Eliza J. Bird

10 Mar 1845 - 20 Feb 1900

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Eliza J. Bird

10 Mar 1845 - 20 Feb 1900
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Kelsey Bird was born January 11, 1837 at Hector, Tompkin Co., New York, to Charles and Mary Ann Kennedy. Kelsey was born just a few months after his parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, they being baptized in August 18, 1836. Six children were born in New York. One account
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Life Information

Eliza J. Bird

Born:
Died:

Benjamin Cemetery

8435 S 3200 W
Benjamin, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Husband: Kelsey Bird, Wife of Kelsey Bird
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crex

June 5, 2011
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Kody

June 1, 2011

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LIFE SKETCH OF KELSEY BIRD

Contributor: denis_ashton Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

Kelsey Bird was born January 11, 1837 at Hector, Tompkin Co., New York, to Charles and Mary Ann Kennedy. Kelsey was born just a few months after his parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, they being baptized in August 18, 1836. Six children were born in New York. One account claims another son, James, was born in Pennsylvania. Another son was born in 1839 at Far West. He died the same day. Bradford K, was born January 26, 1840 in Clayton, Adam Co., Illinois. They took an active part in the church and in the development of the community. Charles received his endownment in the Nauvoo Temple January 2, 1846. Charles Bird and his father, Benjamin Freeman Bird, were merchants in New York and in New Jersey. Charles and Benjamin were religious men as evidenced by their writings, etc., such as wills and legal documents. They were fairly well educated and had considerable wealth. These men heard the gospel and joined the church in its very early days. Benjamin Freeman was baptized in 1835, only five years after the organization of the church. These families were well-to-do. Their sacrifice and devotion to their new found faith places them in that unselfish group of pioneers who were responsible for the rapid growth of the church. Benjamin Freeman Bird was born January 19, 1778, the son of Jeremiah F. Bird., who was born about 1748, both in Rahway, Essex Co., New Jersey. Benjamin married Meribah Reeves, who was born May 8, 1784 in Essex Co., New Jersey. Charles was born September 19, 1803, in Flanders, Morris Co., New Jersey. Mary Ann Kennedy was born December 7, 1807, in Barrington , Massachusetts. These families moved west with the early church members. After the death of the Prophet when permanent plans were being made to move west, the Bird families were in Brigham Young's group and came with him as far as Council Bluffs. Charles was put in charge of a group by President Brigham Young to remain at Council Bluffs and raise corn and wheat for the companies who would arrive the following year. Here they served for three years, 1847 to 1850. They left from the Missouri River June 3, 1850 with the Milo Andrus Company. It consisted of 206 persons, 51 wagons, 9 horses, 6 mules, 184 oxen, 122 cows, 44 sheep, 6 yearlings, 19 dogs, 1 pig and 2 ducks. Thomas Steed wrote in his diary, "We crossed the Missouri River and traveled along the south side. At Salt Creek the streams were so high that the bridges were washed away. We built rafts and floated our wagons across. Sickness and death was before us and behind us. Brother Hyde told us the day our company was organized that if we would be faithful and keep the name of God sacred, we should be blessed with health and protected on our journey. One birth and one death occurred on the journey, so we entered Salt Lake Valley with the same number of persons as we left Council Bluffs With." Captain Andrus wrote, "we have passed the graves of hundreds, yet God has preserved us, for which we feel thankful. Peace and union prevail in our mist," They arrived in Salt Lake City August 3, 1850. Kelsey was about 13 1/2 years old at this time. They settled in Cottonwood, where Charles was bishop for many years. On the 15th day of February, 1853 Charles married his second wife, Sarah Ann Dunsdon. Under assignment from Brigham Young, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his son Richard were sent to Springville, Charles and his family to Mendon, Cache Co., Utah, and James and William into Idaho. Charles took up land in Mendon and built himself a home for his wife Mary Ann and their 14 children, and Sarah Ann and their 11 children. Mary Ann died October 1 1867, leaving the care of her younger children to Sarah Ann. Charles was a prominent man in Cache Co., being educated and having some wealth, which he generously shared with the church and community. He died at Mendon September 29, 1884. Sarah Ann lived until her family was raised, her death date being December 5, 1899. Kelsey spent his early manhood in Mendon. At the age of about twenty-five he married Eliza Jane Perry, age 16,in the old endowment house on May 18, 1861. She was the daughter of Orren Alonzo Perry and Mary Ann Hoops. They made their home in Mendon. Where he, Kelsey, farmed. He was very successful, having sheep, cattle and horses. He accumulated the best farm equipment t be had at that time. On December 6, 1861 a little daughter (Mary Ann) was born, who died at birth. On the 28th of October 1862 a little son was born, and he also died at birth (named Charles Alonzo). The a little girl was born on the 16th of October 1863. They named her Eliza Jane. On the 20th of January, 1865 Kelsey Charles Arrived. On the 23rd of February, 1867 Kelsey took a second wife, Ann Muir. They were Married in the old endowment house. She was the daughter of Walter Muir and Mary Ross. She was born May 7, 1848 in Crofthead, Reafsewshire, Scotland. It was in Scotland that they joined the church. It was not to be the father's privilege to come to Utah. He died in Scotland on August 15, 1860, just a short time after joining the church. Mary said her greatest desire since joining the church was to raise her children in the fear of the Lord and to raise them to be a credit to the church. So leaving her comfortable home and many of her dear ones, three of whom were buried in Scotland, she, with a family of five (three boys and two girls) set sail from Liverpool in the sailing ship "Art Wright", May 28, 1866. Two of her children had emigrated to America previously. She arrived in New York July 6, 1866. Leaving here, they crossed the river in a down pour of rain in an open cattle boat, which was flat surfaced with just a chain around the outside. This was just at the close of the Civil War, when means of travel was very difficult. Landing at New Haven, they boarded the train, reaching Montreal. They continued from here, still traveling by train, until they reached the banks of the Missouri July 22nd. After five days of travel across the plains, they were visited by a band of five hundred Pawnee Indian warriors who told them if they would give them flour, meat, etc., that they could travel over their lands unmolested and that they could use their wood for fires and the oxen could feed on their grass. Two or three oxen had to be given to the Indians for meat. The rest of the journey across the plains began July 25, 1866 with ox teams. Mary Muir walked nearly all the way, arriving in Salt Lake City in October, 1866. They remained in Salt Lake City only for a few days, then traveled northward to Mendon, Cache Co., Utah. Here Mary remained until her death, earning her living by caring for the sick. The final destination of Mary Ross Muir in Mendon provides the setting for her daughter, Annie Muir, and Kelsey Bird to meet and marry. As was stated earlier, she became the second wife. Eliza Jane and Ann became good friends. Their love for each other lasted through out their lives, and they loved each other's children. Ann's children called Eliza Jane 'Aunt Jane' and Eliza Jane's children call Ann 'Aunt Annie'. On November 7,1867 Alonzo William was born to Eliza Jane. Then on March 10,1868 Kelsey Walter was born to Annie. The next two babies were born with in two days of each other. Maribah, a little girl, was born to Annie July 23, 1870 and Lewis Richard was born to Eliza Jane July 25, 1870. On December 30, 1871 Moses George Albert was born to Annie. On March 19, 1873 Sarah Ann was born to Eliza Jane . On March 7, 1874 Annie presented her husband with twin boys, Peter Alma and James Alvin. On December 28, 1875 another little girl, Agnes Betsy, came to Annie. Soon after this Kelsey, with nine other families, was sent to Vermillion in Sevier, Co., Utah by Brigham Young. Some of the other men were Peter Gotfredson, Dastrup, and Cudddabacks. Their trip to Vermillion was slow and tedious because of their stock and farm equipment, nine small children, household furnishings and food supplies. They brought cows. horses and sheep, chickens and pigs. they could not travel many miles each day and water was a necessity at the camp. One of their camps was at Salt Lake Creek, south of Levan. When they made camp at night, the children would her the stock after the day's journey. They arrived in Vermillion in the early spring of 1875. Of course the crops would be the first consideration. Kelsey put the first plow in the Vermillion Canal. That was their only source of water, and it is still a main water source. After planting as much ground as they could get cleared for the first year's crop and getting sufficient water onto the land for irrigation, the next concern was a permanent home. Kelsey hauled logs from the canyon and built on the east side of the Sevier River. He planted the trees that still grow by the Black Knowels. He also made corrals and planted a garden. The garden then belonged to the women. While at Vermillion Kelsey took Kelsey Walter, who was between 9 and 10 years old (and maybe other sons??) with a team and wagon to Manti to work on the temple. He donated three weeks with his team getting rocks out and hauling them. On August 6, 1876 a little girl was born to Eliza Jane. They named her Rosetta. She was Eliza Jane's last baby. She was never well after that. Annie gave birth to John Henry in February(either 24th or 28th), 1878. Later, both families lived in Gooseberry --- about 1879. Kelsey was very superior physically and had great ambition. He was always a good provider. He was a stern man and demanded obedience from his children. He was appointed and set apart as presiding elder of the Gooseberry Branch of Salina Ward on January 21, 1883 by Bishop Jens Jensen. Eliza Jane was appointed president of the Wheat Association and also treasurer of the Relief Society, being set apart the same day, also by Bishop Jensen. At one time Eliza Jane's two oldest girls, then in their teens, wanted new dresses for some particular occasion. Without asking, Annie loaded some wheat on the wagon and took it to Salina, sold it, and bought material for the dresses. Then she and Eliza Jane made the dresses. Kelsey, with the aid of a George Gates, built a good sized house -- two large rooms on each side with loft bedrooms and a lean-to-kitchen on each side. Each family had one side of the house., giving them at least three bedrooms each and their lean-to kitchens. There was a large fireplace in each part of the house. On February 27, 1880 Joseph Smith Bird was born. On June 20, 1882 a little boy, Mart Andrew, was born; he died the same day. (Annie's children) On November 11, 1884 Annie presented her husband with the second set of twin boys --- David Mormon and Brigham Abraham. Hyrum Leroy arrived December 29, 1886 and two years later on October 14, 1888 Mary Ann was born. Ettia Frances is listed on the family group sheet, but no date is given. (This made 14 children for Annie and 8 for Eliza Jane) The authorities of the land were after Kelsey for having two wives. So he took Eliza Jane and her family, some sheep and cattle and went to Benjamin, Utah Co., Utah and started over again. He left Annie and her family in Gooseberry. But he was taken to court, nevertheless. On Tuesday, October 22, 1889 (On Martha Jane Smith's birth date) in the 1st district court at Provo, Utah, Kelsey Bird of Benjamin, Utah was sentenced by Judge Blackburn to six months imprisonment and $300.00 fine for unlawful cohabitation. Monday, April 21, 1890 Kelsey Bird of Benjamin was discharged from the penitentiary. (copied from the church Chronology by Martha Jane Smith, May 20, 1953, at Price, Utah.) Then, on February, 20 1900 Eliza Jane died. Alonzo and his wife, Martha Abigail, said that as they sat with her that night they heard voices speak above her bed. The following is a copy of a newspaper clipping found in the family Bible: Benjamin, Utah -- Death and burial of Eliza Jane Perry Bird. Special correspondence, Benjamin, Utah Co., Utah, February 20th, of 1900. today we buried our beloved Sister Eliza Jane Perry Bird, wife of brother Kelsey Bird, who died of dropsy. She was born March 10, 1845. The funeral was held in the meeting house and was well attended. President Ann Bingham in behalf of the Relief Society bore testimony to the faithful labors of Mrs. Bird in that organization until her health became so bad that she could not attend to the same. Bishop A.J.B. Stewart, Bishop Arglye of Lake Shore, and a number of othes made addresses ulogistic of the sterling character of the deceased. Kelsey Bird was ordained a High Priest July 11, 1903 by Charles Breverton. I In his declining years, his son Alonzo W. Bird and family moved to Benjamin in order to take care of him. He had a large family, most of whom were boys. These active, energetic boys climbed the trees, picked the fruit, scattered the chickens, etc. These actions bothered their grandfather so much that Alonzo moved his family to another farm some distance away. Martha Jane, the oldest daughter, used to walk to grandpa's every day to care for him. He gave her two pretty vases, a glass plate with the picture of the temple on it and a turine. These items she valued very much. When Alonzo and family moved to Idaho, Grandfather Kelsey sold his place and went to live with Lewis R. Bird. Later he went to Mendon to see his sisters and died at their place in Mendon on the 29th of April, 1909. Lewis took him from Mendon to Benjamin for burial. Written by Martha Jane Bird Smith copied by Donna (Dee) Bird

ALONZO WILLIAM BIRD and MARTHA ABIGAIL COOK BIRD

Contributor: denis_ashton Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

ALONZO WILLIAM BIRD and MARTHA ABIGAIL COOK BIRD ~~~~~ As told by their daughter, Martha Jane Bird Smith, Oct. 16, 1973 ~~~~ and *Revised in places [noted with square brackets], information added, and re-typed by their Grand-daughter, Pat(sy) Lorraine Bird Sagers ALONZO WILLIAM and MARTHA ABIGAIL COOK BIRD As a boy, Alonzo helped his father, Kelsey Bird, with the farming and with the care of herding of his sheep. He had to take turns with herding of the sheep with his brothers. He also had to take turns going to school. He did not get much of an education, although he could read, write pretty good, and also do simple arithmetic. When he was about nineteen or twenty, Alonzo met and fell in love with Martha Abigail Cook. After awhile they decided they wanted to get married. A little story is told of how he asked for her hand from her father. Her father was standing in front of the house, and Alonzo was on a horse, and he came galloping up to her father [Isaac Cook] and said, "I want to marry one of your daughters." Her father said, "Which one?" Alonzo replied, "Martha, of course!" and he whirled his horse around and left as fast as he could go. Alonzo's father, Kelsey Bird, took a dislike to Martha, and he tried to keep them from getting married. In his talk with Alonzo, he called her a bad name (slut). Alonzo got very angry and they quarreled; and Alonzo left home, and went to live with the Isaac Cook family (Martha's family). *[NOTE: It is the belief of Pat Sagers, that because of one of Martha’s sisters who had gotten into some trouble, and was quickly married off into a polygamist marriage - that Kelsey (Alonzo’s father) was falsely accusing Martha Cook as being the same as her sister.] Alonzo William Bird and Martha Abigail Cook were married the 15th of August 1886 by Bishop Jens Jensen at Gooseberry, Sevier Co., Utah. Martha Abigail Cook, daughter of Isaac Cook and Martha Elizabeth Holden Cook, was born the 16th day of March 1868 at Nephi, Juab County, Utah. Martha's parents had moved to Gooseberry also. They lived there from 1879 to 1890. Alonzo and Martha continued to live at Gooseberry, and Martha's brother, Jim Cook, told Martha J. Smith, that his brother Wiley Cook and Alonzo did a lot of fencing for a man by the name of Rex. They used wild horses, which they broke, to work by dragging out the logs to fence with. They also cut cedar posts and hauled them out and sold them. * [NOTE: There is a reservoir in the mountains above Gooseberry, called Rex Reservoir--probably named after this same man. P.B.S.] Alonzo and Martha became the proud parents of a little son born the 24th of August 1887. He was blessed and named Alonzo William Bird, the 9th of October 1887, by T. Manning, at Gooseberry, Utah. On 22 October 1889, a daughter, (myself) Martha Jane Bird was born to them at Gooseberry, Utah. [The same day Martha's grandfather was imprisoned for polygamy. P.B.S.] Alonzo was still working for wages. He also did hunting of deer. He traded some meat for flour. Early one morning Martha had breakfast ready and on the table. Alonzo sat down to breakfast, when Martha happened to look out of the window and said, "There stands a deer!" Alonzo jumped up and grabbed his gun and took off after the deer, without eating his breakfast and without his hat. That was the last Martha saw of Alonzo for three or four days. He followed the deer until he was give out; and ran onto his father's sheep camp. One of his half brothers was at the camp. He stayed there till he was able to go again. On the 14th of August 1890, Father in Heaven saw fit to take the little son from them. They were very sad, as one can see from the following song which Martha wrote at that time: I once had a home that was happy and gay, But the joys of this wide world were nothing to me. I had no desire this wild world to roam, For the cares of my heart were my children and home. But now I'm left lonely, my joys are no more, No boy for to greet us with his plays round the door. Our boy has been taken, in the cold grave he's lain, And we're left here to mourn, till we meet again. Come all who have homes, be happy and gay; Be kind to your children, for you don't know the day, That they will be taken, you'll be left lonely like me; Then the days that are gone, you will long for to see. But death like a serpent on poisonous wing, Has flown through our house, and has left there its sting. Our boy has been taken, in the cold grave he's lain, And we're left here to mourn in our desolate home. We once had a boy that was cheerful and gay, And at night with old Coley so delightful he'd play. His sister, she'd sit by him, and join in his play, There were none on this earth, so happy as they. But now we're left lonely, our boy is no more. No plays for to greet us at night round the door. Our boy has been taken, in the cold grave he's lain, And we're left here to mourn, till we meet again. (*Note: The sister mentioned was myself (Martha Jane). I lacked eight days of being ten months old when he died. This song was written on a sheet of writing paper that was in my mother's record book which I have. As the paper was yellow and brittle, I copied the song in the record book, which is a note book.) To go on with the story, another son was born to them the 3rd of April 1892 at Gooseberry, Utah. On the 4th of August 1892, Martha and her brother were both blessed and given names - Martha Jane Bird, and Clarence Orrin Bird, by Brigham Casto, at the Church in Salina, Sevier Co., Utah. The following story Alonzo told to his sons when they were older; and they told Martha Jane when she was trying to find things to write in her story about their parents: One time Alonzo and his half-brother, Uncle Jim Bird, had reloaded their own rifle shells. Alonzo had one shell that sort of buckled and would not go into the chamber of the gun. So he tried to hold a ramrod on the edge of the head of the shell, and Uncle Jim hit the other end of the ramrod with a hammer to drive the shell into the chamber. He hit once, and not waiting for Alonzo to fix the rod for the second time, Jim hit it again. The rod had slipped onto the cap, and it exploded. It blew the shell in pieces and some of the pieces hit Alonzo in the face, and it filled his face full of powder. His eyes were also full of powder. The eye sight in his right eye was covered with powder. It blinded that eye for the rest of his life. The following incident was passed along to Pat Bird Sagers by Roy Bird from Tendoy, Idaho, who was the son of Warren Bird, and Warren was the son of Lewis Richard. Warren said they always called Alonzo, ‘Uncle Lon’, and Warren told this story: Alonzo's father, Kelsey, was quite a stern man, and apparently was kind of harsh and abusive to his wives if things didn't go right. And for some reason he had been abusive to Eliza Jane one day. Lewis had come home and heard what his father had done to his Mom, but he didn't say anything to his father about it. Then, Alonzo (Uncle Lon) came home, and when he heard what his father had done to his mother, he went to Kelsey and told him that he had better never hurt his mother again, or he would have to deal with him next time. Kelsey never struck his wife again. Warren said the family really admired and respected "Uncle Lon" for standing up for his mother, and reproving his father. It appears that Alonzo's father and mother left Gooseberry around 1888. Alonzo’s father, Kelsey, was trying to dodge the authorities of the land, for having two wives. We know Kelsey had moved Eliza Jane, and their 3 youngest children, up to Benjamin, Utah by November 24, 1888, because this is where Alonzo's 15 year old sister, Sarah Ann Bird unexpectedly died, and is buried. It wasn’t many years before the law caught up with Kelsey. On 22 Oct. 1889 he was sentenced to six months imprisonment and fined $300. He was discharged April 21, 1890. On the day that Kelsey was sentenced to prison, Alonzo's wife, gave birth to their second child, Martha Jane Bird, in Gooseberry, Utah. Alonzo, being the oldest living son of Kelsey's probably stayed behind in Gooseberry, to protect, and help his step-mother, 'Aunt Annie' take care of the large farm and livestock in Gooseberry. Alonzo's last child to be born in Gooseberry, was Clarence Orrin, and he was born 3 April 1892. The date of their removal from Gooseberry is not known, but another son, James Ivan, was born to them on 22 June 1894 at Benjamin, in Utah County, Utah. Also, Martha received a letter from her father at Vernal, Uintah Co., Utah, dated Monday, Oct. 29th 1894, saying her brother, Isaac Cook, was killed in the gilsonite mine at Fort Duchesne, Utah. The letter was addressed to her at Benjamin, Utah. Another story Alonzo told to his sons, is as follows: Alonzo and his brother, Lewis Bird, had been hunting ducks. (Alonzo had to use his left eye for shooting and everything now.) As they were returning home they decided to shoot a few rabbits. They were riding in a cart. The cart floor was made of slats, a little apart from each other. Alonzo stood his gun on the bottom of the cart. The gun slipped, fell through the slats, and caused it to shoot. It was a shotgun. It shot right through the muscle of Alonzo’s left arm, taking the pocket off his shirt, and cutting the sleeve off his shirt, except for a little three-cornered piece under his arm. The shot went through the narrow rim of Uncle Lewis' straw hat. It cut the rim right off. It was so very close to his head, and yet did not hurt him. Everyone knew that Heavenly Father was watching over them. Alonzo and Martha and their family lived in a two room log house, with a dirt roof, on a ten or twenty acre piece of ground that his father, Kelsey Bird had given them. It was located about two and one half or three miles west and north from the town of Benjamin. On this ground they raised alfalfa hay for the cow and horses; grain or wheat to make flour and pig and chicken feed. In the fall, Alonzo worked on the thrashing machine, cutting bands and measuring and sacking the grain. For his pay he received one and a half bushels of grain per day, which he stored in the flour mill. This was ground into flour for the use of the family, the shorts and bran were used for pig feed. Three more sons were born to Alonzo and Martha while living in Benjamin. Kelsey ‘Charles’ was born December 19th, 1896; Isaac Wilford was born April 7th, 1899, and Leroy was born July 30, 1901. Alonzo’s youngest sister, Rosetta, had been courting Nathaniel Gardner from Payson, Utah, and on December 30, 1895 they were married there in Benjamin, Utah. They probably remain living nearby - in Payson or Benjamin, as Rosetta’s first two children were born in Benjamin, Utah. Rosetta probably knew that her mother was dying. She gave birth to their third child and first son, Nathaniel, in Salem, Utah just one day before Eliza Jane passed away - on February 19, 1900. This must have been a time of mixed emotions for Rosetta. During the winter of 1900, Alonzo’s mother, Eliza ‘Jane’ was in very poor health. Jane had heart problems and dropsy [a diseased condition in which large amounts of fluid collect in the body tissues and cavities]. Alonzo's and Lewis' families helped their father out by taking turns in caring for Jane during her critical days - staying by her bedside both day and night. On February 20, 1900, Eliza Jane passed away. Alonzo and his wife, Martha Abigail, said that as they sat with Eliza the night of her passing, they heard voices speaking above her bed. Her death was a very sad occasion for the whole family. They all loved Eliza Jane very much. Alonzo also helped his father and brother catch fish [in Utah Lake] with a seine--a large net with sinkers along one edge and floats along the other edge. They dropped this seine from two row boats and pulled it for a ways. Sometimes it would certainly be loaded with fish. They sold the fish from door to door. Sometimes they accepted flour for fish. Alonzo and his brother enjoyed hunting ducks on Utah Lake. One time they were hunting wild ducks in a row boat on Utah Lake, and his brother was rowing the boat. Alonzo laid his gun across his lap for a minute, when BANG, a loaded shell exploded and the gun jumped off his lap into the lake. Alonzo undressed and dove into the cold water. It was so cold he could not stay in the water very long at a time, but he tried and tried, but he could not find the gun--and he never did find it. As time went on, Alonzo and Martha decided they did not have enough land for a growing family of boys. They decided to move to Idaho. But before leaving, they knew it was time to prepare to go to the Temple and get their endowments and sealing done. So they got everything all ready, and started out on the 23rd of April 1902. Soon after they left, it started raining. It took them two days to go from Benjamin to Salt Lake City, and it rained on them all the time. The morning of April 25th, 1902, they went through the Temple and did all their work for the family. When they came out of the Temple it was still raining, so they thought it would be better to go back to Benjamin and wait until the weather settled. So that is what they did, even though their intentions had been to go on to Idaho after they went through the temple. Alonzo's father, Kelsey, went along with them to the Salt Lake City Temple, and back again to Benjamin. By the time Martha and Alonzo were ready to start out for Idaho the second time, his brother, Lewis and his family were now ready to go with them. This time it was the 2nd of June 1902. Each family traveled by team and wagon, and had tents to sleep in at night. They were two weeks on the road. They arrived at their sister's, Rose and Than Gardner's place, on the foothills east of Ammon, Idaho. Their place was about two miles east of Ammon. They visited a few days with relatives, and then Alonzo got a job working on a farm for a Mr. Plank, at Taylorville, Idaho. Alonzo worked for Mr. Plank all summer and fall, and then moved back on the foothills by Rose Gardner. Alonzo and the boys got out logs and built a two room house. His brother, Lewis, moved his family to a little place called Milo, Idaho. Lewis made a home there for his family; and he died there on October 8, 1931. The winter of 1902, Alonzo's two oldest boys, Clarence and James, and his daughter, Martha, walked to school in Ammon, about two miles away. The snow was deep and drifted in big high drifts. The drifts were right over the tops of the fences. The children had great fun walking on top of the fences. In the spring of 1903, lots of sugar beets were planted. Alonzo worked with and for the farmers, planting and irrigating and cultivating beets. Alonzo and Martha’s oldest children thinned beets and weeded beets every few days all summer. In the fall, Alonzo contracted a field of beets to dig. He plowed them loose, and his children piled them in piles and topped them. Then they helped load them in the wagon, and Alonzo hauled them to the sugar factory at Sugar City. In the spring of 1904, Alonzo received a letter from a neighbor of his father's, Kelsey Bird, saying that Kelsey was very ill, and needed Alonzo to come back to Benjamin and take care of him, and if he would, he would get everything Kelsey owned. So Alonzo sold everything he owned except his teams, wagon, and the household effects and loaded the wagon, and once again they left for Benjamin, Utah. When they arrived at Idaho Falls, Alonzo put his pregnant wife, and there little boy, Leroy, on the train and sent them on ahead. The rest of the family went by team and wagon, and it took them about two weeks to travel back to Benjamin. Alonzo and his family moved in with Kelsey to take care of him, and that fall another son, Lyndon was born on the 30th of September 1904. During the Spring and into the Summer, Kelsey was getting really fed up this the antics of his grandsons. They ran all over the place and climbed trees and picked fruit before it was ripe. He finely caught Charlie in a plum tree, so he told him to go and get an ax and cut the tree down. Charlie wanted to know why. Grandpa Kelsey said, “So you can get the fruit easier without climbing the trees.” Kelsey was getting old and not feeling very well, and he couldn’t stand to be around Alonzo’s noisy boys all day - so Alonzo and his family had another move coming! Alonzo rented a two room house in Benjamin from a Mr. Losey about a mile closer to school, church, and the store, etc. Alonzo worked for different farmers gathering in their crops. Then he worked again on the threshing machine, cutting bands and also measuring and sacking the grain. It was while they were living at the Losey place that Martha Jane finally got a baby sister. She was born on the 20th of November 1906, and they named her Voilet Elizabeth. Alonzo and Martha now had six living boys and two daughters. By this time Martha Jane was old enough to be a big help to her Grandfather Kelsey. Every few days she would walk up to his place, and straighten up his house, and do some little chores for him. It was in the spring of 1907 that Alonzo moved his family back to Idaho. This time he bought 20 acres of land at Rudy, Idaho. Later the name of the ward was changed to Clark Ward. Alonzo hauled logs from the mountains and built a two room house there. It was soon afterwards that Kelsey Bird sold his farm in Benjamin and put the money in the bank. That same year there was a depression and when he tried to get his money out of the bank they would only give him ten cents on the dollar and it broke him! He was 70 years old, alone and nowhere to live so he decided to live with his different children, and came to Idaho to live with his daughter Rosetta and son’s Alonzo and Lewis. In 1909 Grandpa Kelsey decided to go to Mendon, Utah to see his sister (Henrietta Shumway) and other extended families for awhile. One day he didn't feel very well, so he started to lay down on the bed. He didn't even get down on the bed before he was dead. He died in Mendon, on April 29, 1909. Kelsey's sisters called Lewis, and Lewis called Alonzo, but for some reason it was impossible for Alonzo to go with Lewis at that time, and his sister, Rosetta could not go as she was expecting another baby in a couple months. So Lewis R. Bird, went alone, and picked up his father's body in Mendon, Utah and took him to Benjamin, Utah for burial. He was buried along beside his first wife, Eliza Jane Perry Bird, and their daughter, Sarah Ann Bird. Alonzo and Martha's third daughter was born June 22, 1909 in Clark Ward, Freemont County, Idaho. She was blessed and given the name of Edith Bird, on August 8, 1909. Edith was the tenth and last child born to Alonzo and Martha. That winter or early spring of 1910, while it was still very cold, all the boys, and Voilet and Martha all had the measles. Four at a time--The three older boys and Voilet first, and then the three small boys and Martha Jane. Alonzo also split the top of his foot open with a broad ax. He was hewing some logs and the ax glanced off and hit his foot. Alonzo heard the government was throwing open the Indian Reservation in Utah, to people who wanted to file and homestead on it. So he decided to go to Utah and find out the particulars about it. About the first of March 1910, he left for Utah. He did a lot of traveling around, on foot, and returned about the middle of April 1910. He had filed on 160 acres of land. Alonzo sold his 20 acres of land at Clark Ward, together with some improvements he had made, and bought another wagon and a small team. The family loaded their personal effects on the two wagons and left for the Indian Reservation in Utah on the 16th of May 1910. It was a hard trip, especially on the small team. The trip took them three weeks. They arrived the 5th of June 1910. They were a little disappointed when they saw the place. There was a creek in a sort of canyon called Water Holler. On each side of that was a hill, mostly rocks. The family lived in tents while Alonzo and his boys hauled out logs to build a house. They built a 2 room cabin on the north side of the creek. People living three or four miles away gave them starts of fruit trees, mostly apricot trees. They planted them, and also some garden stuff. Alonzo and his boys found quite a few swarms of bees along the creeks in the trees. He made boxes and they caught the bees and put them in the boxes. They caught quite a lot of them, maybe thirty stands or so. Alonzo planted alfalfa and every where a damp spot could be found on the hillsides, he planted bull clover. Honey made from bull clover is clear like water. When it crystallizes it is white like snow and is really good honey. Alonzo bought an extractor and different things he needed in the care of honey. Then in 1913 or maybe 1914, Alonzo's son James, took a wagon load of five gallon cans out to Salt Lake City, and Provo and sold it for $12.00 per can. The total was better than a thousand dollars. Later, foul brood got started in his bees and after that he did not do so good. But they still sold quite a lot of apricots, and they raised some grain to make their flour; alfalfa for the horses, cow, pigs, and a few sheep, which Alonzo's son, Charley, had accepted for his pay for herding sheep. Alonzo and Martha were good honest people, and they were religious in a sense. They belonged to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and as stated before, had been through the Temple. They paid their tithing and fast offering, but were not actively engaged in doing Church work. They always had their family prayers, every night and every morning, and the blessing was always asked on the food. Martha took sick, and was taken to Roosevelt, to be close to the doctor, but the doctor was away and did not come to see her. She died there the 3rd of September 1932, age 64 years 5 months and 18 days. Alonzo and his daughter, Martha Jane, was with her, and the whole family came and saw her the night she died. Her funeral was held 5 Sept. 1932, in the Bluebell Ward, and burial was in the Bluebell Cemetery. Alonzo and his son Lyndon lived right at the end of the school bus route, and Martha Jane’s husband, Frank Smith, was running the school bus. Martha Jane and her husband, Frank, thought it would help them all out if they moved down there and helped take care of them. So they did. Lyndon got married April 27, 1933, so he and his wife, Alta, were there to take care of Alonzo. Then Martha and her family moved back up to the town Bluebell. Lynn and his wife began to get a family quite fast. As time went on, there was a lot of noise as the children got older. Alonzo couldn't get used to their ways, and was trying to get courage up to leave. In April, Martha heard he wanted to leave, so she asked him if he would come and live with them, but he refused, at first. Then later on, he said he would come live with them. So on the 10th of May 1941, Martha and her husband, Frank Smith, went after Alonzo, and he went and lived with them. Martha's family was gone--their two boys were in the Army, so there was no noise. Alonzo was not a bit well, but he would not let anyone do anything for him. Alonzo passed away about noon on the 8th of February 1942. He was buried the 10th of February 1942. Both death and funeral were in Bluebell, Duchesne County, Utah, and also in the Bluebell Cemetery. He was 75 years, 3 months and 1 day. Written by Martha Jane Bird Smith, 17 October 1973. (The wording was revised a bit by Pat L. Bird Sagers, August 1997 –mostly such things as "my father" changed to "Alonzo", etc. for easier reading, for my own family. A few additional stories were added to make the history more complete.

HISTORY OF MARY HOOPES PERRY

Contributor: denis_ashton Created: 1 year ago Updated: 4 months ago

HISTORY OF MARY HOOPES PERRY BY PAT L. BIRD SAGERS - February 2008 Lewisberry, York County, Pennsylvania Mary Hoopes was born January 17, 1822 in Lewisberry, York County, Pennsylvania to Jonathan and Rebecca Watts Hoopes. Being the first girl born to this couple, she was named after her grandmother, Mary Hayworth Hoopes; while her oldest brother was named after her grandfather, Elisha Hoopes. Mary’s father was born into a prominent Quaker family, who had lived for many generations - since 1683, in Goshen, Chester County, Pennsylvania. The Hoopes owned a considerable amount of farm land, but the family was quickly outgrowing their land. Mary’s mother, Rebecca Watts Hoopes, was raised in Newberry, York County, Pennsylvania, and this is where Mary’s parents lived for many years. Quaker children were considered to be born innocent; more than that, they were born with the Light of God within them, and they were taught at home and at school to recognize it. The Quaker egalitarian spirit would have affected Mary Hoopes. Girls wore neat dresses in sober colors, white caps, and shoulder kerchiefs neatly folded. Boys wore dark suits of plain cut like the master’s but without his looped cocked hat. The wealthy showed their wealth only in finer fabric. Quakers believed in education for everyone; one of the responsibilities of the Monthly Meeting was to provide an education for poor children, including a few blacks and Indians. Mary’s father and grandparents for several generations had lived in Chester Valley, Pennsylvania. It was a natural meadowland in the beginning. The first Quaker farms had a productivity undreamed of in England. The Southeastern Pennsylvanians took great pride in their land and their occupation. Prior to 1800, many Quaker farmers did not practice farming with conservation, rotation, and fertilization in mind. When his land wore out, a farmer could abandon it and move on to cheaper land on the frontier. One-third of Pennsylvania’s population moved west between 1790 and 1820. The Quakers in Ohio In the eighteenth century, some Quakers began to moved westward, while others moved to the south where there was plenty of land which could be purchased and converted into large plantations. However, those who migrated to the south found themselves in a quandary because they could not reconcile their beliefs with those of many Southerners who refused to acknowledge the human rights of the Negro slaves. The Friends were recognized as one of the earliest groups in America to denounce the evils of slavery. A majority of southern Quakers fought slavery in a quiet way, freeing their own slaves, and encouraging others to emancipate theirs as well. Because of their beliefs and practices, it wasn’t long before the southern Friends realized that the South was not the most advantageous place to live, with its growing hostile atmosphere. After the Treaty of Greenville in 1795 opened the Ohio Country to settlements out of danger from Indian attacks, Friends in the South began to join the great migration to “the new West” (Ohio) which offered economic opportunity, and especially important to the Friends, was their personal and political freedom. This is when the Friends from eastern Pennsylvania and the English Quakers from the eastern seaboard, with their distinctive garb and their reliance upon the “Inner Light” began to migrate to the Northwest Territory to seek a change and to start what many thought would be a better life. It was about 1829, when a group of the Society of Friends (Quakers), in which the Hoopes were active members, made the decision to move to the Ohio Territory. The Hoopes family, which included Mary’s Grandparents, Elisha and Mary Hoopes, and many of Mary’s Aunts, Uncles and cousins left their homeland area which was famous for a large, comfortable ancestral house (called “Brooznoll” - which means a breezy knoll). Mary’s father, Jonathan Hoopes, was about 41 years old, when the Hoopes families make the decision to migrate further west, and little Mary Hoopes was about 7 years old. Jonathan and Rebecca’s had eight children at that time, and they were as follows: 1. Elisha Hoopes - born 13 Oct 1813 at Fairview, York, Pennsylvania; 2. Thomas Watts Hoopes - born 15 Aug 1815 at Fairview, York, Pennsylvania; 3. Warner Hoopes - born 29 Oct 1817 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; 4. Hyrum Hoopes - born 6 Apr 1820 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; 5. Mary Hoopes - born 17 Jan 1822 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; 6. Lewis Hoopes - born 19 Nov 1823 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; 7. Jane Hoopes - born 10 Aug 1826 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; and 8. Seth Hoopes - born in 1828 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania. When Jonathan and Rebecca took their family of 8 children and moved them to the rich farmlands of Columbiana County, Ohio, it was considered, at that time, the western frontier of America. Families who migrated to Ohio had to start their lives all over - erect log homes, clear new farm lands, and plant their crops, and all this on the edge of hostile Indian country. Jonathan and Rebecca took with them their certificate of good standing from their Quaker Church in Pennsylvania. Jonathan was a farmer, and a stonemason by trade, so he was probably anxious to build a nice stone home for his family. By the close of the year 1800, there were about eight hundred families of Friends in the Ohio Country - who came, not as land speculators, but as settlers truly desirous of establishing homes. Sometimes whole meetings in many instances moved westward in a body, while in other meetings many families left their old homes and associations, and pushed out to find new homes and a new career in what was then known as the wilderness of the north-west. Settlements by Quakers in the Old Northwest was a life of toil, privation, struggle, and suffering. A few Quakers were captured and killed by Indians. Yet, Ohio Quakers sent back to their friends glowing reports about the land and the freedom of the Ohio Country. These reports were responsible for many more families deciding to move ‘west’, and within a relatively few years Ohio became a great center of the Society of Friends. By 1826, more than eight thousand Quakers were peacefully living among the limestone hills of Belmont, Jefferson, Harrison, and Columbiana counties in the eastern part of the state. It was reported that for nearly seventy-five years, one third of the Friends in America lived within the boundaries of the ‘Old Northwest Territory’. New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio Mary’s mother and father had four more children while living in various areas and towns in Columbiana County, Ohio. Those children were: 9. Sara Ann Hoopes - born 31 Jan 1830 at New Garden, Columbiana, Ohio; 10. William Harlan Hoopes - born 13 Oct 1831 at New Garden, Columbiana, Ohio; 11. Elizabeth Hoopes - born 28 Jun 1833 at Smith, Columbiana, Ohio; 12. Jonathan Hoopes, Jr. - born 22 Feb 1835 at Hanover, Columbiana, Ohio. Jonathan and Rebecca had a total of twelve children. During the summer of 1830, when the Census was taken, Mary was living with her family in the town of Smith, Columbiana County, Ohio; and they were still living in the township of Smith in 1833. By the time Rebecca and Jonathan’s last child was born in 1835, they had moved to Hanover, Columbiana County, Ohio. The Hoopes Learn About the Restored Gospel It was out in the Ohio Territory that Jonathan Hoopes first heard the Restored Gospel of Jesus Christ from Mormon missionaries. Many of the Hoopes families now knew that Joseph Smith had organized the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on April 6, 1830, under the laws of the State of New York. Mary’s father, Jonathan, had a strong testimony that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God. Jonathan and his family most likely would not have heard about the gospel had they remained in the tight Quaker stronghold in Pennsylvania. It seems as though unseen forces and feelings were moving strong, choice families around, and making it possible for them to hear the gospel so that they, too, could become a part of assisting in bringing forth the fullness of the gospel of Jesus Christ. When Jonathan heard about the Restored Gospel, he knew it was true and he broke the mold of many generations of his family as Quaker members when he joined with the peculiar Mormons. Mary’s father, Jonathan, was baptized on January 16, 1834, and her mother, Rebecca, was baptized three years later, on January 11, 1837. January baptisms by immersion in Ohio waters would have been terribly cold, but it certainly set an example of their strong testimonies, and of their faith and devotion to their new religious conviction. Jonathan and Rebecca found it almost impossible to discard many of their strict Quaker teachings, and their strong traditional use of the Biblical manner of speaking - such as ‘thee’ and ‘thou’. But their quiet, reverent up-bringing would have been a reason for them to be humble enough to listen to the Mormon missionaries, and they certainly would have understood as the spirit of the Holy Ghost bore witness of truth in their hearts. Kirtland, Geauga County, Ohio The Hoopes family seemed to have been migrating towards Kirtland, Ohio area where the Prophet Joseph and the main body of Saints were still living. The Mormons had been driven from New York in 1831, and most of the LDS Church officials had settled in and around Kirtland, Ohio. Some Saints settled in Illinois, and many more ended up in Missouri, twelve miles west of Independence. Those living in Missouri founded a town they called Zion. The headquarters of the Church was in Kirtland, Ohio, and it was the center of missionary work during this period. Kirtland was near the main routes of transportation and contained the largest concentration of Church membership. It was the point of departure for missions to Canada, the Northeast, the Mid-Atlantic States, the Midwest, and the South. The state of Ohio itself was saturated with missionaries who crossed the state on their way to or from other fields of labor. Frequently those unable to go on longer missions or those home during the winter months visited local communities and proselyted there. The Kirtland Temple was probably almost finished when the Hoopes arrived in Kirtland. The Temple took over two and a half years to build. There was a sawmill in Kirtland, to create the wood used in building the temple. Women of the Church contributed their glassware and china, that was crushed and mixed with the exterior coating so that the Temple glistened in the sun. Jonathan Hoopes and perhaps several of his older boys may have worked at the sawmill and helped to finish the Temple, and if so, they would have been present when the beautiful Kirtland Temple was dedicated on Sunday, March 27, 1836. The dedication service lasted seven hours. Nine hundred to a thousand saints were in attendance, and many later wrote of spiritual manifestations. They said Angels could be seen outside the building, and many other miraculous stories of that wonderful event. Mary Hoopes would have been fourteen years old in 1836. Mary’s next to oldest brother, Thomas Watts Hoopes, seemed to have indeed been a “doubting Thomas”, for he remained behind in Columbiana County, Ohio with his aging grandparents, and remained a faithful member of the Quaker Society. Thomas married Elizabeth Elliot on July 16, 1836, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio, and they remained living there. Mormon Saints In Missouri From the historical events of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we know that following the expulsion of the Mormons from Independence, in Jackson County, Missouri in late 1833, most of the Saints lived in relative peace with the original inhabitants of Clay County, Missouri. However, after so many Saints began arriving in Clay and Ray Counties, the citizens began raising objections and requested the Mormons to leave their counties also. In the summer of 1836, some members in northern Missouri were already establishing new headquarters at Far West, in northern Ray County. In December 1836 two new counties were created - Daviess and Caldwell. Far West and Shoal Creek settlements were located in Caldwell Counties, and they were created exclusively for the Mormons. It wasn’t long until Joseph Smith and other leaders of the Church were also driven out of Kirtland, Ohio. The Prophet had been warned of an assassination plot, but while the mob was nearby, Joseph was placed inside a box and taken out of town on an ox cart. The Prophet and other leaders left Kirtland in January 12, 1838, and fled to Far West, Missouri to escape mob violence. Most of the faithful Saints in Ohio decided to follow their leader to Missouri. But before many of them could leave Kirtland, their enemies began ransacking homes of the Saints and starting fires in basements, and harassing the Saints in order to drive them out of Kirtland. The Saints struggled to settle their debts, sell their property, and purchase wagons, teams, and equipment. A company of over five hundred Saints were organized to follow in July 1838. The remaining members in Ohio tried to sell their farms and homes and follow as soon as they could. It is believed that the Hoopes family left with the main body of Ohio saints in July. The migrating Kirtland Camp was dogged by persecution along the trail. They were often ridiculed and threatened with violence, as they traveled by or through towns along the way. Many forces contributed to the suffering in the Kirtland Camp. Accidents and illness constantly afflicted the pioneers. In the midst of their suffering and afflictions, they turned to their Heavenly Father for help. Throughout the journey, elders administered to the sick and the injured; and journalists reported that through the power of the priesthood, many of the afflicted were instantly healed. Far West & Adam-Ondi-Ahman, Missouri & Surrounding Areas By July 1838, the Hoopes family, along with 600 saints with their wagons, teams, and cattle left the rejected town of Kirtland, Ohio for Missouri. When the Ohio saints arrived at the Mississippi River in September, they were informed that war had broken out in western Missouri between the Mormons and their enemies, and that all Mormons would soon be driven from the state, and if they continued their journey, they would be attacked and would suffer a similar fate. Several members of the camp refused to enter Missouri as a result of these threats. But most of them pressed on, and after three months of travel the Kirtland Camp arrived at Far West, Missouri, on October 2, 1838. Five miles from Far West the Ohio Saints were met by the Prophet, his two counselors, Isaac Morley (Patriarch of Far West), and other leading brethren. The next day the Prophet counseled members of the camp to continue their journey north to Adam-ondi-Ahman, a new settlement that had been prepared for them. Far West, was at that time, located in upper Ray County, Missouri, and Adam-ondi-Ahman was in Daviess County, Missouri. Many of the Saints built their homes a little farther out of the main township of Adam-ondi-Ahman in Daviess County. When the saints began arriving in Caldwell and Daviess counties, it was the undisturbed home of the buffalo, deer and wild turkeys. It was part timberland and part prairie, but the soil was very fertile. Soon the hard-working saints had good crops, gardens, and nice homes. Apparently the Hoopes families came to this area with some of the earliest Ohio groups, and Jonathan, and his twenty-one year old son, Warner Hoopes, purchased land in Daviess County, on the outskirts of Adam-ondi-Ahman. They proceeded to build houses and barns, and plant crops by the summer of 1839. Warner Hoopes land and property was valued at $250; and Jonathan’s land, houses, and other property was valued at $1,115. By the summer and fall of 1838 there were about twelve thousand Saints in Missouri. This large number settled, or were in the act of settling, at Far West, Adam-ondi-Ahman, DeWitt, Haun’s Mill and surrounding areas. Far West was now a prosperous town of 5,000 Saints, and on July 4, 1838, Joseph Smith, knowing the importance of temples, laid four cornerstones for a temple to be built in Far West, and he dedicated the land for such. The town of Adam-ondi-Ahman grew rapidly. A conference was held there on June 28, 1838 for the purpose of organizing a Stake of Zion. No doubt Mary Hoopes and her family drove to this meeting. The meeting was held in a grove of trees, and was conducted by the Prophet Joseph Smith. A Stake Presidency was first chosen, then a High Council was organized, consisting of 12 men. Gallatin, Missouri Election, & Persecutions A steady stream of Mormon immigrants from the East, as well as twelve hundred refugees who had been driven out of Jackson County were rapidly increasing the population of Daviess, Caldwell, Ray, and Carroll counties. Long caravans of covered wagons cut deep ruts across the Missouri prairies. By the summer of 1838, the numbers of Latter-day Saints in northern Missouri totaled fifteen thousand. All the old causes of disquiet were intensified by the numbers of Mormons who were overflowing into all northwestern Missouri. The Mormons quickly began to outnumber the gentiles in Daviess County, and it was conceivable that within a few years the Mormons might dominate the whole state. Even the finest citizens became alarmed, and this fear spread quickly to the wild and lawless element of the growing frontier, and seemed to add fuel to the fire and give excuse to again plunder and ravage. When Daviess County was created in 1836, there were still fewer than a hundred settlers. The town of Gallatin was mapped to serve as the county seat of Daviess County. “The renewed persecution began at Gallatin, Missouri on election day, Monday, August 6, 1838. The original Missouri settlers naturally wanted to elect a state legislator who was one of their own, and William Peniston, a staunch enemy of the Saints, was their candidate. Peniston was afraid that he would lose the election because most of the members of the Church supported John A. Williams. A couple weeks before the election, Judge Joseph Morin, advised a couple elders of the Church to be prepared for an attack by mobbers who were determined to prevent Mormons from voting. Gallatin was a mere straggling row of ten houses, three of which were saloons.” (40) Hoping that the judge’s prediction would prove false, a number of Mormon men went unarmed to Gallatin to vote. At 11:00 a.m., William Peniston addressed the crowd of voters, hoping to excite them against the Mormons by stating: “The Mormon leaders are a set of horse thieves, liars, counterfeiters, and you know they profess to heal the sick, and cast out devils, and you all know that is a lie.”(26) After Peniston’s inflammatory speech, and with some of the crowd filled with whiskey, a fight was inevitable. Dick Welding, the mob bully, punched one of the Saints and knocked him down. A fight ensued. Even though outnumbered, one of the Mormons, John L. Butler, grabbed an oak stake from a nearby woodpile and began to strike the Missourians with strength that surprised himself. The Missourians armed themselves with clapboards or anything that came to hand; during the brawl that followed, several persons on both sides were seriously hurt.(41) *(Another one of the author’s [Pat Sagers] ancestors, Harvey Olmstead, was one of the men who was listed as being present in the notorious Election fight at Gallatin, Missouri in August 1838. The following is the story of his involvement:) From John Lowe Butler's account, he recorded: "I also recalled a strange, accidental weapon which helped the beleaguered Saints. Brother Olmstead, before the fight, was carrying a half-dozen earthen bowls with cups and saucers wrapped in a new cotton handkerchief tied to his wrist. When a mobber struck him he raised his arm in self-defense, and the blow shattered the dishes. Olmstead then grasped the bundle of broken pottery and swung it like a weapon. "When the affray was over," John noted, "I saw him empty out his broken earthware on the ground in pieces not larger than a dollar and his handkerchief looked like it had been chewed by a cow. I have thought ever since that time that they had fun to pick the pieces of earthen ware from their heads, for they certainly were pretty well filled."(41) It appears that Mary’s brother, Warner Hoopes, and perhaps her father, Jonathan, went to Gallatin, Missouri to vote. The following Affidavits & Petitions relating to the Missouri Persecution were later on filed by Jonathan Hoopes and Warner Hoopes: fd56: John Lawson, 1805 - ; Benjamin Slade, 1800-1891; Jonathan Hoopes, 1788-1868; Clark Slade, 1812-1814. Short affidavits on depredations in Jackson, Caldwell, and Daviess counties Pittsfield, Pike, Illinois, January 14, 1840. fd57: Warner Hoopes, 1817-1891. Affidavit on Gallatin election and expulsion from Daviess County. Pittsfield, Pike, Illinois, January 14, 1840. The Hoopes families seemed to be living on a large farm in the outlying settlements in Daviess County near Adam-ondi-Ahman. Jonathan had at least one house and other outbuildings. One month after the Gallatin election, mobs were retaliating against Mary Hoopes’ father and his family, as well as other saints. After the Gallatin, Missouri Elections "The First Presidency came to Anson Call’s home on a Sunday, sometime in September 1838, and counseled all of the Church members in the area to leave their homes and temporarily move to Diahman. Although they agreed to relocate, they were anxious concerning their crops and were unsure as to whether or not to sell their farms. Joseph Smith advised them not to sell out, but to continue to maintain their farms as best they could under the circumstances. Some families began to pack up what belongings they felt would be necessary and hastily left during the night. They arrived safely later the next day." Mary’s father, Jonathan, and her whole family were among the Saints who received considerable bad treatment. On September 10, 1838, while Jonathan was in the process of moving some of his personal belongings to Adam-ondi-Ahman, as the Prophet had counseled them to do, Mary’s father was accosted by seventy-five ruffians, most of whom were from Livingston County. They plundered his wagon and threatened Mary’s father. Jonathan said, “the[y] wanted me to Denounce my religion and move my family from Davis County to Levinston County . . . and fight against my society,” he recalled, “then the[y] would protecte me.” Jonathan rejected their several propositions and being threatened at gun point, the band held him captive for half a day! Upon releasing him they said he must leave the county. A short while later, while transporting his family and the remainder of his personal property that hadn’t been destroyed, Jonathan Hoopes was again confronted. The company subsequently released his wife, Rebecca, and their children, including seventeen-year-old Mary Hoopes, and allowed them to continue on to Diahman, but Mary’s father was not so lucky. They made a sport of tracking him like a hunted animal. They informed Jonathan that they would release him for a short time, and then the men of the mob would come looking for him. Jonathan reported, “If the[y] Could see me the[y] would shoot me,” he recalled, “but by keeping myself hid in the woods I got away from them.” The ruffians also stole two of the Hoopes’ horses. *(NOTE: Sidney Rigdon reported William Peniston was the leader of the group who stopped Hoopes - the same William Peniston who was running for election in Gallatin. Hoopes later filed a warrant for Peniston’s arrest and a writ was served. Peniston failed to appear in court, but sent a spokesman, however the judge dismissed any action. (48)) Missouri’s Governor Issues An ‘Extermination Order’ “It was on October 27, 1838 when Missouri Governor Lilburn W. Boggs issued his infamous “Extermination” order - ‘The Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the state if necessary for the public peace - their outrages are beyond all description.” Three days later, a militia mob of about 240 men, suddenly rode into Haun’s Mill, and began firing. This was a settlement of about thirty families, some recently arrived from the East who were camped in wagons and tents near homes and a mill belonging to some other Mormons. Despite no resistance and shouts of surrender, they continued to fire, eventually killing seventeen and wounding many others. When all who had not been able to flee, had been massacred. The militia men looted the houses and tents, stripped the dead, and drove off with their horses and wagons. The Militia troops inflicted some of the most heinous acts upon the Mormon Saints in Missouri. Mary Hoopes was seventeen years old in 1838. Quincy, Adams County, Illinois (& Daviess County, Missouri) There were hundreds of other families who went through similar problems and situations, who were driven by mobs from place to place, who saw their new homes and farms destroyed, and who still loved and followed the Prophet Joseph Smith - just as the Hoopes and the Perry families had done. With the entire First Presidency - Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, and Hyrum Smith being held captive in Liberty Jail, Brigham Young and the Twelve Apostles were left with the task of directing the retreat of several thousand Saints from Missouri and choosing a new gathering place for them. They selected Quincy, Adams County, Illinois - two miles across the Mississippi River, where the good residents were generous and sympathetic to the plight of the exiles. The Gustavus Adolphus Perry Family - Near Quincy, Illinois Eighteen year old Mary Hoopes was listed with her family on the 1840 Federal Census living in Quincy, Adams County, Illinois; however, in the side margin of the Census was written: “Davis County [Mo.] - extension of the city of Quincy [Illinois].” Listed right next to the Hoopes’ family was the Gustavus Adolphus Perry family, which included their oldest son, 23 year old Orrin Alonzo Perry. Also, living nearby was the Perry’s married daughter and her family, the Joseph Tippetts’ family. Joseph Tippetts, had married Orrin Alonzo Perry’s younger sister, Rosalia, and they seem to have kept close family ties to the Perrys. There were several reasons for some of these families stopping, and staying in the Quincy area for awhile - for safety, to get some much needed rest, and provisions, and to plant gardens. We know that during this stop-over, Alonzo Perry’s forty-two year old mother, Eunice, gave birth to her and Gustavus’ last child, Lucy Ann Perry, on May 20, 1839 in the Quincy, Illinois area. Most likely Mary’s mother, Rebecca Hoopes, was at her friend and neighbor’s side as a midwife, as Eunice Perry gave birth to their last child. Marriage of Mary Hoopes and Orrin Alonzo Perry at Quincy, Illinois No doubt Orrin Alonzo Perry and Mary Hoopes had become acquainted with each other during many difficult years as mobs were driving their families from place to place. Both the Perry and Hoopes families lived in Ohio, Missouri and Illinois. Quincy, in Adams County, Illinois was most likely the place where Alonzo, as he was called, and Mary were married on September 20th, 1840, as they were both living there with their parents in the summer of 1840, and were friends and neighbors to each other there. Commerce (Nauvoo), Hancock County, Illinois In April 1839, Joseph Smith and his companions were able to escape, and they joined their families across the river in Quincy, Illinois. That same Spring, Joseph Smith journeyed to a new area called Commerce, about forty-seven miles north of Quincy, on the banks of the Mississippi River, and he and other Saints began purchasing land there. One man described it as a “very sickly place or perhaps the Saints would not have had the privilege of stopping there.” Then the Saints began to drain the swampy land - full of malaria-infected mosquitoes. This land was surrounded on three sides by a sweeping curve or on a peninsula jutting into the Mississippi River from the Illinois side. As soon as the saints could drain the swamps in Commerce (or Nauvoo), most of the Saints began to relocated there. It wasn’t long before they could honestly call their new land, “Nauvoo the beautiful”. Commerce was now the focal spot for the Saints, and there was a strong spirit of gathering. Homes were being built, summer crops were growing, and the swamp was giving way to a city. Nauvoo did not develop in the usual haphazard way of cities. It was fashioned in the mind of its founder before a stone was laid or a ditch dug. It appears that Alonzo and his new bride, Mary Hoopes Perry, went on to Nauvoo with the Jonathan Hoopes family. They may have been there for that first Nauvoo celebration. The Gustavus Perry and Joseph H. Tippetts’ families seemed to have continued living somewhere between Quincy and Nauvoo - in the Carthage, Illinois area where they had purchased farm lands. Gustavus Perry may not have moved into the city limits of Nauvoo, but he seems to have been involved in the many activities there. In the spring of 1841 the ranks of the Nauvoo Legion was multiplying rapidly, and it was fast becoming the largest, best equipped and best-trained military organization. Under self-nominated Major General John C. Bennett, the ragged group of volunteers had turned into a sharp-looking unit. Most able bodied men of Nauvoo participated in the legion, and so Alonzo Perry, and probably other members of the Perry and Hoopes families, were also members. Also in 1841, the Prophet Joseph had announced that work on an important project, the Nauvoo Temple, would begin immediately. The temple would be built through the diligent labors and sacrifice of every man, woman and child who would give a tenth of their increase, plus a tenth of their time. An audience of several thousand Saints was then treated to a demonstration of close-order drill by the Nauvoo Legion prior to the placement of the temple cornerstone. Mary and Alonzo Perry was now a ‘family’ of their own. Their first child, William Henry Perry was born August 17, 1841. While their families were still rejoicing over the birth of their baby boy, their joy was short-lived. It was just four months later when they received the news that Alonzo’s sister and her new born baby had both died in the travails of childbirth in December 1841. Rosalia Elvira Perry Tippetts had a difficult delivery of her baby while living at or near Quincy, in December 1841. As stated in Nancy Tracy’s journal, both Rosalia and her baby had died, and were buried there in an unmarked grave. (It was never recorded in Tracy’s journal if the baby was a boy or girl, or if it was stillborn or lived for a short while.) While living in Nauvoo, two more children were born to Mary Hoopes and Orrin Alonzo Perry, Martha Ann Perry, was born in Nauvoo, just before Christmas, on Dec 21, 1842; and, my great grandmother, Eliza Jane Perry, was also born in Nauvoo, on March 10, 1845. This was about the same time when problems with the murderous mobs began threatening the Saints again. A Lamb To The Slaughter Persecution began again in the fall of 1844, when Mormon homes in Illinois were subjected to “wolf hunts” - raids by mobs. In September of 1845, the harassed Mormons from the surrounding settlements began flocking into Nauvoo for safety after barn-burning and crop-burning attacks became more and more frequent. By the end of September 1845 it was clear to the Saints that they would have to leave Nauvoo. In the years before his death Joseph Smith had discussed a number of colonizing areas for the Saints. Some people later remembered that the Prophet Joseph had prophesied in August 1842, “that the Saints would continue to suffer much affliction, and would be driven to the Rocky Mountains... Some would live to go and assist in making settlements and building cities, and see the Saints become a mighty people in the midst of the Rocky Mountains.”(16) As Joseph and Hyrum were leaving Nauvoo for the Carthage Jail, it was reported that the prophet declared, “This is the loveliest place, and the best people under the Heavens. Little do they know what trials awaits them!” On June 25, 1844 Joseph Smith voluntarily surrenders to the constable at Carthage, Hancock County, Illinois, on charges of inciting a riot; the Prophet then is charged with treason for having declared martial law in Nauvoo. About five o’clock on June 27, 1844 a group of attackers surrounded the Carthage Jail, the men were fired upon by the guard, who were apparently part of the conspiracy and had used blanks. One group of the attackers then stormed up the stairs. Within three minutes Hyrum and Joseph Smith were shot to death, and John Taylor was severely wounded. Brigham Young - A New Prophet Many who were present at the August 8th meeting later remembered seeing in Brigham Young, that day, a new appearance and hearing from him a new voice - one that was very familiar, that of Joseph Smith. For them the “Mantle of Joseph” was given directly, and miraculously, to Brigham Young. Records from both the Hoopes and Perry families have testified that some of them were present at the meeting on Thursday, August 8, 1844, and witnessed the mantle of the Prophet Joseph as it fell upon Brigham Young. After the Charter was revoked, Nauvoo ceased to exist as a city, and the Nauvoo Legion could no longer act as a military police to protect its city or its citizens. Governor Ford’s orders stated that a thousand families would have to leave Illinois that spring, and all the rest of them would have to be gone as soon as possible afterwards, and if they didn’t leave, they would be expelled by ‘violent means’! Brigham Young had a tremendous load on his shoulders as he tried to sell a whole city to people in the east. There were many beautiful new homes, and prosperous businesses. Why would anybody want to buy their homes and farms when they knew that in a few months most of them would be abandoned - and they could just walk in and take them anyway? The Westward Trek Begins On February 4, 1846, the Latter-day Saints began leaving Nauvoo. They had planned to leave in April, but threats from the mobs forced their early departures. Again, both the Perry and Hoopes families were forced to leave their nice homes–again! We don’t know if the Mary and Alonzo Perry and their little family were prepared to go with the first group of Mormon pioneers during the month of February. Brigham Young had instructed the Saints to bring a year’s supply of food, as well as shelter and other supplies, but many didn’t have the necessary provisions. Some had tents, and others had unfinished tents that did little to protect them from the cold. After the snowstorms, the temperatures dropped and the Mississippi River froze over. This was a blessing for many Saints who were waiting for the ferry, because now they could cross on the ice. But it was a trial for those Saints who had reached Sugar Creek, as they had to wait there until the first of March. In Warner Hoopes’ (Mary’s brother) history, it stated that ‘his family was part of the group of saints who witnessed the miraculous appearance of the quail, which saved them from starvation.(19) It’s very possible that the Hoopes’ families all journeyed together as a family, and Mary Hoopes and Alonzo Perry may have been with them - if only to help and support each other. The Jonathan Hoopes Family Near Council Bluffs We are able to learn a little more about what most of the Saints were going through, as well as a little more about some of the Jonathan Hoopes family in David Osborn’s Autobiography. “ In the spring we gathered up our effects and returned to Garden Grove having quite a little fit out for our journey, which we soon continued in company with father Hoop[es, John Allred’s and some others. We did not arrive at Council Bluffs till the 5th of June 1847. We drove up to Brother Amos Stoddard’s on Pigeon Creek.” .The Gustavus Perry Family Near Council Bluffs When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846 the Perrys and Hoopes families were part of the first group to make the painful trip across Iowa. As the first group moved out, families halted from time to time to plow fields and sow crops. This way followers were able to harvest the crops and re-plant. Brigham Young created a highly disciplined march, recognizing that survival depended on organization, and so it took four months to reach the Missouri River on the Iowa side, to the Council Bluffs area. Gustavus and Eunice Perry remained at Pottawattamie County, Iowa near Council Bluffs for approximately six years. Gustavus was frequently mentioned in records of the Lake Branch of the Church in that area between 1848 and 1851. Gustavus Perry and his family settled in the Lake Branch at Winter Quarters. Here Gustavus served as a counselor in the bishopric, until they were instructed in 1852 by Brigham Young to close the ward, join a wagon train, and make the long trek across the plains.”(7) Mary, Alonzo and Family - Near Council Bluffs, Iowa Mary and Alonzo were living in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa when their last child was born. Don Carlos Perry was born 24 June 1847. Some of the Saints had already left for the Great Salt Lake Valley, and many others were trying to work and earn enough money, and get better prepared with the necessary food and supplies to cross the plains, which was the case with Mary and Alonzo. Valley of the Shadow of Death “Underneath the great hope for the future were hearts mellowed by grief and sorrow that few people have known. Before the cold of winter prevented the spread of disease, some three hundred fresh graves appeared in the cemetery outside Winter Quarters. Weakened by the long trek from Nauvoo and the lack of sufficient vegetables in their diet, the Saints became easy victims of malaria, scurvy, and other then little-known maladies. Scurvy, called by the Saints “blackleg,” caused the greatest sufferings and the majority of deaths. When the disease became rampant, wagons were sent to Missouri to bring back potatoes, which proved effective in checking and curing the disease. Horseradish, found in an abandoned fort some distance from the camp, proved an excellent antidote. The disease was totally checked during the winter, but not until it had made inroads upon nearly every family.”(34) The exact cause of death hasn’t been recorded for Mary Hoopes Perry, except that she died at the age of twenty-six years old, on 8 October 1848, at Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. Her youngest baby was only one year old, and her oldest child was just seven years old. Since Mary died at such a young age, and her four children were so young they probably didn’t know enough about her to leave a written record. After Mary Ann Hoopes Perry died, Mary’s mother and father, Rebecca and Jonathan Hoopes, took over the role as guardians to three youngest of the four children of Alonzo and Mary Perry for many years. Mary’s husband, Alonzo, took their oldest son, Henry Perry and went back into Missouri to obtain work as a freighter, in order to earn enough money to bring his son West, and start new lives there. Their histories needs to be told also, but at a different time and place. Council Bluffs, Iowa is where Mary Hoopes Perry finished her journey on this earth. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Since this history was only about Mary Hoopes Perry, I only will give a brief summary of her husband and children. 1. Alonzo takes their 5 year old son, William Henry Perry, and goes back to Missouri to work - possibly as a Freighter, to earn money to go to the West. He is still living in Platte County, Missouri when he marries Frances M. Russell on October 23, 1853. This marriage also ends tragically, one year later, as Frankey died on 13 December 1854, and cause of death is unknown. 2. Mary’s parents (Rebecca and Jonathan Hoopes) take Mary and Alonzo’s other three children, Martha Ann, Eliza Jane, and one year old baby, Don Carlos Perry, on to the Great Salt Lake Valley in 1850. They live in Provo, Utah for many years, and the three youngest children continue to live with their grandparents until they marry. 3. Alonzo and his son, William Henry Perry come to Utah in 1855. Alonzo married a Scottish lady, Jane McLaws, that he met on the wagon train, but they did not have any children together. 4. Alonzo takes his bride, and son, Henry, north to Box Elder County, where his parents and other Perry and Tippetts families have settled. Alonzo’s father became Presiding Elder over the little town called Three Mile Creek. Alonzo’s brother, Henry also served as Presiding Elder until his death. 5. In May 1875 Orrin Alonzo Perry was set apart as the Presiding Elder, and took charge of the little settlement of Three Mile Creek until Aug 19, 1877, when the saints at Three Mile Creek were organized as a ward, with Orrin Alonzo Perry as Bishop. Alonzo’s wife, Jane McLaws Perry also served as the Relief Society President until she died. Orrin Alonzo Perry served as their Bishop for almost 20 years, and on March 5, 1901, the name of Three Mile Creek was changed to Perry, Utah in his honor. Orrin Alonzo Perry died 29 June 1901, at Perry, Utah, and is buried in the Brigham City Cemetery beside his wife, Jane. 6. Mary and Alonzo Perry’s children: William Henry Perry married Emma Ann Tippetts, and they had one child, before Emma died. Henry married second to Annie Albia Smith and they moved to Idaho, and had six children. Henry died 1 Nov 1912, in Perry, Utah - the town named after his father. Martha Ann Perry married Parley Pratt Loveless and they lived in Payson, Utah and had eight children. They entered into polygamy, when her husband took a ssecond wife. She died 25 Jan 1878 in Payson, Utah. Eliza Jane Perry married Kelsey Bird. They lived in Mendon, Vermillion, and Gooseberry where they helped found and start each of those communities. Kelsey and Jane had 8 children. Kelsey also entered into plural marriage with Ann Muir and had 13 children with her. Kelsey and Jane moved from Gooseberry to Benjamin, Utah when plural marriage was outlawed, leaving his second wife and her children behind in Gooseberry. Eliza Jane died in Benjamin, Utah on 20 February 1900. Don Carlos Perry followed his grandfather, Jonathan Hoopes, from Provo to Weston, Idaho. He married Maria Sophie Fredericka Hansen or Smith. They had one child, and Don Carlos died in Weston, Idaho three months after his son was born. His wife married again and had 9 other children. Mary Hoopes and Orrin Alonzo Perry were the grandparents of 24 grandchildren. They were truly faithful pioneers and Saints who loved and followed their leaders to their dying days. CREDITS: 1. 1840 Federal Census Records for Quincy, Adams County, Illinois. 2. 1850 Federal Census Records. 3. 1860 Federal Census Records. 4. D.U.P. Histories of Gustavus Adolphus and Eunice Wing Perry, by Karen Young Christensen, Sept. 1992; and/or Alda Crawford Call, Sept 1981. 16. A Comprehensive History of the Church, by B.H. Roberts 2:181-82; and 3:45. 17. Journal of George Laub, 4 March 1846, Church Archives. 18. Deseret News, 12 March 1892. 19. Conquerors of the West: Stalwart Mormon Pioneers, Vol 1 - 2; and Vol. 4. 34. The Latter-day Saints, A Contemporary History of the Church of Jesus Christ, by William E. Berrett. 40. In Missouri: A Guide to the “Show Me” State, rev. ed. (New York; Hastings House, 1954), p. 510. 41. My Best For the Kingdom, by William G. Hartley, Aspen Books, S.L.C., Quotes taken from the journal of John Lowe Butler. 47. Clark V. Johnson, ed.. Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict (Provo, Utah: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1992), 300-301. 48. Sidney Rigdon, An appeal to the American People, 33) 49. Johnson, Mormon Redress Petitions, 465-66. (The second petition also appears in Journal History, 17 March 1840, and is published in HC4:65-67.)

LIFE SKETCH OF KELSEY BIRD

Contributor: Pan Argo Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

Kelsey Bird was born January 11, 1837 at Hector, Tompkin Co., New York, to Charles and Mary Ann Kennedy. Kelsey was born just a few months after his parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, they being baptized in August 18, 1836. Six children were born in New York. One account claims another son, James, was born in Pennsylvania. Another son was born in 1839 at Far West. He died the same day. Bradford K, was born January 26, 1840 in Clayton, Adam Co., Illinois. They took an active part in the church and in the development of the community. Charles received his endownment in the Nauvoo Temple January 2, 1846. Charles Bird and his father, Benjamin Freeman Bird, were merchants in New York and in New Jersey. Charles and Benjamin were religious men as evidenced by their writings, etc., such as wills and legal documents. They were fairly well educated and had considerable wealth. These men heard the gospel and joined the church in its very early days. Benjamin Freeman was baptized in 1835, only five years after the organization of the church. These families were well-to-do. Their sacrifice and devotion to their new found faith places them in that unselfish group of pioneers who were responsible for the rapid growth of the church. Benjamin Freeman Bird was born January 19, 1778, the son of Jeremiah F. Bird., who was born about 1748, both in Rahway, Essex Co., New Jersey. Benjamin married Meribah Reeves, who was born May 8, 1784 in Essex Co., New Jersey. Charles was born September 19, 1803, in Flanders, Morris Co., New Jersey. Mary Ann Kennedy was born December 7, 1807, in Barrington , Massachusetts. These families moved west with the early church members. After the death of the Prophet when permanent plans were being made to move west, the Bird families were in Brigham Young's group and came with him as far as Council Bluffs. Charles was put in charge of a group by President Brigham Young to remain at Council Bluffs and raise corn and wheat for the companies who would arrive the following year. Here they served for three years, 1847 to 1850. They left from the Missouri River June 3, 1850 with the Milo Andrus Company. It consisted of 206 persons, 51 wagons, 9 horses, 6 mules, 184 oxen, 122 cows, 44 sheep, 6 yearlings, 19 dogs, 1 pig and 2 ducks. Thomas Steed wrote in his diary, "We crossed the Missouri River and traveled along the south side. At Salt Creek the streams were so high that the bridges were washed away. We built rafts and floated our wagons across. Sickness and death was before us and behind us. Brother Hyde told us the day our company was organized that if we would be faithful and keep the name of God sacred, we should be blessed with health and protected on our journey. One birth and one death occurred on the journey, so we entered Salt Lake Valley with the same number of persons as we left Council Bluffs With." Captain Andrus wrote, "we have passed the graves of hundreds, yet God has preserved us, for which we feel thankful. Peace and union prevail in our mist," They arrived in Salt Lake City August 3, 1850. Kelsey was about 13 1/2 years old at this time. They settled in Cottonwood, where Charles was bishop for many years. On the 15th day of February, 1853 Charles married his second wife, Sarah Ann Dunsdon. Under assignment from Brigham Young, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his son Richard were sent to Springville, Charles and his family to Mendon, Cache Co., Utah, and James and William into Idaho. Charles took up land in Mendon and built himself a home for his wife Mary Ann and their 14 children, and Sarah Ann and their 11 children. Mary Ann died October 1 1867, leaving the care of her younger children to Sarah Ann. Charles was a prominent man in Cache Co., being educated and having some wealth, which he generously shared with the church and community. He died at Mendon September 29, 1884. Sarah Ann lived until her family was raised, her death date being December 5, 1899. Kelsey spent his early manhood in Mendon. At the age of about twenty-five he married Eliza Jane Perry, age 16,in the old endowment house on May 18, 1861. She was the daughter of Orren Alonzo Perry and Mary Ann Hoops. They made their home in Mendon. Where he, Kelsey, farmed. He was very successful, having sheep, cattle and horses. He accumulated the best farm equipment t be had at that time. On December 6, 1861 a little daughter (Mary Ann) was born, who died at birth. On the 28th of October 1862 a little son was born, and he also died at birth (named Charles Alonzo). The a little girl was born on the 16th of October 1863. They named her Eliza Jane. On the 20th of January, 1865 Kelsey Charles Arrived. On the 23rd of February, 1867 Kelsey took a second wife, Ann Muir. They were Married in the old endowment house. She was the daughter of Walter Muir and Mary Ross. She was born May 7, 1848 in Crofthead, Reafsewshire, Scotland. It was in Scotland that they joined the church. It was not to be the father's privilege to come to Utah. He died in Scotland on August 15, 1860, just a short time after joining the church. Mary said her greatest desire since joining the church was to raise her children in the fear of the Lord and to raise them to be a credit to the church. So leaving her comfortable home and many of her dear ones, three of whom were buried in Scotland, she, with a family of five (three boys and two girls) set sail from Liverpool in the sailing ship "Art Wright", May 28, 1866. Two of her children had emigrated to America previously. She arrived in New York July 6, 1866. Leaving here, they crossed the river in a down pour of rain in an open cattle boat, which was flat surfaced with just a chain around the outside. This was just at the close of the Civil War, when means of travel was very difficult. Landing at New Haven, they boarded the train, reaching Montreal. They continued from here, still traveling by train, until they reached the banks of the Missouri July 22nd. After five days of travel across the plains, they were visited by a band of five hundred Pawnee Indian warriors who told them if they would give them flour, meat, etc., that they could travel over their lands unmolested and that they could use their wood for fires and the oxen could feed on their grass. Two or three oxen had to be given to the Indians for meat. The rest of the journey across the plains began July 25, 1866 with ox teams. Mary Muir walked nearly all the way, arriving in Salt Lake City in October, 1866. They remained in Salt Lake City only for a few days, then traveled northward to Mendon, Cache Co., Utah. Here Mary remained until her death, earning her living by caring for the sick. The final destination of Mary Ross Muir in Mendon provides the setting for her daughter, Annie Muir, and Kelsey Bird to meet and marry. As was stated earlier, she became the second wife. Eliza Jane and Ann became good friends. Their love for each other lasted through out their lives, and they loved each other's children. Ann's children called Eliza Jane 'Aunt Jane' and Eliza Jane's children call Ann 'Aunt Annie'. On November 7,1867 Alonzo William was born to Eliza Jane. Then on March 10,1868 Kelsey Walter was born to Annie. The next two babies were born with in two days of each other. Maribah, a little girl, was born to Annie July 23, 1870 and Lewis Richard was born to Eliza Jane July 25, 1870. On December 30, 1871 Moses George Albert was born to Annie. On March 19, 1873 Sarah Ann was born to Eliza Jane . On March 7, 1874 Annie presented her husband with twin boys, Peter Alma and James Alvin. On December 28, 1875 another little girl, Agnes Betsy, came to Annie. Soon after this Kelsey, with nine other families, was sent to Vermillion in Sevier, Co., Utah by Brigham Young. Some of the other men were Peter Gotfredson, Dastrup, and Cudddabacks. Their trip to Vermillion was slow and tedious because of their stock and farm equipment, nine small children, household furnishings and food supplies. They brought cows. horses and sheep, chickens and pigs. they could not travel many miles each day and water was a necessity at the camp. One of their camps was at Salt Lake Creek, south of Levan. When they made camp at night, the children would her the stock after the day's journey. They arrived in Vermillion in the early spring of 1875. Of course the crops would be the first consideration. Kelsey put the first plow in the Vermillion Canal. That was their only source of water, and it is still a main water source. After planting as much ground as they could get cleared for the first year's crop and getting sufficient water onto the land for irrigation, the next concern was a permanent home. Kelsey hauled logs from the canyon and built on the east side of the Sevier River. He planted the trees that still grow by the Black Knowels. He also made corrals and planted a garden. The garden then belonged to the women. While at Vermillion Kelsey took Kelsey Walter, who was between 9 and 10 years old (and maybe other sons??) with a team and wagon to Manti to work on the temple. He donated three weeks with his team getting rocks out and hauling them. On August 6, 1876 a little girl was born to Eliza Jane. They named her Rosetta. She was Eliza Jane's last baby. She was never well after that. Annie gave birth to John Henry in February(either 24th or 28th), 1878. Later, both families lived in Gooseberry --- about 1879. Kelsey was very superior physically and had great ambition. He was always a good provider. He was a stern man and demanded obedience from his children. He was appointed and set apart as presiding elder of the Gooseberry Branch of Salina Ward on January 21, 1883 by Bishop Jens Jensen. Eliza Jane was appointed president of the Wheat Association and also treasurer of the Relief Society, being set apart the same day, also by Bishop Jensen. At one time Eliza Jane's two oldest girls, then in their teens, wanted new dresses for some particular occasion. Without asking, Annie loaded some wheat on the wagon and took it to Salina, sold it, and bought material for the dresses. Then she and Eliza Jane made the dresses. Kelsey, with the aid of a George Gates, built a good sized house -- two large rooms on each side with loft bedrooms and a lean-to-kitchen on each side. Each family had one side of the house., giving them at least three bedrooms each and their lean-to kitchens. There was a large fireplace in each part of the house. On February 27, 1880 Joseph Smith Bird was born. On June 20, 1882 a little boy, Mart Andrew, was born; he died the same day. (Annie's children) On November 11, 1884 Annie presented her husband with the second set of twin boys --- David Mormon and Brigham Abraham. Hyrum Leroy arrived December 29, 1886 and two years later on October 14, 1888 Mary Ann was born. Ettia Frances is listed on the family group sheet, but no date is given. (This made 14 children for Annie and 8 for Eliza Jane) The authorities of the land were after Kelsey for having two wives. So he took Eliza Jane and her family, some sheep and cattle and went to Benjamin, Utah Co., Utah and started over again. He left Annie and her family in Gooseberry. But he was taken to court, nevertheless. On Tuesday, October 22, 1889 (On Martha Jane Smith's birth date) in the 1st district court at Provo, Utah, Kelsey Bird of Benjamin, Utah was sentenced by Judge Blackburn to six months imprisonment and $300.00 fine for unlawful cohabitation. Monday, April 21, 1890 Kelsey Bird of Benjamin was discharged from the penitentiary. (copied from the church Chronology by Martha Jane Smith, May 20, 1953, at Price, Utah.) Then, on February, 20 1900 Eliza Jane died. Alonzo and his wife, Martha Abigail, said that as they sat with her that night they heard voices speak above her bed. The following is a copy of a newspaper clipping found in the family Bible: Benjamin, Utah -- Death and burial of Eliza Jane Perry Bird. Special correspondence, Benjamin, Utah Co., Utah, February 20th, of 1900. today we buried our beloved Sister Eliza Jane Perry Bird, wife of brother Kelsey Bird, who died of dropsy. She was born March 10, 1845. The funeral was held in the meeting house and was well attended. President Ann Bingham in behalf of the Relief Society bore testimony to the faithful labors of Mrs. Bird in that organization until her health became so bad that she could not attend to the same. Bishop A.J.B. Stewart, Bishop Arglye of Lake Shore, and a number of othes made addresses ulogistic of the sterling character of the deceased. Kelsey Bird was ordained a High Priest July 11, 1903 by Charles Breverton. I In his declining years, his son Alonzo W. Bird and family moved to Benjamin in order to take care of him. He had a large family, most of whom were boys. These active, energetic boys climbed the trees, picked the fruit, scattered the chickens, etc. These actions bothered their grandfather so much that Alonzo moved his family to another farm some distance away. Martha Jane, the oldest daughter, used to walk to grandpa's every day to care for him. He gave her two pretty vases, a glass plate with the picture of the temple on it and a turine. These items she valued very much. When Alonzo and family moved to Idaho, Grandfather Kelsey sold his place and went to live with Lewis R. Bird. Later he went to Mendon to see his sisters and died at their place in Mendon on the 29th of April, 1909. Lewis took him from Mendon to Benjamin for burial. Written by Martha Jane Bird Smith copied by Donna (Dee) Bird

ALONZO WILLIAM BIRD and MARTHA ABIGAIL COOK BIRD

Contributor: Pan Argo Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

ALONZO WILLIAM BIRD and MARTHA ABIGAIL COOK BIRD ~~~~~ As told by their daughter, Martha Jane Bird Smith, Oct. 16, 1973 ~~~~ and *Revised in places [noted with square brackets], information added, and re-typed by their Grand-daughter, Pat(sy) Lorraine Bird Sagers ALONZO WILLIAM and MARTHA ABIGAIL COOK BIRD As a boy, Alonzo helped his father, Kelsey Bird, with the farming and with the care of herding of his sheep. He had to take turns with herding of the sheep with his brothers. He also had to take turns going to school. He did not get much of an education, although he could read, write pretty good, and also do simple arithmetic. When he was about nineteen or twenty, Alonzo met and fell in love with Martha Abigail Cook. After awhile they decided they wanted to get married. A little story is told of how he asked for her hand from her father. Her father was standing in front of the house, and Alonzo was on a horse, and he came galloping up to her father [Isaac Cook] and said, "I want to marry one of your daughters." Her father said, "Which one?" Alonzo replied, "Martha, of course!" and he whirled his horse around and left as fast as he could go. Alonzo's father, Kelsey Bird, took a dislike to Martha, and he tried to keep them from getting married. In his talk with Alonzo, he called her a bad name (slut). Alonzo got very angry and they quarreled; and Alonzo left home, and went to live with the Isaac Cook family (Martha's family). *[NOTE: It is the belief of Pat Sagers, that because of one of Martha’s sisters who had gotten into some trouble, and was quickly married off into a polygamist marriage - that Kelsey (Alonzo’s father) was falsely accusing Martha Cook as being the same as her sister.] Alonzo William Bird and Martha Abigail Cook were married the 15th of August 1886 by Bishop Jens Jensen at Gooseberry, Sevier Co., Utah. Martha Abigail Cook, daughter of Isaac Cook and Martha Elizabeth Holden Cook, was born the 16th day of March 1868 at Nephi, Juab County, Utah. Martha's parents had moved to Gooseberry also. They lived there from 1879 to 1890. Alonzo and Martha continued to live at Gooseberry, and Martha's brother, Jim Cook, told Martha J. Smith, that his brother Wiley Cook and Alonzo did a lot of fencing for a man by the name of Rex. They used wild horses, which they broke, to work by dragging out the logs to fence with. They also cut cedar posts and hauled them out and sold them. * [NOTE: There is a reservoir in the mountains above Gooseberry, called Rex Reservoir--probably named after this same man. P.B.S.] Alonzo and Martha became the proud parents of a little son born the 24th of August 1887. He was blessed and named Alonzo William Bird, the 9th of October 1887, by T. Manning, at Gooseberry, Utah. On 22 October 1889, a daughter, (myself) Martha Jane Bird was born to them at Gooseberry, Utah. [The same day Martha's grandfather was imprisoned for polygamy. P.B.S.] Alonzo was still working for wages. He also did hunting of deer. He traded some meat for flour. Early one morning Martha had breakfast ready and on the table. Alonzo sat down to breakfast, when Martha happened to look out of the window and said, "There stands a deer!" Alonzo jumped up and grabbed his gun and took off after the deer, without eating his breakfast and without his hat. That was the last Martha saw of Alonzo for three or four days. He followed the deer until he was give out; and ran onto his father's sheep camp. One of his half brothers was at the camp. He stayed there till he was able to go again. On the 14th of August 1890, Father in Heaven saw fit to take the little son from them. They were very sad, as one can see from the following song which Martha wrote at that time: I once had a home that was happy and gay, But the joys of this wide world were nothing to me. I had no desire this wild world to roam, For the cares of my heart were my children and home. But now I'm left lonely, my joys are no more, No boy for to greet us with his plays round the door. Our boy has been taken, in the cold grave he's lain, And we're left here to mourn, till we meet again. Come all who have homes, be happy and gay; Be kind to your children, for you don't know the day, That they will be taken, you'll be left lonely like me; Then the days that are gone, you will long for to see. But death like a serpent on poisonous wing, Has flown through our house, and has left there its sting. Our boy has been taken, in the cold grave he's lain, And we're left here to mourn in our desolate home. We once had a boy that was cheerful and gay, And at night with old Coley so delightful he'd play. His sister, she'd sit by him, and join in his play, There were none on this earth, so happy as they. But now we're left lonely, our boy is no more. No plays for to greet us at night round the door. Our boy has been taken, in the cold grave he's lain, And we're left here to mourn, till we meet again. (*Note: The sister mentioned was myself (Martha Jane). I lacked eight days of being ten months old when he died. This song was written on a sheet of writing paper that was in my mother's record book which I have. As the paper was yellow and brittle, I copied the song in the record book, which is a note book.) To go on with the story, another son was born to them the 3rd of April 1892 at Gooseberry, Utah. On the 4th of August 1892, Martha and her brother were both blessed and given names - Martha Jane Bird, and Clarence Orrin Bird, by Brigham Casto, at the Church in Salina, Sevier Co., Utah. The following story Alonzo told to his sons when they were older; and they told Martha Jane when she was trying to find things to write in her story about their parents: One time Alonzo and his half-brother, Uncle Jim Bird, had reloaded their own rifle shells. Alonzo had one shell that sort of buckled and would not go into the chamber of the gun. So he tried to hold a ramrod on the edge of the head of the shell, and Uncle Jim hit the other end of the ramrod with a hammer to drive the shell into the chamber. He hit once, and not waiting for Alonzo to fix the rod for the second time, Jim hit it again. The rod had slipped onto the cap, and it exploded. It blew the shell in pieces and some of the pieces hit Alonzo in the face, and it filled his face full of powder. His eyes were also full of powder. The eye sight in his right eye was covered with powder. It blinded that eye for the rest of his life. The following incident was passed along to Pat Bird Sagers by Roy Bird from Tendoy, Idaho, who was the son of Warren Bird, and Warren was the son of Lewis Richard. Warren said they always called Alonzo, ‘Uncle Lon’, and Warren told this story: Alonzo's father, Kelsey, was quite a stern man, and apparently was kind of harsh and abusive to his wives if things didn't go right. And for some reason he had been abusive to Eliza Jane one day. Lewis had come home and heard what his father had done to his Mom, but he didn't say anything to his father about it. Then, Alonzo (Uncle Lon) came home, and when he heard what his father had done to his mother, he went to Kelsey and told him that he had better never hurt his mother again, or he would have to deal with him next time. Kelsey never struck his wife again. Warren said the family really admired and respected "Uncle Lon" for standing up for his mother, and reproving his father. It appears that Alonzo's father and mother left Gooseberry around 1888. Alonzo’s father, Kelsey, was trying to dodge the authorities of the land, for having two wives. We know Kelsey had moved Eliza Jane, and their 3 youngest children, up to Benjamin, Utah by November 24, 1888, because this is where Alonzo's 15 year old sister, Sarah Ann Bird unexpectedly died, and is buried. It wasn’t many years before the law caught up with Kelsey. On 22 Oct. 1889 he was sentenced to six months imprisonment and fined $300. He was discharged April 21, 1890. On the day that Kelsey was sentenced to prison, Alonzo's wife, gave birth to their second child, Martha Jane Bird, in Gooseberry, Utah. Alonzo, being the oldest living son of Kelsey's probably stayed behind in Gooseberry, to protect, and help his step-mother, 'Aunt Annie' take care of the large farm and livestock in Gooseberry. Alonzo's last child to be born in Gooseberry, was Clarence Orrin, and he was born 3 April 1892. The date of their removal from Gooseberry is not known, but another son, James Ivan, was born to them on 22 June 1894 at Benjamin, in Utah County, Utah. Also, Martha received a letter from her father at Vernal, Uintah Co., Utah, dated Monday, Oct. 29th 1894, saying her brother, Isaac Cook, was killed in the gilsonite mine at Fort Duchesne, Utah. The letter was addressed to her at Benjamin, Utah. Another story Alonzo told to his sons, is as follows: Alonzo and his brother, Lewis Bird, had been hunting ducks. (Alonzo had to use his left eye for shooting and everything now.) As they were returning home they decided to shoot a few rabbits. They were riding in a cart. The cart floor was made of slats, a little apart from each other. Alonzo stood his gun on the bottom of the cart. The gun slipped, fell through the slats, and caused it to shoot. It was a shotgun. It shot right through the muscle of Alonzo’s left arm, taking the pocket off his shirt, and cutting the sleeve off his shirt, except for a little three-cornered piece under his arm. The shot went through the narrow rim of Uncle Lewis' straw hat. It cut the rim right off. It was so very close to his head, and yet did not hurt him. Everyone knew that Heavenly Father was watching over them. Alonzo and Martha and their family lived in a two room log house, with a dirt roof, on a ten or twenty acre piece of ground that his father, Kelsey Bird had given them. It was located about two and one half or three miles west and north from the town of Benjamin. On this ground they raised alfalfa hay for the cow and horses; grain or wheat to make flour and pig and chicken feed. In the fall, Alonzo worked on the thrashing machine, cutting bands and measuring and sacking the grain. For his pay he received one and a half bushels of grain per day, which he stored in the flour mill. This was ground into flour for the use of the family, the shorts and bran were used for pig feed. Three more sons were born to Alonzo and Martha while living in Benjamin. Kelsey ‘Charles’ was born December 19th, 1896; Isaac Wilford was born April 7th, 1899, and Leroy was born July 30, 1901. Alonzo’s youngest sister, Rosetta, had been courting Nathaniel Gardner from Payson, Utah, and on December 30, 1895 they were married there in Benjamin, Utah. They probably remain living nearby - in Payson or Benjamin, as Rosetta’s first two children were born in Benjamin, Utah. Rosetta probably knew that her mother was dying. She gave birth to their third child and first son, Nathaniel, in Salem, Utah just one day before Eliza Jane passed away - on February 19, 1900. This must have been a time of mixed emotions for Rosetta. During the winter of 1900, Alonzo’s mother, Eliza ‘Jane’ was in very poor health. Jane had heart problems and dropsy [a diseased condition in which large amounts of fluid collect in the body tissues and cavities]. Alonzo's and Lewis' families helped their father out by taking turns in caring for Jane during her critical days - staying by her bedside both day and night. On February 20, 1900, Eliza Jane passed away. Alonzo and his wife, Martha Abigail, said that as they sat with Eliza the night of her passing, they heard voices speaking above her bed. Her death was a very sad occasion for the whole family. They all loved Eliza Jane very much. Alonzo also helped his father and brother catch fish [in Utah Lake] with a seine--a large net with sinkers along one edge and floats along the other edge. They dropped this seine from two row boats and pulled it for a ways. Sometimes it would certainly be loaded with fish. They sold the fish from door to door. Sometimes they accepted flour for fish. Alonzo and his brother enjoyed hunting ducks on Utah Lake. One time they were hunting wild ducks in a row boat on Utah Lake, and his brother was rowing the boat. Alonzo laid his gun across his lap for a minute, when BANG, a loaded shell exploded and the gun jumped off his lap into the lake. Alonzo undressed and dove into the cold water. It was so cold he could not stay in the water very long at a time, but he tried and tried, but he could not find the gun--and he never did find it. As time went on, Alonzo and Martha decided they did not have enough land for a growing family of boys. They decided to move to Idaho. But before leaving, they knew it was time to prepare to go to the Temple and get their endowments and sealing done. So they got everything all ready, and started out on the 23rd of April 1902. Soon after they left, it started raining. It took them two days to go from Benjamin to Salt Lake City, and it rained on them all the time. The morning of April 25th, 1902, they went through the Temple and did all their work for the family. When they came out of the Temple it was still raining, so they thought it would be better to go back to Benjamin and wait until the weather settled. So that is what they did, even though their intentions had been to go on to Idaho after they went through the temple. Alonzo's father, Kelsey, went along with them to the Salt Lake City Temple, and back again to Benjamin. By the time Martha and Alonzo were ready to start out for Idaho the second time, his brother, Lewis and his family were now ready to go with them. This time it was the 2nd of June 1902. Each family traveled by team and wagon, and had tents to sleep in at night. They were two weeks on the road. They arrived at their sister's, Rose and Than Gardner's place, on the foothills east of Ammon, Idaho. Their place was about two miles east of Ammon. They visited a few days with relatives, and then Alonzo got a job working on a farm for a Mr. Plank, at Taylorville, Idaho. Alonzo worked for Mr. Plank all summer and fall, and then moved back on the foothills by Rose Gardner. Alonzo and the boys got out logs and built a two room house. His brother, Lewis, moved his family to a little place called Milo, Idaho. Lewis made a home there for his family; and he died there on October 8, 1931. The winter of 1902, Alonzo's two oldest boys, Clarence and James, and his daughter, Martha, walked to school in Ammon, about two miles away. The snow was deep and drifted in big high drifts. The drifts were right over the tops of the fences. The children had great fun walking on top of the fences. In the spring of 1903, lots of sugar beets were planted. Alonzo worked with and for the farmers, planting and irrigating and cultivating beets. Alonzo and Martha’s oldest children thinned beets and weeded beets every few days all summer. In the fall, Alonzo contracted a field of beets to dig. He plowed them loose, and his children piled them in piles and topped them. Then they helped load them in the wagon, and Alonzo hauled them to the sugar factory at Sugar City. In the spring of 1904, Alonzo received a letter from a neighbor of his father's, Kelsey Bird, saying that Kelsey was very ill, and needed Alonzo to come back to Benjamin and take care of him, and if he would, he would get everything Kelsey owned. So Alonzo sold everything he owned except his teams, wagon, and the household effects and loaded the wagon, and once again they left for Benjamin, Utah. When they arrived at Idaho Falls, Alonzo put his pregnant wife, and there little boy, Leroy, on the train and sent them on ahead. The rest of the family went by team and wagon, and it took them about two weeks to travel back to Benjamin. Alonzo and his family moved in with Kelsey to take care of him, and that fall another son, Lyndon was born on the 30th of September 1904. During the Spring and into the Summer, Kelsey was getting really fed up this the antics of his grandsons. They ran all over the place and climbed trees and picked fruit before it was ripe. He finely caught Charlie in a plum tree, so he told him to go and get an ax and cut the tree down. Charlie wanted to know why. Grandpa Kelsey said, “So you can get the fruit easier without climbing the trees.” Kelsey was getting old and not feeling very well, and he couldn’t stand to be around Alonzo’s noisy boys all day - so Alonzo and his family had another move coming! Alonzo rented a two room house in Benjamin from a Mr. Losey about a mile closer to school, church, and the store, etc. Alonzo worked for different farmers gathering in their crops. Then he worked again on the threshing machine, cutting bands and also measuring and sacking the grain. It was while they were living at the Losey place that Martha Jane finally got a baby sister. She was born on the 20th of November 1906, and they named her Voilet Elizabeth. Alonzo and Martha now had six living boys and two daughters. By this time Martha Jane was old enough to be a big help to her Grandfather Kelsey. Every few days she would walk up to his place, and straighten up his house, and do some little chores for him. It was in the spring of 1907 that Alonzo moved his family back to Idaho. This time he bought 20 acres of land at Rudy, Idaho. Later the name of the ward was changed to Clark Ward. Alonzo hauled logs from the mountains and built a two room house there. It was soon afterwards that Kelsey Bird sold his farm in Benjamin and put the money in the bank. That same year there was a depression and when he tried to get his money out of the bank they would only give him ten cents on the dollar and it broke him! He was 70 years old, alone and nowhere to live so he decided to live with his different children, and came to Idaho to live with his daughter Rosetta and son’s Alonzo and Lewis. In 1909 Grandpa Kelsey decided to go to Mendon, Utah to see his sister (Henrietta Shumway) and other extended families for awhile. One day he didn't feel very well, so he started to lay down on the bed. He didn't even get down on the bed before he was dead. He died in Mendon, on April 29, 1909. Kelsey's sisters called Lewis, and Lewis called Alonzo, but for some reason it was impossible for Alonzo to go with Lewis at that time, and his sister, Rosetta could not go as she was expecting another baby in a couple months. So Lewis R. Bird, went alone, and picked up his father's body in Mendon, Utah and took him to Benjamin, Utah for burial. He was buried along beside his first wife, Eliza Jane Perry Bird, and their daughter, Sarah Ann Bird. Alonzo and Martha's third daughter was born June 22, 1909 in Clark Ward, Freemont County, Idaho. She was blessed and given the name of Edith Bird, on August 8, 1909. Edith was the tenth and last child born to Alonzo and Martha. That winter or early spring of 1910, while it was still very cold, all the boys, and Voilet and Martha all had the measles. Four at a time--The three older boys and Voilet first, and then the three small boys and Martha Jane. Alonzo also split the top of his foot open with a broad ax. He was hewing some logs and the ax glanced off and hit his foot. Alonzo heard the government was throwing open the Indian Reservation in Utah, to people who wanted to file and homestead on it. So he decided to go to Utah and find out the particulars about it. About the first of March 1910, he left for Utah. He did a lot of traveling around, on foot, and returned about the middle of April 1910. He had filed on 160 acres of land. Alonzo sold his 20 acres of land at Clark Ward, together with some improvements he had made, and bought another wagon and a small team. The family loaded their personal effects on the two wagons and left for the Indian Reservation in Utah on the 16th of May 1910. It was a hard trip, especially on the small team. The trip took them three weeks. They arrived the 5th of June 1910. They were a little disappointed when they saw the place. There was a creek in a sort of canyon called Water Holler. On each side of that was a hill, mostly rocks. The family lived in tents while Alonzo and his boys hauled out logs to build a house. They built a 2 room cabin on the north side of the creek. People living three or four miles away gave them starts of fruit trees, mostly apricot trees. They planted them, and also some garden stuff. Alonzo and his boys found quite a few swarms of bees along the creeks in the trees. He made boxes and they caught the bees and put them in the boxes. They caught quite a lot of them, maybe thirty stands or so. Alonzo planted alfalfa and every where a damp spot could be found on the hillsides, he planted bull clover. Honey made from bull clover is clear like water. When it crystallizes it is white like snow and is really good honey. Alonzo bought an extractor and different things he needed in the care of honey. Then in 1913 or maybe 1914, Alonzo's son James, took a wagon load of five gallon cans out to Salt Lake City, and Provo and sold it for $12.00 per can. The total was better than a thousand dollars. Later, foul brood got started in his bees and after that he did not do so good. But they still sold quite a lot of apricots, and they raised some grain to make their flour; alfalfa for the horses, cow, pigs, and a few sheep, which Alonzo's son, Charley, had accepted for his pay for herding sheep. Alonzo and Martha were good honest people, and they were religious in a sense. They belonged to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and as stated before, had been through the Temple. They paid their tithing and fast offering, but were not actively engaged in doing Church work. They always had their family prayers, every night and every morning, and the blessing was always asked on the food. Martha took sick, and was taken to Roosevelt, to be close to the doctor, but the doctor was away and did not come to see her. She died there the 3rd of September 1932, age 64 years 5 months and 18 days. Alonzo and his daughter, Martha Jane, was with her, and the whole family came and saw her the night she died. Her funeral was held 5 Sept. 1932, in the Bluebell Ward, and burial was in the Bluebell Cemetery. Alonzo and his son Lyndon lived right at the end of the school bus route, and Martha Jane’s husband, Frank Smith, was running the school bus. Martha Jane and her husband, Frank, thought it would help them all out if they moved down there and helped take care of them. So they did. Lyndon got married April 27, 1933, so he and his wife, Alta, were there to take care of Alonzo. Then Martha and her family moved back up to the town Bluebell. Lynn and his wife began to get a family quite fast. As time went on, there was a lot of noise as the children got older. Alonzo couldn't get used to their ways, and was trying to get courage up to leave. In April, Martha heard he wanted to leave, so she asked him if he would come and live with them, but he refused, at first. Then later on, he said he would come live with them. So on the 10th of May 1941, Martha and her husband, Frank Smith, went after Alonzo, and he went and lived with them. Martha's family was gone--their two boys were in the Army, so there was no noise. Alonzo was not a bit well, but he would not let anyone do anything for him. Alonzo passed away about noon on the 8th of February 1942. He was buried the 10th of February 1942. Both death and funeral were in Bluebell, Duchesne County, Utah, and also in the Bluebell Cemetery. He was 75 years, 3 months and 1 day. Written by Martha Jane Bird Smith, 17 October 1973. (The wording was revised a bit by Pat L. Bird Sagers, August 1997 –mostly such things as "my father" changed to "Alonzo", etc. for easier reading, for my own family. A few additional stories were added to make the history more complete.

HISTORY OF MARY HOOPES PERRY

Contributor: Pan Argo Created: 4 months ago Updated: 4 months ago

HISTORY OF MARY HOOPES PERRY BY PAT L. BIRD SAGERS - February 2008 Lewisberry, York County, Pennsylvania Mary Hoopes was born January 17, 1822 in Lewisberry, York County, Pennsylvania to Jonathan and Rebecca Watts Hoopes. Being the first girl born to this couple, she was named after her grandmother, Mary Hayworth Hoopes; while her oldest brother was named after her grandfather, Elisha Hoopes. Mary’s father was born into a prominent Quaker family, who had lived for many generations - since 1683, in Goshen, Chester County, Pennsylvania. The Hoopes owned a considerable amount of farm land, but the family was quickly outgrowing their land. Mary’s mother, Rebecca Watts Hoopes, was raised in Newberry, York County, Pennsylvania, and this is where Mary’s parents lived for many years. Quaker children were considered to be born innocent; more than that, they were born with the Light of God within them, and they were taught at home and at school to recognize it. The Quaker egalitarian spirit would have affected Mary Hoopes. Girls wore neat dresses in sober colors, white caps, and shoulder kerchiefs neatly folded. Boys wore dark suits of plain cut like the master’s but without his looped cocked hat. The wealthy showed their wealth only in finer fabric. Quakers believed in education for everyone; one of the responsibilities of the Monthly Meeting was to provide an education for poor children, including a few blacks and Indians. Mary’s father and grandparents for several generations had lived in Chester Valley, Pennsylvania. It was a natural meadowland in the beginning. The first Quaker farms had a productivity undreamed of in England. The Southeastern Pennsylvanians took great pride in their land and their occupation. Prior to 1800, many Quaker farmers did not practice farming with conservation, rotation, and fertilization in mind. When his land wore out, a farmer could abandon it and move on to cheaper land on the frontier. One-third of Pennsylvania’s population moved west between 1790 and 1820. The Quakers in Ohio In the eighteenth century, some Quakers began to moved westward, while others moved to the south where there was plenty of land which could be purchased and converted into large plantations. However, those who migrated to the south found themselves in a quandary because they could not reconcile their beliefs with those of many Southerners who refused to acknowledge the human rights of the Negro slaves. The Friends were recognized as one of the earliest groups in America to denounce the evils of slavery. A majority of southern Quakers fought slavery in a quiet way, freeing their own slaves, and encouraging others to emancipate theirs as well. Because of their beliefs and practices, it wasn’t long before the southern Friends realized that the South was not the most advantageous place to live, with its growing hostile atmosphere. After the Treaty of Greenville in 1795 opened the Ohio Country to settlements out of danger from Indian attacks, Friends in the South began to join the great migration to “the new West” (Ohio) which offered economic opportunity, and especially important to the Friends, was their personal and political freedom. This is when the Friends from eastern Pennsylvania and the English Quakers from the eastern seaboard, with their distinctive garb and their reliance upon the “Inner Light” began to migrate to the Northwest Territory to seek a change and to start what many thought would be a better life. It was about 1829, when a group of the Society of Friends (Quakers), in which the Hoopes were active members, made the decision to move to the Ohio Territory. The Hoopes family, which included Mary’s Grandparents, Elisha and Mary Hoopes, and many of Mary’s Aunts, Uncles and cousins left their homeland area which was famous for a large, comfortable ancestral house (called “Brooznoll” - which means a breezy knoll). Mary’s father, Jonathan Hoopes, was about 41 years old, when the Hoopes families make the decision to migrate further west, and little Mary Hoopes was about 7 years old. Jonathan and Rebecca’s had eight children at that time, and they were as follows: 1. Elisha Hoopes - born 13 Oct 1813 at Fairview, York, Pennsylvania; 2. Thomas Watts Hoopes - born 15 Aug 1815 at Fairview, York, Pennsylvania; 3. Warner Hoopes - born 29 Oct 1817 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; 4. Hyrum Hoopes - born 6 Apr 1820 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; 5. Mary Hoopes - born 17 Jan 1822 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; 6. Lewis Hoopes - born 19 Nov 1823 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; 7. Jane Hoopes - born 10 Aug 1826 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania; and 8. Seth Hoopes - born in 1828 at Lewisberry, York, Pennsylvania. When Jonathan and Rebecca took their family of 8 children and moved them to the rich farmlands of Columbiana County, Ohio, it was considered, at that time, the western frontier of America. Families who migrated to Ohio had to start their lives all over - erect log homes, clear new farm lands, and plant their crops, and all this on the edge of hostile Indian country. Jonathan and Rebecca took with them their certificate of good standing from their Quaker Church in Pennsylvania. Jonathan was a farmer, and a stonemason by trade, so he was probably anxious to build a nice stone home for his family. By the close of the year 1800, there were about eight hundred families of Friends in the Ohio Country - who came, not as land speculators, but as settlers truly desirous of establishing homes. Sometimes whole meetings in many instances moved westward in a body, while in other meetings many families left their old homes and associations, and pushed out to find new homes and a new career in what was then known as the wilderness of the north-west. Settlements by Quakers in the Old Northwest was a life of toil, privation, struggle, and suffering. A few Quakers were captured and killed by Indians. Yet, Ohio Quakers sent back to their friends glowing reports about the land and the freedom of the Ohio Country. These reports were responsible for many more families deciding to move ‘west’, and within a relatively few years Ohio became a great center of the Society of Friends. By 1826, more than eight thousand Quakers were peacefully living among the limestone hills of Belmont, Jefferson, Harrison, and Columbiana counties in the eastern part of the state. It was reported that for nearly seventy-five years, one third of the Friends in America lived within the boundaries of the ‘Old Northwest Territory’. New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio Mary’s mother and father had four more children while living in various areas and towns in Columbiana County, Ohio. Those children were: 9. Sara Ann Hoopes - born 31 Jan 1830 at New Garden, Columbiana, Ohio; 10. William Harlan Hoopes - born 13 Oct 1831 at New Garden, Columbiana, Ohio; 11. Elizabeth Hoopes - born 28 Jun 1833 at Smith, Columbiana, Ohio; 12. Jonathan Hoopes, Jr. - born 22 Feb 1835 at Hanover, Columbiana, Ohio. Jonathan and Rebecca had a total of twelve children. During the summer of 1830, when the Census was taken, Mary was living with her family in the town of Smith, Columbiana County, Ohio; and they were still living in the township of Smith in 1833. By the time Rebecca and Jonathan’s last child was born in 1835, they had moved to Hanover, Columbiana County, Ohio. The Hoopes Learn About the Restored Gospel It was out in the Ohio Territory that Jonathan Hoopes first heard the Restored Gospel of Jesus Christ from Mormon missionaries. Many of the Hoopes families now knew that Joseph Smith had organized the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on April 6, 1830, under the laws of the State of New York. Mary’s father, Jonathan, had a strong testimony that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God. Jonathan and his family most likely would not have heard about the gospel had they remained in the tight Quaker stronghold in Pennsylvania. It seems as though unseen forces and feelings were moving strong, choice families around, and making it possible for them to hear the gospel so that they, too, could become a part of assisting in bringing forth the fullness of the gospel of Jesus Christ. When Jonathan heard about the Restored Gospel, he knew it was true and he broke the mold of many generations of his family as Quaker members when he joined with the peculiar Mormons. Mary’s father, Jonathan, was baptized on January 16, 1834, and her mother, Rebecca, was baptized three years later, on January 11, 1837. January baptisms by immersion in Ohio waters would have been terribly cold, but it certainly set an example of their strong testimonies, and of their faith and devotion to their new religious conviction. Jonathan and Rebecca found it almost impossible to discard many of their strict Quaker teachings, and their strong traditional use of the Biblical manner of speaking - such as ‘thee’ and ‘thou’. But their quiet, reverent up-bringing would have been a reason for them to be humble enough to listen to the Mormon missionaries, and they certainly would have understood as the spirit of the Holy Ghost bore witness of truth in their hearts. Kirtland, Geauga County, Ohio The Hoopes family seemed to have been migrating towards Kirtland, Ohio area where the Prophet Joseph and the main body of Saints were still living. The Mormons had been driven from New York in 1831, and most of the LDS Church officials had settled in and around Kirtland, Ohio. Some Saints settled in Illinois, and many more ended up in Missouri, twelve miles west of Independence. Those living in Missouri founded a town they called Zion. The headquarters of the Church was in Kirtland, Ohio, and it was the center of missionary work during this period. Kirtland was near the main routes of transportation and contained the largest concentration of Church membership. It was the point of departure for missions to Canada, the Northeast, the Mid-Atlantic States, the Midwest, and the South. The state of Ohio itself was saturated with missionaries who crossed the state on their way to or from other fields of labor. Frequently those unable to go on longer missions or those home during the winter months visited local communities and proselyted there. The Kirtland Temple was probably almost finished when the Hoopes arrived in Kirtland. The Temple took over two and a half years to build. There was a sawmill in Kirtland, to create the wood used in building the temple. Women of the Church contributed their glassware and china, that was crushed and mixed with the exterior coating so that the Temple glistened in the sun. Jonathan Hoopes and perhaps several of his older boys may have worked at the sawmill and helped to finish the Temple, and if so, they would have been present when the beautiful Kirtland Temple was dedicated on Sunday, March 27, 1836. The dedication service lasted seven hours. Nine hundred to a thousand saints were in attendance, and many later wrote of spiritual manifestations. They said Angels could be seen outside the building, and many other miraculous stories of that wonderful event. Mary Hoopes would have been fourteen years old in 1836. Mary’s next to oldest brother, Thomas Watts Hoopes, seemed to have indeed been a “doubting Thomas”, for he remained behind in Columbiana County, Ohio with his aging grandparents, and remained a faithful member of the Quaker Society. Thomas married Elizabeth Elliot on July 16, 1836, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio, and they remained living there. Mormon Saints In Missouri From the historical events of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we know that following the expulsion of the Mormons from Independence, in Jackson County, Missouri in late 1833, most of the Saints lived in relative peace with the original inhabitants of Clay County, Missouri. However, after so many Saints began arriving in Clay and Ray Counties, the citizens began raising objections and requested the Mormons to leave their counties also. In the summer of 1836, some members in northern Missouri were already establishing new headquarters at Far West, in northern Ray County. In December 1836 two new counties were created - Daviess and Caldwell. Far West and Shoal Creek settlements were located in Caldwell Counties, and they were created exclusively for the Mormons. It wasn’t long until Joseph Smith and other leaders of the Church were also driven out of Kirtland, Ohio. The Prophet had been warned of an assassination plot, but while the mob was nearby, Joseph was placed inside a box and taken out of town on an ox cart. The Prophet and other leaders left Kirtland in January 12, 1838, and fled to Far West, Missouri to escape mob violence. Most of the faithful Saints in Ohio decided to follow their leader to Missouri. But before many of them could leave Kirtland, their enemies began ransacking homes of the Saints and starting fires in basements, and harassing the Saints in order to drive them out of Kirtland. The Saints struggled to settle their debts, sell their property, and purchase wagons, teams, and equipment. A company of over five hundred Saints were organized to follow in July 1838. The remaining members in Ohio tried to sell their farms and homes and follow as soon as they could. It is believed that the Hoopes family left with the main body of Ohio saints in July. The migrating Kirtland Camp was dogged by persecution along the trail. They were often ridiculed and threatened with violence, as they traveled by or through towns along the way. Many forces contributed to the suffering in the Kirtland Camp. Accidents and illness constantly afflicted the pioneers. In the midst of their suffering and afflictions, they turned to their Heavenly Father for help. Throughout the journey, elders administered to the sick and the injured; and journalists reported that through the power of the priesthood, many of the afflicted were instantly healed. Far West & Adam-Ondi-Ahman, Missouri & Surrounding Areas By July 1838, the Hoopes family, along with 600 saints with their wagons, teams, and cattle left the rejected town of Kirtland, Ohio for Missouri. When the Ohio saints arrived at the Mississippi River in September, they were informed that war had broken out in western Missouri between the Mormons and their enemies, and that all Mormons would soon be driven from the state, and if they continued their journey, they would be attacked and would suffer a similar fate. Several members of the camp refused to enter Missouri as a result of these threats. But most of them pressed on, and after three months of travel the Kirtland Camp arrived at Far West, Missouri, on October 2, 1838. Five miles from Far West the Ohio Saints were met by the Prophet, his two counselors, Isaac Morley (Patriarch of Far West), and other leading brethren. The next day the Prophet counseled members of the camp to continue their journey north to Adam-ondi-Ahman, a new settlement that had been prepared for them. Far West, was at that time, located in upper Ray County, Missouri, and Adam-ondi-Ahman was in Daviess County, Missouri. Many of the Saints built their homes a little farther out of the main township of Adam-ondi-Ahman in Daviess County. When the saints began arriving in Caldwell and Daviess counties, it was the undisturbed home of the buffalo, deer and wild turkeys. It was part timberland and part prairie, but the soil was very fertile. Soon the hard-working saints had good crops, gardens, and nice homes. Apparently the Hoopes families came to this area with some of the earliest Ohio groups, and Jonathan, and his twenty-one year old son, Warner Hoopes, purchased land in Daviess County, on the outskirts of Adam-ondi-Ahman. They proceeded to build houses and barns, and plant crops by the summer of 1839. Warner Hoopes land and property was valued at $250; and Jonathan’s land, houses, and other property was valued at $1,115. By the summer and fall of 1838 there were about twelve thousand Saints in Missouri. This large number settled, or were in the act of settling, at Far West, Adam-ondi-Ahman, DeWitt, Haun’s Mill and surrounding areas. Far West was now a prosperous town of 5,000 Saints, and on July 4, 1838, Joseph Smith, knowing the importance of temples, laid four cornerstones for a temple to be built in Far West, and he dedicated the land for such. The town of Adam-ondi-Ahman grew rapidly. A conference was held there on June 28, 1838 for the purpose of organizing a Stake of Zion. No doubt Mary Hoopes and her family drove to this meeting. The meeting was held in a grove of trees, and was conducted by the Prophet Joseph Smith. A Stake Presidency was first chosen, then a High Council was organized, consisting of 12 men. Gallatin, Missouri Election, & Persecutions A steady stream of Mormon immigrants from the East, as well as twelve hundred refugees who had been driven out of Jackson County were rapidly increasing the population of Daviess, Caldwell, Ray, and Carroll counties. Long caravans of covered wagons cut deep ruts across the Missouri prairies. By the summer of 1838, the numbers of Latter-day Saints in northern Missouri totaled fifteen thousand. All the old causes of disquiet were intensified by the numbers of Mormons who were overflowing into all northwestern Missouri. The Mormons quickly began to outnumber the gentiles in Daviess County, and it was conceivable that within a few years the Mormons might dominate the whole state. Even the finest citizens became alarmed, and this fear spread quickly to the wild and lawless element of the growing frontier, and seemed to add fuel to the fire and give excuse to again plunder and ravage. When Daviess County was created in 1836, there were still fewer than a hundred settlers. The town of Gallatin was mapped to serve as the county seat of Daviess County. “The renewed persecution began at Gallatin, Missouri on election day, Monday, August 6, 1838. The original Missouri settlers naturally wanted to elect a state legislator who was one of their own, and William Peniston, a staunch enemy of the Saints, was their candidate. Peniston was afraid that he would lose the election because most of the members of the Church supported John A. Williams. A couple weeks before the election, Judge Joseph Morin, advised a couple elders of the Church to be prepared for an attack by mobbers who were determined to prevent Mormons from voting. Gallatin was a mere straggling row of ten houses, three of which were saloons.” (40) Hoping that the judge’s prediction would prove false, a number of Mormon men went unarmed to Gallatin to vote. At 11:00 a.m., William Peniston addressed the crowd of voters, hoping to excite them against the Mormons by stating: “The Mormon leaders are a set of horse thieves, liars, counterfeiters, and you know they profess to heal the sick, and cast out devils, and you all know that is a lie.”(26) After Peniston’s inflammatory speech, and with some of the crowd filled with whiskey, a fight was inevitable. Dick Welding, the mob bully, punched one of the Saints and knocked him down. A fight ensued. Even though outnumbered, one of the Mormons, John L. Butler, grabbed an oak stake from a nearby woodpile and began to strike the Missourians with strength that surprised himself. The Missourians armed themselves with clapboards or anything that came to hand; during the brawl that followed, several persons on both sides were seriously hurt.(41) *(Another one of the author’s [Pat Sagers] ancestors, Harvey Olmstead, was one of the men who was listed as being present in the notorious Election fight at Gallatin, Missouri in August 1838. The following is the story of his involvement:) From John Lowe Butler's account, he recorded: "I also recalled a strange, accidental weapon which helped the beleaguered Saints. Brother Olmstead, before the fight, was carrying a half-dozen earthen bowls with cups and saucers wrapped in a new cotton handkerchief tied to his wrist. When a mobber struck him he raised his arm in self-defense, and the blow shattered the dishes. Olmstead then grasped the bundle of broken pottery and swung it like a weapon. "When the affray was over," John noted, "I saw him empty out his broken earthware on the ground in pieces not larger than a dollar and his handkerchief looked like it had been chewed by a cow. I have thought ever since that time that they had fun to pick the pieces of earthen ware from their heads, for they certainly were pretty well filled."(41) It appears that Mary’s brother, Warner Hoopes, and perhaps her father, Jonathan, went to Gallatin, Missouri to vote. The following Affidavits & Petitions relating to the Missouri Persecution were later on filed by Jonathan Hoopes and Warner Hoopes: fd56: John Lawson, 1805 - ; Benjamin Slade, 1800-1891; Jonathan Hoopes, 1788-1868; Clark Slade, 1812-1814. Short affidavits on depredations in Jackson, Caldwell, and Daviess counties Pittsfield, Pike, Illinois, January 14, 1840. fd57: Warner Hoopes, 1817-1891. Affidavit on Gallatin election and expulsion from Daviess County. Pittsfield, Pike, Illinois, January 14, 1840. The Hoopes families seemed to be living on a large farm in the outlying settlements in Daviess County near Adam-ondi-Ahman. Jonathan had at least one house and other outbuildings. One month after the Gallatin election, mobs were retaliating against Mary Hoopes’ father and his family, as well as other saints. After the Gallatin, Missouri Elections "The First Presidency came to Anson Call’s home on a Sunday, sometime in September 1838, and counseled all of the Church members in the area to leave their homes and temporarily move to Diahman. Although they agreed to relocate, they were anxious concerning their crops and were unsure as to whether or not to sell their farms. Joseph Smith advised them not to sell out, but to continue to maintain their farms as best they could under the circumstances. Some families began to pack up what belongings they felt would be necessary and hastily left during the night. They arrived safely later the next day." Mary’s father, Jonathan, and her whole family were among the Saints who received considerable bad treatment. On September 10, 1838, while Jonathan was in the process of moving some of his personal belongings to Adam-ondi-Ahman, as the Prophet had counseled them to do, Mary’s father was accosted by seventy-five ruffians, most of whom were from Livingston County. They plundered his wagon and threatened Mary’s father. Jonathan said, “the[y] wanted me to Denounce my religion and move my family from Davis County to Levinston County . . . and fight against my society,” he recalled, “then the[y] would protecte me.” Jonathan rejected their several propositions and being threatened at gun point, the band held him captive for half a day! Upon releasing him they said he must leave the county. A short while later, while transporting his family and the remainder of his personal property that hadn’t been destroyed, Jonathan Hoopes was again confronted. The company subsequently released his wife, Rebecca, and their children, including seventeen-year-old Mary Hoopes, and allowed them to continue on to Diahman, but Mary’s father was not so lucky. They made a sport of tracking him like a hunted animal. They informed Jonathan that they would release him for a short time, and then the men of the mob would come looking for him. Jonathan reported, “If the[y] Could see me the[y] would shoot me,” he recalled, “but by keeping myself hid in the woods I got away from them.” The ruffians also stole two of the Hoopes’ horses. *(NOTE: Sidney Rigdon reported William Peniston was the leader of the group who stopped Hoopes - the same William Peniston who was running for election in Gallatin. Hoopes later filed a warrant for Peniston’s arrest and a writ was served. Peniston failed to appear in court, but sent a spokesman, however the judge dismissed any action. (48)) Missouri’s Governor Issues An ‘Extermination Order’ “It was on October 27, 1838 when Missouri Governor Lilburn W. Boggs issued his infamous “Extermination” order - ‘The Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the state if necessary for the public peace - their outrages are beyond all description.” Three days later, a militia mob of about 240 men, suddenly rode into Haun’s Mill, and began firing. This was a settlement of about thirty families, some recently arrived from the East who were camped in wagons and tents near homes and a mill belonging to some other Mormons. Despite no resistance and shouts of surrender, they continued to fire, eventually killing seventeen and wounding many others. When all who had not been able to flee, had been massacred. The militia men looted the houses and tents, stripped the dead, and drove off with their horses and wagons. The Militia troops inflicted some of the most heinous acts upon the Mormon Saints in Missouri. Mary Hoopes was seventeen years old in 1838. Quincy, Adams County, Illinois (& Daviess County, Missouri) There were hundreds of other families who went through similar problems and situations, who were driven by mobs from place to place, who saw their new homes and farms destroyed, and who still loved and followed the Prophet Joseph Smith - just as the Hoopes and the Perry families had done. With the entire First Presidency - Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, and Hyrum Smith being held captive in Liberty Jail, Brigham Young and the Twelve Apostles were left with the task of directing the retreat of several thousand Saints from Missouri and choosing a new gathering place for them. They selected Quincy, Adams County, Illinois - two miles across the Mississippi River, where the good residents were generous and sympathetic to the plight of the exiles. The Gustavus Adolphus Perry Family - Near Quincy, Illinois Eighteen year old Mary Hoopes was listed with her family on the 1840 Federal Census living in Quincy, Adams County, Illinois; however, in the side margin of the Census was written: “Davis County [Mo.] - extension of the city of Quincy [Illinois].” Listed right next to the Hoopes’ family was the Gustavus Adolphus Perry family, which included their oldest son, 23 year old Orrin Alonzo Perry. Also, living nearby was the Perry’s married daughter and her family, the Joseph Tippetts’ family. Joseph Tippetts, had married Orrin Alonzo Perry’s younger sister, Rosalia, and they seem to have kept close family ties to the Perrys. There were several reasons for some of these families stopping, and staying in the Quincy area for awhile - for safety, to get some much needed rest, and provisions, and to plant gardens. We know that during this stop-over, Alonzo Perry’s forty-two year old mother, Eunice, gave birth to her and Gustavus’ last child, Lucy Ann Perry, on May 20, 1839 in the Quincy, Illinois area. Most likely Mary’s mother, Rebecca Hoopes, was at her friend and neighbor’s side as a midwife, as Eunice Perry gave birth to their last child. Marriage of Mary Hoopes and Orrin Alonzo Perry at Quincy, Illinois No doubt Orrin Alonzo Perry and Mary Hoopes had become acquainted with each other during many difficult years as mobs were driving their families from place to place. Both the Perry and Hoopes families lived in Ohio, Missouri and Illinois. Quincy, in Adams County, Illinois was most likely the place where Alonzo, as he was called, and Mary were married on September 20th, 1840, as they were both living there with their parents in the summer of 1840, and were friends and neighbors to each other there. Commerce (Nauvoo), Hancock County, Illinois In April 1839, Joseph Smith and his companions were able to escape, and they joined their families across the river in Quincy, Illinois. That same Spring, Joseph Smith journeyed to a new area called Commerce, about forty-seven miles north of Quincy, on the banks of the Mississippi River, and he and other Saints began purchasing land there. One man described it as a “very sickly place or perhaps the Saints would not have had the privilege of stopping there.” Then the Saints began to drain the swampy land - full of malaria-infected mosquitoes. This land was surrounded on three sides by a sweeping curve or on a peninsula jutting into the Mississippi River from the Illinois side. As soon as the saints could drain the swamps in Commerce (or Nauvoo), most of the Saints began to relocated there. It wasn’t long before they could honestly call their new land, “Nauvoo the beautiful”. Commerce was now the focal spot for the Saints, and there was a strong spirit of gathering. Homes were being built, summer crops were growing, and the swamp was giving way to a city. Nauvoo did not develop in the usual haphazard way of cities. It was fashioned in the mind of its founder before a stone was laid or a ditch dug. It appears that Alonzo and his new bride, Mary Hoopes Perry, went on to Nauvoo with the Jonathan Hoopes family. They may have been there for that first Nauvoo celebration. The Gustavus Perry and Joseph H. Tippetts’ families seemed to have continued living somewhere between Quincy and Nauvoo - in the Carthage, Illinois area where they had purchased farm lands. Gustavus Perry may not have moved into the city limits of Nauvoo, but he seems to have been involved in the many activities there. In the spring of 1841 the ranks of the Nauvoo Legion was multiplying rapidly, and it was fast becoming the largest, best equipped and best-trained military organization. Under self-nominated Major General John C. Bennett, the ragged group of volunteers had turned into a sharp-looking unit. Most able bodied men of Nauvoo participated in the legion, and so Alonzo Perry, and probably other members of the Perry and Hoopes families, were also members. Also in 1841, the Prophet Joseph had announced that work on an important project, the Nauvoo Temple, would begin immediately. The temple would be built through the diligent labors and sacrifice of every man, woman and child who would give a tenth of their increase, plus a tenth of their time. An audience of several thousand Saints was then treated to a demonstration of close-order drill by the Nauvoo Legion prior to the placement of the temple cornerstone. Mary and Alonzo Perry was now a ‘family’ of their own. Their first child, William Henry Perry was born August 17, 1841. While their families were still rejoicing over the birth of their baby boy, their joy was short-lived. It was just four months later when they received the news that Alonzo’s sister and her new born baby had both died in the travails of childbirth in December 1841. Rosalia Elvira Perry Tippetts had a difficult delivery of her baby while living at or near Quincy, in December 1841. As stated in Nancy Tracy’s journal, both Rosalia and her baby had died, and were buried there in an unmarked grave. (It was never recorded in Tracy’s journal if the baby was a boy or girl, or if it was stillborn or lived for a short while.) While living in Nauvoo, two more children were born to Mary Hoopes and Orrin Alonzo Perry, Martha Ann Perry, was born in Nauvoo, just before Christmas, on Dec 21, 1842; and, my great grandmother, Eliza Jane Perry, was also born in Nauvoo, on March 10, 1845. This was about the same time when problems with the murderous mobs began threatening the Saints again. A Lamb To The Slaughter Persecution began again in the fall of 1844, when Mormon homes in Illinois were subjected to “wolf hunts” - raids by mobs. In September of 1845, the harassed Mormons from the surrounding settlements began flocking into Nauvoo for safety after barn-burning and crop-burning attacks became more and more frequent. By the end of September 1845 it was clear to the Saints that they would have to leave Nauvoo. In the years before his death Joseph Smith had discussed a number of colonizing areas for the Saints. Some people later remembered that the Prophet Joseph had prophesied in August 1842, “that the Saints would continue to suffer much affliction, and would be driven to the Rocky Mountains... Some would live to go and assist in making settlements and building cities, and see the Saints become a mighty people in the midst of the Rocky Mountains.”(16) As Joseph and Hyrum were leaving Nauvoo for the Carthage Jail, it was reported that the prophet declared, “This is the loveliest place, and the best people under the Heavens. Little do they know what trials awaits them!” On June 25, 1844 Joseph Smith voluntarily surrenders to the constable at Carthage, Hancock County, Illinois, on charges of inciting a riot; the Prophet then is charged with treason for having declared martial law in Nauvoo. About five o’clock on June 27, 1844 a group of attackers surrounded the Carthage Jail, the men were fired upon by the guard, who were apparently part of the conspiracy and had used blanks. One group of the attackers then stormed up the stairs. Within three minutes Hyrum and Joseph Smith were shot to death, and John Taylor was severely wounded. Brigham Young - A New Prophet Many who were present at the August 8th meeting later remembered seeing in Brigham Young, that day, a new appearance and hearing from him a new voice - one that was very familiar, that of Joseph Smith. For them the “Mantle of Joseph” was given directly, and miraculously, to Brigham Young. Records from both the Hoopes and Perry families have testified that some of them were present at the meeting on Thursday, August 8, 1844, and witnessed the mantle of the Prophet Joseph as it fell upon Brigham Young. After the Charter was revoked, Nauvoo ceased to exist as a city, and the Nauvoo Legion could no longer act as a military police to protect its city or its citizens. Governor Ford’s orders stated that a thousand families would have to leave Illinois that spring, and all the rest of them would have to be gone as soon as possible afterwards, and if they didn’t leave, they would be expelled by ‘violent means’! Brigham Young had a tremendous load on his shoulders as he tried to sell a whole city to people in the east. There were many beautiful new homes, and prosperous businesses. Why would anybody want to buy their homes and farms when they knew that in a few months most of them would be abandoned - and they could just walk in and take them anyway? The Westward Trek Begins On February 4, 1846, the Latter-day Saints began leaving Nauvoo. They had planned to leave in April, but threats from the mobs forced their early departures. Again, both the Perry and Hoopes families were forced to leave their nice homes–again! We don’t know if the Mary and Alonzo Perry and their little family were prepared to go with the first group of Mormon pioneers during the month of February. Brigham Young had instructed the Saints to bring a year’s supply of food, as well as shelter and other supplies, but many didn’t have the necessary provisions. Some had tents, and others had unfinished tents that did little to protect them from the cold. After the snowstorms, the temperatures dropped and the Mississippi River froze over. This was a blessing for many Saints who were waiting for the ferry, because now they could cross on the ice. But it was a trial for those Saints who had reached Sugar Creek, as they had to wait there until the first of March. In Warner Hoopes’ (Mary’s brother) history, it stated that ‘his family was part of the group of saints who witnessed the miraculous appearance of the quail, which saved them from starvation.(19) It’s very possible that the Hoopes’ families all journeyed together as a family, and Mary Hoopes and Alonzo Perry may have been with them - if only to help and support each other. The Jonathan Hoopes Family Near Council Bluffs We are able to learn a little more about what most of the Saints were going through, as well as a little more about some of the Jonathan Hoopes family in David Osborn’s Autobiography. “ In the spring we gathered up our effects and returned to Garden Grove having quite a little fit out for our journey, which we soon continued in company with father Hoop[es, John Allred’s and some others. We did not arrive at Council Bluffs till the 5th of June 1847. We drove up to Brother Amos Stoddard’s on Pigeon Creek.” .The Gustavus Perry Family Near Council Bluffs When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo in 1846 the Perrys and Hoopes families were part of the first group to make the painful trip across Iowa. As the first group moved out, families halted from time to time to plow fields and sow crops. This way followers were able to harvest the crops and re-plant. Brigham Young created a highly disciplined march, recognizing that survival depended on organization, and so it took four months to reach the Missouri River on the Iowa side, to the Council Bluffs area. Gustavus and Eunice Perry remained at Pottawattamie County, Iowa near Council Bluffs for approximately six years. Gustavus was frequently mentioned in records of the Lake Branch of the Church in that area between 1848 and 1851. Gustavus Perry and his family settled in the Lake Branch at Winter Quarters. Here Gustavus served as a counselor in the bishopric, until they were instructed in 1852 by Brigham Young to close the ward, join a wagon train, and make the long trek across the plains.”(7) Mary, Alonzo and Family - Near Council Bluffs, Iowa Mary and Alonzo were living in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa when their last child was born. Don Carlos Perry was born 24 June 1847. Some of the Saints had already left for the Great Salt Lake Valley, and many others were trying to work and earn enough money, and get better prepared with the necessary food and supplies to cross the plains, which was the case with Mary and Alonzo. Valley of the Shadow of Death “Underneath the great hope for the future were hearts mellowed by grief and sorrow that few people have known. Before the cold of winter prevented the spread of disease, some three hundred fresh graves appeared in the cemetery outside Winter Quarters. Weakened by the long trek from Nauvoo and the lack of sufficient vegetables in their diet, the Saints became easy victims of malaria, scurvy, and other then little-known maladies. Scurvy, called by the Saints “blackleg,” caused the greatest sufferings and the majority of deaths. When the disease became rampant, wagons were sent to Missouri to bring back potatoes, which proved effective in checking and curing the disease. Horseradish, found in an abandoned fort some distance from the camp, proved an excellent antidote. The disease was totally checked during the winter, but not until it had made inroads upon nearly every family.”(34) The exact cause of death hasn’t been recorded for Mary Hoopes Perry, except that she died at the age of twenty-six years old, on 8 October 1848, at Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. Her youngest baby was only one year old, and her oldest child was just seven years old. Since Mary died at such a young age, and her four children were so young they probably didn’t know enough about her to leave a written record. After Mary Ann Hoopes Perry died, Mary’s mother and father, Rebecca and Jonathan Hoopes, took over the role as guardians to three youngest of the four children of Alonzo and Mary Perry for many years. Mary’s husband, Alonzo, took their oldest son, Henry Perry and went back into Missouri to obtain work as a freighter, in order to earn enough money to bring his son West, and start new lives there. Their histories needs to be told also, but at a different time and place. Council Bluffs, Iowa is where Mary Hoopes Perry finished her journey on this earth. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Since this history was only about Mary Hoopes Perry, I only will give a brief summary of her husband and children. 1. Alonzo takes their 5 year old son, William Henry Perry, and goes back to Missouri to work - possibly as a Freighter, to earn money to go to the West. He is still living in Platte County, Missouri when he marries Frances M. Russell on October 23, 1853. This marriage also ends tragically, one year later, as Frankey died on 13 December 1854, and cause of death is unknown. 2. Mary’s parents (Rebecca and Jonathan Hoopes) take Mary and Alonzo’s other three children, Martha Ann, Eliza Jane, and one year old baby, Don Carlos Perry, on to the Great Salt Lake Valley in 1850. They live in Provo, Utah for many years, and the three youngest children continue to live with their grandparents until they marry. 3. Alonzo and his son, William Henry Perry come to Utah in 1855. Alonzo married a Scottish lady, Jane McLaws, that he met on the wagon train, but they did not have any children together. 4. Alonzo takes his bride, and son, Henry, north to Box Elder County, where his parents and other Perry and Tippetts families have settled. Alonzo’s father became Presiding Elder over the little town called Three Mile Creek. Alonzo’s brother, Henry also served as Presiding Elder until his death. 5. In May 1875 Orrin Alonzo Perry was set apart as the Presiding Elder, and took charge of the little settlement of Three Mile Creek until Aug 19, 1877, when the saints at Three Mile Creek were organized as a ward, with Orrin Alonzo Perry as Bishop. Alonzo’s wife, Jane McLaws Perry also served as the Relief Society President until she died. Orrin Alonzo Perry served as their Bishop for almost 20 years, and on March 5, 1901, the name of Three Mile Creek was changed to Perry, Utah in his honor. Orrin Alonzo Perry died 29 June 1901, at Perry, Utah, and is buried in the Brigham City Cemetery beside his wife, Jane. 6. Mary and Alonzo Perry’s children: William Henry Perry married Emma Ann Tippetts, and they had one child, before Emma died. Henry married second to Annie Albia Smith and they moved to Idaho, and had six children. Henry died 1 Nov 1912, in Perry, Utah - the town named after his father. Martha Ann Perry married Parley Pratt Loveless and they lived in Payson, Utah and had eight children. They entered into polygamy, when her husband took a ssecond wife. She died 25 Jan 1878 in Payson, Utah. Eliza Jane Perry married Kelsey Bird. They lived in Mendon, Vermillion, and Gooseberry where they helped found and start each of those communities. Kelsey and Jane had 8 children. Kelsey also entered into plural marriage with Ann Muir and had 13 children with her. Kelsey and Jane moved from Gooseberry to Benjamin, Utah when plural marriage was outlawed, leaving his second wife and her children behind in Gooseberry. Eliza Jane died in Benjamin, Utah on 20 February 1900. Don Carlos Perry followed his grandfather, Jonathan Hoopes, from Provo to Weston, Idaho. He married Maria Sophie Fredericka Hansen or Smith. They had one child, and Don Carlos died in Weston, Idaho three months after his son was born. His wife married again and had 9 other children. Mary Hoopes and Orrin Alonzo Perry were the grandparents of 24 grandchildren. They were truly faithful pioneers and Saints who loved and followed their leaders to their dying days. CREDITS: 1. 1840 Federal Census Records for Quincy, Adams County, Illinois. 2. 1850 Federal Census Records. 3. 1860 Federal Census Records. 4. D.U.P. Histories of Gustavus Adolphus and Eunice Wing Perry, by Karen Young Christensen, Sept. 1992; and/or Alda Crawford Call, Sept 1981. 16. A Comprehensive History of the Church, by B.H. Roberts 2:181-82; and 3:45. 17. Journal of George Laub, 4 March 1846, Church Archives. 18. Deseret News, 12 March 1892. 19. Conquerors of the West: Stalwart Mormon Pioneers, Vol 1 - 2; and Vol. 4. 34. The Latter-day Saints, A Contemporary History of the Church of Jesus Christ, by William E. Berrett. 40. In Missouri: A Guide to the “Show Me” State, rev. ed. (New York; Hastings House, 1954), p. 510. 41. My Best For the Kingdom, by William G. Hartley, Aspen Books, S.L.C., Quotes taken from the journal of John Lowe Butler. 47. Clark V. Johnson, ed.. Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict (Provo, Utah: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1992), 300-301. 48. Sidney Rigdon, An appeal to the American People, 33) 49. Johnson, Mormon Redress Petitions, 465-66. (The second petition also appears in Journal History, 17 March 1840, and is published in HC4:65-67.)

Life timeline of Eliza J. Bird

Eliza J. Bird was born on 10 Mar 1845
Eliza J. Bird was 15 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Eliza J. Bird was 16 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Eliza J. Bird was 35 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Eliza J. Bird was 44 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Eliza J. Bird was 46 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Eliza J. Bird died on 20 Feb 1900 at the age of 54
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Eliza J. Bird (10 Mar 1845 - 20 Feb 1900), BillionGraves Record 9823 Benjamin, Utah, Utah, United States

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