Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore)

23 Nov 1867 - 21 Mar 1931

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Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore)

23 Nov 1867 - 21 Mar 1931
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Claud Fenton Hawkins, 76, of 710 W. 800 N., Provo, died Tuesday at the Veterans Hospital in Salt Lake City of complications following injuries suffered in a fall. Mr. Hawkins was born in Benjamin on Nov. 10, 1897, to William Edward and Drusella [Drusilla] Fillmore Hawkins. He married Alice Virginia
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Life Information

Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore)

Born:
Died:

Benjamin Cemetery

8435 S 3200 W
Benjamin, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Children - Leland, Melvin, Thora, Kenneth

Headstone Description

Massachusetts Co K 56 Regt Mass Inf Civil War, Children - Leland - Melvin- Thora - Kenneth
Transcriber

laurabolen1

December 8, 2019
Photographer

Kody

June 1, 2011

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Obituary

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

Claud Fenton Hawkins, 76, of 710 W. 800 N., Provo, died Tuesday at the Veterans Hospital in Salt Lake City of complications following injuries suffered in a fall. Mr. Hawkins was born in Benjamin on Nov. 10, 1897, to William Edward and Drusella [Drusilla] Fillmore Hawkins. He married Alice Virginia Hanks on May 18, 1921, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. Mr. Hawkins was Provo chief of police and had worked with the FBI. He was a staff assistant for U.S. Steel at Geneva in public relations, and he was a charter member and organizer of the Geneva Steel Credit Union. He retired in 1962, and then he organized the Utah County Safety Council which he served for two years until he lost his sight. Mr. Hawkins served in the Army during World War I and he had worked at several banks in Idaho and Utah. He attended schools in Benjamin, Provo and Salt Lake City, and attended the University of Utah. He was a recruiting supervisor in employing men to build Geneva Plant. Survivors include widow, one daughter and two sons, Mrs. Louis (Dorothy) Sayre, Woods Cross; Paul E. Hawkins, Bardstown, Ky.; and Robert R. Hawkins, Salt Lake City; 14 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; four sisters, Mrs. Henry (Hazel) Wilcox, Salt Lake City; Mrs. Marcella Olsen, Lindon; Mrs. Delbert (Fern) Wilcox, Orangeville, Emery County; and Mrs. Bernell (Alene) Perry, Provo. Funeral services will be Saturday at 11 a.m. in the Berg Drawing Room Chapel, Provo, where friends may call Satruday prior to services. Burial will be in East Lawn Memorial Hills. - Provo Daily Herald | 3 April 1974, pg. 4 | transcribed by Annie Duckett Hundley.

Obituary

Contributor: Robbhaas Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

Claud Fenton Hawkins, 76, of 710 W. 800 N., Provo, died Tuesday at the Veterans Hospital in Salt Lake City of complications following injuries suffered in a fall. Mr. Hawkins was born in Benjamin on Nov. 10, 1897, to William Edward and Drusella [Drusilla] Fillmore Hawkins. He married Alice Virginia Hanks on May 18, 1921, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. Mr. Hawkins was Provo chief of police and had worked with the FBI. He was a staff assistant for U.S. Steel at Geneva in public relations, and he was a charter member and organizer of the Geneva Steel Credit Union. He retired in 1962, and then he organized the Utah County Safety Council which he served for two years until he lost his sight. Mr. Hawkins served in the Army during World War I and he had worked at several banks in Idaho and Utah. He attended schools in Benjamin, Provo and Salt Lake City, and attended the University of Utah. He was a recruiting supervisor in employing men to build Geneva Plant. Survivors include widow, one daughter and two sons, Mrs. Louis (Dorothy) Sayre, Woods Cross; Paul E. Hawkins, Bardstown, Ky.; and Robert R. Hawkins, Salt Lake City; 14 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; four sisters, Mrs. Henry (Hazel) Wilcox, Salt Lake City; Mrs. Marcella Olsen, Lindon; Mrs. Delbert (Fern) Wilcox, Orangeville, Emery County; and Mrs. Bernell (Alene) Perry, Provo. Funeral services will be Saturday at 11 a.m. in the Berg Drawing Room Chapel, Provo, where friends may call Satruday prior to services. Burial will be in East Lawn Memorial Hills. - Provo Daily Herald | 3 April 1974, pg. 4 | transcribed by Annie Duckett Hundley.

Memories of My Childhood by Alene Hawkins Perry

Contributor: Robbhaas Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

I was the eleventh child born to Drusilla Fillmore Hawkins and William Edward Hawkins. This is the way I remember the twenty-five beautiful years spent with my parents. There were happy times and sad times. But these are the memories I would like to share with my posterity. The first recollection is about being different than other children. I was playing with my special friend, Boyd Dennis, and noticed his mother was up and walking around. She was cooking and setting the table for dinner. I realized that my mother was sitting in her wheel chair all the time. I remember that I was angry over this. I ran home and asked my mother why she sat in that chair all the time. She explained to me that she had rheumatoid arthritis. "I love you Petty." she said, "and wish that I could do the things that other mothers do for their little girls. I hope that I'm always here do guide and direct you in the things you need to know, When Dad and I found out that we were having another child, I was forty-seven years old and had been on crutches for several years, we both felt that you were sent to us as something special in our lives. We felt that God must have sent you to take care of us in our later years." And the things I was taught; Mother was always gracious and kind, and never complained about the pain in her poor little crippled body. Now I must tell you about the rest of the family. My oldest sister Maud was married to Ephraim Hansen. They had two children, Ethel who was two and a half years older than I and Maud's son Bill. They lived two blocks away from our house. I couldn't wait each night for my father to come from work. He was a happy man. He would come in and throw us kids up in the air and kiss and hug us. He always said that if he had a dog he would have done the same thing him. He and mother had such a deep devotion for each other and for us children. I don't remember them ever speaking a cross word to each other. Dad had sold the farm in Benjamin and bought a home in Provo. It was close to Brigham Young University. We rented rooms to some of the BYU students for an apartment. We enjoyed them and they seemed to enjoy us. Most of the time we had a girl working for us doing all of the things that Dad couldn't do. And the things that she couldn't do Dad always managed to do. And he did it so wonderfully with all the other things he had to do. We had a big garden behind the house. I used to weed a row early in the morning and Dad always managed to have a nickel ready for me. I had a place. Our neighbor girl, whose parents were chiropractors, was the only kid who owned a bike in our neighborhood. She would let me ride her bike for a nickel. So there went my nickel, but it was fun riding the bike. While my parents lived in Benjamin they had been very active in church. But when Dad sold the farm in Benjamin and moved to Provo to go to work at the state mental hospital mother's condition had so deteriorated at she was unable to attend church and Dad wouldn't go without her. Dad had come to Provo to work at the State Mental Hospital. He loved his job and was very fond of the patients there. He was kind and patient with the patients there, and he seemed to love them as much as he did his own family. We didn't have a car at this time and Dad walked three miles to and from work each day. At this time Dad had to sleep at the hospital two nights a week. Mother had several different wheel chairs and I wasn't big enough to take her anywhere. But even before I started school I had learned to put on her shoes and lace them. I was proud to be one of the family and to be able to take care of her. When Dad and Mother moved to Provo, they had kind of given up going to church. Mother couldn't go and Dad wouldn't go without her. Before they left Benjamin the whole family was active in church. They both had many callings in the church. Dad played in the Benjamin Band as a drummer. Dad had a wonderful musical talent, he could play almost any musical instrument by ear. He also had a very good singing voice, some of my sisters also had beautiful singing voices. We enjoyed many evenings singing together. Mother especially enjoyed them also. We kids only attended Sunday School. But we did always remember our Heavenly Father and we learned to pray when we were very small. I remember having our family prayers and I would always kneel by Mother. And I remember the beautiful prayers that our parents taught us. My oldest sister Maud had a boy, Bill born in December 1912. Mother was expecting me in June and because of her crippled condition she knew that there was no way that she would be able to care for a new baby. But Dad solved that problem. He could solve any problem that was related to his family. He obtained work for Eph, Maud's husband, at the State Mental Hospital, so they could move from Payson to Provo. They could live with us and Maud could take care of Mother and nurse the two new babies, her new baby Bill and me the new expected one. So they cane and I was born and we made a big happy family, Later Dad was thinking of buying a car. I remember the day when he went to look for one and he came back with a big Overland touring card, The tires were as tall as my head. It was a right hand drive, and it was open air as all cars were at that time. It had eisen glass side curtains that we could put on when it was cold. It had no heater, but then that wasn't very important to us. In the winter time we could not use it because of the snow. so when winter came Dad would put it in the barn jack up the wheels so the tires would remain in good shape, when spring came. After Dad had learned to drive this Overland, he came to mother one day . He said "Mother I'm going to take you for a drive." Mother had never been in a car before and I'm sure that she was frightened. She would have done anything that she could to make Dad happy. I imagine she was very excited too. Dad took her in her wheelchair out to the car and gently lofted her in. Away they went! I think it must have been at least twenty miles per hour. ten up and down and twenty along. When they came back they were laughing, and their sweet spirit and love for each other seemed to glow, That short ride in the new automobile opened a new world for both of them. A word in which they could live and show their love for each other. It was a joyous world that they could could share with each other until Mother died in 1931. We had many hired girls, as I previously said, in our home. I especially remember one, named Latisha Carter. She was almost as small as us kids. She looked like a beautiful doll. Mother had just taught her how to cook and keep house when she up and got married. Most of the hired girls did the same thing. But they were always kind to Mother and us kids. It was a necessary way of life, until we girls grew old enough to take over the responsibility of caring for Mother, cooking, taking care of each other and keeping the house in spic and span order.

Personal History of Ethel Valera Hansen Dain Case

Contributor: Robbhaas Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

I was born in Provo, Utah, November 28, 1910. The Utah pioneers had first come to Utah in 1847, just 63 years before I was born. Many developments had occurred during that time. The Salt Lake Temple had just been finished a few years before. My mother and father were married in the Salt Lake Temple. My first recollection was of a loving mother and father. My brother, Bill, was just two years younger than I was. We lived near my grandmother and grandfather (Hawkins) in Provo, Utah. My grandmother had two of her children about the same time my mother had my brother, Bill, and me. My grandmother, Drusilla Hawkins, was a very special person to me. My first remembrance of her was in her wheelchair. She had rheumatoid arthritis and spent most of her adult life in a wheelchair. All her joints were out of place. She must have been in a lot of pain most of the time. I never remember her being irritable but she must have been sometimes. As I remember she was always pleasant. Every child should experience the companionship of grandparents like I had. Even if my grandmother was incapacitated it never occurred to her to not be as active as she could. She went to shows (movies), picnics, traveled and participated in all the family activities. My grandmother was a great storyteller. All the children would sit on the floor around her wheelchair to hear our favorite stories. Each one of us got to take turns having our favorite story told. This was a very special time in my life. My grandfather, Will Hawkins, was a handsome, considerate, loving person. I don't know whether it was because he was so kind and loving to my grandmother or whether I just had a close loving relationship with him. I'm sure all the grandchildren must have have felt as close to him as I did. This makes all my remembering a very pleasant memory of my grandparents. If I could have a wish for all children, it would be to have grandparents like I had.

Personal History of Ethel Valera Hansen Dain Case

Contributor: Robbhaas Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

I was born in Provo, Utah, November 28, 1910. The Utah pioneers had first come to Utah in 1847, just 63 years before I was born. Many developments had occurred during that time. The Salt Lake Temple had just been finished a few years before. My mother and father were married in the Salt Lake Temple. My first recollection was of a loving mother and father. My brother, Bill, was just two years younger than I was. We lived near my grandmother and grandfather (Hawkins) in Provo, Utah. My grandmother had two of her children about the same time my mother had my brother, Bill, and me. My grandmother, Drusilla Hawkins, was a very special person to me. My first remembrance of her was in her wheelchair. She had rheumatoid arthritis and spent most of her adult life in a wheelchair. All her joints were out of place. She must have been in a lot of pain most of the time. I never remember her being irritable but she must have been sometimes. As I remember she was always pleasant. Every child should experience the companionship of grandparents like I had. Even if my grandmother was incapacitated it never occurred to her to not be as active as she could. She went to shows (movies), picnics, traveled and participated in all the family activities. My grandmother was a great storyteller. All the children would sit on the floor around her wheelchair to hear our favorite stories. Each one of us got to take turns having our favorite story told. This was a very special time in my life. My grandfather, Will Hawkins, was a handsome, considerate, loving person. I don't know whether it was because he was so kind and loving to my grandmother or whether I just had a close loving relationship with him. I'm sure all the grandchildren must have have felt as close to him as I did. This makes all my remembering a very pleasant memory of my grandparents. If I could have a wish for all children, it would be to have grandparents like I had.

Memories of My Childhood by Alene Hawkins Perry

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

I was the eleventh child born to Drusilla Fillmore Hawkins and William Edward Hawkins. This is the way I remember the twenty-five beautiful years spent with my parents. There were happy times and sad times. But these are the memories I would like to share with my posterity. The first recollection is about being different than other children. I was playing with my special friend, Boyd Dennis, and noticed his mother was up and walking around. She was cooking and setting the table for dinner. I realized that my mother was sitting in her wheel chair all the time. I remember that I was angry over this. I ran home and asked my mother why she sat in that chair all the time. She explained to me that she had rheumatoid arthritis. "I love you Petty." she said, "and wish that I could do the things that other mothers do for their little girls. I hope that I'm always here do guide and direct you in the things you need to know, When Dad and I found out that we were having another child, I was forty-seven years old and had been on crutches for several years, we both felt that you were sent to us as something special in our lives. We felt that God must have sent you to take care of us in our later years." And the things I was taught; Mother was always gracious and kind, and never complained about the pain in her poor little crippled body. Now I must tell you about the rest of the family. My oldest sister Maud was married to Ephraim Hansen. They had two children, Ethel who was two and a half years older than I and Maud's son Bill. They lived two blocks away from our house. I couldn't wait each night for my father to come from work. He was a happy man. He would come in and throw us kids up in the air and kiss and hug us. He always said that if he had a dog he would have done the same thing him. He and mother had such a deep devotion for each other and for us children. I don't remember them ever speaking a cross word to each other. Dad had sold the farm in Benjamin and bought a home in Provo. It was close to Brigham Young University. We rented rooms to some of the BYU students for an apartment. We enjoyed them and they seemed to enjoy us. Most of the time we had a girl working for us doing all of the things that Dad couldn't do. And the things that she couldn't do Dad always managed to do. And he did it so wonderfully with all the other things he had to do. We had a big garden behind the house. I used to weed a row early in the morning and Dad always managed to have a nickel ready for me. I had a place. Our neighbor girl, whose parents were chiropractors, was the only kid who owned a bike in our neighborhood. She would let me ride her bike for a nickel. So there went my nickel, but it was fun riding the bike. While my parents lived in Benjamin they had been very active in church. But when Dad sold the farm in Benjamin and moved to Provo to go to work at the state mental hospital mother's condition had so deteriorated at she was unable to attend church and Dad wouldn't go without her. Dad had come to Provo to work at the State Mental Hospital. He loved his job and was very fond of the patients there. He was kind and patient with the patients there, and he seemed to love them as much as he did his own family. We didn't have a car at this time and Dad walked three miles to and from work each day. At this time Dad had to sleep at the hospital two nights a week. Mother had several different wheel chairs and I wasn't big enough to take her anywhere. But even before I started school I had learned to put on her shoes and lace them. I was proud to be one of the family and to be able to take care of her. When Dad and Mother moved to Provo, they had kind of given up going to church. Mother couldn't go and Dad wouldn't go without her. Before they left Benjamin the whole family was active in church. They both had many callings in the church. Dad played in the Benjamin Band as a drummer. Dad had a wonderful musical talent, he could play almost any musical instrument by ear. He also had a very good singing voice, some of my sisters also had beautiful singing voices. We enjoyed many evenings singing together. Mother especially enjoyed them also. We kids only attended Sunday School. But we did always remember our Heavenly Father and we learned to pray when we were very small. I remember having our family prayers and I would always kneel by Mother. And I remember the beautiful prayers that our parents taught us. My oldest sister Maud had a boy, Bill born in December 1912. Mother was expecting me in June and because of her crippled condition she knew that there was no way that she would be able to care for a new baby. But Dad solved that problem. He could solve any problem that was related to his family. He obtained work for Eph, Maud's husband, at the State Mental Hospital, so they could move from Payson to Provo. They could live with us and Maud could take care of Mother and nurse the two new babies, her new baby Bill and me the new expected one. So they cane and I was born and we made a big happy family, Later Dad was thinking of buying a car. I remember the day when he went to look for one and he came back with a big Overland touring card, The tires were as tall as my head. It was a right hand drive, and it was open air as all cars were at that time. It had eisen glass side curtains that we could put on when it was cold. It had no heater, but then that wasn't very important to us. In the winter time we could not use it because of the snow. so when winter came Dad would put it in the barn jack up the wheels so the tires would remain in good shape, when spring came. After Dad had learned to drive this Overland, he came to mother one day . He said "Mother I'm going to take you for a drive." Mother had never been in a car before and I'm sure that she was frightened. She would have done anything that she could to make Dad happy. I imagine she was very excited too. Dad took her in her wheelchair out to the car and gently lofted her in. Away they went! I think it must have been at least twenty miles per hour. ten up and down and twenty along. When they came back they were laughing, and their sweet spirit and love for each other seemed to glow, That short ride in the new automobile opened a new world for both of them. A word in which they could live and show their love for each other. It was a joyous world that they could could share with each other until Mother died in 1931. We had many hired girls, as I previously said, in our home. I especially remember one, named Latisha Carter. She was almost as small as us kids. She looked like a beautiful doll. Mother had just taught her how to cook and keep house when she up and got married. Most of the hired girls did the same thing. But they were always kind to Mother and us kids. It was a necessary way of life, until we girls grew old enough to take over the responsibility of caring for Mother, cooking, taking care of each other and keeping the house in spic and span order.

Personal History of Ethel Valera Hansen Dain Case

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

I was born in Provo, Utah, November 28, 1910. The Utah pioneers had first come to Utah in 1847, just 63 years before I was born. Many developments had occurred during that time. The Salt Lake Temple had just been finished a few years before. My mother and father were married in the Salt Lake Temple. My first recollection was of a loving mother and father. My brother, Bill, was just two years younger than I was. We lived near my grandmother and grandfather (Hawkins) in Provo, Utah. My grandmother had two of her children about the same time my mother had my brother, Bill, and me. My grandmother, Drusilla Hawkins, was a very special person to me. My first remembrance of her was in her wheelchair. She had rheumatoid arthritis and spent most of her adult life in a wheelchair. All her joints were out of place. She must have been in a lot of pain most of the time. I never remember her being irritable but she must have been sometimes. As I remember she was always pleasant. Every child should experience the companionship of grandparents like I had. Even if my grandmother was incapacitated it never occurred to her to not be as active as she could. She went to shows (movies), picnics, traveled and participated in all the family activities. My grandmother was a great storyteller. All the children would sit on the floor around her wheelchair to hear our favorite stories. Each one of us got to take turns having our favorite story told. This was a very special time in my life. My grandfather, Will Hawkins, was a handsome, considerate, loving person. I don't know whether it was because he was so kind and loving to my grandmother or whether I just had a close loving relationship with him. I'm sure all the grandchildren must have have felt as close to him as I did. This makes all my remembering a very pleasant memory of my grandparents. If I could have a wish for all children, it would be to have grandparents like I had.

Personal History of Ethel Valera Hansen Dain Case

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

I was born in Provo, Utah, November 28, 1910. The Utah pioneers had first come to Utah in 1847, just 63 years before I was born. Many developments had occurred during that time. The Salt Lake Temple had just been finished a few years before. My mother and father were married in the Salt Lake Temple. My first recollection was of a loving mother and father. My brother, Bill, was just two years younger than I was. We lived near my grandmother and grandfather (Hawkins) in Provo, Utah. My grandmother had two of her children about the same time my mother had my brother, Bill, and me. My grandmother, Drusilla Hawkins, was a very special person to me. My first remembrance of her was in her wheelchair. She had rheumatoid arthritis and spent most of her adult life in a wheelchair. All her joints were out of place. She must have been in a lot of pain most of the time. I never remember her being irritable but she must have been sometimes. As I remember she was always pleasant. Every child should experience the companionship of grandparents like I had. Even if my grandmother was incapacitated it never occurred to her to not be as active as she could. She went to shows (movies), picnics, traveled and participated in all the family activities. My grandmother was a great storyteller. All the children would sit on the floor around her wheelchair to hear our favorite stories. Each one of us got to take turns having our favorite story told. This was a very special time in my life. My grandfather, Will Hawkins, was a handsome, considerate, loving person. I don't know whether it was because he was so kind and loving to my grandmother or whether I just had a close loving relationship with him. I'm sure all the grandchildren must have have felt as close to him as I did. This makes all my remembering a very pleasant memory of my grandparents. If I could have a wish for all children, it would be to have grandparents like I had.

Life timeline of Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore)

Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore) was born on 23 Nov 1867
Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore) was 10 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore) was 21 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore) was 31 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore) was 41 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore) was 49 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore) was 53 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore) died on 21 Mar 1931 at the age of 63
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Drusilla Hawkins (Fillmore) (23 Nov 1867 - 21 Mar 1931), BillionGraves Record 34703106 Benjamin, Utah, Utah, United States

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