Elmarion Heber Nicholes

6 Nov 1892 - 12 Aug 1945

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Elmarion Heber Nicholes

6 Nov 1892 - 12 Aug 1945
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HISTORY OF JOSEPH NICHOLES Native Pioneer, 1861 written by Belva Booth Ross, camp historian American Fork Camp, DAU, Utah County American Fork, Utah Joseph Nicholes, the fifth child of Josiah and Ann Rachel Marsh Nicholes, was born in American Fork, Utah County, Utah, April 23, 1861, just ten years

Life Information

Elmarion Heber Nicholes

Born:
Married: 14 Sep 1916
Died:

American Fork Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Sept. 14, 1916 engraved under temple
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crex

June 27, 2011
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DdraigGoch

December 10, 2011
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HurleyFamily

April 14, 2020
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gordonz5

April 15, 2020
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mcain1006

April 5, 2020
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nathan.westwood

April 9, 2020
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PapaMoose

June 27, 2011

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HISTORY OF JOSEPH NICHOLES Native Pioneer, 1861

Contributor: DdraigGoch Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

HISTORY OF JOSEPH NICHOLES Native Pioneer, 1861 written by Belva Booth Ross, camp historian American Fork Camp, DAU, Utah County American Fork, Utah Joseph Nicholes, the fifth child of Josiah and Ann Rachel Marsh Nicholes, was born in American Fork, Utah County, Utah, April 23, 1861, just ten years after the first families began settling the community. Josiah Nicholes, an English convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was born Oct. 11, 1815, at Hook Norton, Oxfordshire, a son of James and Harriet Smith Nicholes, (originally Nichols). He had emigrated from the vicinity of Hull, England, to the United States and to Utah in October 1851. In England he had married Harriet Elizabeth Dean who came with him to American Fork but dies in 1852. It is said that he took the box from his covered wagon to make her casket. It was the only available lumber. Ann Rachel Marsh was born Oct. 16, 1824, in St. Heliers, Isle of Jersey, the daughter of a French woman and an English military officer. She emigrated to Utah in October 1853, also a convert to the church. About a year after the death of his wife, Josiah Nicholes, who had been apprenticed as a railroad track foreman in England, became very discouraged with his poor agricultural self-employment here in American Fork and decided to return to England. He visited Bishop Leonard E. Harrington to report his decision. Bishop Harrington extracted from him a promise that on his way east he would visit President Brigham Young in Salt Lake City. This promise Josiah Nicholes kept for he was above all else a man of honor for his promised word. This, in fact, is the basis for his remarkable character and key to his life. Brother Brigham asked Josiah if he ever testified that he knew the gospel was true and that Joseph Smith was a prophet. Josiah answered in the affirmative. Then Brother Brigham challenged Josiah to make good his own testimony and return to American Fork as a pioneer of that community. President Young helped the immediate situation by telling Josiah that an immigrant company from Jersey Island had come just newly to “The Old Square”. In this company was an old maid (about 30 years) and take her to American Fork as his housekeeper. One year later Bishop Harrington married Josiah and Ann in Josiah’s home which stood on the spot where the American Fork library now is. (Now the senior citizen’s building) Eight children born to the couple were: Josiah Jr., born Sept. 19, 1854–married Electa Webb; James, born Dec. 12, 1855–died at ten months; Elizabeth Harriet, born July 9, 1856–married John Woods, died July 29, 1946; John, born Mar. 25, 1859–married Mary Steele Jan 2, 1882; Joseph (the subject of this sketch) and David his twin brother, born April 23, 1861 (David married Julia King); Daniel, born May 8, 1864, died 1869; and Ann Rachel, born July 23, 1867–married Anton Turgeson, died Feb. 24, 1948. The year following the marriage of Josiah and Ann, a widow convert from France arrived in Utah. She came to be housekeeper for Ann Nicholes and when Ann’s first baby was born she gave the housekeeper, Ernestine Douerin, to her husband as his plural wife. Ernestine became the mother of nine boys–Samuel, Frederick, Stephen (who died young), Edwin, Sidney Ernest, Alma, George Henry, Alexander and Theodore. So there was a large family to support. The community was in its infancy and there was plenty of work so the boys went to work as soon as they were old enough to help. Joe (he was never called Joseph except legally) began as a very young man to herd sheep for Washburn and Henry Chipman and for William Henry Grant. The Nicholes boys and the Chipman Boys grew up together and worked together and became lifelong friends. By diligent work and saving Joe soon had a small herd of sheep of his own. One of Joe’s close friends was Heber Kelly and Joe often went to the Kelly home. Fine looking, a gentleman in every deed, he soon played havoc with the heart of Heber’s little sister Nell (Eleanor). They were almost direct opposites. Joe was quiet, shy, and rather slow. Nell was vivacious, quick, and a real live wire. No other girl had half a chance after Nell realized she cared for her brother’s friend. But that was all right with Joe; he fell as deeply in love with Nell as she was with him. So they were married May 7, 1886, at the home of her parents in American Fork. They set up housekeeping in a small log house in the east part of town. The small herd of sheep took Joe away from home so much of the time that they decided to sell the sheep and buy a farm. By now they had three sons–Joseph Kelly, Ray Deloss and Heber Elmarion. They bought a farm at the west end of main street and built a comfortable brick home. Here two other sons were born–Victor William and Faunzo Rulon. Five fine healthy boys who grew to be as popular as their father and his brothers had been in their day. Joe was a good farmer. He raised chickens and cows and had a big orchard; so by the time the boys were old enough each one was sent away to school. Joseph K., Ray and Victor all filled missions for the Church. They were all musical and it filled the hearts of their parents with pride when they sang in the operas at the Brigham Young University. As the boys grew up the home was always open to their companions and friends and their happy home life was extended to all who came their way. Joseph K. came to understand the nature of his father, the depths of his character, and his inherent fine qualities. Recently he wrote of him: “My father grew up in the environment of early American Fork history. Financial opportunities were terribly limited, especially for young men. My father was a sheep herder and a ‘seasonal farmer’. Occasionally he worked in some of the early mines in American Fork Canyon for the late James Chipman and in Park City for some of the Park City mining companies. My father was an individualist and in a certain sense a perfectionist. It was very difficult for him to work for any other person than himself. While he acquired a very good farm in his total life and this through the devotions of his wife particularly, he suffered much financial understand how any man could be satisfied with life unless a great rain storm would bring him directly magnificent blessings. I think, however, that he was not in any sense a farmer. He farmed because of his individualism. His temperament was not that of a good farmer. I think my father was basically an artist, but an artist under pioneer conditions which found extremely little opportunity for training and self-expression. I think my father was basically a very religious man. He was extremely democratic in his basic concepts. To him, Democracy and Christianity were one and the same. Democracy was the Christian social order and the best in Mormonism was the religious expression of Democratic principles. My father was untrained in academic theory. He had practically no formal schooling but his judgement was keen and reliable and he had a refined sense of understanding of human characteristics which made him a good judge of people. Because of a timidity due primarily to lack of schooling, he retired from all official administrative positions but he supported wholeheartedly righteous causes and their leadership. He had a profound respect for men like James Chipman, Stephen L. Chipman, James H. Clark, Bishop Joseph H. Storrs, and Atlantic Christensen. With the latter he went ward teaching for a quarter of a century. In all that time I think he was not the head teacher. He became a high priest. He was a good contributor to church building projects”. Rulon wrote of an early boyhood experience which shows the understanding heart of his father. “When I was a boy of about 12 years of age, I wore a suit of brown pin-stripe material with knickerbocker trousers. These trousers were full at the knee with a band that buckled just below the knee, which caused some undue wear because of the fullness. I had worn it a long time and the seat of the trousers was getting thin and the back of the coat was beginning to shine. One Sunday morning I hesitated about putting the suit on to go to Sunday School. I caught the look in Father’s eye. I had hurt his feelings by implying with my action the thought that he was not a good provider. But I still did not want to wear the suit to Sunday School. Father looked at me a second time and said , ‘Rulon, if you will wear that suit to Sunday School today, during the week I will hitch the grey mare to the buggy and we will go get you a new suit before next Sunday’. He did not want me to miss my Sunday training.” And that was characteristic of his life. Everything was done, with the full concurrence of his wife, for the advancement of his sons. They must have the advantages he had missed. All of them have proven themselves worthy of the sacrifices he made for them. Some recollections of his father were written by Victor, the third living son. He said: “I like to think back to the days when we lived in the old home west of American Fork. I well remember the ‘Old Early Breakfast’ stove we had. It had oven doors on both sides, a hearth in front and a water reservoir on the back. In the morning when we heard Father rattle the grates and fill the reservoir, we knew it would soon be time to get up. Father was up early most of the time with a warm room ready for us to dress in and breakfast started. I can see him now cutting round pieces of sausage from the long sacks he and mother stored it in. The teaching that Father gave us was by example from his everyday life. Out in the fields while loading hay or grain, he would tell us to build good foundations and corners, then the load would not tip over if the road was rough. Then he would tell us to build our lives the same way, telling us to do unto others as we wanted them to do to us. This was the foundation of our character building. I made a trip or two with Father when he freighted potatoes to Salt Lake City with a team of horses. The first trip was quite a thrill. We slept in the hay loft of the livery barn and went to a restaurant on state street to eat. I saw my first vaudeville show at that time. Many are the experiences I have had with him that have been of much value in my later life. Father was a good man–humorous, kind, and able to meet every situation in life.” Although he [Joseph Nicholes] did not take too active part in Church and civic affairs, he gave his full support to his wife and boys who were always active. All the boys began working in the priesthood quorums and the ward auxiliaries as soon as they were old enough and they were frequently called upon to sing from the time they were very small. But the years passed all too soon. The time came when the boys were all married and had homes and work of their own, and eventually Joe was not able to carry on the work of his farm. His physical strength was not what it had been. So early in 1941, when he was 80 years old, they sold the farm and built a modern four-room comfortable home at 61 south 200 west. But they were not to enjoy it long together. They had been living there only eight months when Joe died 8 October 1941. At the present time he has a living posterity of three sons, 20 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Joseph Kelly, the oldest son, is an instructor at the Brigham Young University. For several years he was president of Dixie College at St. George. He filled a mission to Denmark and for a long time has been a member of the Sunday School General board. He married Olive Maiben and they became the parents of nine children–Eleanor, who received her doctor of philosophy degree in 1951 from the University of New York, has a position in Literary Research and Bibliography at the Carl H. Pforzheimer Library, N.Y.; Henry Joseph has a Ph.D. in Human Physiology from the University of Wisconsin and is teaching at the BYU; Max Maiben has a Doctor of Veterinary Science degree from Colorado State College, and is now employed by the government at the Dugway Proving Grounds; Ruth and Margaret graduated from the Y before they were married; Virginia and Elizabeth both attended the Y but married before graduation; Kelly and Joyce are both attending BYU. Ray D. graduated from the BYU, taught school for some time, went to the British Isles on a mission, served as counselor in the Second Ward Bishopric, went to the University of California at Berkeley for higher education but took ill and died August 11, 1931, following a serious operation. He married Fern Scott. One of their sons died in childhood. Paul received his Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati and is now teaching at the University of Utah. Elmarion [Marion] attended the BYU, taught school in several different towns in Utah and Idaho, specializing in music. He married Theodocia Brown. They became the parents of six children but their only son died while a small boy. Four of the five girls, Sarah Jean, Arlene, LaRae and La Rene (twins) are married. Beth is still with her mother. Marion, as he was generally called, died 12 August 1945 after a long illness. Victor was more mechanically minded and did not go to school after graduation from the American Fork High School. He married Norma Jones, Lehi, and they have five children–Faye and Iris who are married; Sgt. Thomas V., who is in the military forces; Donna, who is married, and Ronald. Rulon, the youngest of the five boys, attended BYU three years. He stopped school to help his father on the farm. He has followed the occupation of farming; since and he owns one of the best row-crop farms in Utah County. He has served as city councilman and when the old First Ward was divided in 1946 he was made Bishop of the new Fifth Ward and held the position until September 1951. He married Ethel Parker. They had two children who died in infancy. They raised two of Ether’s brothers’ children who were left motherless. Ethel died 4 April 1951. It is now over ten years since Joseph Nicholes died but his friends still mention his name with respect and his children and grandchildren cherish his memory. One friend who had known him from earliest boyhood all through his life (when told that his history was to be written) said ‘I never saw Joe Nicholes do a crude or ungentlemanly act in his life.’ A real tribute to one of nature’s noblemen. Read at the meeting of the American Fork, DUP by Belva Booth Ross, 13 April 1952. The meeting was held at the home of Captain Sarah Monson in American Fork, Utah

HISTORY OF JOSEPH NICHOLES Native Pioneer, 1861

Contributor: mcain1006 Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

HISTORY OF JOSEPH NICHOLES Native Pioneer, 1861 written by Belva Booth Ross, camp historian American Fork Camp, DAU, Utah County American Fork, Utah Joseph Nicholes, the fifth child of Josiah and Ann Rachel Marsh Nicholes, was born in American Fork, Utah County, Utah, April 23, 1861, just ten years after the first families began settling the community. Josiah Nicholes, an English convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was born Oct. 11, 1815, at Hook Norton, Oxfordshire, a son of James and Harriet Smith Nicholes, (originally Nichols). He had emigrated from the vicinity of Hull, England, to the United States and to Utah in October 1851. In England he had married Harriet Elizabeth Dean who came with him to American Fork but dies in 1852. It is said that he took the box from his covered wagon to make her casket. It was the only available lumber. Ann Rachel Marsh was born Oct. 16, 1824, in St. Heliers, Isle of Jersey, the daughter of a French woman and an English military officer. She emigrated to Utah in October 1853, also a convert to the church. About a year after the death of his wife, Josiah Nicholes, who had been apprenticed as a railroad track foreman in England, became very discouraged with his poor agricultural self-employment here in American Fork and decided to return to England. He visited Bishop Leonard E. Harrington to report his decision. Bishop Harrington extracted from him a promise that on his way east he would visit President Brigham Young in Salt Lake City. This promise Josiah Nicholes kept for he was above all else a man of honor for his promised word. This, in fact, is the basis for his remarkable character and key to his life. Brother Brigham asked Josiah if he ever testified that he knew the gospel was true and that Joseph Smith was a prophet. Josiah answered in the affirmative. Then Brother Brigham challenged Josiah to make good his own testimony and return to American Fork as a pioneer of that community. President Young helped the immediate situation by telling Josiah that an immigrant company from Jersey Island had come just newly to “The Old Square”. In this company was an old maid (about 30 years) and take her to American Fork as his housekeeper. One year later Bishop Harrington married Josiah and Ann in Josiah’s home which stood on the spot where the American Fork library now is. (Now the senior citizen’s building) Eight children born to the couple were: Josiah Jr., born Sept. 19, 1854–married Electa Webb; James, born Dec. 12, 1855–died at ten months; Elizabeth Harriet, born July 9, 1856–married John Woods, died July 29, 1946; John, born Mar. 25, 1859–married Mary Steele Jan 2, 1882; Joseph (the subject of this sketch) and David his twin brother, born April 23, 1861 (David married Julia King); Daniel, born May 8, 1864, died 1869; and Ann Rachel, born July 23, 1867–married Anton Turgeson, died Feb. 24, 1948. The year following the marriage of Josiah and Ann, a widow convert from France arrived in Utah. She came to be housekeeper for Ann Nicholes and when Ann’s first baby was born she gave the housekeeper, Ernestine Douerin, to her husband as his plural wife. Ernestine became the mother of nine boys–Samuel, Frederick, Stephen (who died young), Edwin, Sidney Ernest, Alma, George Henry, Alexander and Theodore. So there was a large family to support. The community was in its infancy and there was plenty of work so the boys went to work as soon as they were old enough to help. Joe (he was never called Joseph except legally) began as a very young man to herd sheep for Washburn and Henry Chipman and for William Henry Grant. The Nicholes boys and the Chipman Boys grew up together and worked together and became lifelong friends. By diligent work and saving Joe soon had a small herd of sheep of his own. One of Joe’s close friends was Heber Kelly and Joe often went to the Kelly home. Fine looking, a gentleman in every deed, he soon played havoc with the heart of Heber’s little sister Nell (Eleanor). They were almost direct opposites. Joe was quiet, shy, and rather slow. Nell was vivacious, quick, and a real live wire. No other girl had half a chance after Nell realized she cared for her brother’s friend. But that was all right with Joe; he fell as deeply in love with Nell as she was with him. So they were married May 7, 1886, at the home of her parents in American Fork. They set up housekeeping in a small log house in the east part of town. The small herd of sheep took Joe away from home so much of the time that they decided to sell the sheep and buy a farm. By now they had three sons–Joseph Kelly, Ray Deloss and Heber Elmarion. They bought a farm at the west end of main street and built a comfortable brick home. Here two other sons were born–Victor William and Faunzo Rulon. Five fine healthy boys who grew to be as popular as their father and his brothers had been in their day. Joe was a good farmer. He raised chickens and cows and had a big orchard; so by the time the boys were old enough each one was sent away to school. Joseph K., Ray and Victor all filled missions for the Church. They were all musical and it filled the hearts of their parents with pride when they sang in the operas at the Brigham Young University. As the boys grew up the home was always open to their companions and friends and their happy home life was extended to all who came their way. Joseph K. came to understand the nature of his father, the depths of his character, and his inherent fine qualities. Recently he wrote of him: “My father grew up in the environment of early American Fork history. Financial opportunities were terribly limited, especially for young men. My father was a sheep herder and a ‘seasonal farmer’. Occasionally he worked in some of the early mines in American Fork Canyon for the late James Chipman and in Park City for some of the Park City mining companies. My father was an individualist and in a certain sense a perfectionist. It was very difficult for him to work for any other person than himself. While he acquired a very good farm in his total life and this through the devotions of his wife particularly, he suffered much financial understand how any man could be satisfied with life unless a great rain storm would bring him directly magnificent blessings. I think, however, that he was not in any sense a farmer. He farmed because of his individualism. His temperament was not that of a good farmer. I think my father was basically an artist, but an artist under pioneer conditions which found extremely little opportunity for training and self-expression. I think my father was basically a very religious man. He was extremely democratic in his basic concepts. To him, Democracy and Christianity were one and the same. Democracy was the Christian social order and the best in Mormonism was the religious expression of Democratic principles. My father was untrained in academic theory. He had practically no formal schooling but his judgement was keen and reliable and he had a refined sense of understanding of human characteristics which made him a good judge of people. Because of a timidity due primarily to lack of schooling, he retired from all official administrative positions but he supported wholeheartedly righteous causes and their leadership. He had a profound respect for men like James Chipman, Stephen L. Chipman, James H. Clark, Bishop Joseph H. Storrs, and Atlantic Christensen. With the latter he went ward teaching for a quarter of a century. In all that time I think he was not the head teacher. He became a high priest. He was a good contributor to church building projects”. Rulon wrote of an early boyhood experience which shows the understanding heart of his father. “When I was a boy of about 12 years of age, I wore a suit of brown pin-stripe material with knickerbocker trousers. These trousers were full at the knee with a band that buckled just below the knee, which caused some undue wear because of the fullness. I had worn it a long time and the seat of the trousers was getting thin and the back of the coat was beginning to shine. One Sunday morning I hesitated about putting the suit on to go to Sunday School. I caught the look in Father’s eye. I had hurt his feelings by implying with my action the thought that he was not a good provider. But I still did not want to wear the suit to Sunday School. Father looked at me a second time and said , ‘Rulon, if you will wear that suit to Sunday School today, during the week I will hitch the grey mare to the buggy and we will go get you a new suit before next Sunday’. He did not want me to miss my Sunday training.” And that was characteristic of his life. Everything was done, with the full concurrence of his wife, for the advancement of his sons. They must have the advantages he had missed. All of them have proven themselves worthy of the sacrifices he made for them. Some recollections of his father were written by Victor, the third living son. He said: “I like to think back to the days when we lived in the old home west of American Fork. I well remember the ‘Old Early Breakfast’ stove we had. It had oven doors on both sides, a hearth in front and a water reservoir on the back. In the morning when we heard Father rattle the grates and fill the reservoir, we knew it would soon be time to get up. Father was up early most of the time with a warm room ready for us to dress in and breakfast started. I can see him now cutting round pieces of sausage from the long sacks he and mother stored it in. The teaching that Father gave us was by example from his everyday life. Out in the fields while loading hay or grain, he would tell us to build good foundations and corners, then the load would not tip over if the road was rough. Then he would tell us to build our lives the same way, telling us to do unto others as we wanted them to do to us. This was the foundation of our character building. I made a trip or two with Father when he freighted potatoes to Salt Lake City with a team of horses. The first trip was quite a thrill. We slept in the hay loft of the livery barn and went to a restaurant on state street to eat. I saw my first vaudeville show at that time. Many are the experiences I have had with him that have been of much value in my later life. Father was a good man–humorous, kind, and able to meet every situation in life.” Although he [Joseph Nicholes] did not take too active part in Church and civic affairs, he gave his full support to his wife and boys who were always active. All the boys began working in the priesthood quorums and the ward auxiliaries as soon as they were old enough and they were frequently called upon to sing from the time they were very small. But the years passed all too soon. The time came when the boys were all married and had homes and work of their own, and eventually Joe was not able to carry on the work of his farm. His physical strength was not what it had been. So early in 1941, when he was 80 years old, they sold the farm and built a modern four-room comfortable home at 61 south 200 west. But they were not to enjoy it long together. They had been living there only eight months when Joe died 8 October 1941. At the present time he has a living posterity of three sons, 20 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Joseph Kelly, the oldest son, is an instructor at the Brigham Young University. For several years he was president of Dixie College at St. George. He filled a mission to Denmark and for a long time has been a member of the Sunday School General board. He married Olive Maiben and they became the parents of nine children–Eleanor, who received her doctor of philosophy degree in 1951 from the University of New York, has a position in Literary Research and Bibliography at the Carl H. Pforzheimer Library, N.Y.; Henry Joseph has a Ph.D. in Human Physiology from the University of Wisconsin and is teaching at the BYU; Max Maiben has a Doctor of Veterinary Science degree from Colorado State College, and is now employed by the government at the Dugway Proving Grounds; Ruth and Margaret graduated from the Y before they were married; Virginia and Elizabeth both attended the Y but married before graduation; Kelly and Joyce are both attending BYU. Ray D. graduated from the BYU, taught school for some time, went to the British Isles on a mission, served as counselor in the Second Ward Bishopric, went to the University of California at Berkeley for higher education but took ill and died August 11, 1931, following a serious operation. He married Fern Scott. One of their sons died in childhood. Paul received his Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati and is now teaching at the University of Utah. Elmarion [Marion] attended the BYU, taught school in several different towns in Utah and Idaho, specializing in music. He married Theodocia Brown. They became the parents of six children but their only son died while a small boy. Four of the five girls, Sarah Jean, Arlene, LaRae and La Rene (twins) are married. Beth is still with her mother. Marion, as he was generally called, died 12 August 1945 after a long illness. Victor was more mechanically minded and did not go to school after graduation from the American Fork High School. He married Norma Jones, Lehi, and they have five children–Faye and Iris who are married; Sgt. Thomas V., who is in the military forces; Donna, who is married, and Ronald. Rulon, the youngest of the five boys, attended BYU three years. He stopped school to help his father on the farm. He has followed the occupation of farming; since and he owns one of the best row-crop farms in Utah County. He has served as city councilman and when the old First Ward was divided in 1946 he was made Bishop of the new Fifth Ward and held the position until September 1951. He married Ethel Parker. They had two children who died in infancy. They raised two of Ether’s brothers’ children who were left motherless. Ethel died 4 April 1951. It is now over ten years since Joseph Nicholes died but his friends still mention his name with respect and his children and grandchildren cherish his memory. One friend who had known him from earliest boyhood all through his life (when told that his history was to be written) said ‘I never saw Joe Nicholes do a crude or ungentlemanly act in his life.’ A real tribute to one of nature’s noblemen. Read at the meeting of the American Fork, DUP by Belva Booth Ross, 13 April 1952. The meeting was held at the home of Captain Sarah Monson in American Fork, Utah

Life timeline of Elmarion Heber Nicholes

Elmarion Heber Nicholes was born on 6 Nov 1892
Elmarion Heber Nicholes was 13 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Elmarion Heber Nicholes was 24 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Elmarion Heber Nicholes was 28 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Elmarion Heber Nicholes was 47 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Elmarion Heber Nicholes died on 12 Aug 1945 at the age of 52
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Elmarion Heber Nicholes (6 Nov 1892 - 12 Aug 1945), BillionGraves Record 27545 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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