beloved brother Hyrum were murdered by the hands of an angry mob at the Carthage Jail, Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus had realized with the other Saints that their days in Nauvoo were numbered. Several months after the martyrdom, Emery and his family joined with the body of the Saints as they rallied behind the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles as the leaders of the Church. Under their direction families made plans to leave their homes in Nauvoo. Emery moved his family from their home in Nauvoo, across the Mississippi River to the island where his shingle mill was located. Emery now started building wagons instead of shingles, and it would be easier to work with his family on the island where they would be nearer to the source of the timber. Huldah Abigail gave birth to another son, there on the island. They named him Orrin Eleazer after her grandfather. There was so much to be done. Wagons took several months to build because the wood must be dried in stages. When she was well enough, Huldah Abigail helped in the process, holding one end of the cross cut saw as they sawed the trees into blocks ready to cut planks for the wagons. She also helped to saw the wood into suitable lengths for different parts of the wagon. Emery would then put the planks in the rafters of the shop to allow the wood to season. Throughout the winter, they built fifteen wagons right from the stumps of the trees. Everyone was working so hard to prepare to leave their homes. In the bitter cold of February, the first large group of the Saints to leave Nauvoo made their way down Parley Street and crossed the great Mississippi River which had frozen solid with the cold. The Saints were leaving Nauvoo every day throughout the spring and early summer of 1846. Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus had prepared their wagons and were gathering the supplies they would need to join the Saints in their exodus. However, Huldah Abigail’s father, Freeman Nickerson had not returned from his mission, and they felt they must wait along with the other Nickerson’s to leave. Meanwhile, things were getting progressively worse in Nauvoo. When the opponents of the Church realized that not all the Saints were going to leave Nauvoo by summer, persecution began anew. Men and women harvesting grain were attacked and some were severely beaten. This type of harassment lasted all summer and into the fall of 1846. Finally in August, Freeman Nickerson returned. The previous year, Freeman had married a second wife in polygamy, Huldah Howes from Yarmouth, who was actually his cousin. They had been married in Nauvoo. Now he brought with him a woman by the name of Eliza Kent, whom he had married in Boston. She had an eight-year-old son, Christopher. Freeman was not well, as he had been ill during this last mission to the Boston area. He really needed time to gather his strength if they were to leave their home to live in a wagon and cross the Mississippi River into the wilderness of Iowa. When Freeman returned from his mission, Emery and Huldah Abigail gathered with the family, leaving behind their island home. The family needed to band together to prepare for the time they could leave the city. About this time, Freeman’s daughter, Caroline Eliza Grover, arrived in Nauvoo with her children. She had left Nauvoo during the first exodus in the early spring and had traveled to Mount Pisgah, where she left the group and returned to Nauvoo. She was expecting a baby at any moment, and the group felt it would be wise to wait for the baby to be born before they left. They continued to make their preparations, but things were not good in Nauvoo. Huldah Abigail’s brother, Levi Nickerson told of fighting in the Battle of Nauvoo. No doubt, Emery Barrus and Freeman Nickerson did also. By the second week in September, the anti-Mormons were determined to drive the Saints out of Nauvoo. Approximately eight hundred men equipped with six cannons prepared to lay siege to the city. Most of the Saints who were left in Nauvoo were old, feeble, or unwell, like the Nickerson family. Emery Barrus and Levi Nickerson, Huldah Abigail’s brother, joined with the Saints and some few citizens, numbering only about 150 fighting men, as they prepared to defend the city. The Battle of Nauvoo began on September 10th, with sporadic firing. During the following two days there were minor skirmishes. On September 13th, an anti-Mormon column advanced in an attempt to rout the defenders. Emery and Levi joined a spirited counter attack led by Daniel H. Wells which saved the day, but there were casualties on both sides. The battle continued the next day, which was the Sabbath. Gratefully no one in the Nickerson and Barrus families was hurt but it was a terrible time. On September 16th, the “Quincy Committee,” which had helped keep the peace in previous months, interceded once again. The Saints were forced to surrender unconditionally in order to save their lives and gain a chance of escaping across the river. Only five men and their families were allowed to stay in Nauvoo to dispose of property. Those who could quickly crossed the river without provisions or additional clothing. Finally, the mob entered the city, looted homes, and desecrated the temple. Some of the Saints, who were not able to escape fast enough, were beaten and thrown into the river by the mob. Emery and Levi discussed the situation. Father Nickerson was sick; they had two older women in their family; Caroline was about to give birth; and there were so many little ones. They were a sad looking lot. After prayer, they decided to wait out the birth of Caroline’s baby, as they knew they would not have a better place to deliver a baby while on the trail. Finally, on September 27th, Caroline gave birth to a baby boy whom she named Marshall Hubbard Grover, and the families hurriedly left the city the very next day while the mobs descended. As they slowly made their way toward the river, they looked back to see angry men ransacking their home and finally lighting a fire to it. It was a devastating sight. By the time they made it down Parley Street to the river it was evening. The town seemed to be in all-out confusion. They were finally picked up by friends and that night crossed the river by the light of the burning city. The crossing of the river in the darkness of night was treacherous. Everything got wet. Even the wagon in which the new mother and babe reclined was water soaked, and Caroline feared for the life of the little one she held. Through the blessings of the Lord, they all made it through the ordeal. Their group consisted of: Freeman and Huldah Nickerson; their son Levi, his wife Mary Ann and his family; Freeman and Huldah’s daughter Caroline and her four children including her newborn son; Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus and their four children; and Freeman’s new wives, Huldah and Eliza and her son Christopher. Across the river Emery and Levi looked around and were dismayed at the sad shape they found things in. Refugee camps of five to six hundred dispossessed men, women, and children, including those who had been left as too sick to travel, were scattered along two miles of riverbank above Montrose, Iowa. Most people had only blankets or bowers made of brush for shelter and little more than boiled or parched corn to eat. Father Nickerson was not well after the ordeal of being forced from his home and the perilous and wet crossing of the Mississippi River. Emery and Huldah Abigail knew they must stop for a time and let him rest. Though there were people dying in the camp because of exposure, they feared for his life if they continued on. A few days later, Bishop Newel K. Whitney showed up with some flour he had purchased and distributed it among the poor camps. This was a great blessing to many who were starving. Huldah Abigail joined with the others of her little group to help alleviate the suffering they saw around them, but they were not in good shape themselves. Prayers ascended to their Father in Heaven for help and relief from the suffering. On the 9th of October, when food was in especially short supply, several large flocks of quail flew into camp and landed on the ground and even on tables. Huldah Abigail’s children along with Emery and the other Saints were able to catch many of them. These Quail were then cooked and eaten by the hungry Saints. To The Nickerson and Barrus families, it was a sign of God’s mercy to modern Israel as a similar incident had been to ancient Israel, and they gave great thanks to their Father in Heaven for his tender mercies. Finally, Emery and Levi felt they could prolong their stay on the banks of the Mississippi River no longer. It was a wretched camp, and the time was fleeting. Sickness and death stalked the camps of the Saints. The hasty exodus from Nauvoo, the exhausting trek across Iowa, the storms, insufficient provisions, inadequate and impoverished shelter, and the unhealthy riverbank environments all took their toll. Many of the travelers suffered from the exposure-related diseases of malaria, pneumonia, and tuberculosis. Each night the weather got colder, and despite the sickness in their little group, they felt they must push on and try to find better shelter for the upcoming winter. Father Nickerson was not yet well, and now his two wives, Huldah and Eliza, were sick also. But, there was no other way than to press on. The families continued their journey westward, but finally, they were forced to halt seven miles west of Bonaparte, Iowa, on account of sickness. There, Freeman’s second wife, Huldah Howes, died and was buried. It was a low blow to the family who loved her dearly. Late in November, the families continued their journey to the Chariton River. At Soap Creek, about 30 miles above Whiskey Point, Emery and Levi, with the help of their wives and children, erected temporary cabins for shelter during the winter. The livestock survived by eating tree buds and limbs of small trees that they felled for that purpose. It was a cold winter, and without proper shelter and food, there was much sickness in the family. Toward the end of December, Freeman’s third wife, Eliza died and six days later her little son followed her in death. Freeman was not well. He was 69 years old now, and over the past fourteen years since his baptism into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, his life had not been easy. He had served four-full time missions, besides several short-term missions. He had marched as a member of Zion’s Camp. He had survived the winter on the frozen riverbanks of the Allegheny River while on his way to live with the Saints. He had then made his way to Commerce which would become the city of Nauvoo, only to contract malaria and struggle for his life in the swampy fields of that fledgling city. And now he had been forced from his comfortable home in Nauvoo to these cold and impoverished conditions on the banks of yet another river. This time the odds would prove too much, and with his family gathered around him in their makeshift shelter, Freeman Nickerson, one of the Lords truly valiant men of the kingdom, slipped from this life to return to the God who gave him life. Surely he soon heard the words, “Well done thou good and faithful servant.” Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Caroline Nickerson, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, Terrance, Utah, 6 February 1881, (DFH/N78-81). Freeman Nickerson (1779-1847), in possession of Jolene Dew (DFH/N16-18). “Freeman Nickerson,” September 2005, www.shafferweb.com, (DFH/N157-159). Huldah Abigail Nickerson, a history found in The Nickerson Family. The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689 Part 4 Nicholas, page 110. (DFH/B44) The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, “Huldah Abigail Nickerson,” and “Nicholas,” 1173, 110, (DFH/B44). Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B2). Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 267, 316-321. Ensign, “Eternity Lies Before Us,” by James E. Faust, May 1997, 18, (DFH/B47).

On Our Way to Zion

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

On Our Way to Zion After being forced from their home by mobs in Nauvoo in 1846, Emery Barrus and his family crossed part of Iowa before the snows halted their travel and they were forced to build small cabins and winter over. The exposure was great and their Grandfather, Freeman Nickerson died on the banks of the Chariton River during that hard winter. In the spring they had traveled on to Kanesville, which is where Council Bluffs is today. They settled in the small community of Ferryville, Iowa, where they had lived for the five years as they tried to gather provisions to cross the plains to Utah. Two children had been born while they lived in Iowa, a son Emery, who was now five years old and a son Ruel, who was two years old. They also had three other children, seven-year-old son, Orrin, ten-year-old Mary, and fifteen-year-old Benjamin. Finally in 1853 the Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus family were ready to leave and joined the Appleton Harmon Company which was due to leave that summer. About 200 individuals and about 22 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa. The company crossed the Missouri River on a ferry boat on July 14, 1853. (The Appleton Harmer Company had with them 55 wagons that were part of the Perpetual Emigration Fund. It is possible that through this program the Emery Barrus family was able to come to Utah after such a long layover in Iowa.) The Barrus family was happy to finally be on their way to Zion. The Indians were on the warpath, so the company had to stay together as much as possible for safety. One day as the wagons were rolling, a large group of Indians stopped the company. Huldah Abigail quickly gathered her small ones around her. The situation did not look good; there were so many of them. Emery stood ready with his hunting rifle as the leaders of the company went forward to talk with the Indians. Much time went by as they tried to make a peaceful settlement. Finally, the Indians agreed to let the company pass if they were given a substantial amount of the company’s provisions. The pioneers would feel the need of these provisions later on, but Huldah Abigail and Emery joined with the others in prayers of gratitude for the peaceful ending to such a frightening situation. When they started out, the children had wondered what kinds of animals they would see on the plains. It was not long until their wagon train was stopped for a huge herd of buffalo. There were so many of the large wooly creatures that the company had to stop completely and let them pass. It was quite a site and one that the children would remember and talk about for years to come. Being a pretty good shot, Emery was appointed as a hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train, and when he could find a buffalo close to the road, he would shoot it and then wait for the company to catch up so he could divide it up among the Saints. At night, it was the practice of the company to circle the wagons making a corral where the people could stay inside for safety. There were always chores to do around the camp and Benjamin was a great help to his father, Emery, in taking care of the animals. Mary would help her mother with the meals as well as take care of her little brothers. Huldah Abigail was grateful for the help as she was finding it harder each day to accomplish all of her duties as a baby grew within her. In the evening after supper and when the animals were taken care of, Emery and Huldah would sit around the campfire with their children and the others from the company and sing songs or tell stories. One brother among them had a violin, and he would begin with a rousing tune for those who were not too tired would dance. Benjamin was just the right age to enjoy a moment to kick up his heels. By the time the company made it to the Sweetwater River, it was September and their provisions were running low. Brother Harmon, the company commander, sent a message on ahead with a Brother Babbit to let the Brethren in Salt Lake City know of their progress. In the letter they said that the company of nearly 400 persons had 23 days rations among them. They had counted all the provisions and were sharing with each other to make them last. They had also made a count of their guns. They said that in case of an attack by the Utah Indians, they could muster only about 40 guns, all of which were common English fowling pieces, not many rifles and balls. He felt that they were poorly prepared for war and hoped that they would not have any difficulty. He finished the letter saying that despite the shortage in food and weapons, the Saints were generally in good spirits and anxious to reach the Valley before the snow would. They would endeavor to bear all that came with patience. It would be another 29 days before the wagon train would roll down the mountain and into the Salt Lake Valley. Gratefully, three days before they arrived, a few wagons met them with a load of flour, meat, and vegetables, which the Saints felt was a true blessing having already run out of food. Emery and Huldah Abigail were grateful to see the Salt Lake Valley after such a long trek. After talking with some of the Saints about a good place to settle, they made their way toward the Great Salt Lake and around the mountain to the west finally settling in the fledgling town of Grantsville. Huldah Abigail was big with child at that time and it would not be long before her son, Owen Henry would be born. Owen Henry always considered himself a pioneer saying that his mother had carried him all the way across the plains. Ever after, when the call was made for original pioneers, Owen Henry would stand among the group who had come across the plains to live with the Saints in Zion. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B3). Treasures of Pioneer History; Journal of Lucina Mecham Boren, Vol. 6; 306-308. 1173. Huldah Abigail Nickerson, a history found in The Nickerson Family, The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689 Part 4 Nicholas 110. (DFH/B44) The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, “Huldah Abigail Nickerson,” and “Nicholas,” 1173, 110, (DFH/B44).

Indian Trouble

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

Indian Trouble Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus had crossed the plains and were now settling with their little family in the small community of Grantsville. It was a little oasis in the west desert just south of the banks of the Great Salt Lake where the creeks from the Stansbury Mountains made a grove of Willows. At first it had been known as Willow Creek, but the name had been changed in honor of Major George D. Grant who had helped the community with the Indian trouble they were having. The Indians were a constant problem to the settlers because they not only stole cattle and horses, but did a lot of malicious mischief. The cattle had to be kept under constant guard both day and night. Even though the pioneers gave the Indians meats and grain, they could not afford the raids that seemed to be a form of sport to the Indians. The pioneers decided to build a fort for their protection. Emery helped in its construction which consisted of making mud and pounding it hard and letting it dry. Huldah Abigail marveled at the size of the Fort which was about four acres square. The walls were five feet thick at the bottom and stood twelve feet high. It was a very large fort with homes built on the insides and a stockade of cedar logs to hold the cattle at night. Emery was grateful for a place to bring his cattle at night and took his turns at the night watch. Even with all of their preparations, the Indians were still troublesome. Finally it was proposed that the little group of Saints would fast and pray for divine guidance that someone would be able to talk to the Indians and persuade them that the settlers were their friends. The answer to their prayers came in a miraculous way. One day, William Lee, one of the Saints, was building a chimney on the outside of his cabin which he had erected in the fort, when an Indian appeared and began making signs to him that he wished to help him. William was afraid and retreated inside the cabin, but the Indian kept making signs and finally began carrying rock to the chimney site and mixing up the mud that was used to cover up the rock. William watched for a while and finally gathered up his courage and came out to continue his labor of building the chimney. The Indian assisted him all day. In the evening, William gave the Indian his supper and a blanket on which to sleep Early the next morning, Lee let the Indian know through signs that he was going to the canyon for wood and would like his company as it was not safe to go alone. The Indian agreed to go, so they yoked up the oxen and started for the canyon. William Lee was on the front bolster with the Indian on the rear bolster. About half way to the canyon, William found himself facing the Indian and talking to him in the Indian language. So engrossed was he in his talk with the Indian that he paid no attention to the oxen and, left to themselves, they circled around and William found himself entering the fort with his oxen, wagon, and the Indian but with no wood. It was such a surprise to see William Lee riding with an Indian, and the incident was immediately made known to the little band of settlers. Emery and Huldah Abigail joined the group as they gathered around the Indian listening intently as Brother Lee interpreted what the Indian said and asked him questions in his own language. The Indian’s name was Ship-rus. They asked him if he would bring his people to the fort so that they could have a talk with them. Emery and Huldah Abigail marveled along with the rest of the saints as they witnessed how the Lord had answered their prayers by revealing the Indian Language to William Lee. In two days, Huldah Abigail stared as a group of Indians walked into the fort. It was such a sight and one she thought she would never see. William Lee was there and stood on an old chair and talked to them in their own language for an hour, telling them of their origin, that the settlers were their friends, and that they would teach them how to till the ground to supply themselves with the necessities of life. The Indians listened to all he had to say and then replied, “The Mountains are ours, the water, the woods, the grass, and the game all belongs to us, but the Mormons are our brothers. We will share with them and smoke the pipe of peace. This ended the trouble with the Indians and the settlers were able to move out of the Fort and build homes of their own. Emery and Huldah Abigail would always remember the miracle of the Lord which they had witnessed in answer to their fasting and prayers. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B3). History of Tooele County, by the Tooele County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 215-222.

The Utah War

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Utah War When the dreadful news arrived in Grantsville, Huldah and Emery Barrus were stunned. The United States was sending an army to subdue the “rebellious Mormons.” Governor Brigham Young had issued a call for the Territorial Militia, known at that time as the Nauvoo Legion, to come to Salt Lake City to mobilize for active duty. The call was for every able-bodied man. Huldah knew that her son, Benjamin, who was now twenty years old would answer the call and this, stirred her heart. Of course she realized the danger that the Mormons were in and also that this call came from a Prophet as well as their Governor. Still, it was hard to send her son into harm’s way. Benjamin joined with his Uncle Ruel Barrus who had been a member of the Mormon Battalion some ten years earlier. Together they joined the group of thirty-five men from Grantsville and marched to Salt Lake City. Once in the city, they met up with men from all over the territory. It was late fall as the Legion, under the command of General Daniel H. Wells, made its way east to Echo Canyon. These soldiers built walls and dug trenches from which they could act as snipers. They loosened huge boulders that could easily be sent crashing down on the moving troops. They also constructed ditches and dams that could be opened to flood the enemy’s path. It was so cold, especially at night. Benjamin and his Uncle Ruel joined with the others as they built big campfires and stayed up around them as long as they could to keep warm. They would pull the hot embers to one side and lay on the warm ground, turning frequently the first hour to keep from being scorched. Despite the cold, the Legion did what it had come to do. Another group of forty-four men were sent farther on to find the actual troops and to proceed at once to annoy them in every possible way. Their instructions were to “Use every exertion to stampede their animals, and set fire to their trains. Burn the whole country before them and on their flanks. Keep them from sleeping by night surprises…Take no life, but destroy their trains, and stampede or drive away their animals at every opportunity.” These tactics succeeded so well that the army was indeed delayed and was forced to winter over in the burned-out Fort Bridger. Back in Grantsville, it was a winter of anxiety for Huldah and Emery as they gathered their family together to pray for Benjamin and Uncle Ruel. In April, the instructions came for the people to leave their homes and travel south. The Saints had been through much persecution in Missouri and in Nauvoo at the hand of angry mobs. They had been forced from their homes with only what they could carry while their property was taken over by their assailants. Now, they vowed, they were not about to let the same thing happen in this new land. They would rather burn their homes to the ground than let them be taken over by the army. Emery helped place the cattle in a large church herd with men left to guard them from the Indians and the army. Huldah gathered what she could and they packed a wagon with the bare necessities that they could take and closed the door to their home, not knowing if they would ever see it again. It was a great trial to once again follow the Prophet’s council and leave their home behind them. A small group of men was left behind with instructions to burn the buildings and the fields should the Army try to invade. Most of the people from Grantsville went south to Spring Creek just past Payson. There they camped as best they could throughout the summer. Negotiations with the Army started in the spring as the Saints were deserting their homes. Thomas Kane, who had always been a friend to the Saints throughout their trials and persecutions, came to help with the relations between the Army and Brigham Young. He finally talked the new governor who was sent by the U.S. Federal Government, into coming to Salt Lake City for talks. There was quite an entourage which accompanied the governor. Porter Rockwell joined the column as well as many other Mormons as the procession continued toward Salt Lake City. Benjamin and his Uncle Ruel were still in the mountains of Echo Canyon. They helped stage a show one evening as the governor’s train continued late into the night through the gloomy clutches of Echo Canyon. Several times hidden sentries surrounded his carriage and challenged the official party. They only waved them on after conversations with Rockwell. As the train proceeded down the canyon, they saw bonfires in the hills, one after another, which were surrounded by riflemen silhouetted against the tall rocks. By the time the governor reached the west end of the canyon, he guessed that from two to three thousand Mormons manned its fortifications. Had Rockwell been able to read the governor’s thoughts, he would have been tremendously pleased. The governor could not have known that he had been a victim of a gigantic hoax, for in truth fewer than one hundred and fifty Mormons occupied the canyon’s defenses. Each time the party had been challenged, the sentries raced back to repeat the performance. As for the campfires, they had been lighted and left unguarded, except for the handful of men who had deliberately exposed themselves to the Governor’s view. The trick even surpassed Brigham Young’s expectations of what the Mormon Army could do. Through this elaborate ruse, the Governor was convinced that an overwhelmingly hostile force faced Johnston’s command and that any attempt to penetrate the canyon would be suicidal. Finally, in the fall, nearly a year later, a joyous end came to their suffering. A treaty with the government representatives called a halt to the “Utah War.” The army, under the direction of General Johnston, peacefully traveled through the deserted streets of Salt Lake City, to Cedar Valley, 40 miles south of Salt Lake City and made camp. Pres. Brigham Young sent word that the refugees could return to their homes. Emery and Huldah were tired, but very grateful as they traveled back to their homes to find everything as they had left it. It was an added pleasure when shortly thereafter, their son Benjamin, along with Uncle Ruel, were released from the Nauvoo Legion and returned home safe. Together again as a family, they knelt in a prayer of gratitude to their Father in Heaven for a peaceful outcome to this terrible ordeal. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B4). History of Tooele County, by the Tooele County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 224-225. Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 368-379. Ensign, “The Temple, the Priesthood,” by Boyd K. Packer, May 1993, 18. (DFH/Hu89-90). Orrin Porter Rockwell Man of God Son of Thunder, by Harold Schindler 285-286.

The Seagulls and the Crickets

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Seagulls and the Crickets Huldah Abigail worked hard at carding wool. In this new land where the Saints had come after being forced to leave their homes in Nauvoo, there was much to do with little resources. She was able to obtain the wool from a flock of sheep in the community. She would card it, spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn, the yarn into cloth or stockings, and the cloth into clothing for her little family and neighbors. She also made pounds of cheese and butter which she could trade for things they needed. Emery worked with the 46 head of loose stock he had brought to this place besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons as they crossed the plains. Emery was a hard worker and a carpenter and woodworker besides. He constructed the first barn in Grantsville as well as some good houses. Things seemed to be going well for the little family now that the Indian trouble had subsided, all until the trouble started with the crickets. The years of 1855 and 1856 would long be remembered as the years of famine. One day Huldah Abigail looked into the sky only to see that the sun was darkened by hordes of crickets. They were like a cloud as they descended upon the lake and then the fields. They seemed to stretch for miles along the lake in some places almost six feet deep. The settlers contrived a roller that they had the oxen drag over the creatures to kill them. Emery and Huldah joined with the others as they tried to drown the crickets in irrigation ditches and burn them with brush fires, all to no avail. With all their work, they had not saved enough grain to plant their fields again the next spring. Things indeed looked desperate. Huldah and Emery united with the other settlers in special prayers in behalf of their crops. Following their faith and prayers, a great horde of seagulls came in from the Great Salt Lake in flocks to feed on the crickets and disgorge and feed again, and at times the wind blew so hard the crickets were blown out onto the lake and were drowned. The Barrus’ looked on in amazement as the hand of the Lord was evident in this miracle. They gathered their children around them to give thanks to the Lord for his goodness to them in their desperate time of need. Although the crickets had been cleared from the land, the effects of their damage was long lasting. Even the cows and livestock were affected because of the loss of grass. What little milk, Huldah could get, she gave to her children. They tried to live on boiled greens, sego lily roots, and thistles. Emery tried to shoot what game he could, but there was very little if any, as the crickets had starved the rabbits and other wildlife, too. Finally one of the settlers had a small patch of barley ripen, and he gathered every bit he could and distributed it to all the families. Huldah almost cried for joy as she ground hers in a coffee mill and cooked it into mush for the family. It was so delicious to all that they remembered it as a banquet. In the winter months, they were able to eat the potatoes that the crickets didn’t get, but hunger seemed to be the rule. In the summer of 1856, a patch of barley was harvested by hand and cleaned up in the wind. Emery and the others would use rakes to toss the barley over and over as the wind carried off the hulls covering the grains of barley. Every morsel was saved and each family got half a bushel. Huldah joined with the other women in grinding it in a coffee mill to make cake for the 4th of July celebration. By the end of the month, there was another bunch of grain, and Emery helped to harvest it, delivering each family a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery provided one of his animals for beef, and each family in the little community was blessed with a flour cake and a beef stake for their celebration. The summer of 1856 continued to be a poor time for crops, but Emery noticed that there was cooperation among the settlers which proved that while everyone was hungry no one starved. Through the miracle of the seagulls given at the hand of the Lord, the little community made it through this time of famine, and they had banded together in a time of trial to help each other. This good will strengthened the community for years to come. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B4). History of Tooele County, by the Tooele County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 223-224.

On a Mission with the Prophet

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

In about 1832 Freeman Nickerson’s family met Elders from a new religion known to many as “the Mormons.” Elder Zerubbabel Snow and Amasa Lyman taught them the Gospel, and it had not taken long for Freeman and his wife Huldah to recognize the Spirit of God in these missionaries’ words. The Nickersons had eagerly shared what they were learning with those of their children who still lived close to them, and they had also embraced the new teachings. Each of them had entered the cool spring waters of baptism thus joining themselves with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Freeman was a 7 foot tall, agile, 55-year-old man who had a happy disposition. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, seven of whom were still living. Their daughters, Caroline and Data, both joined the Church along with their husbands. Chittendon, twenty three, Levi, nineteen and Huldah Abigail, seventeen also joined the new church. Huldah Abigail who was soon to be married to Emery Barrus, a young man who had been working as a farm hand at their home, also joined the Church as did Emery. Freeman felt sad that his other two boys were living in Canada with their families and were not able to hear the glad tidings of the Gospel. Freeman had a great desire to meet the Prophet Joseph Smith about whom he had heard so much. He made the wagon trip southwest the one hundred miles from his home in Perrysville, New York, to the town of Kirtland, Ohio, where Joseph was living with many of the Saints. Freeman was very impressed with this prophet of God, and this meeting only increased his conviction that this truly was Christ’s Church on the earth. Freeman felt a great desire for his sons in Canada to hear the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and asked if the Prophet if he would accompany him on a trip to Canada where he wanted to teach his sons. Joseph inquired of the Lord and was given direction to go on the mission to Canada and to take Sidney Rigdon, his first counselor, with him. Freeman, or Father Nickerson as the Prophet Joseph affectionately called him, was elated, and the three men were soon on their way north. With a team and conveyance provided by Freeman, the three started eastward from Kirtland on October 5, 1833. They stopped at various towns along the way, visiting with Saints and preaching the gospel each evening to anyone who came to listen. After a week on the road, they arrived at Freeman Nickerson’s own home, in Perrysville, New York. Huldah was a gracious hostess to the Prophet and Bro. Rigdon, and eagerly welcomed the neighbors when they were invited to her home to hear the Prophet speak. A large congregation gathered and they were richly blessed by the words they heard. The Prophet wrote in his journal that “the Lord gave His spirit in a remarkable manor.” While at the Nickerson’s home, Joseph felt a little concern for his family so far away. He wrote in his journal that he had “much anxiety about my family.” In answer to his concerns, Joseph received a comforting revelation which became Section 100 of the Doctrine and Covenants. In the revelation he is told. “…your families are well; they are in my hands, and I will do with them as seemeth me good…” The Lord continued “I have much people in this place, in the regions round about and an effectual door shall be opened in the regions round about in this eastern land. Therefore I have suffered you to come unto this place…lift up your voices unto this people…for it shall be given you in the very hour, yea, in the very moment, what ye shall say.” (D&C 100: 1-6) This has become a great missionary scripture, being received at Freeman Nickerson’s home. When the Prophet and Sidney Rigdon continued their journey northward to Canada, Freeman brought along his wife, Huldah, and their son, Levi. She couldn’t miss an opportunity to visit her grandchildren. The group stopped every evening and taught the gospel to those who would listen. Finally, after almost a week on the road they arrived at the home of their son, Eleazer Nickerson, at Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada, and were pleasantly received, and of course, Huldah was ecstatic about being near the grandchildren. The very next Sunday Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon preached to an attentive congregation in the morning and a large gathering that evening. Joseph said that “they gave good heed to the things which were spoken. What may be the result we cannot tell but the prospect is flattering.” With their spirits lifted from their first two meetings, the Nickersons joined with the Prophet and Sidney for another meeting on Tuesday evening although this meeting did not turn out so well. It was snowing hard that night, but they went ahead and held their meeting by candlelight. They were about half way through their talks when a Wesleyan Methodist stood up and began to attack them with hot words. As they tried to quiet him and proceed with the meeting, the man became more vehement in his manner. He exhibited a great lack of reason, knowledge, and wisdom and gave them no opportunity to reply. The meeting was broken up and all went home in the snow. During the week, Freeman and Huldah spoke with their sons, Eleazer and Moses about their feelings of this new religion. They bore their testimonies to it’s truthfulness with the hopes that they too would pray and study and gain a witness for themselves. Joseph and Sidney continued their preaching, and the Nickersons attended again and again. Thursday was a very wet day and their preaching at the town of Weathersford drew only a small congregation. But at Mount Pleasant that evening a fine meeting developed. The Spirit was strong and it was during this meeting that Freeman’s son Eleazer declared his full belief in the truth of the work. Huldah and Freeman were gratified with his testimony and even more so when his wife also agreed to be baptized the following Sunday. At this time, Eleazer Nickerson had a young woman by the name of Lydia Bailey living with his family who was influenced greatly by the Prophet. She had a sad history and when Eleazer met her, she was living with her parents, following the death of her two children and after being deserted by her husband because of his drinking. Eleazer offered her a place to stay with his family, feeling that the change may do her good. Lydia had met the Prophet Joseph Smith when he came to stay at the Nickerson home. She had attended many of the meetings where he and Sidney Rigdon had preached. She spoke of her feelings saying, “The Prophet commenced by relating the scenes of his early life. He told how the angel visited him, of his finding the plates, the translation of them, and gave a short account of the matter contained in the Book of Mormon.” She added that he “bore a faithful testimony that the Priesthood was again restored to the earth, and that God and His son had conferred upon him the keys of the Aaronic and Melchizedek Priesthoods.” She was deeply touched. When Sunday came, Eleazer Nickerson was joined by his family in the waters of baptism, and to the joy of Freeman and Huldah, their son Moses also asked for baptism. What a beautiful day this was for the Nickerson family. All their prayers had been answered. They truly felt to praise the Lord for his Spirit which had rested upon their family. Lydia Bailey also joined the group in the waters of baptism. That evening, they held another meeting for confirmations. Joseph and Sidney broke bread for the administration of the sacrament and following that they laid their hands on the heads of those who had been baptized and blessed them with the Gift of the Holy Spirit. The following evening, Eleazer Nickerson was ordained an elder and set apart as a branch president in charge of all the new converts. During this meeting the Spirit was very strong and Lydia Bailey arose and spoke in tongues. It was said that the Spirit was so strong upon her, that she was clothed in a shining light as she spoke. It was a powerful and humbling meeting and one which made the Saints rejoice. It was soon time for the Prophet to return to Kirtland, and preparations were made for their departure. It was decided that they would return by crossing Lake Erie. Eleazer paid for the crossing for the group thus saving them about 250 miles of travel. Freeman and Huldah and their son Levi joined with Joseph and Sidney on the return trip. It was with grateful and full hearts that the Nickersons bid farewell to their two sons and their families who had accepted the newly restored Gospel of Jesus Christ. A new light seemed to glow in their eyes, and surely a new flame of truth burned in their hearts. Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: The Papers of Joseph Smith Volume ! Autobiographical and Historical Writings, Edited by Dean C. Jessee, 4-11, (DFH/M6-9). Freeman Nickerson, by E. McClain Barrus, (DFH/N49-53). New Era, “Joseph Smith’s Missionary Journal,” by Dean C. Jessee and William G. Hartley, Feb. 1974, 34, (DFH/N89-90). The History of the Church, Vol. 1, 416-423. A Genealogy in Part of Caroline Eliza Hubbard's Parentage and Family, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, (DFH/N33 Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

Stuck in the Ice

Contributor: imtsmith98 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Nickerson family was on their way to live in Missouri with the Saints. They had packed up their belongings from their home in Perrysburg, New York, and were headed south toward the Allegheny River. They had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints five and a half years before and had enjoyed their association with the Saints who came through regularly from the Church headquarters in Kirtland, Ohio, just 150 miles away. They had become good friends with the Prophet Joseph Smith and had even accompanied him on a mission to Canada where their two sons, Eleazer and Moses were also converted to the Church. Freeman and his sons had already been on several missions for the church including the trek referred to as “Zion’s Camp” where they accompanied the Prophet as they went to Missouri to help the beleaguered Saints there. That had been a hard but overall spiritually uplifting time as they associated daily with the Prophet of God. Now, Freeman and his wife Huldah had made the decision to uproot their family and move to Missouri where the Lord had said was the place to build Zion. Besides Freeman and Huldah, their company included their daughter Huldah and her husband Emery Barrus, with their three small children; their two sons, Uriel Chittenden, and Moses along with their wives and Moses’ infant son; and their daughter Caroline and her four children. Caroline’s husband had recently died of congestive chills while they were living in Lenawee, Ogden Township, Michigan. She had come home to New York to be with her family, and now joined the group on their way to Missouri. Freeman drove his wagon along with the others as the group traveled as far as the Allegheny River where they boarded a raft and drifted down the river. It was November of 1838 and very cold. They got as far as Armstrong County, just 30 miles from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. One night the men of the group maneuvered the large raft to the bank and tied it up for the night as was their usual practice. In the morning the group was disheartened to find that the raft was frozen to the shore. Try as they might, they could not release the raft. They worked all day at the project but finally had to concede that the river had won, and they were not going to move the raft until spring. Freeman and the other men decided they would have to find wood and build shanties along the riverbank to live in until the weather became warmer and they could break the raft free. This was a dismal prospect, but there truly was nothing more to be done since they did not have the provisions and equipment necessary to continue on foot during the hard winter. The families worked hard and finally had suitable shelters to live in. They found work they could do to provide food for the families and somehow eked out an existence there on the river bank. It was very cold that winter living in their shanties along the riverbank. They did the best they could, especially with the little ones who suffered greatly for warmth and proper food. Huldah Abigail had three small children, little Lydia who was four years old, Betsy was two years old and little Benjamin was just six months old, but it was Betsy who they worried aboutShe grew weaker as the winter months progressed. The new year of 1839 had just arrived as their dear little Betsy could not brave the adversity any longer and died. They laid her to rest on a cold January day in an unfamiliar town, becoming another grave in the Nickerson family marking the way to Zion. Despite the hardships, Freeman was not one to pass by an opportunity, and he began to preach the gospel to the people in the vicinity. Freeman was a very tall man, nearly seven feet tall and robust. He had a commanding voice and could really give a sermon, especially when he was preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ which he loved so dearly. At one of the missionary meetings, he met William Hickenlooper, a man who had heard so much ill spoken of the Mormons that he confessed to being surprised at finding Freeman to be “an ordinary mortal” and “an intelligent man.” He invited Freeman to spend an evening at their home so they could discuss the gospel. The Pennsylvanian asked what the difference was between the Mormons and other sects. Freeman’s reply was direct, “We believe the Bible, and they do not.” Hickenlooper disputed his contention, but admitted that he “was forced to yield point after point to the Mormon.” Freeman knew his scriptures, and he carried the Spirit with him because of his great faith. It was difficult to catch him without an answer to a religious question. Hickenlooper went back often to hear Freeman preach. Each time he went he was prepared to debate points of doctrine with him. Each time, he came away impressed that Freeman was “strictly truthful in his statements and correct in his references.” But it wasn’t through argumentation that Hickenlooper and his family became converted to the Church. Sarah Hawkins, Sister Hickenlooper’s rheumatism-afflicted mother, had a spiritual experience that prompted her to ask Freeman Nickerson for a blessing. Bro. Nickerson knelt down with the family and prayed, then laid hands upon Mrs. Hawkins, rebuking her sickness in the name of the Lord.The rheumatism left her body. This was such a sacred experience that the family was convinced of the spiritual power manifested through the priesthood, and having already understood the Church’s doctrine, the Hickenlooper's were baptized. Before the Nickerson’s left in the spring, there was a branch of about forty members in this town near Pittsburgh. Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Caroline Nickerson, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, Terrance, Utah, 6 February 1881, (DFH/N78-81). Freeman Nickerson (1779-1847), (DFH/N16-18). The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, "Moses Chapman Nickerson," by Nicholas, 105, (DHF/N147). Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

Emery Barrus, pioneer, 1809-1899 (KWJ6-SH1)

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

HISTORY OF EMERY BARRUS Author Unknown(Possibly Benjamin Franklin Barrus) Emery Barrus was born in Chautauqua County, New York, in 1809. He was the only one of his father's family who was baptized in New York. In 1839, he with his wife and year old son, Benjamin Franklin Barrus, went to Jefferson City, Missouri, and in the spring of 1840 settled in Nauvoo, where they lived until after the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith. Following the perse[#$@^!]tion of the Saints, preparations were made for the never to be forgotten journey across the plains. Wagon shops were created. Emery had a shingle mill on an island in the Mississippi river, and in 1845 they moved to the island, where, with the assistance of his wife, he would get the timber, saw it into suitable lengths, and fix the different parts of the wagons. He would store the wood in the shop to season. Preparatory to starting west from Nauvoo in the spring, he made 15 wagons right from the stumps of the trees that winter. The Barrus family arrived in Grantsville October 1853, just two years after Grantsville was settled, which was in 1851. Samuel Steele arrived with the first seven families. The Indians made a great deal of trouble for the settlers in the early days. We had to herd our stock in the day time on the range and stand guard at night to keep the Indians from driving them off. Not a fruit or shade tree was growing in Grantsville in 1853. Mr. Sceva, John Clark, and James McBride were the first to plant trees. Emery Barrus built the first barns and some good houses in Grantsville. Thomas H. Clark was the first Bishop of Grantsville, Timothy Parkinson and John B. Walker were his counselors. In 1855 the grasshoppers came so thick that they darkened the sun and destroyed the crops. 1856 was the year of the famine. A good horse would not buy a sack of flour and we were without bread for months, living on sego bulbs, thistle roots, etc. John W. Cooley had a patch of barley get almost ripe in 1856. William Burton and James Kearl harvested it by hand, threshed it with a flail and cleaned it with the wind. Each family received one-half bushel and ground it in coffee mills to make cakes for the Fourth of July dinner. Some other grain got ripe enough to be harvested and each family received a part of family had a flour cake and beef steak for dinner July 24, 1856. Emery Barrus was Mayor of Grantsville City and attended to the surveying the cemetery into burial lots and drove the stakes when it was surveyed by Charles Herman. EMERY BARRUS From History of Tooele County by Tooele County Daughters of Utah Pioneers, pp 415,416 A picture of him and his wife is found on page 613. Emery Barrus, son of Benjamin Barrus and Betsy Stebbins, was born 8 APR 1809 in Chautauqua County, New York. He came to Utah 9 OCT 1853 in the Appleton Harmon Company. He married Huldah Abigail Nickerson. Their children were: (1) Lydia, (2) Betsy N., (3) Benjamin Franklin, (4) Emery Freeman, (5) Mary Huldah, (6) Orrin Eleazer, (7) Emery Alexander, (8) Ruel Michael, (9) Owen Henry, (10) Sarah Abigail, (11) John Nickerson, (12) Eliza Alvira. He married Jane Zerilda Baker, who was a daughter of Benjamin Baker. Their children were: (1) Emeline Abigail, (2) James Baker, (3) William Taylor, (4) Thomas, (5) Freeman, (6) Chauncy Baker, (7) Catherine Rozena.\ The family home was in Grantsville, Utah. He was a High Priest, a Patriarch, a carpenter, stock raiser, farmer and, wheelwright. He died 5 OCT 1899. Esther Warner -- researcher

Emery Barrus 1809-1899

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

By McClain Barrus I regret that I did not think to ask my father (Ezra Barrus) to tell me all that he remembered about his grandfather Emery Barrus. He must have been intimately acquainted with Emery because they lived for twenty years in the same town. How I wish Dad had told me stories concerning that great man. Perhaps we could all learn the lesson that we should take opportunities to interview our aging parents or grandparents and obtain all the knowledge we can about our ancestors. The information gained in such interviews would be precious to those who come after us, provided it was written in family histories. I wonder if Emery told Dad about the time he was courting Freeman Nickerson's 17-year-old daughter. It was in 1833 when Freeman returned to his home in New York from a mission in Ohio, and brought with him the Prophet Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon. Emery was twenty-four years old and was working on the Nickerson farm. He was engaged to marry Huldah Abigail Nickerson. The Prophet was there in October and they were married about two months later. I can imagine how awed Emery must have been to see the Prophet, and it was at that time he was baptized. He must have been aware that Joseph Smith had received a revelation from the Lord in Freeman's home, which later became the 100th section of the Doctrine Covenants. Surely he must have told Dad that inspiring story. Dad didn't get to meet his grandmother, Huldah Abigail, because she died seven years before he was born. How I admire my great-grandmother, the daughter of Freeman Nickerson. She witnessed the persecution in Nauvoo when men were whipped, houses burned, and crops destroyed. It was there that she gave birth to my grandfather. She worked with her husband in his shingle mill and would hold one end of the cross cut saw and saw the trees into blocks ready for shingles. When wagons were needed for the use of the Saints who were fleeing Nauvoo, she helped her husband saw wood into suitable lengths for different parts of the wagons. She and Emery made fifteen wagons right from stumps of trees. Esther Warner tells us in her booklet, "Emery Barrus, Pioneer". "The home of mother Barrus would take the wool right from the sheep's back, card and spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn and the yarn into cloth and stockings and the cloth into clothing for the family and neighbors. When a carding machine arrived in Provo, Hulda Barrus would take the wool there, driving a pair of colts they brought across the plains, and get the wool made into rolls. She also made thousands of pounds of cheese and butter. Huldah Abigail Nickerson was the first president of the Grantsville Ward Relief Society." In addition to all of the hard physical work she accomplished, she bore her husband twelve children. She died at the age of fifty-six. What a remarkable woman! Emery didn't experience the Missouri persecutions, as did Thomas and James McBride because at that time he was still living in New York. He moved to Nauvoo in 1844 after the Saints had been driven out of Missouri. But he was among those who were driven from Nauvoo after the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were martyred. He must have been acquainted with the Prophet who was a good friend and missionary companion of his father-in-law. Esther Warner pointed out: "Many found the temptation too great and dropped by the wayside, not intending to denounce Mormonism but to side track it until they could find an easier way to worship God." When Emery saw the lowering clouds on the horizon, the tribulations and calamities, the spirit of hell raging in the hearts of their persecutors, even though he must have been in a state of great uneasiness and fear, he had a foundation which anchored his life. It was his faith in the gospel of Jesus Christ. I get the impression that Emery was a hard-working out-of-doors type of man. He must have been a fine marksman with a gun because he was appointed hunter for the Appleton Harmon Company when they were crossing the plains. He was a fine craftsman and built many wagons. He also built many good houses and was the first in Grantsville to erect a barn. He must have been a. sort of politician because he was the first mayor of Grantsville City. Perhaps it was he who appointed my grandfather a peace officer in that town. The Salt Lake Temple was dedicated in 1893, six years he before Emery died and was a faithful worker in that House of the Lord. I remember hearing my father tell about the dedication of the Salt Lake Temple. I received the impression that he was in Salt Lake City at the time it took place. If he wasn't personally in attendance at the meeting when Wilford Woodruff offered the dedicatory prayer, he was aware of what was taking place. Perhaps he rode to Salt Lake with his grandfather, Emery Barrus. Emery was a devout and faithful man, and was ordained a patriarch in the Grantsville Stake. It is remarkable that he was able to continue working in the temple up until two weeks before he died at the age of ninety. He opened the door to great rewards and joy unspeakable. He, like Freeman Nickerson, Thomas McBride, and James McBride, made his greatest contribution to the cause of Zion by being the ancestor of numerous posterity, among whom are many faithful Latter-day Saints who meet the strictest requirements of righteousness. These four men whose lives I have outlined in this "book, are filled with the light that will show us the way to God. Conclusion In this writing I have tried to point out that our ancestors: Thomas McBride, Freeman Nickerson, James McBride, Emery Barrus, and their faithful wives, with sincere conviction and unflinching courage, remained steadfast in the Faith. They passed the acid test of character; and they have stirred our sense of the heroic. We have seen their bitter strivings and glorious achievements. They choose the high way, undaunted and undismayed. Their hilltop hour came after many dark valleys. The Lord consecrated their afflictions for their gain. (2 Ne. 2:2). They had their lofty goals clearly in mind, with Divine assurance in their hearts, and were able to withstand the world's scorn. Their lives shine and they "became noble in the sight of God. Now we their descendants, after possibly a century has gone by number in the thousands, and a large portion of our number are devout Latter-day Saints. We hold high places of honor and respect in the world. When I read about those days in Church history when the air was heavy with despair, I wondered; would I have had the courage and strength of character so that I could stand to be really put through the wringer? If enemies were building fires all around me, would I be able to carry the great crushing load? Would I have given up the ghost of all my hopes and be tinged with foreboding because of the terror of the hour? Would I have been numbered among the apostates who were cut off the Church because of their unwillingness to sacrifice? The answer is, only God knows. It could very well be that the age in which we live is just as hazardous and the trials of our faith will be just as severe as it was for our pioneer forbearers. It is true that at the present time Mormons are not usually despised and hated. Mobs are not trying to destroy our homes and drive us from the areas in which we live. The devil is trying to destroy us in different ways. All around us there is so much evil that could lead us from the true path.We should evaluate our personal testimonies and commitments. This may also be a time of refiner's fire for us. Let us not be among the weak who fall by the wayside. Let us all shine and also become noble in the sight of God.

The Nauvoo Period

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Nauvoo Period Freeman Nickerson and Emery Barrus bought land in Nauvoo next to each other on the northeast section of Bluff Street and Hubbard Street. Here they built their houses and planted fruit trees. Life was busy in the new and bustling town of Nauvoo. After the swamps were drained, the wretched sickness subsided, and life went on at a rapid pace. New members of the Church were arriving almost every day and the town was growing rapidly. Emery and Huldah Abigail were happy to finally live in a home among the Saints, and loved to gather for church meetings with the Prophet Joseph Smith and others. Emery helped build the Nauvoo Temple, and Huldah Abigail sewed and cooked for the men also Huldah Abigail and Emery Barrus’ three little children were growing. Life was good and they soon looked forward to the birth of a baby. In the spring they were blessed with a little boy who they named Emery Freeman after his father and grandfather Emery had always been good with wood and with the great growth Nauvoo was experiencing; there was a great demand for building materials. Emery Barrus built a shingle mill on an island in the middle of the Mississippi River. This very island once served as a hiding place for the Prophet. In May of 1842, Joseph Smith was accused of an assassination attempt on the life of former Governor Boggs of Missouri. He knew that if he were returned to Missouri, he would surely be killed. So, the Prophet sought seclusion there on the island where Emery constructed his shingles. Life seemed to move along happily until September came. Little Emery had only been sick a short time, but things did not look good. They prayed with faith for the little lad, but finally their tiny baby died in their arms. This was a devastating blow to the family. Huldah Abigail’s arms ached for her son. Her mother and father were a comfort to her, but it was so hard. It would be two long years until Huldah Abigail would hold another baby in her arms, this one a little girl they named Mary. She was a joy to the family and a consolation after little Emery’s death. The doctrine of Baptism for the Dead was introduced into the church and Huldah Abigail’s parents, Freeman and Huldah Nickerson, were grateful to have the opportunity to do many proxy baptisms for their deceased relatives in the Mississippi River. Freeman Nickerson was called on a mission to the Eastern States including Boston. He was gone for about two and a half years, returning in 1844. At the time returned, the Prophet Joseph Smith declared his intentions as a candidate for the President of the United States. Freeman was soon called on another mission to travel around the United States campaigning for the Prophet Joseph Smith to become President of the United States. Life went on in Nauvoo, but because of the continued tormenting from the Missouri mobs, relations with the people in Illinois were deteriorating. The Prophet Joseph Smith was continually being harassed with lawsuits. Some of the Saints living in outlying areas around Nauvoo were being forced from their homes by mobs. There were even problems of conspiracy among the leadership of the Church. By June of 1844, Joseph Smith had declared Martial Law in Nauvoo. It was a critical time, and Emery felt the weight of caring for his young family and the Nickersons with such upheaval in the church. They had to be continually on the alert because of all the threats. On June 27th, 1844, a runner came to Nauvoo with the dreadful news that the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum had been shot and killed in the Carthage Jail. It was a time when every heart felt as if it would break. The next day was gloomy as Emery and Huldah Abigail gathered their family and joined the Saints as they lined the streets when the bodies of their beloved leaders were brought back to Nauvoo. As the wagons slowly passed in front of the unfinished temple, thousands of the saints stood in mourning. It was hard to adjust to life without the Prophet. Emery and Huldah Abigail had known him well. The Prophet had been in their home many times and they loved him as a friend as well as a Prophet of God. By August, Emery and Huldah Abigail and their family had rallied under the leadership of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and felt the need to finish the Temple and prepare to leave their beloved city of Nauvoo. Work on the temple continued at a rapid pace, and finally at the end of 1845, they began to do Temple Work in the portions of the temple which had been finished and dedicated. Huldah Abigail’s parents Freeman and Huldah Nickerson received their Endowments in the Nauvoo Temple on December 15th, 1845. On the bitter cold day of February 3, 1846 Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus were at the Nauvoo Temple to receive their endowments. That day, President Brigham Young recorded in his diary: “Notwithstanding that I had announced that we would not attend to the administration of the ordinances, the House of the Lord was thronged all day. … I also informed the brethren that I was going to get my wagons started and be off. I walked some distance from the Temple supposing the crowd would disperse, but on returning I found the house filled to overflowing. Looking upon the multitude and knowing their anxiety, as they were thirsting and hungering for the word, we continued at work diligently in the House of the Lord.” And so the temple work continued until 1:30 A.M. Huldah Abigail and Emery were overjoyed with the blessings of the Temple and deeply grateful that they were able to receive these ordinances that day. This great blessing would give them strength in the time of trial ahead. Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Caroline Nickerson, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, Terrance, Utah, 6 February 1881, (DFH/N78-81). Freeman Nickerson (1779-1847), in the possession of Jolene Dew (DFH/N16-18). “Freeman Nickerson,” September 2005, www.shafferweb.com, (DFH/N157-159). 1173. Huldah Abigail Nickerson, a history found in The Nickerson Family, The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689 Part 4 Nicholas 110. (DFH/B44) The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, “Huldah Abigail Nickerson,” and “Nicholas,” 1173, 110, (DFH/B44). Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B2). Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 267, 316-321. Ensign, “Eternity Lies Before Us,” by James E. Faust, May 1997, 18. (DFH/B47).

The Battle of Nauvoo

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Battle of Nauvoo Since the devastating day when the Prophet Joseph Smith and his beloved brother Hyrum were murdered by the hands of an angry mob at the Carthage Jail, Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus had realized with the other Saints that their days in Nauvoo were numbered. Several months after the martyrdom, Emery and his family joined with the body of the Saints as they rallied behind the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles as the leaders of the Church. Under their direction families made plans to leave their homes in Nauvoo. Emery moved his family from their home in Nauvoo, across the Mississippi River to the island where his shingle mill was located. Emery now started building wagons instead of shingles, and it would be easier to work with his family on the island where they would be nearer to the source of the timber. Huldah Abigail gave birth to another son, there on the island. They named him Orrin Eleazer after her grandfather. There was so much to be done. Wagons took several months to build because the wood must be dried in stages. When she was well enough, Huldah Abigail helped in the process, holding one end of the cross cut saw as they sawed the trees into blocks ready to cut planks for the wagons. She also helped to saw the wood into suitable lengths for different parts of the wagon. Emery would then put the planks in the rafters of the shop to allow the wood to season. Throughout the winter, they built fifteen wagons right from the stumps of the trees. Everyone was working so hard to prepare to leave their homes. In the bitter cold of February, the first large group of the Saints to leave Nauvoo made their way down Parley Street and crossed the great Mississippi River which had frozen solid with the cold. The Saints were leaving Nauvoo every day throughout the spring and early summer of 1846. Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus had prepared their wagons and were gathering the supplies they would need to join the Saints in their exodus. However, Huldah Abigail’s father, Freeman Nickerson had not returned from his mission, and they felt they must wait along with the other Nickerson’s to leave. Meanwhile, things were getting progressively worse in Nauvoo. When the opponents of the Church realized that not all the Saints were going to leave Nauvoo by summer, persecution began anew. Men and women harvesting grain were attacked and some were severely beaten. This type of harassment lasted all summer and into the fall of 1846. Finally in August, Freeman Nickerson returned. The previous year, Freeman had married a second wife in polygamy, Huldah Howes from Yarmouth, who was actually his cousin. They had been married in Nauvoo. Now he brought with him a woman by the name of Eliza Kent, whom he had married in Boston. She had an eight-year-old son, Christopher. Freeman was not well, as he had been ill during this last mission to the Boston area. He really needed time to gather his strength if they were to leave their home to live in a wagon and cross the Mississippi River into the wilderness of Iowa. When Freeman returned from his mission, Emery and Huldah Abigail gathered with the family, leaving behind their island home. The family needed to band together to prepare for the time they could leave the city. About this time, Freeman’s daughter, Caroline Eliza Grover, arrived in Nauvoo with her children. She had left Nauvoo during the first exodus in the early spring and had traveled to Mount Pisgah, where she left the group and returned to Nauvoo. She was expecting a baby at any moment, and the group felt it would be wise to wait for the baby to be born before they left. They continued to make their preparations, but things were not good in Nauvoo. Huldah Abigail’s brother, Levi Nickerson told of fighting in the Battle of Nauvoo. No doubt, Emery Barrus and Freeman Nickerson did also. By the second week in September, the anti-Mormons were determined to drive the Saints out of Nauvoo. Approximately eight hundred men equipped with six cannons prepared to lay siege to the city. Most of the Saints who were left in Nauvoo were old, feeble, or unwell, like the Nickerson family. Emery Barrus and Levi Nickerson, Huldah Abigail’s brother, joined with the Saints and some few citizens, numbering only about 150 fighting men, as they prepared to defend the city. The Battle of Nauvoo began on September 10th, with sporadic firing. During the following two days there were minor skirmishes. On September 13th, an anti-Mormon column advanced in an attempt to rout the defenders. Emery and Levi joined a spirited counter attack led by Daniel H. Wells which saved the day, but there were casualties on both sides. The battle continued the next day, which was the Sabbath. Gratefully no one in the Nickerson and Barrus families was hurt but it was a terrible time. On September 16th, the “Quincy Committee,” which had helped keep the peace in previous months, interceded once again. The Saints were forced to surrender unconditionally in order to save their lives and gain a chance of escaping across the river. Only five men and their families were allowed to stay in Nauvoo to dispose of property. Those who could quickly crossed the river without provisions or additional clothing. Finally, the mob entered the city, looted homes, and desecrated the temple. Some of the Saints, who were not able to escape fast enough, were beaten and thrown into the river by the mob. Emery and Levi discussed the situation. Father Nickerson was sick; they had two older women in their family; Caroline was about to give birth; and there were so many little ones. They were a sad looking lot. After prayer, they decided to wait out the birth of Caroline’s baby, as they knew they would not have a better place to deliver a baby while on the trail. Finally, on September 27th, Caroline gave birth to a baby boy whom she named Marshall Hubbard Grover, and the families hurriedly left the city the very next day while the mobs descended. As they slowly made their way toward the river, they looked back to see angry men ransacking their home and finally lighting a fire to it. It was a devastating sight. By the time they made it down Parley Street to the river it was evening. The town seemed to be in all-out confusion. They were finally picked up by friends and that night crossed the river by the light of the burning city. The crossing of the river in the darkness of night was treacherous. Everything got wet. Even the wagon in which the new mother and babe reclined was water soaked, and Caroline feared for the life of the little one she held. Through the blessings of the Lord, they all made it through the ordeal. Their group consisted of: Freeman and Huldah Nickerson; their son Levi, his wife Mary Ann and his family; Freeman and Huldah’s daughter Caroline and her four children including her newborn son; Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus and their four children; and Freeman’s new wives, Huldah and Eliza and her son Christopher. Across the river Emery and Levi looked around and were dismayed at the sad shape they found things in. Refugee camps of five to six hundred dispossessed men, women, and children, including those who had been left as too sick to travel, were scattered along two miles of riverbank above Montrose, Iowa. Most people had only blankets or bowers made of brush for shelter and little more than boiled or parched corn to eat. Father Nickerson was not well after the ordeal of being forced from his home and the perilous and wet crossing of the Mississippi River. Emery and Huldah Abigail knew they must stop for a time and let him rest. Though there were people dying in the camp because of exposure, they feared for his life if they continued on. A few days later, Bishop Newel K. Whitney showed up with some flour he had purchased and distributed it among the poor camps. This was a great blessing to many who were starving. Huldah Abigail joined with the others of her little group to help alleviate the suffering they saw around them, but they were not in good shape themselves. Prayers ascended to their Father in Heaven for help and relief from the suffering. On the 9th of October, when food was in especially short supply, several large flocks of quail flew into camp and landed on the ground and even on tables. Huldah Abigail’s children along with Emery and the other Saints were able to catch many of them. These Quail were then cooked and eaten by the hungry Saints. To The Nickerson and Barrus families, it was a sign of God’s mercy to modern Israel as a similar incident had been to ancient Israel, and they gave great thanks to their Father in Heaven for his tender mercies. Finally, Emery and Levi felt they could prolong their stay on the banks of the Mississippi River no longer. It was a wretched camp, and the time was fleeting. Sickness and death stalked the camps of the Saints. The hasty exodus from Nauvoo, the exhausting trek across Iowa, the storms, insufficient provisions, inadequate and impoverished shelter, and the unhealthy riverbank environments all took their toll. Many of the travelers suffered from the exposure-related diseases of malaria, pneumonia, and tuberculosis. Each night the weather got colder, and despite the sickness in their little group, they felt they must push on and try to find better shelter for the upcoming winter. Father Nickerson was not yet well, and now his two wives, Huldah and Eliza, were sick also. But, there was no other way than to press on. The families continued their journey westward, but finally, they were forced to halt seven miles west of Bonaparte, Iowa, on account of sickness. There, Freeman’s second wife, Huldah Howes, died and was buried. It was a low blow to the family who loved her dearly. Late in November, the families continued their journey to the Chariton River. At Soap Creek, about 30 miles above Whiskey Point, Emery and Levi, with the help of their wives and children, erected temporary cabins for shelter during the winter. The livestock survived by eating tree buds and limbs of small trees that they felled for that purpose. It was a cold winter, and without proper shelter and food, there was much sickness in the family. Toward the end of December, Freeman’s third wife, Eliza died and six days later her little son followed her in death. Freeman was not well. He was 69 years old now, and over the past fourteen years since his baptism into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, his life had not been easy. He had served four-full time missions, besides several short-term missions. He had marched as a member of Zion’s Camp. He had survived the winter on the frozen riverbanks of the Allegheny River while on his way to live with the Saints. He had then made his way to Commerce which would become the city of Nauvoo, only to contract malaria and struggle for his life in the swampy fields of that fledgling city. And now he had been forced from his comfortable home in Nauvoo to these cold and impoverished conditions on the banks of yet another river. This time the odds would prove too much, and with his family gathered around him in their makeshift shelter, Freeman Nickerson, one of the Lords truly valiant men of the kingdom, slipped from this life to return to the God who gave him life. Surely he soon heard the words, “Well done thou good and faithful servant.” Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Caroline Nickerson, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, Terrance, Utah, 6 February 1881, (DFH/N78-81). Freeman Nickerson (1779-1847), in possession of Jolene Dew (DFH/N16-18). “Freeman Nickerson,” September 2005, www.shafferweb.com, (DFH/N157-159). Huldah Abigail Nickerson, a history found in The Nickerson Family. The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689 Part 4 Nicholas, page 110. (DFH/B44) The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, “Huldah Abigail Nickerson,” and “Nicholas,” 1173, 110, (DFH/B44). Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B2). Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 267, 316-321. Ensign, “Eternity Lies Before Us,” by James E. Faust, May 1997, 18, (DFH/B47).

On Our Way to Zion

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

On Our Way to Zion After being forced from their home by mobs in Nauvoo in 1846, Emery Barrus and his family crossed part of Iowa before the snows halted their travel and they were forced to build small cabins and winter over. The exposure was great and their Grandfather, Freeman Nickerson died on the banks of the Chariton River during that hard winter. In the spring they had traveled on to Kanesville, which is where Council Bluffs is today. They settled in the small community of Ferryville, Iowa, where they had lived for the five years as they tried to gather provisions to cross the plains to Utah. Two children had been born while they lived in Iowa, a son Emery, who was now five years old and a son Ruel, who was two years old. They also had three other children, seven-year-old son, Orrin, ten-year-old Mary, and fifteen-year-old Benjamin. Finally in 1853 the Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus family were ready to leave and joined the Appleton Harmon Company which was due to leave that summer. About 200 individuals and about 22 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa. The company crossed the Missouri River on a ferry boat on July 14, 1853. (The Appleton Harmer Company had with them 55 wagons that were part of the Perpetual Emigration Fund. It is possible that through this program the Emery Barrus family was able to come to Utah after such a long layover in Iowa.) The Barrus family was happy to finally be on their way to Zion. The Indians were on the warpath, so the company had to stay together as much as possible for safety. One day as the wagons were rolling, a large group of Indians stopped the company. Huldah Abigail quickly gathered her small ones around her. The situation did not look good; there were so many of them. Emery stood ready with his hunting rifle as the leaders of the company went forward to talk with the Indians. Much time went by as they tried to make a peaceful settlement. Finally, the Indians agreed to let the company pass if they were given a substantial amount of the company’s provisions. The pioneers would feel the need of these provisions later on, but Huldah Abigail and Emery joined with the others in prayers of gratitude for the peaceful ending to such a frightening situation. When they started out, the children had wondered what kinds of animals they would see on the plains. It was not long until their wagon train was stopped for a huge herd of buffalo. There were so many of the large wooly creatures that the company had to stop completely and let them pass. It was quite a site and one that the children would remember and talk about for years to come. Being a pretty good shot, Emery was appointed as a hunter for the company. He would go ahead of the wagon train, and when he could find a buffalo close to the road, he would shoot it and then wait for the company to catch up so he could divide it up among the Saints. At night, it was the practice of the company to circle the wagons making a corral where the people could stay inside for safety. There were always chores to do around the camp and Benjamin was a great help to his father, Emery, in taking care of the animals. Mary would help her mother with the meals as well as take care of her little brothers. Huldah Abigail was grateful for the help as she was finding it harder each day to accomplish all of her duties as a baby grew within her. In the evening after supper and when the animals were taken care of, Emery and Huldah would sit around the campfire with their children and the others from the company and sing songs or tell stories. One brother among them had a violin, and he would begin with a rousing tune for those who were not too tired would dance. Benjamin was just the right age to enjoy a moment to kick up his heels. By the time the company made it to the Sweetwater River, it was September and their provisions were running low. Brother Harmon, the company commander, sent a message on ahead with a Brother Babbit to let the Brethren in Salt Lake City know of their progress. In the letter they said that the company of nearly 400 persons had 23 days rations among them. They had counted all the provisions and were sharing with each other to make them last. They had also made a count of their guns. They said that in case of an attack by the Utah Indians, they could muster only about 40 guns, all of which were common English fowling pieces, not many rifles and balls. He felt that they were poorly prepared for war and hoped that they would not have any difficulty. He finished the letter saying that despite the shortage in food and weapons, the Saints were generally in good spirits and anxious to reach the Valley before the snow would. They would endeavor to bear all that came with patience. It would be another 29 days before the wagon train would roll down the mountain and into the Salt Lake Valley. Gratefully, three days before they arrived, a few wagons met them with a load of flour, meat, and vegetables, which the Saints felt was a true blessing having already run out of food. Emery and Huldah Abigail were grateful to see the Salt Lake Valley after such a long trek. After talking with some of the Saints about a good place to settle, they made their way toward the Great Salt Lake and around the mountain to the west finally settling in the fledgling town of Grantsville. Huldah Abigail was big with child at that time and it would not be long before her son, Owen Henry would be born. Owen Henry always considered himself a pioneer saying that his mother had carried him all the way across the plains. Ever after, when the call was made for original pioneers, Owen Henry would stand among the group who had come across the plains to live with the Saints in Zion. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B3). Treasures of Pioneer History; Journal of Lucina Mecham Boren, Vol. 6; 306-308. 1173. Huldah Abigail Nickerson, a history found in The Nickerson Family, The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689 Part 4 Nicholas 110. (DFH/B44) The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, “Huldah Abigail Nickerson,” and “Nicholas,” 1173, 110, (DFH/B44).

Indian Trouble

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

Indian Trouble Emery and Huldah Abigail Barrus had crossed the plains and were now settling with their little family in the small community of Grantsville. It was a little oasis in the west desert just south of the banks of the Great Salt Lake where the creeks from the Stansbury Mountains made a grove of Willows. At first it had been known as Willow Creek, but the name had been changed in honor of Major George D. Grant who had helped the community with the Indian trouble they were having. The Indians were a constant problem to the settlers because they not only stole cattle and horses, but did a lot of malicious mischief. The cattle had to be kept under constant guard both day and night. Even though the pioneers gave the Indians meats and grain, they could not afford the raids that seemed to be a form of sport to the Indians. The pioneers decided to build a fort for their protection. Emery helped in its construction which consisted of making mud and pounding it hard and letting it dry. Huldah Abigail marveled at the size of the Fort which was about four acres square. The walls were five feet thick at the bottom and stood twelve feet high. It was a very large fort with homes built on the insides and a stockade of cedar logs to hold the cattle at night. Emery was grateful for a place to bring his cattle at night and took his turns at the night watch. Even with all of their preparations, the Indians were still troublesome. Finally it was proposed that the little group of Saints would fast and pray for divine guidance that someone would be able to talk to the Indians and persuade them that the settlers were their friends. The answer to their prayers came in a miraculous way. One day, William Lee, one of the Saints, was building a chimney on the outside of his cabin which he had erected in the fort, when an Indian appeared and began making signs to him that he wished to help him. William was afraid and retreated inside the cabin, but the Indian kept making signs and finally began carrying rock to the chimney site and mixing up the mud that was used to cover up the rock. William watched for a while and finally gathered up his courage and came out to continue his labor of building the chimney. The Indian assisted him all day. In the evening, William gave the Indian his supper and a blanket on which to sleep Early the next morning, Lee let the Indian know through signs that he was going to the canyon for wood and would like his company as it was not safe to go alone. The Indian agreed to go, so they yoked up the oxen and started for the canyon. William Lee was on the front bolster with the Indian on the rear bolster. About half way to the canyon, William found himself facing the Indian and talking to him in the Indian language. So engrossed was he in his talk with the Indian that he paid no attention to the oxen and, left to themselves, they circled around and William found himself entering the fort with his oxen, wagon, and the Indian but with no wood. It was such a surprise to see William Lee riding with an Indian, and the incident was immediately made known to the little band of settlers. Emery and Huldah Abigail joined the group as they gathered around the Indian listening intently as Brother Lee interpreted what the Indian said and asked him questions in his own language. The Indian’s name was Ship-rus. They asked him if he would bring his people to the fort so that they could have a talk with them. Emery and Huldah Abigail marveled along with the rest of the saints as they witnessed how the Lord had answered their prayers by revealing the Indian Language to William Lee. In two days, Huldah Abigail stared as a group of Indians walked into the fort. It was such a sight and one she thought she would never see. William Lee was there and stood on an old chair and talked to them in their own language for an hour, telling them of their origin, that the settlers were their friends, and that they would teach them how to till the ground to supply themselves with the necessities of life. The Indians listened to all he had to say and then replied, “The Mountains are ours, the water, the woods, the grass, and the game all belongs to us, but the Mormons are our brothers. We will share with them and smoke the pipe of peace. This ended the trouble with the Indians and the settlers were able to move out of the Fort and build homes of their own. Emery and Huldah Abigail would always remember the miracle of the Lord which they had witnessed in answer to their fasting and prayers. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B3). History of Tooele County, by the Tooele County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 215-222.

The Utah War

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Utah War When the dreadful news arrived in Grantsville, Huldah and Emery Barrus were stunned. The United States was sending an army to subdue the “rebellious Mormons.” Governor Brigham Young had issued a call for the Territorial Militia, known at that time as the Nauvoo Legion, to come to Salt Lake City to mobilize for active duty. The call was for every able-bodied man. Huldah knew that her son, Benjamin, who was now twenty years old would answer the call and this, stirred her heart. Of course she realized the danger that the Mormons were in and also that this call came from a Prophet as well as their Governor. Still, it was hard to send her son into harm’s way. Benjamin joined with his Uncle Ruel Barrus who had been a member of the Mormon Battalion some ten years earlier. Together they joined the group of thirty-five men from Grantsville and marched to Salt Lake City. Once in the city, they met up with men from all over the territory. It was late fall as the Legion, under the command of General Daniel H. Wells, made its way east to Echo Canyon. These soldiers built walls and dug trenches from which they could act as snipers. They loosened huge boulders that could easily be sent crashing down on the moving troops. They also constructed ditches and dams that could be opened to flood the enemy’s path. It was so cold, especially at night. Benjamin and his Uncle Ruel joined with the others as they built big campfires and stayed up around them as long as they could to keep warm. They would pull the hot embers to one side and lay on the warm ground, turning frequently the first hour to keep from being scorched. Despite the cold, the Legion did what it had come to do. Another group of forty-four men were sent farther on to find the actual troops and to proceed at once to annoy them in every possible way. Their instructions were to “Use every exertion to stampede their animals, and set fire to their trains. Burn the whole country before them and on their flanks. Keep them from sleeping by night surprises…Take no life, but destroy their trains, and stampede or drive away their animals at every opportunity.” These tactics succeeded so well that the army was indeed delayed and was forced to winter over in the burned-out Fort Bridger. Back in Grantsville, it was a winter of anxiety for Huldah and Emery as they gathered their family together to pray for Benjamin and Uncle Ruel. In April, the instructions came for the people to leave their homes and travel south. The Saints had been through much persecution in Missouri and in Nauvoo at the hand of angry mobs. They had been forced from their homes with only what they could carry while their property was taken over by their assailants. Now, they vowed, they were not about to let the same thing happen in this new land. They would rather burn their homes to the ground than let them be taken over by the army. Emery helped place the cattle in a large church herd with men left to guard them from the Indians and the army. Huldah gathered what she could and they packed a wagon with the bare necessities that they could take and closed the door to their home, not knowing if they would ever see it again. It was a great trial to once again follow the Prophet’s council and leave their home behind them. A small group of men was left behind with instructions to burn the buildings and the fields should the Army try to invade. Most of the people from Grantsville went south to Spring Creek just past Payson. There they camped as best they could throughout the summer. Negotiations with the Army started in the spring as the Saints were deserting their homes. Thomas Kane, who had always been a friend to the Saints throughout their trials and persecutions, came to help with the relations between the Army and Brigham Young. He finally talked the new governor who was sent by the U.S. Federal Government, into coming to Salt Lake City for talks. There was quite an entourage which accompanied the governor. Porter Rockwell joined the column as well as many other Mormons as the procession continued toward Salt Lake City. Benjamin and his Uncle Ruel were still in the mountains of Echo Canyon. They helped stage a show one evening as the governor’s train continued late into the night through the gloomy clutches of Echo Canyon. Several times hidden sentries surrounded his carriage and challenged the official party. They only waved them on after conversations with Rockwell. As the train proceeded down the canyon, they saw bonfires in the hills, one after another, which were surrounded by riflemen silhouetted against the tall rocks. By the time the governor reached the west end of the canyon, he guessed that from two to three thousand Mormons manned its fortifications. Had Rockwell been able to read the governor’s thoughts, he would have been tremendously pleased. The governor could not have known that he had been a victim of a gigantic hoax, for in truth fewer than one hundred and fifty Mormons occupied the canyon’s defenses. Each time the party had been challenged, the sentries raced back to repeat the performance. As for the campfires, they had been lighted and left unguarded, except for the handful of men who had deliberately exposed themselves to the Governor’s view. The trick even surpassed Brigham Young’s expectations of what the Mormon Army could do. Through this elaborate ruse, the Governor was convinced that an overwhelmingly hostile force faced Johnston’s command and that any attempt to penetrate the canyon would be suicidal. Finally, in the fall, nearly a year later, a joyous end came to their suffering. A treaty with the government representatives called a halt to the “Utah War.” The army, under the direction of General Johnston, peacefully traveled through the deserted streets of Salt Lake City, to Cedar Valley, 40 miles south of Salt Lake City and made camp. Pres. Brigham Young sent word that the refugees could return to their homes. Emery and Huldah were tired, but very grateful as they traveled back to their homes to find everything as they had left it. It was an added pleasure when shortly thereafter, their son Benjamin, along with Uncle Ruel, were released from the Nauvoo Legion and returned home safe. Together again as a family, they knelt in a prayer of gratitude to their Father in Heaven for a peaceful outcome to this terrible ordeal. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B4). History of Tooele County, by the Tooele County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 224-225. Church History in the Fulness of Times A History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 368-379. Ensign, “The Temple, the Priesthood,” by Boyd K. Packer, May 1993, 18. (DFH/Hu89-90). Orrin Porter Rockwell Man of God Son of Thunder, by Harold Schindler 285-286.

The Seagulls and the Crickets

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Seagulls and the Crickets Huldah Abigail worked hard at carding wool. In this new land where the Saints had come after being forced to leave their homes in Nauvoo, there was much to do with little resources. She was able to obtain the wool from a flock of sheep in the community. She would card it, spin it into rolls, make the rolls into yarn, the yarn into cloth or stockings, and the cloth into clothing for her little family and neighbors. She also made pounds of cheese and butter which she could trade for things they needed. Emery worked with the 46 head of loose stock he had brought to this place besides the oxen that were yoked to the wagons as they crossed the plains. Emery was a hard worker and a carpenter and woodworker besides. He constructed the first barn in Grantsville as well as some good houses. Things seemed to be going well for the little family now that the Indian trouble had subsided, all until the trouble started with the crickets. The years of 1855 and 1856 would long be remembered as the years of famine. One day Huldah Abigail looked into the sky only to see that the sun was darkened by hordes of crickets. They were like a cloud as they descended upon the lake and then the fields. They seemed to stretch for miles along the lake in some places almost six feet deep. The settlers contrived a roller that they had the oxen drag over the creatures to kill them. Emery and Huldah joined with the others as they tried to drown the crickets in irrigation ditches and burn them with brush fires, all to no avail. With all their work, they had not saved enough grain to plant their fields again the next spring. Things indeed looked desperate. Huldah and Emery united with the other settlers in special prayers in behalf of their crops. Following their faith and prayers, a great horde of seagulls came in from the Great Salt Lake in flocks to feed on the crickets and disgorge and feed again, and at times the wind blew so hard the crickets were blown out onto the lake and were drowned. The Barrus’ looked on in amazement as the hand of the Lord was evident in this miracle. They gathered their children around them to give thanks to the Lord for his goodness to them in their desperate time of need. Although the crickets had been cleared from the land, the effects of their damage was long lasting. Even the cows and livestock were affected because of the loss of grass. What little milk, Huldah could get, she gave to her children. They tried to live on boiled greens, sego lily roots, and thistles. Emery tried to shoot what game he could, but there was very little if any, as the crickets had starved the rabbits and other wildlife, too. Finally one of the settlers had a small patch of barley ripen, and he gathered every bit he could and distributed it to all the families. Huldah almost cried for joy as she ground hers in a coffee mill and cooked it into mush for the family. It was so delicious to all that they remembered it as a banquet. In the winter months, they were able to eat the potatoes that the crickets didn’t get, but hunger seemed to be the rule. In the summer of 1856, a patch of barley was harvested by hand and cleaned up in the wind. Emery and the others would use rakes to toss the barley over and over as the wind carried off the hulls covering the grains of barley. Every morsel was saved and each family got half a bushel. Huldah joined with the other women in grinding it in a coffee mill to make cake for the 4th of July celebration. By the end of the month, there was another bunch of grain, and Emery helped to harvest it, delivering each family a pan of flour for the 24th of July dinner. Emery provided one of his animals for beef, and each family in the little community was blessed with a flour cake and a beef stake for their celebration. The summer of 1856 continued to be a poor time for crops, but Emery noticed that there was cooperation among the settlers which proved that while everyone was hungry no one starved. Through the miracle of the seagulls given at the hand of the Lord, the little community made it through this time of famine, and they had banded together in a time of trial to help each other. This good will strengthened the community for years to come. Emery and Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus are the parents of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Biography of Barrus Family, Grantsville Observer, (DFH/B4). History of Tooele County, by the Tooele County Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, 223-224.

On a Mission with the Prophet

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

In about 1832 Freeman Nickerson’s family met Elders from a new religion known to many as “the Mormons.” Elder Zerubbabel Snow and Amasa Lyman taught them the Gospel, and it had not taken long for Freeman and his wife Huldah to recognize the Spirit of God in these missionaries’ words. The Nickersons had eagerly shared what they were learning with those of their children who still lived close to them, and they had also embraced the new teachings. Each of them had entered the cool spring waters of baptism thus joining themselves with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Freeman was a 7 foot tall, agile, 55-year-old man who had a happy disposition. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, seven of whom were still living. Their daughters, Caroline and Data, both joined the Church along with their husbands. Chittendon, twenty three, Levi, nineteen and Huldah Abigail, seventeen also joined the new church. Huldah Abigail who was soon to be married to Emery Barrus, a young man who had been working as a farm hand at their home, also joined the Church as did Emery. Freeman felt sad that his other two boys were living in Canada with their families and were not able to hear the glad tidings of the Gospel. Freeman had a great desire to meet the Prophet Joseph Smith about whom he had heard so much. He made the wagon trip southwest the one hundred miles from his home in Perrysville, New York, to the town of Kirtland, Ohio, where Joseph was living with many of the Saints. Freeman was very impressed with this prophet of God, and this meeting only increased his conviction that this truly was Christ’s Church on the earth. Freeman felt a great desire for his sons in Canada to hear the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and asked if the Prophet if he would accompany him on a trip to Canada where he wanted to teach his sons. Joseph inquired of the Lord and was given direction to go on the mission to Canada and to take Sidney Rigdon, his first counselor, with him. Freeman, or Father Nickerson as the Prophet Joseph affectionately called him, was elated, and the three men were soon on their way north. With a team and conveyance provided by Freeman, the three started eastward from Kirtland on October 5, 1833. They stopped at various towns along the way, visiting with Saints and preaching the gospel each evening to anyone who came to listen. After a week on the road, they arrived at Freeman Nickerson’s own home, in Perrysville, New York. Huldah was a gracious hostess to the Prophet and Bro. Rigdon, and eagerly welcomed the neighbors when they were invited to her home to hear the Prophet speak. A large congregation gathered and they were richly blessed by the words they heard. The Prophet wrote in his journal that “the Lord gave His spirit in a remarkable manor.” While at the Nickerson’s home, Joseph felt a little concern for his family so far away. He wrote in his journal that he had “much anxiety about my family.” In answer to his concerns, Joseph received a comforting revelation which became Section 100 of the Doctrine and Covenants. In the revelation he is told. “…your families are well; they are in my hands, and I will do with them as seemeth me good…” The Lord continued “I have much people in this place, in the regions round about and an effectual door shall be opened in the regions round about in this eastern land. Therefore I have suffered you to come unto this place…lift up your voices unto this people…for it shall be given you in the very hour, yea, in the very moment, what ye shall say.” (D&C 100: 1-6) This has become a great missionary scripture, being received at Freeman Nickerson’s home. When the Prophet and Sidney Rigdon continued their journey northward to Canada, Freeman brought along his wife, Huldah, and their son, Levi. She couldn’t miss an opportunity to visit her grandchildren. The group stopped every evening and taught the gospel to those who would listen. Finally, after almost a week on the road they arrived at the home of their son, Eleazer Nickerson, at Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada, and were pleasantly received, and of course, Huldah was ecstatic about being near the grandchildren. The very next Sunday Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon preached to an attentive congregation in the morning and a large gathering that evening. Joseph said that “they gave good heed to the things which were spoken. What may be the result we cannot tell but the prospect is flattering.” With their spirits lifted from their first two meetings, the Nickersons joined with the Prophet and Sidney for another meeting on Tuesday evening although this meeting did not turn out so well. It was snowing hard that night, but they went ahead and held their meeting by candlelight. They were about half way through their talks when a Wesleyan Methodist stood up and began to attack them with hot words. As they tried to quiet him and proceed with the meeting, the man became more vehement in his manner. He exhibited a great lack of reason, knowledge, and wisdom and gave them no opportunity to reply. The meeting was broken up and all went home in the snow. During the week, Freeman and Huldah spoke with their sons, Eleazer and Moses about their feelings of this new religion. They bore their testimonies to it’s truthfulness with the hopes that they too would pray and study and gain a witness for themselves. Joseph and Sidney continued their preaching, and the Nickersons attended again and again. Thursday was a very wet day and their preaching at the town of Weathersford drew only a small congregation. But at Mount Pleasant that evening a fine meeting developed. The Spirit was strong and it was during this meeting that Freeman’s son Eleazer declared his full belief in the truth of the work. Huldah and Freeman were gratified with his testimony and even more so when his wife also agreed to be baptized the following Sunday. At this time, Eleazer Nickerson had a young woman by the name of Lydia Bailey living with his family who was influenced greatly by the Prophet. She had a sad history and when Eleazer met her, she was living with her parents, following the death of her two children and after being deserted by her husband because of his drinking. Eleazer offered her a place to stay with his family, feeling that the change may do her good. Lydia had met the Prophet Joseph Smith when he came to stay at the Nickerson home. She had attended many of the meetings where he and Sidney Rigdon had preached. She spoke of her feelings saying, “The Prophet commenced by relating the scenes of his early life. He told how the angel visited him, of his finding the plates, the translation of them, and gave a short account of the matter contained in the Book of Mormon.” She added that he “bore a faithful testimony that the Priesthood was again restored to the earth, and that God and His son had conferred upon him the keys of the Aaronic and Melchizedek Priesthoods.” She was deeply touched. When Sunday came, Eleazer Nickerson was joined by his family in the waters of baptism, and to the joy of Freeman and Huldah, their son Moses also asked for baptism. What a beautiful day this was for the Nickerson family. All their prayers had been answered. They truly felt to praise the Lord for his Spirit which had rested upon their family. Lydia Bailey also joined the group in the waters of baptism. That evening, they held another meeting for confirmations. Joseph and Sidney broke bread for the administration of the sacrament and following that they laid their hands on the heads of those who had been baptized and blessed them with the Gift of the Holy Spirit. The following evening, Eleazer Nickerson was ordained an elder and set apart as a branch president in charge of all the new converts. During this meeting the Spirit was very strong and Lydia Bailey arose and spoke in tongues. It was said that the Spirit was so strong upon her, that she was clothed in a shining light as she spoke. It was a powerful and humbling meeting and one which made the Saints rejoice. It was soon time for the Prophet to return to Kirtland, and preparations were made for their departure. It was decided that they would return by crossing Lake Erie. Eleazer paid for the crossing for the group thus saving them about 250 miles of travel. Freeman and Huldah and their son Levi joined with Joseph and Sidney on the return trip. It was with grateful and full hearts that the Nickersons bid farewell to their two sons and their families who had accepted the newly restored Gospel of Jesus Christ. A new light seemed to glow in their eyes, and surely a new flame of truth burned in their hearts. Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: The Papers of Joseph Smith Volume ! Autobiographical and Historical Writings, Edited by Dean C. Jessee, 4-11, (DFH/M6-9). Freeman Nickerson, by E. McClain Barrus, (DFH/N49-53). New Era, “Joseph Smith’s Missionary Journal,” by Dean C. Jessee and William G. Hartley, Feb. 1974, 34, (DFH/N89-90). The History of the Church, Vol. 1, 416-423. A Genealogy in Part of Caroline Eliza Hubbard's Parentage and Family, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, (DFH/N33 Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

Stuck in the Ice

Contributor: WHatch Created: 1 year ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Nickerson family was on their way to live in Missouri with the Saints. They had packed up their belongings from their home in Perrysburg, New York, and were headed south toward the Allegheny River. They had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints five and a half years before and had enjoyed their association with the Saints who came through regularly from the Church headquarters in Kirtland, Ohio, just 150 miles away. They had become good friends with the Prophet Joseph Smith and had even accompanied him on a mission to Canada where their two sons, Eleazer and Moses were also converted to the Church. Freeman and his sons had already been on several missions for the church including the trek referred to as “Zion’s Camp” where they accompanied the Prophet as they went to Missouri to help the beleaguered Saints there. That had been a hard but overall spiritually uplifting time as they associated daily with the Prophet of God. Now, Freeman and his wife Huldah had made the decision to uproot their family and move to Missouri where the Lord had said was the place to build Zion. Besides Freeman and Huldah, their company included their daughter Huldah and her husband Emery Barrus, with their three small children; their two sons, Uriel Chittenden, and Moses along with their wives and Moses’ infant son; and their daughter Caroline and her four children. Caroline’s husband had recently died of congestive chills while they were living in Lenawee, Ogden Township, Michigan. She had come home to New York to be with her family, and now joined the group on their way to Missouri. Freeman drove his wagon along with the others as the group traveled as far as the Allegheny River where they boarded a raft and drifted down the river. It was November of 1838 and very cold. They got as far as Armstrong County, just 30 miles from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. One night the men of the group maneuvered the large raft to the bank and tied it up for the night as was their usual practice. In the morning the group was disheartened to find that the raft was frozen to the shore. Try as they might, they could not release the raft. They worked all day at the project but finally had to concede that the river had won, and they were not going to move the raft until spring. Freeman and the other men decided they would have to find wood and build shanties along the riverbank to live in until the weather became warmer and they could break the raft free. This was a dismal prospect, but there truly was nothing more to be done since they did not have the provisions and equipment necessary to continue on foot during the hard winter. The families worked hard and finally had suitable shelters to live in. They found work they could do to provide food for the families and somehow eked out an existence there on the river bank. It was very cold that winter living in their shanties along the riverbank. They did the best they could, especially with the little ones who suffered greatly for warmth and proper food. Huldah Abigail had three small children, little Lydia who was four years old, Betsy was two years old and little Benjamin was just six months old, but it was Betsy who they worried aboutShe grew weaker as the winter months progressed. The new year of 1839 had just arrived as their dear little Betsy could not brave the adversity any longer and died. They laid her to rest on a cold January day in an unfamiliar town, becoming another grave in the Nickerson family marking the way to Zion. Despite the hardships, Freeman was not one to pass by an opportunity, and he began to preach the gospel to the people in the vicinity. Freeman was a very tall man, nearly seven feet tall and robust. He had a commanding voice and could really give a sermon, especially when he was preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ which he loved so dearly. At one of the missionary meetings, he met William Hickenlooper, a man who had heard so much ill spoken of the Mormons that he confessed to being surprised at finding Freeman to be “an ordinary mortal” and “an intelligent man.” He invited Freeman to spend an evening at their home so they could discuss the gospel. The Pennsylvanian asked what the difference was between the Mormons and other sects. Freeman’s reply was direct, “We believe the Bible, and they do not.” Hickenlooper disputed his contention, but admitted that he “was forced to yield point after point to the Mormon.” Freeman knew his scriptures, and he carried the Spirit with him because of his great faith. It was difficult to catch him without an answer to a religious question. Hickenlooper went back often to hear Freeman preach. Each time he went he was prepared to debate points of doctrine with him. Each time, he came away impressed that Freeman was “strictly truthful in his statements and correct in his references.” But it wasn’t through argumentation that Hickenlooper and his family became converted to the Church. Sarah Hawkins, Sister Hickenlooper’s rheumatism-afflicted mother, had a spiritual experience that prompted her to ask Freeman Nickerson for a blessing. Bro. Nickerson knelt down with the family and prayed, then laid hands upon Mrs. Hawkins, rebuking her sickness in the name of the Lord.The rheumatism left her body. This was such a sacred experience that the family was convinced of the spiritual power manifested through the priesthood, and having already understood the Church’s doctrine, the Hickenlooper's were baptized. Before the Nickerson’s left in the spring, there was a branch of about forty members in this town near Pittsburgh. Freeman Nickerson is the father of Huldah Abigail Nickerson Barrus who is the mother of Owen Henry Barrus, who is the father of Edith Marian Barrus, who is the mother of Deloris, Milo LeRoy, LaMar Owen, and Maxine Dew This story is adapted from the following accounts: Caroline Nickerson, by Caroline Eliza Nickerson Hubbard Grover, Terrance, Utah, 6 February 1881, (DFH/N78-81). Freeman Nickerson (1779-1847), (DFH/N16-18). The Nickerson Family: The Descendants of William Nickerson 1604-1689, Part 4, "Moses Chapman Nickerson," by Nicholas, 105, (DHF/N147). Dew Book This story comes from a book I (Jolene Christensen Dew) wrote which is in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City call # 929.273D51dj There are 102 stories in the book. The book is titled for each of the families in the book as follows: " Dew, Gillette, Kirk, Barrus, Hunter, Nickerson, Hyde family stories : Samuel Phillip Dew, Edith Marion Barrus, Heber Dew, Elizabeth Kirk, Thomas Dew, Jane Gillette, Phillip Kirk, Mary Ann Taylor, Owen Henry Barrus, Mary Ann Hunter, Emery Barrus, Huldah Abigail Nickerson, Freeman Nickerson, Huldah Chapman, Edward Hunter, Martha Ann Hyde, Edward Hunter, Ann Standly, Rosel Hyde, Mary Annn Cowles, Heman Hyde, Polly Wyman Tilton" Author Jolene Christensen Dew

Life timeline of Emery Barrus

Emery Barrus was born on 8 Apr 1809
Emery Barrus was 4 years old when Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is first published in the United Kingdom. Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism. Her use of biting irony, along with her realism and social commentary, have earned her acclaim among critics and scholars.
Emery Barrus was 17 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Emery Barrus was 23 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Emery Barrus was 31 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Emery Barrus was 50 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Emery Barrus was 53 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Emery Barrus was 66 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Emery Barrus was 72 years old when The world's first international telephone call is made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine, United States. A telephone call is a connection over a telephone network between the called party and the calling party.
Emery Barrus died on 6 Oct 1899 at the age of 90
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Emery Barrus (8 Apr 1809 - 6 Oct 1899), BillionGraves Record 3772493 Grantsville, Tooele, Utah, United States

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