Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal)

10 Jan 1852 - 16 Apr 1925

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Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal)

10 Jan 1852 - 16 Apr 1925
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THOMAS & ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON On Memorial Monument to early settlers of American Fork, Utah Cemetery (Copied 5-31-05 by Ione Bush) Thomas was born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 3 August 1839 to George and Jane Hutchison (Hutchinson) Crookston, the third in a family of seven. They were tenant

Life Information

Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal)

Born:
Married: 1871
Died:

American Fork Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Earnest in the pursuit of righteousness & revered for honesty

Headstone Description

Thomas was born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 3 August 1839 to George and Jan Hutchinson (Hutchinson) Crookston, the third in a family of seven. They were tenants of a coal company owned house. Thomas went to school for a short time but studied from his father's many books. When he was sixteen and his father forty five the family immigrated to America, like so many others, the six-week journey on a sailing ship was full of hardships. They landed in New York in 1855, then made the journey to Utah by ox team. Thomas and his sister, Janet, lived in several places before the family finally came together in American Fork where they lived in a dugout, later building a house at 145 South 100 West. /

In 1864 Thomas went to Montana to work in the mines where earned enough for a span of mules. He then freighted across Nevada and Montana. At the onset of the Black Hawk War he was hauling coal to a blacksmith in Salt Lake and was subsequently called to serve in the war in Manti's twelve mile canyon area. (Mayheld) /

Elizabeth (Betsy) Crystal was also born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 10 January 1852, the daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth cousins Crystal. The family of eight left Scotland 27 May 1863 on the ship Cynosure, enduring the eight-week trip with the usual hardships, but also measles. After landing in New York they started immediately for Utah by ox team. Baby William died during the journey and was hurriedly buried in the flour box of the wagon train captain. They were met in Salt Lake by an uncle Peter Adamson, coming directly to American Fork, where they settled on the northwest corner of what is now called Merchant ST. After the father made sufficient abodes they built a home on East State Road. In this house an additional seven children were welcomed into the famliy. /

Elizabeth worked for the Crooks family for a time, then was employed in Salt Lake until her marriage at age 20 in 1871. Thomas was then 32. The marriage was performed in Judge Obed Stricklands office. The judge was appointed associate justice to server in the first district at Provo by Abraham Lincoln. They became the parents of nine children, Elizabeth, Thomas, Andrew, George, John, Byron, Lenorah (died as a child), Pearl, and Frank. /

Elizabeth died 16 April 1925 at age 73 having endured the hard work and hardships of that era yet she was known as a kind, honest and industrious woman. The services were conducted in the family home by The Reverend W. Murphy of Payson, who also dedicated the grave in the American Fork Cemetery. /

At the time of his death on 25 April 1933, Thomas was the oldest resident of American Fork, being 94. His life was full of hardships but one of an earnest pursuit of righteousness. He was the proud father of nine children. He was cut off from the church because he would not stop trading at Auerbach's and Walkers in Salt Lake, where he could obtain better prices. He said in his typical Scottish brogue, "I'll go where I can get the most for my money." His religion was to pay his honest debts and to owe no man. He is buried in the American Fork Cemetery. /

The last paragraph was taken from an account by his son Byron. The rest of the information is from the family records in the possession of Phyllis O. Crookston. That which pertains to Judge Strickland is taken from the History of Utah by Andrew L. Neff.
Transcriber

Conyngham

June 27, 2011
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trishkovach

July 24, 2011
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Soonersports1

July 24, 2011
Transcriber

ABC

April 7, 2020
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Mike M

April 14, 2020
Photographer

PapaMoose

June 26, 2011

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Thomas & Elizabeth C. Crookston: mem. at Amer. Frk. UT Cem.

Contributor: Soonersports1 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

THOMAS & ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON On Memorial Monument to early settlers of American Fork, Utah Cemetery (Copied 5-31-05 by Ione Bush) Thomas was born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 3 August 1839 to George and Jane Hutchison (Hutchinson) Crookston, the third in a family of seven. They were tenants of a coal company owned house. Thomas went to school for a short time but studied from his father’s many books. When he was sixteen and his father forty five the family immigrated to America, like so many others, the six-week journey on a sailing ship was full of hardships. They landed in New York in 1855, then made the journey to Utah by ox team. Thomas and his sister, Janet, lived in several places before the family finally came together in American Fork where they lived in a dugout, later building a house at 145 South 100 West. In 1864 Thomas went to Montana to work in the mines where he earned enough for a span of mules. He then freighted across Nevada and Montana. At the onset of the Black Hawk War he was hauling coal to a blacksmith in Salt Lake, and was subsequently called to serve in the war in Manti’s, twelve mile canyon area, (Mayfield). Elizabeth (Betsy) Crystal was also born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 10 January 1852, the daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Cousins Crystal. The family of eight left Scotland 27 May 1863 on the ship Cynosure, enduring the eight-week trip with the usual hardships, but also measles. After landing in New York they started immediately for Utah by ox team. Baby William died during the journey and was hurriedly buried in the flour box of the wagon train captain. They were met in Salt Lake by an uncle Peter Adamson, coming directly to American Fork, where they settled on the northwest corner of what is now called Merchant St. After the father made sufficient adobes they built a home on East state Road. In this house an additional seven children were welcomed into the family. Elizabeth worked for the Crooks Family for a time, then was employed in Salt Lake until her marriage at age 20 in 1871. Thomas was then 32. The marriage was performed in Judge Obed Stricklands office. The judge was appointed associate justice to serve in the first district at Provo by Abraham Lincoln. They became the parents of nine children, Elizabeth, Thomas, Andrew, George, John, Byron, Lenorah (died as a child), Pearl and Frank. Elizabeth died 16 April 1925 at age 73 having endured the hard work and hardships of that era yet she was known as a kind, honest and industrious woman. The services were conducted in the family home by the Reverend W. Murphy of Payson, who also dedicated the grave in the American Fork Cemetery. At the time of his death on 25 April 1933, Thomas was the oldest resident of American Fork, being 94. His life was full of hardships but one of an earnest pursuit of righteousness. He was the proud father of nine children. He was cut off from the church because he would not stop trading at Auerbach’s and Walkers in Salt Lake, where he could obtain better prices. He said in the typical Scottish brogue, “I’ll go where I can get the most for my money.” His religion was to pay his honest debts and to owe no man. He is buried in the American Fork Cemetery. The last paragraph was taken from an account by his son Byron. The rest of the information is from family records in possession of Phyllis O. Crookston. That which pertains to Judge Strickland is taken from The History of Utah by Andrew L. Neff. EARNEST IN THE PURSUIT OF RIGHTEOUSNESS & REVERED FOR HONESTY.”

ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON (Betsy)

Contributor: Soonersports1 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON Elizabeth, commonly known as Betsy was born on January 10, 1852 in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland. She was a daughter of Andrew Crystal and Elizabeth Cousins. The family (her parents and siblings), consisting of six children and the parents, left Scotland on May 27, 1863. Elizabeth was 11 years old when they arrived in Utah. During their voyage on the ship “Cynosure” across the ocean, the family had the measles. Two daughters, Margaret and Agnes, were blind most all the way. The trip across the ocean took eight weeks, they landed in New York. It was late summer so they started immediately for Utah. Elizabeth and the older children walked most all the way. One night baby William died, and was hurriedly buried, so the company of ox-teams could move on. Having no caskets the captain of the company, removed the flour from his “flour box,” and baby William’s body was buried. Peter Adamson, an uncle met the family in Salt Lake with a horse team, and brought them directly to American Fork, Utah. After settling in American Fork, seven more children were born. The names of all the children were: Elizabeth, James, Mary, Margaret, Agnes, William, Andrew, David, Peter, Annie, Janet (Nettie), Euphema and John. William and Euphema both died in babyhood. John, the last of the family, was never married. He was a plumber by trade and lived in American Fork. He was missed one day in 1925, and was found dead in his room, which was in a house owned by an old couple by the name of Gardner. The house in which he was found was located two blocks south of the Bank building in American Fork. No one knew how long he had been dead. (Inserted by Reed Crystal) The Crystal family first lived in a long row of houses on the northwest end of what is now called Merchant Street. They lived here until the father made enough adobe brick to build their home on the old state road. At first Elizabeth worked in American Fork, for a Scotish family named Crooks. She then went to Salt Lake and worked until the time of her marriage to Thomas Crookston in 1871. She became the mother of nine children: Elizabeth, Thomas, Andrew, George, John, Byron, Lennie, Pearl, and Frank. She was known to be a very honest, industrious and kind woman. Elizabeth Crystal Crookston died April 16, 1925 at the age of 73. Her mother was Elizabeth Cousins Crystal born at Fifeshire, Scotland February 25, 1832 and died February 2, 1921 at the age of 88.

Thomas & Elizabeth C. Crookston: mem. at Amer. Frk. UT Cem.

Contributor: Celique Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

THOMAS & ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON On Memorial Monument to early settlers of American Fork, Utah Cemetery (Copied 5-31-05 by Ione Bush) Thomas was born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 3 August 1839 to George and Jane Hutchison (Hutchinson) Crookston, the third in a family of seven. They were tenants of a coal company owned house. Thomas went to school for a short time but studied from his father’s many books. When he was sixteen and his father forty five the family immigrated to America, like so many others, the six-week journey on a sailing ship was full of hardships. They landed in New York in 1855, then made the journey to Utah by ox team. Thomas and his sister, Janet, lived in several places before the family finally came together in American Fork where they lived in a dugout, later building a house at 145 South 100 West. In 1864 Thomas went to Montana to work in the mines where he earned enough for a span of mules. He then freighted across Nevada and Montana. At the onset of the Black Hawk War he was hauling coal to a blacksmith in Salt Lake, and was subsequently called to serve in the war in Manti’s, twelve mile canyon area, (Mayfield). Elizabeth (Betsy) Crystal was also born in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland 10 January 1852, the daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Cousins Crystal. The family of eight left Scotland 27 May 1863 on the ship Cynosure, enduring the eight-week trip with the usual hardships, but also measles. After landing in New York they started immediately for Utah by ox team. Baby William died during the journey and was hurriedly buried in the flour box of the wagon train captain. They were met in Salt Lake by an uncle Peter Adamson, coming directly to American Fork, where they settled on the northwest corner of what is now called Merchant St. After the father made sufficient adobes they built a home on East state Road. In this house an additional seven children were welcomed into the family. Elizabeth worked for the Crooks Family for a time, then was employed in Salt Lake until her marriage at age 20 in 1871. Thomas was then 32. The marriage was performed in Judge Obed Stricklands office. The judge was appointed associate justice to serve in the first district at Provo by Abraham Lincoln. They became the parents of nine children, Elizabeth, Thomas, Andrew, George, John, Byron, Lenorah (died as a child), Pearl and Frank. Elizabeth died 16 April 1925 at age 73 having endured the hard work and hardships of that era yet she was known as a kind, honest and industrious woman. The services were conducted in the family home by the Reverend W. Murphy of Payson, who also dedicated the grave in the American Fork Cemetery. At the time of his death on 25 April 1933, Thomas was the oldest resident of American Fork, being 94. His life was full of hardships but one of an earnest pursuit of righteousness. He was the proud father of nine children. He was cut off from the church because he would not stop trading at Auerbach’s and Walkers in Salt Lake, where he could obtain better prices. He said in the typical Scottish brogue, “I’ll go where I can get the most for my money.” His religion was to pay his honest debts and to owe no man. He is buried in the American Fork Cemetery. The last paragraph was taken from an account by his son Byron. The rest of the information is from family records in possession of Phyllis O. Crookston. That which pertains to Judge Strickland is taken from The History of Utah by Andrew L. Neff. EARNEST IN THE PURSUIT OF RIGHTEOUSNESS & REVERED FOR HONESTY.”

ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON (Betsy)

Contributor: Celique Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

ELIZABETH CRYSTAL CROOKSTON Elizabeth, commonly known as Betsy was born on January 10, 1852 in Dysart, Fifeshire, Scotland. She was a daughter of Andrew Crystal and Elizabeth Cousins. The family (her parents and siblings), consisting of six children and the parents, left Scotland on May 27, 1863. Elizabeth was 11 years old when they arrived in Utah. During their voyage on the ship “Cynosure” across the ocean, the family had the measles. Two daughters, Margaret and Agnes, were blind most all the way. The trip across the ocean took eight weeks, they landed in New York. It was late summer so they started immediately for Utah. Elizabeth and the older children walked most all the way. One night baby William died, and was hurriedly buried, so the company of ox-teams could move on. Having no caskets the captain of the company, removed the flour from his “flour box,” and baby William’s body was buried. Peter Adamson, an uncle met the family in Salt Lake with a horse team, and brought them directly to American Fork, Utah. After settling in American Fork, seven more children were born. The names of all the children were: Elizabeth, James, Mary, Margaret, Agnes, William, Andrew, David, Peter, Annie, Janet (Nettie), Euphema and John. William and Euphema both died in babyhood. John, the last of the family, was never married. He was a plumber by trade and lived in American Fork. He was missed one day in 1925, and was found dead in his room, which was in a house owned by an old couple by the name of Gardner. The house in which he was found was located two blocks south of the Bank building in American Fork. No one knew how long he had been dead. (Inserted by Reed Crystal) The Crystal family first lived in a long row of houses on the northwest end of what is now called Merchant Street. They lived here until the father made enough adobe brick to build their home on the old state road. At first Elizabeth worked in American Fork, for a Scotish family named Crooks. She then went to Salt Lake and worked until the time of her marriage to Thomas Crookston in 1871. She became the mother of nine children: Elizabeth, Thomas, Andrew, George, John, Byron, Lennie, Pearl, and Frank. She was known to be a very honest, industrious and kind woman. Elizabeth Crystal Crookston died April 16, 1925 at the age of 73. Her mother was Elizabeth Cousins Crystal born at Fifeshire, Scotland February 25, 1832 and died February 2, 1921 at the age of 88.

Life timeline of Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal)

Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal) was born on 10 Jan 1852
Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal) was 9 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal) was 28 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal) was 37 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal) was 41 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal) was 54 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal) was 63 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal) died on 16 Apr 1925 at the age of 73
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Elizabeth Crookston (Crystal) (10 Jan 1852 - 16 Apr 1925), BillionGraves Record 28096 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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