Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter)

7 Apr 1840 - 10 May 1903

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Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter)

7 Apr 1840 - 10 May 1903
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Grave site information of Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter) (7 Apr 1840 - 10 May 1903) at American Fork Cemetery in American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter)

Born:
Died:

American Fork Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

A pioneer of 1847. Son of Alpmonzo & Betsy Green. Born in Hamilton, New York, CAPT
2 UTAH TER MILITIA
INDIAN WARS, wife of Alva A Green
born in Chester Co. Penn.
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finnsh

June 27, 2011
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Gina369

May 28, 2012
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smithc

June 26, 2012
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apockalipse

May 31, 2012
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Celique

December 26, 2018
Photographer

PapaMoose

June 26, 2011

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Mormon Hollow and the Buckwalter Family

Contributor: smithc Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

(Prepared by Ross McBride Buckwalter, October 28, 2013) The following is quoted from the article Edward Hunter: Generous Pioneer, Presiding Bishop which appeared in the July 2004 issue of Ensign magazine. “When the schoolhouse in Chester County, Pennsylvania, burned to the ground in 1833, wealthy Quaker Edward Hunter offered to replace it on land he would donate if residents ‘would allow all persons and persuasions to meet in it to worship God.’ This requirement was included in the articles of agreement for the donated land and building. The finished building was called the West Nantmeal Seminary. Quaker and Scotch-Irish Presbyterian farmers populated Chester County, which is located about 12 miles west of Philadelphia. In the spring of 1839, Latter-day Saint missionaries Elijah H. Davis and Lorenzo Barnes arranged to use the West Nantmeal Seminary building to teach the gospel. When residents became outraged, Edward Hunter reminded them of the agreement made in 1833 allowing people of every religion to have the privilege of meeting there to worship God. He told the people that the ‘Mormons’ would have their rights or he would take the building back. Such were the circumstances that surrounded the first visit of the missionaries to the valley that would eventually become known as ‘Mormon Hollow,’ circumstances that prepared Edward Hunter to be an advocate for these early Saints… Light Filled the Room Soon after the missionaries taught the gospel in 1839 in the West Nantmeal Seminary building, Edward heard that missionary Elijah H. Davis was going to speak in Locust Grove, a few miles away, and that there were plans to treat him badly. He mounted his horse and rode over to Locust Grove. Of Elijah Davis and his teachings, Edward said: “He was a humble young man, the first one that I was impressed was sent of God…. He spoke well on the subject (of the Atonement), but before he was through (Robert) Johnson interrupted him and ordered him to quit preaching. I sprang up and said: ‘He is a stranger and shall have justice shown him and be respected; we will hear him and then hear you speak.’ I was informed that there were many present opposed to the ‘Mormons,’ but I resolved as I lived that Mr. Davis should be protected, if I had to meet the rabble on their own ground. I kept my eye on them and determined to stand by him at the risk of person and property. I had friends, though Mr. Davis had none. Mr. J. Johnson, brother to Robert Johnson, came to me as I was going out and apologized for his brother’s conduct. I walked out of the crowd, got on my horse and rode home alone.” After going home and retiring for the night, Edward lay awake for some time thinking about what had taken place. ‘My reflections were,’ he said, ‘why have I taken such a decided stand for 2 those strangers,’ and I asked the Lord: ‘Are those Mormons thy servants?’ Instantly, a light came in the room at the top of the door, so great that I could not endure it. I covered my head with the bed-clothes and turned over to the wall. I had exerted my mind and body much that day and soon fell asleep.’ Baptisms in Chester County On 8 October 1840, Edward Hunter was baptized by Elder Orson Hyde. Edward’s wife, Ann, was also baptized. Of Edward’s baptism, neighbor H. W. Vallette said, ‘I only felt that if a man like Edward Hunter, whose name was a synonym of upright probity, of sound sense and discernment, could be brought to believe in these things, what right had I or others of less understanding to… ridicule them.’ Hearts were softened among these Quaker residents, and soon about 200 were baptized, sometimes at the rate of eight to ten a week. The Prophet Joseph Smith stopped in ‘Mormon Hollow’ for about two weeks in January 1840 in connection with a trip to Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. The Prophet spoke to the Saints at the West Nantmeal Seminary and stayed with the Hunter family. During the autumn of 1840, Hyrum Smith visited Edward. They attended conference in Philadelphia, and Brother Hunter ‘subscribed liberally to the building of the Nauvoo House and the Temple.’” The Hunter family moved to Nauvoo in June 1842, where Edward had purchased a farm and several lots. He donated $7,000 in cash and nearly $5,000 in goods to the Prophet Joseph for the building of Zion. He continued to donate generously, to the point that Joseph told him he had done enough and should reserve the rest for his own use. He later offered his home to the Prophet as a place of safety, and became one of Joseph’s bodyguards, enjoying the confidence and friendship of the Prophet. Edward later said, “The two years I was in Nauvoo with Joseph, it was one stream of revelations.” Sections 127 and 128 of the Doctrine and Covenants were among the revelations which Joseph received in the Hunter home. Edward served as a bishop in Nauvoo, and in 1846, along with many of the other “Mormon Hollow Saints,” joined the main body of Latter-day Saints in Winter Quarters. He also served as bishop while in Winter Quarters. In 1847 he was appointed captain of 100 wagons for the trek west, arriving with his group on 29 September 1847. After arriving in the Valley, he again served as bishop, and played an integral part in implementing the Perpetual Emigrating Fund. Edward Hunter was sustained as the third Presiding Bishop of the Church on 7 April 1851, and during April Conference of 1853, laid the southwest cornerstone of the Salt Lake Temple. He served faithfully as Presiding Bishop until his death on 16 October 1883. 3 These plaques are located right at the entrance to the West Nantmeal Seminary property 4 The West Nantmeal Seminary Building today 5 The Brandywine River, where the “Mormon Hollow Saints” were baptized. It is located about a mile from the West Nantmeal Seminary building. John and Sarah Shuler Buckwalter were both born and raised in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and were married there on 21 February 1828. After their marriage, they settled in West Nantmeal, Chester County, about 20 miles west of Phoenixville, the Buckwalter family home. By 1840, Sarah had given birth to 8 children, including twins Joseph and Ritner, who were born in March 1836 and lived only about one month. Their other children were, Margaret (born 12 November 1828), William Shuler (born 1 January 1830), Henry Shuler (born 12 May 1831), Sarah (born 2 March 1833), John Edwin (born 30 June 1834), and Elizabeth Lucretia (born 7 April 1840). One of the main sources of information we have on their family is the Biographical Sketch of Henry Shuler Buckwalter, from which the following quotes are taken. “My father being in poor health for sometime past, and our family in rather destitute circumstances, I was at the age of 7 years put out by my parents to live with a family by the name of East…. Father embraced the gospel in the year 1839 and died on the first of March 1841. Sometime during this year, my mother became convinced of the truth, and went down into the waters of baptism.” As noted in the above discussion, the LDS missionaries began teaching the gospel in the West Nantmeal Seminary in the spring of 1839 and continued preaching there until at least 1842. These dates, along with the fact that John and Sarah lived in West Nantmeal, all of their children were born there, and John died there, leaves no doubt that John and Sarah were among those who were taught the gospel in the West Nantmeal Seminary. And along with 6 many others, they were undoubtedly baptized in the Brandywine River, about a mile from the Seminary. “Very early in the spring of 1842, she (my mother) came for me, preparatory to take me along to Nauvoo, Illinois, she having made up her mind to emigrate to the above place…. And in April of this year we started for Nauvoo, on our journey traveling by steamboat from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, to Nauvoo.” Henry was baptized in the Mississippi River in 1843, after their arrival in Nauvoo. He describes some of the illnesses they had during their time there, and in fact his older brother, William, died of “Bilious Fever” in September 1843 and is buried in Nauvoo. Continuing with quotes from Henry, “Was there when the massacre of the Prophet Joseph and Hyrum took place. Saw the terrible cries and lamentations of our brethren and sisters on that occasion. Shared in all the threats and persecution of our people of those days. Was at the meeting when Sidney Rigdon tried to lay claim to the presidency of the church and Pres. Brigham Young told him different – and his voice and looks were precisely like that of the prophet Joseph. Witnessed the erection of our magnificent temple, and when finished, was blessed with the privilege to view the interior from bottom to top. Witnessed the departure in February 1846 from Nauvoo, of the great majority of the people for the Rocky Mountains. Witnessed the approach and attacks of the mob in September 1846, upon us few remaining Saints that was too poor in this world’s goods to admit of emigrating along with our brethren and sisters when the first start was made, but was forced to remain behind to be driven out by them…” An interesting note, not mentioned in Henry’s journal, is that one of the John Buckwalter’s brothers, Henry (the uncle of Henry Shuler Buckwalter), and his wife Emily Wynn Buckwalter, also joined the Church in Chester County and moved to Nauvoo. We know this because Henry is on the list of members of the Seventies quorum in Nauvoo, and he also received a Patriarchal Blessing there. But Henry and Emily never moved west; during this difficult time following the death of Joseph Smith, they apparently gave up and moved back home to Chester County. It has always been a testimony to me of the strength and conviction that Sarah had, that she, the widow, was the one who went through all of the tribulations and brought her family west to be with the Saints. Henry continues describing the difficulties they went through in leaving Nauvoo and moving across Iowa. They decided to go to Saint Louis and remain there until they could raise enough money to continue the trek west. And they had some interesting experiences during this time. “Early in the spring of 1849 and about three months previous to her (my mother’s) attack of this disease, she paid a visit to her relatives in the State of Pennsylvania. In conversing on the 7 principles of the gospel, one of her brothers said that it might be true but he had no time to bother with it. Also another brother pleaded with her to forsake what he called the deluded Mormons and with her family return back to the land of her birth amongst her relatives. And if she did so, he would give her a home to live in and see that herself and family wanted for nothing to make life comfortable while he had a crust to subsist upon. But this advice to her proved all to no purpose as she had the testimony within her to know that the great work that she was engaged in was indeed the work of our Father in Heaven and God. My grandmother Buckwalter wrote a letter to me from Chester County in the Spring of 1851 counseling me not to leave Saint Louis, to go no farther west at present. To not follow after those people that my mother had associated herself with until I had come more advanced in years, until I would realize and know for myself what was best for me to do that I might not be deceived. But with me, her advice went in one ear and had no weight or bearing with me as God had revealed to me when but a boy 12 years of age, in the days of the prophet Joseph Smith at Nauvoo of the truth and divinity of the work that myself and the persecuted Saints were engaged in. After remaining in the city of Saint Louis, Missouri, from December 1846 until the spring of 1852, started for the valleys of the mountains in April of that year in company with my mother

Elizabeth Buckwalter Green from Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude

Contributor: smithc Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

birthdate: 7 Apr 1840 in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania death: 10 Nov1903 in American fork,Utah County, Utah parents: John Buckwalter and Sarah Shuler Pioneer: 11 Aug 1852 in John Higbee Wagon Train spouse: Alva A. Green married: 25 Dec 1858 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah death sp: 2 Mar 1901 in American Fork, Utah Country, Utah children: Alva Alphonzo, John Buckwalter, Erastus, Sarah Marion, Delia Betsy, Perry, Jesse, William Quincy, Margaret Vilate, Winifred Leroy "Fred,", Nymphus Jay Elizabeth was born in Pennsylvania, in 1840, the youngest child in her family. In 1839, her parents were converted to the gospel of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints when her father told his family that the message the missionaries brought was the truth, but he died before he could be baptized. Elizabeth's mother was left with six children. In May 1842, Sarah and her children traveled by steamboat to Nauvoo, Illinois, to join the other converts. They lived there until February, of 1846, when they were driven from their homes by anti-Mormon mobs. Her family spent the next five years living in St. Louis, Missouri, until the older sons earned enough money for the Westward trek. They finally reached the Salt Lake Valley in 1852, when Elizabeth was twelve years of age. The following spring they purchased an eighty acre farm in American Fork, Utah. When Elizabeth was eighteen, she married Alva Alphonzo Green on Dec 25, 1858. Their's was a double wedding which also included Alva's sister who married James Chipman. Their wedding dinner was held at the Green Home. Alva and Elizabeth built a house about a mile west of town where their eleven children were born. Elizabeth was a woman of great faith. If someone was sick in the home, she always called the elders to administer to them. She devoted much time to temple work, taught Primary for many years and was president in 1884. Elizabeth was one of the first women to teach school in American Fork and it is believed she taught school in the little adobe church-school constructed in 1861.

Mormon Hollow and the Buckwalter Family

Contributor: Celique Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

(Prepared by Ross McBride Buckwalter, October 28, 2013) The following is quoted from the article Edward Hunter: Generous Pioneer, Presiding Bishop which appeared in the July 2004 issue of Ensign magazine. “When the schoolhouse in Chester County, Pennsylvania, burned to the ground in 1833, wealthy Quaker Edward Hunter offered to replace it on land he would donate if residents ‘would allow all persons and persuasions to meet in it to worship God.’ This requirement was included in the articles of agreement for the donated land and building. The finished building was called the West Nantmeal Seminary. Quaker and Scotch-Irish Presbyterian farmers populated Chester County, which is located about 12 miles west of Philadelphia. In the spring of 1839, Latter-day Saint missionaries Elijah H. Davis and Lorenzo Barnes arranged to use the West Nantmeal Seminary building to teach the gospel. When residents became outraged, Edward Hunter reminded them of the agreement made in 1833 allowing people of every religion to have the privilege of meeting there to worship God. He told the people that the ‘Mormons’ would have their rights or he would take the building back. Such were the circumstances that surrounded the first visit of the missionaries to the valley that would eventually become known as ‘Mormon Hollow,’ circumstances that prepared Edward Hunter to be an advocate for these early Saints… Light Filled the Room Soon after the missionaries taught the gospel in 1839 in the West Nantmeal Seminary building, Edward heard that missionary Elijah H. Davis was going to speak in Locust Grove, a few miles away, and that there were plans to treat him badly. He mounted his horse and rode over to Locust Grove. Of Elijah Davis and his teachings, Edward said: “He was a humble young man, the first one that I was impressed was sent of God…. He spoke well on the subject (of the Atonement), but before he was through (Robert) Johnson interrupted him and ordered him to quit preaching. I sprang up and said: ‘He is a stranger and shall have justice shown him and be respected; we will hear him and then hear you speak.’ I was informed that there were many present opposed to the ‘Mormons,’ but I resolved as I lived that Mr. Davis should be protected, if I had to meet the rabble on their own ground. I kept my eye on them and determined to stand by him at the risk of person and property. I had friends, though Mr. Davis had none. Mr. J. Johnson, brother to Robert Johnson, came to me as I was going out and apologized for his brother’s conduct. I walked out of the crowd, got on my horse and rode home alone.” After going home and retiring for the night, Edward lay awake for some time thinking about what had taken place. ‘My reflections were,’ he said, ‘why have I taken such a decided stand for 2 those strangers,’ and I asked the Lord: ‘Are those Mormons thy servants?’ Instantly, a light came in the room at the top of the door, so great that I could not endure it. I covered my head with the bed-clothes and turned over to the wall. I had exerted my mind and body much that day and soon fell asleep.’ Baptisms in Chester County On 8 October 1840, Edward Hunter was baptized by Elder Orson Hyde. Edward’s wife, Ann, was also baptized. Of Edward’s baptism, neighbor H. W. Vallette said, ‘I only felt that if a man like Edward Hunter, whose name was a synonym of upright probity, of sound sense and discernment, could be brought to believe in these things, what right had I or others of less understanding to… ridicule them.’ Hearts were softened among these Quaker residents, and soon about 200 were baptized, sometimes at the rate of eight to ten a week. The Prophet Joseph Smith stopped in ‘Mormon Hollow’ for about two weeks in January 1840 in connection with a trip to Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. The Prophet spoke to the Saints at the West Nantmeal Seminary and stayed with the Hunter family. During the autumn of 1840, Hyrum Smith visited Edward. They attended conference in Philadelphia, and Brother Hunter ‘subscribed liberally to the building of the Nauvoo House and the Temple.’” The Hunter family moved to Nauvoo in June 1842, where Edward had purchased a farm and several lots. He donated $7,000 in cash and nearly $5,000 in goods to the Prophet Joseph for the building of Zion. He continued to donate generously, to the point that Joseph told him he had done enough and should reserve the rest for his own use. He later offered his home to the Prophet as a place of safety, and became one of Joseph’s bodyguards, enjoying the confidence and friendship of the Prophet. Edward later said, “The two years I was in Nauvoo with Joseph, it was one stream of revelations.” Sections 127 and 128 of the Doctrine and Covenants were among the revelations which Joseph received in the Hunter home. Edward served as a bishop in Nauvoo, and in 1846, along with many of the other “Mormon Hollow Saints,” joined the main body of Latter-day Saints in Winter Quarters. He also served as bishop while in Winter Quarters. In 1847 he was appointed captain of 100 wagons for the trek west, arriving with his group on 29 September 1847. After arriving in the Valley, he again served as bishop, and played an integral part in implementing the Perpetual Emigrating Fund. Edward Hunter was sustained as the third Presiding Bishop of the Church on 7 April 1851, and during April Conference of 1853, laid the southwest cornerstone of the Salt Lake Temple. He served faithfully as Presiding Bishop until his death on 16 October 1883. 3 These plaques are located right at the entrance to the West Nantmeal Seminary property 4 The West Nantmeal Seminary Building today 5 The Brandywine River, where the “Mormon Hollow Saints” were baptized. It is located about a mile from the West Nantmeal Seminary building. John and Sarah Shuler Buckwalter were both born and raised in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and were married there on 21 February 1828. After their marriage, they settled in West Nantmeal, Chester County, about 20 miles west of Phoenixville, the Buckwalter family home. By 1840, Sarah had given birth to 8 children, including twins Joseph and Ritner, who were born in March 1836 and lived only about one month. Their other children were, Margaret (born 12 November 1828), William Shuler (born 1 January 1830), Henry Shuler (born 12 May 1831), Sarah (born 2 March 1833), John Edwin (born 30 June 1834), and Elizabeth Lucretia (born 7 April 1840). One of the main sources of information we have on their family is the Biographical Sketch of Henry Shuler Buckwalter, from which the following quotes are taken. “My father being in poor health for sometime past, and our family in rather destitute circumstances, I was at the age of 7 years put out by my parents to live with a family by the name of East…. Father embraced the gospel in the year 1839 and died on the first of March 1841. Sometime during this year, my mother became convinced of the truth, and went down into the waters of baptism.” As noted in the above discussion, the LDS missionaries began teaching the gospel in the West Nantmeal Seminary in the spring of 1839 and continued preaching there until at least 1842. These dates, along with the fact that John and Sarah lived in West Nantmeal, all of their children were born there, and John died there, leaves no doubt that John and Sarah were among those who were taught the gospel in the West Nantmeal Seminary. And along with 6 many others, they were undoubtedly baptized in the Brandywine River, about a mile from the Seminary. “Very early in the spring of 1842, she (my mother) came for me, preparatory to take me along to Nauvoo, Illinois, she having made up her mind to emigrate to the above place…. And in April of this year we started for Nauvoo, on our journey traveling by steamboat from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, to Nauvoo.” Henry was baptized in the Mississippi River in 1843, after their arrival in Nauvoo. He describes some of the illnesses they had during their time there, and in fact his older brother, William, died of “Bilious Fever” in September 1843 and is buried in Nauvoo. Continuing with quotes from Henry, “Was there when the massacre of the Prophet Joseph and Hyrum took place. Saw the terrible cries and lamentations of our brethren and sisters on that occasion. Shared in all the threats and persecution of our people of those days. Was at the meeting when Sidney Rigdon tried to lay claim to the presidency of the church and Pres. Brigham Young told him different – and his voice and looks were precisely like that of the prophet Joseph. Witnessed the erection of our magnificent temple, and when finished, was blessed with the privilege to view the interior from bottom to top. Witnessed the departure in February 1846 from Nauvoo, of the great majority of the people for the Rocky Mountains. Witnessed the approach and attacks of the mob in September 1846, upon us few remaining Saints that was too poor in this world’s goods to admit of emigrating along with our brethren and sisters when the first start was made, but was forced to remain behind to be driven out by them…” An interesting note, not mentioned in Henry’s journal, is that one of the John Buckwalter’s brothers, Henry (the uncle of Henry Shuler Buckwalter), and his wife Emily Wynn Buckwalter, also joined the Church in Chester County and moved to Nauvoo. We know this because Henry is on the list of members of the Seventies quorum in Nauvoo, and he also received a Patriarchal Blessing there. But Henry and Emily never moved west; during this difficult time following the death of Joseph Smith, they apparently gave up and moved back home to Chester County. It has always been a testimony to me of the strength and conviction that Sarah had, that she, the widow, was the one who went through all of the tribulations and brought her family west to be with the Saints. Henry continues describing the difficulties they went through in leaving Nauvoo and moving across Iowa. They decided to go to Saint Louis and remain there until they could raise enough money to continue the trek west. And they had some interesting experiences during this time. “Early in the spring of 1849 and about three months previous to her (my mother’s) attack of this disease, she paid a visit to her relatives in the State of Pennsylvania. In conversing on the 7 principles of the gospel, one of her brothers said that it might be true but he had no time to bother with it. Also another brother pleaded with her to forsake what he called the deluded Mormons and with her family return back to the land of her birth amongst her relatives. And if she did so, he would give her a home to live in and see that herself and family wanted for nothing to make life comfortable while he had a crust to subsist upon. But this advice to her proved all to no purpose as she had the testimony within her to know that the great work that she was engaged in was indeed the work of our Father in Heaven and God. My grandmother Buckwalter wrote a letter to me from Chester County in the Spring of 1851 counseling me not to leave Saint Louis, to go no farther west at present. To not follow after those people that my mother had associated herself with until I had come more advanced in years, until I would realize and know for myself what was best for me to do that I might not be deceived. But with me, her advice went in one ear and had no weight or bearing with me as God had revealed to me when but a boy 12 years of age, in the days of the prophet Joseph Smith at Nauvoo of the truth and divinity of the work that myself and the persecuted Saints were engaged in. After remaining in the city of Saint Louis, Missouri, from December 1846 until the spring of 1852, started for the valleys of the mountains in April of that year in company with my mother

Elizabeth Buckwalter Green from Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude

Contributor: Celique Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

birthdate: 7 Apr 1840 in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania death: 10 Nov1903 in American fork,Utah County, Utah parents: John Buckwalter and Sarah Shuler Pioneer: 11 Aug 1852 in John Higbee Wagon Train spouse: Alva A. Green married: 25 Dec 1858 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah death sp: 2 Mar 1901 in American Fork, Utah Country, Utah children: Alva Alphonzo, John Buckwalter, Erastus, Sarah Marion, Delia Betsy, Perry, Jesse, William Quincy, Margaret Vilate, Winifred Leroy "Fred,", Nymphus Jay Elizabeth was born in Pennsylvania, in 1840, the youngest child in her family. In 1839, her parents were converted to the gospel of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints when her father told his family that the message the missionaries brought was the truth, but he died before he could be baptized. Elizabeth's mother was left with six children. In May 1842, Sarah and her children traveled by steamboat to Nauvoo, Illinois, to join the other converts. They lived there until February, of 1846, when they were driven from their homes by anti-Mormon mobs. Her family spent the next five years living in St. Louis, Missouri, until the older sons earned enough money for the Westward trek. They finally reached the Salt Lake Valley in 1852, when Elizabeth was twelve years of age. The following spring they purchased an eighty acre farm in American Fork, Utah. When Elizabeth was eighteen, she married Alva Alphonzo Green on Dec 25, 1858. Their's was a double wedding which also included Alva's sister who married James Chipman. Their wedding dinner was held at the Green Home. Alva and Elizabeth built a house about a mile west of town where their eleven children were born. Elizabeth was a woman of great faith. If someone was sick in the home, she always called the elders to administer to them. She devoted much time to temple work, taught Primary for many years and was president in 1884. Elizabeth was one of the first women to teach school in American Fork and it is believed she taught school in the little adobe church-school constructed in 1861.

Life timeline of Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter)

Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter) was born on 7 Apr 1840
Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter) was 19 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter) was 21 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter) was 40 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter) was 47 years old when Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show opens in London. William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody was an American scout, bison hunter, and showman. He was born in Le Claire, Iowa Territory, but he lived for several years in his father's hometown in Toronto Township, Ontario, Canada, before the family returned to the Midwest and settled in the Kansas Territory.
Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter) was 51 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter) died on 10 May 1903 at the age of 63
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Elizabeth Lucretia Green (Buckwalter) (7 Apr 1840 - 10 May 1903), BillionGraves Record 27623 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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