Eliza A. Carter Snow

28 Sep 1818 - 9 Mar 1897

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Eliza A. Carter Snow

28 Sep 1818 - 9 Mar 1897
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I, Eliza Ann Carter Snow, was born in 1818 in the town of Newry, County of Oxford, state of Maine. My parents are John Carter and Hannah Knight Libby. I was baptized into the Church in April, 1843, converted through the preaching of John Boynton, then one of the twelve apostles. In 1836, I left fath
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Life Information

Eliza A. Carter Snow

Born:
Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States
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SharonLavashHawkins

May 29, 2011
Photographer

GraveScavenger

May 29, 2011

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ELIZA ANN CARTER

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

I, Eliza Ann Carter Snow, was born in 1818 in the town of Newry, County of Oxford, state of Maine. My parents are John Carter and Hannah Knight Libby. I was baptized into the Church in April, 1843, converted through the preaching of John Boynton, then one of the twelve apostles. In 1836, I left father, mother, sisters, and brothers to gather with the saints in Kirtland, Ohio. I was married to James Chauncey Snow in 1838, went up to Missouri the same year with the Kirtland Camp, and I gave birth to my first child, Sara Jane Snow, October 30, 1838 in Far West. The same day, a mob came and ordered us out of the place. My husband was ill at this time, but I left my sick bed, took my new-born babe and carried her bed into a tall cornfield where we hid from the mob. We left Far West in February, 1839, and arrived in Illinois the same year. And in Illinois, the Morley settlement where we lived was burned down by a wicked mob painted black (1845). I was forced to leave and go to Nauvoo. I left Nauvoo in 1845 [it must have been 1846, as she was sealed to her husband in the Nauvoo Temple in February of 1846 according to the family group sheet] to go to the valleys of the mountains, stayed at Council Bluffs until 1851, and arrived in Provo in 1852. While passing through all the trials and persecutions of the Church, I was one of the Kirtland quier [choir] members, led by Lyman Carter. I received my Patriarchal blessing in the Kirtland temple under the hand of Joseph Smith's brother [Hyrum], Patriarch of the Church in 1837. After I arrived in Provo in 1852, I was still a quier member, led by William Carter and James Daniels. I received my endowments in the Nauvoo Temple in 1846. Sister Nancy Flemings and myself were [visiting] teachers in the Provo Ward for eight years, and then because of sickness I resigned. I was [re-]baptized in the Salt Lake font in 1875 and in 1886 re-baptized in the Logan temple for my health [they used to do this], and did work for some of my friends that were dead. I also went to the Manti Temple to do work for the dead in 1888. Myself and Arletta Snow worked one month for the dead and returned home August 11. I went with my daughter Arletta Snow to the Logan temple in 1890 and was sealed to my mother and returned home July 18, 1890. --Eliza Ann wrote the above section on Oct. 9, 1882. Then, about ten years later, April 10, 1892, she wrote the following: To my children, I have written some of the history of my life when I was in my younger days, and now I am 74 years old. I will still add to my history, but will have to go back to when I first embraced Mormonism in 1834 in the town of Newry, Maine. The first Mormon elders I ever heard preach were John F. Boynton and Daniel Bean. They came to my father's house. My mother lay very sick, the doctors had given her up. They told her they were preaching a new doctrine. They told her that she could be healed if she had faith. That they would lay hands on her head and give her a blessing. They did lay hands on her head and said, "In the name of the Lord Jesus, be thou made whole," and my mother was made whole. She was baptized into the Church, but my father never did join the Church. Typed by Edith Baker, Feb. 1990

JAMES CHAUNCY SNOW

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

My grandfather, James Chauncey Snow, was born in Chesterfield, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire, January 11, 1817, the son of Gardner Snow (Patriarch of the Manti Temple) and Sara Sawyer Hastings Snow. He was the second son and second child in a family of nine children. He joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1836 at the age of 19 years. [Family group record shows his baptism date as October 19, 1833, in which case he would have been 16 years old. That was the same year that his father and mother joined the church, also.] He filled a mission for the Church in Vermont and Maine. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He met and married his wife, Eliza Ann Carter, in January, 1838, at Kirtland, Lake Co., Ohio, and they went to Missouri the same year with the Kirtland Camp. They set out for Missouri, driving an ox-team. It was cold weather and they suffered very much from the cold. They traveled until they came to Terre Haute, Indiana, when one of their oxen died. This left them with only one ox, so they were obliged to stop there. They had no money or house to go into, so they got the privilege of going into a horse stable. They cleaned it out and were glad to get into a place out of the storm. After stopping in Indiana a few weeks, Hyrum Smith's Company came along. He was acquainted with them and told my grandmother Eliza Ann that she could ride in his baggage wagon and he would take them along if she would drive the team, and grandfather and the men would walk. They said they would do it. They traveled until they came to Jacksonville, Illinois. There, one of Hyrum Smith's horses died, and he had to leave them. There was a branch of the church nearby. Hyrum Smith called for the president of the branch and told him to let my grandfather, James C. Snow, preside over the branch as a missionary, and to feed and shelter him and Grandmother until the Kirtland Camp came along in the fall. This the branch president did. When the Kirtland Camp came, they went to Missouri with them. When they arrived in Missouri, they stayed in an old log house which had large cracks between the logs. Here their first child was born on October 30, 1838, a daughter named Sarah Jane. [This was in Far West.] It was cold and snowed every day. The mob came into Far West the very day the baby was born. Grandfather was very sick, also. They couldn't get the midwife to stay long enough to dress the baby. Although they were both very sick, they had to wash and dress their baby alone, just a young man and his girl wife [she was 20 and he was 21.] The mob came to order them out. Grandmother left her sick bed, took her new-born baby and went into a tall corn-field, where she hid from the mob. The mob was blowing horns and firing guns all night long. They were without bread or anything with which to make bread. By the help of the Lord, they were preserved, by the brethren giving up their arms and promising to leave Far West Missouri. They [the Snows] left for Illinois in February the following year. There were three families to one wagon and one span of old horses. They took turns walking. Their group consisted of Brother Winslow Farr and his wife, Gardner Snow and his wife Sarah Sawyer Hastings (my great grandparents), and James C. and Eliza Ann Snow, my grandparents. They would travel all day and at night lie down by a campfire, as they had no tent. While living in Illinois in the Morley Settlement, they had their home burned down by a wicked mob painted black, and they were again forced to leave and go to Nauvoo. They were sealed in the Nauvoo Temple, February 3, 1846, at 7:15 p.m. by Amasa Lyman. Witnesses were Brigham Young and Isaac Morley. [They were in the Lima Branch. James Chauncey was the Branch Clerk. This was during the time that the saints were striving with all their might to get their endowments and sealings done, as they were under great pressure from the mob and the state to leave Illinois. That February was the great crossing of the Mississippi River.] They left Nauvoo to go to Utah, the valley of the mountains. James C. Snow was the captain of his company, which was called the James C. Snow Company. They stayed at Council Bluffs until 1851 [where two children were born to themBthey now had a total of seven children], and arrived in Provo in 1852, passing through all the persecutions of the Church. One of their babies, a little girl named Mary Ellen, was buried before they left the states. [The family group record shows Mary Ellen as being born in Provo, June 16, 1856, and dying the following day.] Dominicus Carter Snow [their seventh child], was one year old, and learned to walk while coming across the plains. After arriving in Utah, they settled in Provo, where Grandfather was President of the Stake from 1853 until 1858, succeeding George A. Smith. They had nine children who were all born before coming across the plains, except the last little girl, who was born at Provo, Utah [actually two were born in Provo]. They are as follows: Sarah Jane Snow married Marshall Kinsman John Carter Snow married Harriet Baker Don Carlos Snow married Mary Hallet Eliza Ann Snow married Caleb Haws James Erastus Snow married Josephine Ferre Richard Carter Snow married Mary Barbara Bay Dominicus Carter Snow married Hannah Harrison Arletta Calista Snow did not marry Mary Ellen Snow--I have no date or place of birth or death, or in what order she came in the family. [See bracketed notes above] [There also was a little Indian girl named Deseret whom the Snows took in and raised as their own. Deseret's Indian father deserted his family, and when her mother was going to marry again, her prospective husband demanded that she either give up the child or kill it, as he would not have it in his family. So the Snows raised her until she was married. She has been sealed to them.] Grandfather James Chauncey Snow is of the same family tree as President Lorenzo Snow and his sister Eliza R. Snow; also Erastus Snow. They all have the same ancestor, Richard Snow, who was born in 1607 and who sailed from Gravesent, England, on the ship "Expedition" to America, November 20, 1635. In 1856, Grandfather started to practice polygamy. He married three wives within 13 months. Lydia Chadwick became his second wife February 20, 1856. He married Jane Cecelia Roberts, his third wife, December 2, 1856. He married Ann Clark, his fourth wife, March 13, 1857. Lydia Chadwick had no children. Jane Roberts had a large family. Ann Clark had two children. The latter part of his life was lived in Manti, Utah. I know very little about his life after he left Provo. He was always a staunch Latter-day Saint and a great worker in the Church, holding many prominent positions. He died at the age of 67 years on April 30, 1884, in Pettyville, Sanpete County, Utah, and was buried in the Manti City Cemetery, Manti, Utah. Written by Frances Snow McEwan, a Granddaughter. Re-typed by Edith Baker, Feb. 1990. Bracketed comments were made by Edith as she checked the family group sheet.

William Furlsbury "F" Carter as written by the Lavina Irene "Carter" (Croff) Genealogy

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

William Furlsbury "F" Carter May 1, 1811 - October 11, 1888 William F. was born in Newry, Oxford County, Maine, the fourth child of John and Hannah Libby Knight Carter. He was married five times, his first wife Cordelia Hannah Mecham, born at Lawrence, New York about 1814 and died 1830. It appears that she died soon after their marriage. There is no record of any children. His second wife was Sarah York born 1812 and died 1888. Married about 1831 and later received their Endowments in the Nauvoo Temple just prior to being driven out by the mobs. They first lived in Newry, Maine. Sarah had ten children. William's third wife he met and married while living in Kanesville, Iowa, Roxena Mecham born December 2, 1830 at Salem, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. They were married March 13, 1846 and lived in a place just outside Kanesville Iowa called Parley Springs, later named Carterville after William F. Carter. Roxena had ten children. She died some time around 1918. ... William's fourth wife, Elizabeth Howard, (1837-1903) was an English emigrant he had met while crossing the plains returning from his mission to India. Upon arriving in Salt Lake and prior to seeing any of his family living in Provo, they were married in the Salt Lake temple on September 10, 1854. Elizabeth had seven children. William's fifth wife, Sally Ann Mecham (1842-1910) was the sister of his third wife Roxena, and was the mother of nine children. All total William and his five wives were the parents of 36 children. William was baptized in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints on November 17, 1834, while living in Newry, maine, by Elder Daniel Beal. His mother Hannah, older brother Dominicus, two younger brothers John H. and Richard, and younger sister Eliza Ann, had joined the church some four months earlier. Around 1836, William, wanting to be with the main body of saints, moved to Kirtland, Ohio. because of the many problems confronting the Mormons in Kirtland, in October 1837 he left Kirtland and relocated in Far West, Missouri. He carried with him a letter of commendation from the prophet Joseph Smith. In 1839 he was driven out of Far West by the mobs and settled in t he Nauvoo area. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion, and was called on his first mission to preach the Gospel in Hancock County, Illinois, particularly in Nauvoo, Morleyville, and the surrounding area. In the cold of winter 1846, with the main body of saints he and his family were forced out of Nauvoo by the mobs and sought refuge in the wilderness. He settled in the area of Kanesville, Iowa (Council Bluffs). [There he] built a home and blacksmith shop. Before his blacksmith shop was burned down by another mob, he had so much business from the California bound Gold Rushers, he frequently had to empty his pockets of coins because they were so heavy. He was considered the best smithing and forging person in the area, so good that Brigham Young asked him to stay back in Kanesville to prepare the wagons and horses and equipment of other emigrants heading to the Salt Lake Valley. He and his wives and children finally arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in 1850. They first lived in Salt lake for about two years and then in 1852, moved to Provo. He purchased 100 acres of land on the east bench in Provo where the state asylum used to be, and built two houses, one each for his wives. Shortly after moving to Provo he was called on his second mission, to serve in India. In 1852 he left his two wives and children, without purse or script, but armed with the Book of Mormon, he headed off to preach the Gospel in India. He didn't baptize anyone while in India, but is known to be the second LDS Missionary to circle the earth, and the first one to carry the Book of Mormon around the world. Returning home from his mission, he passed through Lima, Illinois (Morley's Settlement near Nauvoo) and visited with his brother Phillip. He learned his father (John Carter) had died and that a son Edward Mecham Carter had been born during his missionary absence. He lived in Provo until 1862, [and then] moved to the Santaquin, Utah area, where he lived until his death October 11, 1888. He is buried in the Santaquin Cemetery.

Hannah Knight Libby Carter as taken from "Pioneer Memoirs" compiled by Kate B. Carter

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

Hannah Knight Libby Carter was a refined, cultured woman. the family belonged to the Methodist church. In 1834, Mormon elders brought to them in their home in Maine the Gospel. The following account is written by Eliza Ann (Carter) Snow, daughter of Hannah: "I first embraced Mormonism in 1834, in the town of Newry, Oxford County, State of Maine. The first Mormon elders I ever heard breach were John F. Boynton and Daniel Bean. They came to my mother's house, told her they were preaching a new doctrine and they told her that she could be healed if she could have faith, that they would hold hands on her. They did lay hands on her and said, 'In the name of the Lord Jesus be thou made whole'. And she was made whole and arose and called for her clothes and said, 'I must go to the water'. She walked 1/2 mile and was baptized in the river called Bear River and confirmed, and there was a large branch raised up in that place." John Carter did not join the church. When his wife was healed he said, "That beats doctor bills". but he never joined the church. Of the nine children, Dominicus, Hannah, who had married Aaron York, William F., John, Eliza Ann, and Richard were all baptized, most of them in June, 1834. Two daughters and one son never became members. Responding to the spirit of gathering which rested upon them, those who had embraced Mormonism left Maine in 1836, and traveled all the long way to Kirtland, Ohio, then the headquarters of the church. They attended the Temple, took part in the wonderful meetings, and joined the saints in singing the sons of Zion. The next year an apostate movement arose, and John F. Boynton, the missionary who had brought the gospel to the in Maine and had since become one of the first quorum of apostles, because one of the bitterest and most violent leaders against the prophet. So intense was the persecution that those who remained staunch and faithful were forced to leave for Far West, Missouri. Early in 1838, William F. Carter and his sister, Eliza Ann, who had recently married James C. Snow, set out for Missouri driving an ox team. The graphic story of that trying journey is thus told by Eliza Ann: "It was cold weather and we suffered much with the cold, but we traveled until we came to Terre Haute, Indiana, and one of our oxen died, leaving us with one ox, so we were obliged to stop. We had no money, no house to go in and we got the privilege of going into a horse stable and I cleaned it out and was glad to get into a place out of the storms. After stopping in Indiana a few weeks, Hyrum Smith's company came along, and being acquainted with me said to me, 'If you will ride in my baggage wagon, I will take you along and you can drive the team and the men can walk'. I said I will do so. We traveled until we came to Jacksonville, Illinois; there on of Hyrum Smith's horses dies and he had to leave us. There was a branch of the church near by but he did not leave us penniless amongst strangers, without home or friends, but he called for the President of the branch and told him to let Brother Snow preside over the branch as a missionary and to feed and clothe us until the Kirtland Company came along in the fall, and he did so. The President's name was Merrick, the brother that was killed a the Haun's Mill Massacre in Missouri. While we were there in the branch I looked out, and behold, there came my brother William with the one ox we had left behind. He made a harness and tacked him up and the one ox carried his wife and three children to Missouri, and when I saw him I rejoiced to see him have so much faith, but the Gentiles made all manner of fun of him. They said, 'There goes a d___ Mormon and with one ox,' but he got there just the same; and Father Joseph Smith said it should be in the annals of his history. After that the Kirtland camp came along and we went to Missouri with them. We went into an old log house that we could poke a cat out between the logs and there my first child was born. It was the 30th of October in the year of 1838. Sarah Jane, who became the wife of Marshall Kinsman and afterwards the wife of President Joseph Young. It was cold and snowed every day and the mob came into Far West the very day of her birth, and we were much excited. I could not keep the midwife long enough to dress the baby. Sister Diantha Billings was her name, well known among our people. the mob was blowing horns and firing guns all night long. We were without bread or anything to make bread of, but the help of the Lord was with us and we were preserved by the brethren giving up their arms and promising to leave Far West. We left with three families to one wagon and one span of old horses; we took turns in walking. There was brother Winslow Farr and wife, Gardener Snow and wife, and James Snow and wife. We traveled all day and at night lay down at camp fire as we had no tent". In the famous Kirtland camp, which traveled from Kirtland to Far West, were Dominicus Carter with six in his family, Aaron York with four in his family and John Carter with two. Dominicus on July 18, was appointed commissary of the camp. Once when three of the camp members were unjustly thrown into prison, Dominicus voluntarily returned and stayed with them in prison, until their release was obtained. One August 11, in the fore part of the night, Sarah Emily, daughter of Dominicus Carter, aged about two years, and three months, died. Hers was the fourth death of the journey. Her funeral was held at two o'clock the next day. But still further sorrows awaited him as the camp neared Far West. Every day they saw numerous men of the community take up arms and join the mob militia to drive the Mormons from the state of Missouri or exterminate them. Someone suggested that members of the camp turn back and not run into certain danger, but this proposal was unanimously rejected. the camp arrived at its destination July 4. Persecution and massacres were a frequent occurrence and mobs preyed upon the community. In February, 1839, the saints were driven from Missouri. The leader of one group was Isaac Morley. He found a suitable spot for settlement near Lima, Illinois, where four walls of a log cabin had been set up. He moved into it while it had neither roof, floor nor windows. Other families joined him, and soon a prosperous community had arisen, known as Morley's Settlement. It was also called Yelrone. In February, 1846, the exodus from Nauvoo began. Hannah Libby and her husband John had moved to Nauvoo as early as 1842, when they signed a deed in Hancock County purchasing land at Morley's Settlement. She had received a patriarchal blessing from Isaac Morley in 1844. At last the day of separation came. John Carter persistently refused to join the church. Hannah, his wife, elected to come west with her people and her children who had embraced Mormonism. Before leaving Nauvoo, she was sealed for time and eternity to Isaac Morley. It is said that Dominicus Carter would have been one of the first company of 1847 pioneers, but being an expert blacksmith he was requested by the leaders to remain at Council Bluffs and help prepare the emigrant trains for the long journey. He crossed the plains in 1851, accompanied by his aged mother, and arrived at Salt Lake city June 20, 1851. Shortly afterward he went to Provo, and in 1852 was selected as counselor to George A. Smith, who was called to preside over the settlement. The position he occupied for years. The first president of Utah Stake was James C. Snow, son-in-law of Hanna Carter. She remained at Provo during the time of the Echo Canyon War, and when the body of saints moved south of Provo and adjoining towns. She lived in her later years at the home of Dominicus Carter. Thoses who remember her describe her as short in stature, with a round face, impressive blue eyes, and refined and dignified bearing. She frequently wore a lace cap and was very prim and neat. She was well educated and always very industruious, keeping her knitting close by and working even in her advanced years. Her death occurred shortly before November 2, 1867, for on this day a letter written by Mary B. Whiting from Springville to a a relative in Manti states, "Mother Carter is dead." Her funeral was held at the graveside of the Provo Cemetery. The day was very cold. On Memorial Day, 1941, 155 years after her birth, 90 years after she crossed the plains, and 74 years after her death, members of her posterity held a memorial service in her honor, sang again the songs tat were sung at her funeral, and listened to a sketch of her rich life history. Then once again they gathered at her grave side an dedicated a bronze marker as a lasting memorial to her name and noble character. Beside the motif of a covered wagon it bore this inscription: HANNAH KNIGHT LIBBY CARTER Oct. 9, 1786 -- Nov. 1867 "Faithful in the day of trial." Taken from the Memoirs - 1947 - A Heroine of the West - compiled by Kate B. Carter - Daughter of the Utah Pioneers

Journal entry for Eliza Ann Carter Snow

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

The following is taken from a life history written by Myrlene Snow Woodbury, great granddaughter. Eliza Ann Carter, the eighth child and third daughter of John and Hannah Knight Libby Carter. She was born in Newry, Oxford Co., Maine the 28th of September 1818. In 1836 the missionaries contacted her family. She was converted and baptized along with four brothers and one of her sisters. Her mother lay very ill at the time and Eliza saw her raised from her sickbed after being administered to by the elders, whereupon she walked to a stream a half mile away and was baptized. That same year Eliza started for Kirkland, Ohio, and from her journal we read: "Upon arriving in Kirkland I was invited to go and live to Hyrum Smith's, a brother of the prophet Joseph. I went there as a hired girl and there I became acquainted with Samuel, another brother, he living under the same roof, and finally became acquainted with the whole Smith family. I was invited into the church choir by William Cahoon and there got to know Emma Smith, wife of the Prophet Joseph and Zina Huntington Young, who later was president of the Relief Societies over the whole earth. I had my patriarchial blessing under the hand of Joseph Smith Sr., in the Kirkland Temple when I was 18 years old. I was in the temple when it was dedicated where the spirit of God like a fire was burning, and saw the stars fall from heaven. Hyrum Smith was one of the best men that I saw. He was so kind to his family and prayed with them three times a day." James and Eliza were brought together and were married in January 1838 at Kirkland, Ohio. Upon being driven out of Missouri the saints left for Illinois. James and Eliza travelled with her brother, William, and his family driving an ox team. The weather was very cold and they suffered much. They travelled until they reached Terre Haute, Indiana, where one of their oxen died and they were obliged to stop there. They had no money or house to go into but were offered a horse stable. They shoveled it out and cleaned it the best they could and were glad to get into a place out of the storm. After a few weeks Hyrum Smith's family came along and being acquainted with them he told Eliza that she could ride in his baggage wagon and he would take them along if she would drive the team and the men would walk. This they agreed on but there was no room for William's family so they were left there with the one good ox. They travelled as far as Jacksonville, Illinois, where one of Hyrum's horses died and they were stopped again. Hyrum called on the president of the branch to let James preside over the branch as a missionary and to feed and clothe him and his wife until a group known as the Kirkland Camp came along later. So that arrangement was made. The kind branch president was Brother Merrick who was later killed in the Haun's Mill Massacre in Missouri. Again we read from Eliza's account concerning this time: "While we were there in the branch one day I looked out and lo and behold! There came my brother William with the one ox we had left behind. He had made a harness and tackled him up and the one ox carried his wife and three children to Missouri. When I saw him I rejoiced to see him have so much faith but the gentiles made all manner of fun of him and saying, 'There goes a d___ Mormon with one ox.' But he go there just the same and Father Smith said it should be in the annals of history." When the Kirkland Camp arrived Eliza was happy to find travelling with it her brother Dominicus and his family of six and her brother John with two so they all pressed on toward Far West Missouri. On the trip Dominicus' little two year old daughter became ill and died, making the fourth death in the party. But still further trouble awaited them as they neared their destination. Every day they saw numerous men of the communities take up arms and join the mob militia to drive the Mormons out or exterminate them. Someone in the camp suggested that they turn back and not run right into certain danger and death but this proposal was unanimously rejected in spite of the persecutions and frequent massacres. They arrived at Far West on July 4. Again we read from Eliza's account: "In Far West we went into an old log house that we could poke a cat through the holes and there on October 30, 1938, I gave birth to my first child, Sarah Jane. It was cold and snowed every day and the mob came the very first day of her birth. The midwife was so frightened she didn't stay long enough to dress the baby, and my husband, who was ill, and I had to take care of her ourselves. Then I took my child and a little bedding and ran into a corn field to hid. The mob blew horns and fired guns all right and only spared our lives on condition that we vacate that place and the men give up all their arms." About the same time that Eliza gave birth, Dominicus' wife was confined and when the baby was but five days old she was ordered by a mob with blackened faces to vacate her home by midnight or they were going to burn it. She went into a nearby woods with her children and remained throughout the night. There was a cold heavy rainfall and as a result of the exposure the mother took cold and passed away shortly afterward. Their children were scattered among the relatives until the father remarried a few months later. In February 1839 the refugees again pressed on in search of a place to make a home. Travelling with James and Eliza that time were his grandparents, Gardner Snow and wife Sarah Hastings Snow and another relative, Winslow Farr and his wife. The three families had only one wagon and a span of old horses. They took turns walking, travelling all day and lying down by a campfire at night as they had no tent. The group in which they travelled, was led by Isaac Morley who found a suitable spot for a settlement near Lima, Illinois, where four walls of a log cabin had been set up and they moved into it while it had neither roof, floor or windows. Other families gathered there and it soon became a prosperous community which was known as Morley's Settlement or sometimes Yelrone. To this place had come Eliza's parents and although her father had never joined the church he had followed the Westward movement. No doubt the good land offered better opportunities than the rocky shores of Maine. In the space of five years fertile farms had been developed and the community was a veritable hive of industry. There on June 15, 1844, a mob of two thousand men headed by the bitter anti-Mormon, Col Levi Williams, came upon these people at Morley's Settlement and ordered them to either take up arms, join the mob and go with them to Nauvoo, Illinois, not far away, and help arrest the Prophet Joseph Smith and 17 other church leaders or give up their arms and religion and remain neutral. They were given until eight o'clock to decide and told that if they did not join the mob they would 'smell thunder.' These brave and devoted church members did not join the mob or remain neutral so the mob ordered them out of the place at gun point and the people filed to Nauvoo where the main body of the church was establish. Joseph Smith sent messengers to Governor Ford to report this outrage. However, the prophet and his brother, Hyrum, were martyred a few days later on June 27 at Carthage Jail. This seemed to appease the persecutors and during the months that followed the situation became more peaceful and the group returned to Morley's Settlement. The vandals supposed that the death of their leader, Joseph Smith, would put an end to the movement but Brigham Young immediately took his place and on September 10 another mob bent on destruction came upon the settlement and for eight days and nights fired upon the settlers. The Snow's home was burned along with many others. Some people were killed and many died from exposure. Edmond Durfee one of the leaders of the community, was shot and killed by the mob. Brigham Young and other leaders sent help to bring the members to Nauvoo. The mob followed and gave orders that the city was to be evacuated within 5 months. Before they left Nauvoo, James and Eliza were sealed in the Nauvoo Temple on February 3, 1846 at 7:15 p.m. by A. M. Lyman. Witnesses were Isaac Morley and B. Young. In February of 1846 the saints began their exodus from their beautiful city of 20,000 people and the temple they had raised to their God with so much work and sacrifice. Eliza saw her parents parted as her father refused to continue with them. Their great leader, Brigham Young, was inspired of the Lord to lead the people Westward to a placed among the Rocky Mountains. He had tried to get permission to leave a few weeks later when there would be grass for the animals but was refused. During the few months grated them before evacuating, the saints were forced to trade their land and homes at a great sacrifice for teams, covered wagons, farm implements, and provisions so they left with very little else. On that cold winter day, according to church history, a vanguard of 15,000 people with 400 wagons drove off the wharf at Nauvoo onto flat boats and were ferried across the mighty Mississippi River. Reaching the Iowa side the wagons struck West onto the prairie and disappeared in the distance leaving a deep trail through the newly fallen snow. The concourse was soon divided into companies and James was appointed captain of one company known as the James C. Snow Company, consisting of 250 people. President Young met with the captains of the camp and decided on the details for the government of the camp as follows: "At 5 o'clock in the morning the bugle is to be sounded as a signal for every man to arise and attend to prayers before he leaves his wagon. Then the people will engage in cooking, eating, feeding teams, etc., until 7 o'clock, at which time the train is to move at the sound of the bugle. Each teamster is to keep beside his team with a loaded gun in hand or within easy reach. In case of an attack or any demonstrations by Indians the wagons will travel in double file- - the order of encampment to be in a circle with the mouth of each wagon to the outside and the horses and cattle tied inside the circle. At 8:30 p.m. the bugles are to be sounded again upon which signal all will hold prayers in their wagons and be retired to rest by 9 o'clock. A night guard of 48 men was organized and divided into four watches to serve half a night at a time. President Young and others of the twelve were among this group." By then James and Eliza had 7 children, a baby girl, Mary Ellen, was buried before they left. The caravan travelled to Council Bluffs, Iowa where some stayed until 1851. During which time they raised crops to replenish their food supply and to provide seed for planting when they reached their destination. Council Bluffs, on the East side of the Missouri River, was one of several resting and re-supply stations established for pioneers going to Utah, Oregon and California. At that place a United States officer came and asked them to supply soldiers to fight in the Mexican War. Eliza's brother Richard enlisted along with 500 others and died on the march to California, leaving a wife and 2 children. Then his wife died and Eliza took the children and cared for them. In 1852 they arrived in Provo, Utah, where James acquired some farmland. By then, according to the Carter Pioneers of Provo, Utah, there was a considerable number of people moving into that area erecting dwellings, church and school buildings, posts and stores, all made of logs from the plentiful supply of timber in the canyons. There was also such industries as a brown ware pottery, a sash factory, a wooden bowl factory, two gristmills, two tailor shops, two lime kilns, two hotels, two store houses, a meat market and three cabinet shops. Just a year previous to their arrival the general assembly of the Provincial State of Deseret grated Provo City a charter modeled after that of Nauvoo and in 1853 the church authorities organized Utah Stake and James C. Snow was sustained as the first president and served until 1858. Dominicus Carter was one of his councillors. A fort had been constructed against Indian attacks in the Southwest part of town next to Utah Lake but at times it became flooded so another fort was erected in the Northeast part of town at 5th North and 5th East. After relations with the Indians became more peaceful the walls were torn down and it was left for public use and called Sowiette Park. A great granddaughter, Myrlene Snow Woodbury, remembers how she often listened to band concerts in that park and enjoyed the play ground equipment, and in 1977 picnicked there with some of her family. Utah Lake near Provo afforded a variety of uses, along its stores and the stream that emptied into it there grew wild cherries and berries of many kinds, timber, grass and flax. In the streams was an abundance of mountain trout and other fish. Besides irrigation, the lake was used for fishing, boating and swimming and a pavilion was built at the North end where for a number of year, dances and other social activities were held. Provo River teemed with so many suckers that they could be tossed out with a pitchfork. By 1855 Provo was a city inhabited by 860 families of almost 5,000 people. Eliza had accepted the gospel teachings of the Latter Day Church in their entirety including the doctrine of plural marriage and consented to her husband entering into polygamy. He married his second wife, Lydia Chadwick, February 20, 1856 who had no children. Cecelia Roberts became his third wife on December 2, 1856 and she bore him a large family. He married his fourth wife, Ann Clark, March 13, 1857, and she had two children. This brought the federal officers down on him and he was imprisoned. A letter written to him then from Eliza has been found in her own handwriting and is included in part here: "My dear companion, I saw Dominicus today and he said you wanted me to write. I told him I did not see the use of writing when you were right in town but he said it was a mistake and he also said your health was poor." "I do not want you to trouble yourself about home, I and the children are well and would feel first rate if I did not realize your forlorn situation. To think of your lonesome hours, your sorrow and sighing, torn from friends and home, deprived of liberty. It destroys all my happiness." "My love, faith and confidence towards you grows stronger every day. I feel thankful that I have a husband that is counted worthy to suffer persecution for Christ's sake. Rejoice, cheer up and be comforted and remember I am your true and faithful wife whether in life or death and through all eternity, Eliza." It is not recorded how long James was held but many men were in jail for weeks and even months. This trouble went on until 1890 when the Lord revealed to President Wilford Woodruff that this principle had served its purpose and the church sanctioned no more plural marriages, whereupon, the harassment subsided to a certain extent. There was not as much friction among polygamous families as might be expected. The wives welcomed each other's help with house work, gardening, during childbirth and sickness. If one went on a trip she knew her children would be cared for. The children, outside their schooling, were given responsibilities while young. The boys helped with the planting and harvesting of crops, tending of livestock, hauling and chopping firewood. The girls soon learned how to cook, clean, sew and knit, as well as card wool and make quilts. Many chores were made lighter by working together. Many Indians camped in the vicinity of Provo and one squaw went regularly to the Snow's house for a drink of milk. This could have been the same woman who late one dark stormy night in 1863 rapped at their door. She was carrying her baby and told them she had lost her husband and an Indian man wanted to marry her but only on condition that she either kill or give away the child. She begged James and Eliza to take it to save its life. This they consented to do although their children were mostly grown and they were middle aged. They named her Deseret and reared her in their home until she was 18 years old when she ran away and married a Mr. McBride. They learned that she died in 1883. James remained a staunch Latter Day Saint and a great worker in the church, holding many prominent positions. The latter part of his life was lived in Manti, Utah, where he died on 30 April, 1884, at the age of 67 and was buried in the Manti City Cemetery. Eliza also remained faithful and in her later years did much work for her dead relatives and friends in the Logan, Utah temple. In July of 1880 she and her daughter, Arletta went to Manti for one month and worked in the temple there. She sold her home and lot in Provo in 1889. She died on March 9, 1897 at age 79 in Provo and was buried in the cemetery there.

William F. Carter - The Ox Ride

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

The Ox Ride Story of William F. Carter, Eliza Ann Carter Snow, 1838 - son & daughter of Hannah Knight Libby Carter Responding to the spirit of gathering, which rested on them, those who had embraced Mormonism left Maine in 1836 and traveled all the long way to Kirtland Ohio, then the headquarters of the Church. Early in 1838; William F. Carter and Eliza Ann who had recently married James C. Snow, set out together for Missouri, driving an ox team The graphic story of that trying experience is thus told by Eliza Ann: It was cold weather and we suffered much with the cold, but we traveled until we came to Terre Haute, Indiana, and one of our oxen died leaving us with one ox, so we were obliged to stop. We had no money, no house to go in, and we got the privilege of going into a horse stable. I cleaned it out and was glad to get a place out of the storm. After stopping in Indiana a few weeks, Hyrum Smith's company came along and he being acquainted with me said to me, "If you will ride in my baggage wagon I will take you along and you can drive the team and the men can walk." I said, ‘I will do so’. We traveled until we came to Jacksonville, Illinois and there one of Hyrum Smith's horses died and he had to leave us. There was a branch of the church near by. But he did not leave us penniless among strangers, with out home or friend. He called for the President of the branch and told him to let Brother Snow preside over the branch as a missionary and to feed and clothe us until the Kirtland Company came along in the fall, and he did so The branch president's name was Merrick and he was the brother that was killed in the Haun's Mill massacre in Missouri. While we were there in the branch, I looked out and behold, there came my brother, William, with the one ox that we left behind. He made a harness and tackled him up, and the ox carried his wife and three children to Missouri. When I saw him I rejoiced to see him have so much faith, but the gentiles made all manner of fun of him. They said, "there goes a d—Mormon with one ox." But he got there just the same. Father Smith said it should be in the annals of his history.

Heart Felt Letter to Missionary James Chauncey Snow

Contributor: SharonLavashHawkins Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

This letter was reprinted in the online Meridian Magazine April 26 2017 The article appears below The photo of the original letter is in the photo gallery July 22, 1837 Dear Absent Brother,  I received your letter on June 28th.  And I was glad to hear that you had  arrived at St. Johnsbury, Maine in good health. You had wished for me to write as soon as I received your letter–respecting the Church and Bank.  I must confess to you of my negligence in not writing back to fulfill my word to you–and sincerely pray that you will forgive me.   You need not think that I have forgotten you in consequence of my not writing– for I have not.   I often think of the happy hours that we spent together and do anticipate the day when we shall meet again and enjoy each other’s society.    The reason that I did not write you sooner was because I had written to mother a short time before I received your letter.  I wrote to her respecting the Church and also the Bank.  I knew that you might see her and I thought that if you stopped by her place you would be likely to see my letter.  For this reason I delayed my response.   I also thought that I would wait and see how the Church bore out their difficulties before I wrote back.  I shall now endeavor to drop a few lines with regard to the Church and also the Bank. With respect to Church, there are some who have been standing out against the heads of the Church.  They have now come and made their confession to the Church and there are some who have not. Elder Patten, Elder Marsh and William Smith have come to Kirtland.  They arrived here the 8th of July– for the purpose of settling the affairs of the Church.   It was their request to meet with the Twelve and Presidency and hold a Conference.   However,  the Twelve left– some had gone one way and some another. Lyman Johnson and Luke Johnson went to Missouri. Parley Pratt started for there but met Elder Patten and turned around and came back with him. They held counsel at Brother Joseph’s with those that were here and settled their difficulties.   We had a glorious meeting in the House of the Lord last Sabbath in the forenoon. We were addressed by our beloved Brother Patten.  In the afternoon confessions were made by William Smith, Parley P. Pratt,  Orson Pratt,  Sidney Rigdon and Joseph Smith, Jr.   William Smith made a very humble confession to the Church with regard to his conduct the winter past—he said he was determined to forsake all and go forth and proclaim the Gospel to the ends of the earth.  As for Parley Pratt and Orson Pratt, they said they were truly convinced that the charges which were laid to Brother Joseph the season past ware actually false.  They were now fully persuaded in their own minds that Joseph had done the best that he could–considering all things.   They confessed that their minds had been darkened, their hearts hardened, and they had said many things against the Prophet that they ought not to have said.   Parley Pratt has sold his stand and all his house furniture and is about take his wife Mary Ann and go East to preach–as far as New York– or some where there about.   He calculates to stay until  fall and then return back to Kirtland and settle up his business and then he will take his wife and two children and start for England.  And he will probibly stay there a number of years. With regard to Joseph and Sidney’s confessions,  they acknowledged that they were men subjected to light passions as other men,  and that they had erred in some things as well as others. Orson Hyde and Heber C. Kimball have gone to England.  Elder Patten and Elder Marsh have started for Missouri again.   The Church is prospering very fast.   They seem to be united and the contentions and disputations are done away with — and the spirit of God is with us. Now concerning the Bank–the money is not good here yet–and I don’t know when it will be.   Some think that it will be good by next fall.  I understood that they were sending it out west to buy land.   It went well there and they have carried a great deal of it out of Kirtland so that it is not very plentiful here — so I was informed. Now I will turn my subject upon something else.  We have had as fine a weather here as anyone could wish  for.  Farmers have begun to hay here— and grain is now ready to harvest.  We have potatoes, onions, beets,  green peas, beans,  currents,  cherries and raspberries now.   In a short time we shall have apples.    My health has been very poor — but it is better now.   I called for Father Smith and Brother Butterfield.  They prayed for me and anointed with oil and said that I should have my health.  I believe that I shall — if  I  keep the commandments of God.  I desire your prayers that I may be preserved from the powers of darkness and the evils which are and will come on the earth.   I feel strong in the Lord and am determined to stand fast in the liberty wherewith Christ has made me free— and hope that you are of the same determination. I feel perfectly contented here and I do not want to go back to Newry [Maine] while I live–and I think now I never shall.   I wrote to mother that I had some notion of going home–but I have given it up.  Your folks are all well and enjoying good health.   I now say that my respects to you are the same now that they were when you went away.   The covenant I made with you shall never fail on my part.  Not while the earth shall stand, shall anyone enjoy my company but you.   And I hope that you are of the same mind.   I want to see you very much.   You must come home in October without fail. I must draw this letter to a close for I have nothing more to write. Please write to me without fail–and let me know where you are and how you get along through this wicked and devilish generation.    Respectfully yours,  Eliza Ann Carter  Kirtland Ohio The letters was edited for length, grammar and spelling. Article titled Jane Austen Meets the Wild West: Letter From a Young Woman in Kirtland His commentary follows the letter By Reid N. Moon · April 25, 2017 LDS Meridian Magazine Jane Austen died on July 18, 1817.  Twenty years later, on July 22, 1837, a young woman named Eliza Ann Carter penned a heartfelt letter to a young missionary named James Chauncey Snow. This letter was kept by that missionary. In fact, that letter was passed down through his descendants for the next 180 years until it was rediscovered in a chest by a great-great-great grandson of James Chauncey Snow.  He then shared it with me.   When I read the letter, I felt like I could have been reading a passage out of “Pride and Prejudice” or “Sense and Sensibility“. It was obvious that Eliza Ann Carter had tender feelings for James Chauncey Snow.  Her letter was part “expressions of love and devotion” and part “keen observer of turbulent Kirtland” as the following excerpts show: “I often think of the happy hours that we spent together and do anticipate the day when we shall meet again and enjoy each other’s society”.   “William Smith made a very humble confession to the Church with regard to his conduct the winter past—he said he was determined to forsake all and go forth and proclaim the Gospel to the ends of the earth “. “Not while the earth shall stand, shall anyone enjoy my company but you”. The setting for Eliza Ann was quite different than the English countryside enjoyed by Jane Austen.  Eliza Ann lived in Kirtland, Ohio; which in comparison to the English countryside, was like the “Wild West”.  The spring and summer of 1837 in Kirtland were not for the faint of heart.  Many of Joseph Smith’s closest friends had turned against him.  The newly founded “Kirtalnd Safety Society ” Bank was failing.  At the time, James Chauncey Snow was on a mission back East and  anxious to hear news of the “Church” and the “Bank”.  He was now serving a mission in Maine–in the very town where Eliza Ann had lived before she moved to Kirtland.   For me, this letter shows the incredible faith and optimism of a young woman who had embraced the new “Church of the Latter-day Saints” and  left her home in Maine and traveled 800 miles to join the Saints in Kirtland.  And, in spite of the spirit of apostasy that affected many members during that time, she remained faithful. She patiently waited for the return of the man she loved–and while he was away she asked for his prayers that she would  “be preserved from the powers of darkness and the evils which are and will come on the earth”.  James Chauncey Snow did return from his mission in the Fall of 1837.  James and Eliza Ann were married in January 1838.  As newlyweds, the tempestuous days in Kirtland were replaced by mob violence in Missouri and Illinois.  While living in Illinois in the Morley Settlement, they had their home burned down by a mob which was painted black.  Before the Saints were forced out of Nauvoo, James and Eliza Ann were sealed in the Nauvoo Temple on February 3, 1846 by Amasa Lyman–with Brigham Young and Isaac Morely as the witnesses. Like  many other early Mormon pioneers, they made the long trek to Utah.  In spite of the difficulties which arose later with the addition of three new wives into their marriage, they remained faithful in the Church.  They settled in Provo where James was the Stake President. Eliza Ann had nine children. It was never a dull day in the lives of James and Eliza Ann.  If their courtship, marriage and life were ever written into a book, I think that their story  would be just as exciting and interesting as any Jane Austen novel.

Life Timeline of Eliza A. Carter Snow

1818
Eliza A. Carter Snow was born on 28 Sep 1818
Eliza A. Carter Snow was 7 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
1825
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Eliza A. Carter Snow was 13 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Eliza A. Carter Snow was 22 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Eliza A. Carter Snow was 41 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Eliza A. Carter Snow was 44 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1862
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Eliza A. Carter Snow was 61 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1879
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Eliza A. Carter Snow was 69 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
1888
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Eliza A. Carter Snow died on 9 Mar 1897 at the age of 78
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Eliza A. Carter Snow (28 Sep 1818 - 9 Mar 1897), BillionGraves Record 3753 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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