Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn)

18 Jan 1840 - 22 Aug 1922

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Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn)

18 Jan 1840 - 22 Aug 1922
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Elizabeth Dunn, daughter of William Gallimore Dunn and Elizabeth Howells Dunn, was born on January 18, 1840 in Manchester England. In 1851 her father after having joined the Mormon Church, left for Salt Lake City, Utah so he could follow the teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Sain
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Life Information

Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn)

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Simini

May 29, 2011
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GraveScavenger

May 29, 2011

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Elizabeth Dunn

Contributor: Simini Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Elizabeth Dunn, daughter of William Gallimore Dunn and Elizabeth Howells Dunn, was born on January 18, 1840 in Manchester England. In 1851 her father after having joined the Mormon Church, left for Salt Lake City, Utah so he could follow the teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The following year, 1852 Elizabeth at the age of eleven, with her mother and two other children, followed their father and husband to Utah. They left in the A.O. Smoot’s Company. They suffered many hardships on their trip. While crossing the plains Elizabeth would walk twenty one miles a day and she had to wade across many streams as there was not room for her to ride in the ox carts. After many long weary months they reached Salt Lake City in September 1852 and joined their father. For several years Elizabeth lived in Salt Lake City with her parents, then in the year 1856 she became the bride of Peter Stubbs whom she had met in England at the age of eight, at this time he was working in a bakery shop. Their marriage was performed by B. Hickenlooper in the sixth Ward in Salt Lake City, Utah, on October 19th. Brother Charles Walker and William Barnes were witnesses to their marriage. Her marriage was a happy one, but full of trials and hardships. Many times it was hard to get food and at the time of Johnson’s Army they were sent to Camp Floyd. She and her husband went there and would take supplies to the soldiers and receive potatoes and other food stuffs in payment. They also earned money and with this they returned to Provo, Utah and started in the business running a bake shop. They worked very hard to make this a success and their efforts were realized by the bakery becoming a very thriving business. In the home as well as in the bakery Elizabeth was known as a very good cook, this virtue she passed on to all her daughters. Sometime after her marriage she was given a blessing by Eliza R. Snow in which she was told that she would be given the gift of healing. This blessing was surely answered and throughout Elizabeth’s whole life she was called many times to the bedside of the sick and through her kind efforts and with the help of many home remedies she made herself she healed not only her own family but many neighbors, friends and other relatives. Her home remedies to this day are remembered and used in the homes of her children and grandchildren. It was never too much work to go to the help of others. Oft times when called to the sick, she would gather clean sheets, towels and any other necessities she might know of what the people would need in their sickness and from her own home would supply all needs along with her home remedies. Elizabeth Stubbs was the mother of eleven children of her own. August 13th, 1886 Ann Wride Stubbs, second wife of Peter Stubbs died and Elizabeth took seven of Ann’s children, a baby three months old, a girl five, one eight and twelve and seventeen, also boys fourteen and one twenty-one. Some of these children were the age of her own. These children she raised as her own never showing any partiality between her family and Ann’s. They were raised as one big family and she was a good mother to them all. They loved and respected her very much and to this day all living children of this family are very close in joy, sickness or sadness. For sixty five years she lived in Provo, Utah she was always a faithful worker in the Mormon Church. She was one of the first Relief Society Teachers in Provo. During this time it was sometimes necessary for her to walk many blocks carrying a baby, gathering donations for the Relief Society. Everyone enjoyed the company of Elizabeth Stubbs, she was known to all as a cheerful, loveable and witty person. Her wit was very outstanding and at all times would say clever witty things that made everyone enjoy being around her. During the World War, eleven grandsons went into service for their country, several were sent across, but only one grandson and one great grandson saw actual service. Every one of these boys came back in perfect health and physical condition, none of them having suffered from wounds nor from the effects of the “flue” which raged furiously in all the camps. Elizabeth Stubbs enjoyed a very healthy life, never having any serious sickness. She was strong in mind and body, this blessing she passed on to all her posterity. At the age of 82, on August 13, 1922 she passed on suffering from no illness but just tired by age. Her memory is a beautiful picture in the hearts of all those that knew her. There wasn’t room for her to ride, so she walked across the plains at the age of 12 years. After they arrived here they went through many hardships. All they had for lights was some kind of string and put in some kind of a container in grease. They lit the string. They were called ***** lights. She married Peter Stubbs at the age of 17 years. She didn’t have any kettles or pans; she borrowed from the neighbors, a container and baked bread over a fire place. When her first baby was born she laid on a hard bed of straw. She said she never would have another baby on such a hard bed. She would take her baby in the fields lay it down on weeds while she gathered milk weed pods enough to dry and open for a bed. She had 11 children also raised 7 children of a second wife, who died and left a 3 month old baby. The two families grew up like one family. She lived to be 82 years old. She nursed all her daughters and daughter-in-laws with their babies also many other women until she was quite old. She was a wonderful woman. Her Children Born Jane Elizabeth Feb 13, 1858 Mary Ellen Jul 5, 1860 Emma Selena Aug 20, 1862 Hannah Aseneth Apr 16, 1864 Peter Stubbs Jr Nov 15, 1867 James Ephraim Dec 7, 1868 Sarah Ann Mar 13, 1871 Fanny Adah Dec 24, 1873 Albert Peter Oct 24, 1877 Alfred Dunn Oct 16, 1880 One still born child Written by Adele Peters and Ruby Taylor Stewart

Life Timeline of Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn)

1840
Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) was born on 18 Jan 1840
Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) was 20 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) was 23 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1862
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Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) was 40 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) was 49 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
1889
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Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) was 56 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
1895
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Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) was 64 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
1903
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Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) was 77 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
1917
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Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) died on 22 Aug 1922 at the age of 82
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Grave record for Elizabeth Stubbs (Dunn) (18 Jan 1840 - 22 Aug 1922), BillionGraves Record 4623 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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