Don L. Bigelow

22 May 1866 - 5 Jul 1954

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Don L. Bigelow

22 May 1866 - 5 Jul 1954
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Grave site information of Don L. Bigelow (22 May 1866 - 5 Jul 1954) at Wallsburg Cemetery in Wallsburg, Wasatch, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Don L. Bigelow

Born:
Died:

Wallsburg Cemetery

200 E
Wallsburg, Wasatch, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Mother - Father
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trishkovach

September 11, 2011
Photographer

Catirrel

September 6, 2011

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Don Louis Bigelow Life Story

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

The following verses express the great hope, privilege and desire of my life. The world is as you take it And life is what you make it. Freedom Know this that every soul is free To choose his life and what he'll be For this eternal truth is given That God will force no man to Heaven He'll call persuade direct aright Bless us with wisdom love and light In nameless ways be good and kind But never force the human mind. Wisdom and reason make us men Take these away, what are we then Mere animals and just as well The beasts may think of heaven or hell. Don L. Bigelow was born May 22, 1866, at Heber City, Wasatch County, Utah in a little old log house with a dirt roof. In the early spring of 1866 there was an Indian scare. People were advised to move to the county seat, where they could be better protected in case of Indian raids. Indians had been killing people in different parts of the country. One incident which caused much alarm was two boys went up American Fork canyon for wood, the Indians killed them both. Another incident about that time a company of men and boys went up Springville hobblecreek to get wood. They went in bunches on account of the hostile Indians. Two boys brothers got delayed, and went after the crowd did. The boys were only ten and twelve years old. When they went in the canyon to follow the crowd they got on the wrong road. They tried to get a load of wood and night came on. So they tied the oxen up to the wagon so they wouldn't stray off and went to bed. About nine or ten o'clock they were awakened by two buck Indians. They were told to get up, put their shoes on, and untie the cattle from the wagon and unyoke them. Then they took the cattle and the boys follow them toward Strawberry valley. After they had drove them high to the high point of the night, the other boy began to cry. Then the Indians told him if he didn't stop crying they would kill him and leave him so he stoped crying. they went on till long toward morning. Then the Indians desided to stop and rest. They rolled up in their blankets and tied the largest boy to one of their feet. After the Indians went to sleep the oldest boy had taken an old razor blade in his pocket. He cut the rope with that, then woke his brother and they took their gun and six shooter, the Indians had taken their powder horn and ammunition, but the two guns were loaded. Then they started the oxen back on the trail. The boys got tired of walking and one of the oxen was used to bing rode. They both got on him, the little boy got sleepy and would nearly fall off but the older boy sensed the danger and kept him awake. When daylight and the sun came up about nine or ten they kept a watch on the trail behind them. They saw those two Indians coming behind them so they got off the ox and got behind some big rocks that were there close by, and waited till the Indians came close. The oldest boy took the rifle and the other on the six shooter, the older boy said "I will count to three and we will both shoot at once." They hit one Indian in the hip and crippled him for life. The Indians shot arrows at the boys and tried to kill them but the rocks protected them. In a little while they heard the white men coming. The Indians hid in the brush and sneeked off. The white men took the boys unharmed but frightened. Also they got the cattle went back on the trail and went home. Later the two Indians came to Springville and one of them limped from the bullet wound. They saw the boys and recognized, them and said "Them heap brave boys." After the Indian scare was over part of the people went back to Wallsburg. But my parents with others went to Provo to live for some time. While my parents were, moving back to Wallsburg up Provo canyon they tipped their wagon over in the river. Lost part of their belongings, and some chickens they were taking crated in a box went floping down the river and were lost. I said "What luck now we havnt got any home." I was just big enough to talk a little. When the people came back to Wallsburg they built a fort in a square. All the houses facing the center, for a protection from the Indians. The first lesson my Mother gave me in honesty was in that fort. My sister Emily and I were in Ann Wheelers dooryard and we found a button and a straight pin. We went home thinking what we found belonged to us. My Mothers words has stayed with me all my life. She said "Dont you know they belong to someone else? When you find things you must always try to find the owner. Now you found them in Ann Wheelers door yard, you must take them back and tell her you found them there and give them to her. You must tell her you are sorry and ask her forgiveness." In those days pins and buttons were scarce and hard to get. I remember living in the fort when I was about three or four years old the saying of Brigham Young was "It is better to feed the Indians than to fight them." So the men of the fort decided to buy a large steer that belonged to one of the men and each man was to pay an equal share and give the steer to the Indians. The buck Indians killed the steer just out south of the fort. A group of squaws came in and dressed the beef. The little Indians stood by and watched and so did I. After they got it dressed they gave Father or Grandfather a piece of liver. It was cooked at Grandmothers and I will always remember how good that liver was. Later I was told that Indians would not eat the liver that may have been the reason we got the liver. On July 28, 1872 I had a Patriarchel blessing given me by John Smith has been a guide to me through life. The power, of the Lord rested down on him so much it made him so weak he had to go lie down and rest after he was through giving it. Here is a copy of it. Wallsburg, Wasatch Co, Utah, Territory, July 28, 1872. A blessing by John Smith Patriarch upon the head of Daniel Don Louis Bigelow Son of Daniel and Permelia Bigelow. Born in Heber City, Wasatch Co, Utah Territory, May 22, 1866. Daniel Don Louis Bigelow in the name of Jesus Christ I lay my hands upon thy head and bless thee with a Fathers blessing which is also Patriarchel. Thou art numbered with the sons of zion of whom much is expected. Thou hast many years to live if thou wilt fill up the measure of thy creation. For the Lord has a work for thee to do in which thou shalt see his arm made bare in behalf of Isreal. Thou art of the lienage of Ephraim and an heir to the blessings of the new and everlasting covenant with the gifts of the Priesthood and I say unto thee honor and obey thy parents and as you grow in years grow in grace and in the knowledge of the truth and thou shalt become a mighty man, in Isreal and thy name shall go forth among the nations of the Earth and thou shalt have great faith and be mighty in healing the sick by the laying on of hands many shall seek thee for council and wonder at thy wisdom and if necessary thou shalt command the elements and the waves of the sea shall obey thy voice and thou shalt gather of this worlds goods around thee, all that shall be necessary in life. Thy name shall be handed down, in honorable rememberance and written in the Lambs book of life. This blessing I seal upon thy head and I thee up unto Eternal life to come forth in the morning of the ressurection, Even so Amen. When I was between seven and eight years old Father and two of his brothers and their familys were called to help settle southern Utah. They didnt all go together. Father had a herd of cattle. He hired a man to go help drive the cattle down. We didnt get started till late in the fall. We got snow bound in what they called wild cat canyon after the storm cleared up we rounded up the cattle and drove to Kanosh. From there to a place that was called the Black Rocks. There we wintered the cattle on what they called white sage and what little grass they could find. While there we lived in a covered wagon and a tent all winter and long toward spring President Brigham Young came that way on a mission tour and at Kanosh he held a meeting. Father told him how he had left his valuable land and a homestead he hadn't proved up on. President Young advised him to take his family and go back to Wallsburg and prove up on the ground. When the weather got good in the spring we moved back to Wallsburg. There were no pastures to keep the milk cows in so all of the town cows were taken by the young boys over a, hill called the little devide there they would graze over the big devide, then go down to the lower end of the valley on a green spot. So we boys had to take our dinners down on the green spot to heard the cows so they wouldnt get on the ground the men mowed for hay. A family lived down there by the name of Owens. Mrs Owens came down there one day with a six shooter and shot in the air to frighten us. She said we'd killed her geese and if we killed any more she would kill us. I hadn't killed any of her geese and didnt know about any being killed and the rest of the boys said they hadnt killed them. We were sure all of us badly frightened though, and promised not to harm her geese. The farmers lived along the main road and when we were driving the cows home one night going up the road Jim Lamb had two bad dogs that would bite. After we passed his house the boys were all larger than I and was ahead of me running close to the cows. Both of the dogs came out and run a head of me. One of them bit Cal Duke in the thigh and the blood run down off his leg and dripped off his heel. We were all bare footed at that time. I was baptised July 11, 1875 by Daniel Bigelow confirmed a member of the church by Wm. Nuttal about that time we moved from town out on a ranch where Father had built a homestead house. There we enjoyed life for a while. Then Father bought a saw mill in the north fork on Provo canyon. Although very young I had to help tend or round up the oxen that were turned out on the mountain to feed. Early in the morning before the work started Father told me to hunt the oxen I climbed up a steep hill through the brush. Went over in a quaking asp flat a half mile up the mountain around a hole and was coming down a trail that the oxen had made. I had an old big black dog with me. Coming down the trail the cattle had made I came into an opening about three rods square I sensed danger and my hair began to raise. I came to a thicket of willows and stopped. When I stoped just below the brush began to crack and break. I was scared stiff and couldnt move the old dog put his tail between his hind legs and howeled right behind me. The brush kept cracking and I desided it was a bear that had went on the trail and sure enough there was a bear track about eight or nine inches long. The bear had been coming up the trail and all we lacked meeting face to face was that willow bunch. The old dog was just as scared as I was. Another time when I went to get the horses, I found them and they were running away. I tried to head them and one of the horses whirled and kicked me in the head. It dented a place im my skull and left a gash in my forhead about two or three inches long. When Father got back that day from logging there was no Dr. this side of Provo and we had to have that gash sewed up and all they had was a round sewing needle so Father started to sew it up. When he pushed the needle toward the wound I could stand that but when the needle struck the opposite side the pain was almost inbearable. I wasn't crying but the tears would roll out of my eyes. When Father got it sewed up I certainly was glad to get it over with. When I was about sixteen years old the girls and I run the saw mill when Father went away to work. One day we all desided to go to Wallsburg the folks started out ahead of me in a wagon and they had a wild colt in the team. I was coming horse back behind them. They had just got to the top of a high dugway when the colt began to rearing and pushed the other horse off the dugway. Father called for them all to get out They all jumped out of the wagon except my sister Polly, before the wagon went off the dugway. The team and wagon with Polly in it rolled down the mountain together about thirty or forty yards. Mother was standing on the bank wringing her hands crying suposing Polly would be dead. Soon as the cloud of dust began to raise Polly came running up the side of the hill unhurt and didn't have as much as a scratch on her. But it smashed the wagon and bows up and broke the tounge out and the horses were tangled up and couldn't get away but they were unhurt. We stayed most of the summer in the North Fork. In the fall Aunt Lucy B. Young talked Father in the notion of going to St. George for the winter to work in the temple. That spring I was sixteen I had my endowments and worked in the temple and done some endowment work for the dead. There was where I was ordained an Elder by A. P. Windor on February eight, eighteen eighty two. We lived with Aunt Lucy that winter. Some time that winter Father came back to Wallsburg. We drove the team as far north as Minnersville, I came to drive the team back. From Minnersville I drove to Beaver there I loaded up some tithing potatoes. It was cold weather, the snow was eight or ten inches deep and I put my bedding over the potatoes to keep them from freezing. I drove all night and, when I got to St. George there was only a few of the potatoes that froze but tho most of them were all right. But I suffered severely with the cold to save the potatoes. While Father was gone Mother wanted to go to Tokerville to visit her sister Emma Hill. We stayed there with her three weeks then Father came there and we went back to St. George. We soon left there and started back home to Provo. The next spring we moved back to the saw mill. When the snow was three or four feet deep we went up the right hand fork and climbed the Timpinogas mountain almost half way to the top in the deep snow. There was a nice grove of white pine timber. A man by the name of Phillips' owned a sawmill about a mile below us in the canyon and to our surprise three of their men came in and went to cutting timber in the same grove we were. We cut logs all day then walked three miles back to the mill every night we were wet to our waists from wallowing in the snow. At day light we were up and going again. I helped haul the logs with oxen to the sawmill then hauled lumber to Provo with a horse team. The road through Provo canyon at that time was narrow and a one way road it was hard to pass a team. I run into a mans wagon one time the hind wheels locked together. The man got mad and swore, he said I could have driven farther around him. One spring before we moved in the canyon Father and I went up in the hills and came across the left hand fork of the North fork. When we got there we saw an old black bear and two brown cubs. Father took his gun and shot the old black bear. Of all the roaring and hollering that bear done it. It was under some big ledges and the scream and roars of the old bear went up that big high mountain of ledges and every time the sound would go from one shelf to another the sound would re-echo and it sounded terrible The little bears run down twenty or thirty yards to some big quakenasp trees and up the tree they climbed thirty five or forty feet high. Father shot them out of the trees with a shot gun. We skinned the old bear and cut steaks out of the hind quarter and roasted it on the coals. It was the corsest grained meat I ever ate, but it tasted like meat just the same for we were hungry. We had been all day without our dinner. When we were working all these summers we would come down to Provo and go to school three or four months each winter. I remember well going to the Brigham Young Acadamy down where the Farmers and Merchants Bank now stands or on third west and center street, and Carl G. Measer was the Principle. One spring that building burned down and the next winter they held school in the ware house over the ZCMI down just above the rail road track where I went to school the last time. After we moved back to the sawmill in the summer I took the gun and went up over the hills back of the sawmill and two big buck deer jumped up and started up the hill. One of them stopped and I shot him under the lower part of his neck. The deer reared over backwards and fell head first down the hill and when I got to him the bullet had cut off his jugler vain. He had bleed to death so that was the first deer I ever killed. Another time after we left the north fork and was moved back to Wallsburg our cows strayed off and I desided to go hunt for them. I was impressed to take my gun with me. So I went up back of the poles and around across the lane and up the valley above town around the point and as I was going up the road up on the bench where those springs are. Along about two or three o'clock in the afternoon I saw two big buck deer coming down the road. I got behind an oak bunch and the deer came down to the big spring and got a drink, then they went over through the oaks then I went up around above the oak brush and tied my horse there. I came carefully down through the brush and saw one of the deer standing by an oak bunch rubbing the velvet off his horns then I shot him, and in just a few minutes here came Parley Ford riding a horse on the run and asked me what I shot at. Supposing he had seen the deer I told him a deer and ask him if he had seen them and he said no. He and I started to hunt through the sage and oak brush for the deer. I had shot it I knew but we had no success and finely he said I have got to go. He had not been gone five minutes till I saw the deer laying down in the hollow behind me. That was a testimony to me that he should of had no part in it. Again I used to sleep outdoors in a grainery up in the stackyard one night as usual I went to bed and it was a dark night. I woke up in the middle of the night and it was like some one told me to get up and go up hobble creek to an old fish trap that had been put in the spring before. I got up and dressed and went and as I went and crawled under the willow bunch on my hands and knees I felt a big trout about seventeen or eighteen inches long lying there on that old dry willow trap. I scratched my hand along under his belly and up to his gills and stuck my fingers under his throat and got a good hold on him. Then crawled back out and came back and wraped him in a blanket so a cat wouldnt get him and went back to sleep. Next morning the folks asked me where I got that fish and when I told them they were just as surprised as I was the night before. That summer I logged in Daniels creek canyon for Fathers and McGuirs mill. The next summer I wouldnt go back to the mill and I stayed in Wallsburg and run the farm. I raised a good crop, that year we had twelve hundred bushels of grain and a large crop of hay. We built a sawmill there at Wallsburg, just below the town. One winter we cut two hundred thousand feet of lumber, hauled most of it to Provo and sold it to a man by the name of Ward that run a lumber yard for sixteen dollars a thousand. He said that was the most perfect sawed lumber he ever had come into his yard. Bishop Fraughton meet me on the street in Wallsburg and asked me how I would like to go on a mission. I told him I thought it would be better to get someone with more experience so I didnt go. I have always been sorry I missed that opportunity. I worked more or less for myself untill I was married, then I went on my own. One summer when I was about twenty three years old the Bishop had set me apart as a ward teacher and Aurther C. Whiting was living over on the ranch and Will Whiting his son was living there with his father and I was appointed to visit them. When I went over where they lived Will was there smoking so that was a good chance to talk to him on the word of wisdom so I began, but when I was about sixteen down in the north fork in Provo canyon my cousin Will Bigelow was there helping the mill and he was older then I was and he used tobacco. He used to give me a smoke and we smoked together. When Father found out I was smoking he talked to me and told me it was a bad filthy habit and it was also expensive and he wanted me to go to school the next winter down in Provo the Academy. He said if I would not use tobacco till after I was twenty one he did not think I would ever use it. So I quit and sure enough I have never used the weed from that day to this. Will Whiting was just young and I gave him about the same kind of a talk Father gave me and I told him if he would wait till he was grown or twenty one I doubted if ever he would. Well after that he quit and I think he went to the temple and was married and he never did use tobacco any more The first time Annie and I went together I took her to a charactor ball, I wore a pair of red pants that came to the knee, trimmed with white lace. We had the time of our lives. The first winter we went together long toward spring we were going home one night after a dance. I asked her how she would like to marry and be my wife. She said she was to young so I just had one thing to do and that was to wait and hope so the second winter as spring time aproached I told her I knew a little poem that was sacred to me. She asked what it was. I said, "Will you say yes if I tell it to you?" She said "I dont know tell it to me then I will answer." Then I said: "If you to me your heart resign Then in return I'll give you mine." Then she said "I will say yes to that." As spring came on and the flowers began to bloom I asked her to set the wedding day. We agreed that it should be on the twenty nineth of April so we could have our reception and dance on the first of May. We wanted to be married in the temple and the nearest one was in Manti, so we went as far as Provo in a wagon then went on the train to Manti and there we were sealed for time and all eternity. Anthony H. Lund sealed us. We were the last couple married in the temple that day and after he married us he gave us a most wonderful blessing. We have only been glad once and that was from that day to this. We always expected to be faithful and true to the covenants we made that day. One of the grand events in our lives was when our first child was born May sixth eighteen ninety two. On July thirty first eighteen hundred ninety two I was ordained a seventy. About that time I decided I had three objects in life. First was raise an honerable and noble family. Second was to do missionary work, and the third was to do temple work. About that time I was put in as secretary in the Sunday School. I was ward teacher for forty years and worked in the mutual and was class leader in the priesthood corum. I was called out many times to administer to the sick and went any time night or day. We moved to Vernal July eighteen ninety four and our third daughter was born there January thirtieth , eighteen ninety five. We stayed there for two years built a log house and stable correl and granery and cleared forty acres of land. We had the hardest time in our lives trying to get the necessities of life there. Money was hard to get for example: I took my team and hauled wood for six days and at the end of the six days I got a check for six dollars. I helped bail hay but I didnt get any money out of it only trade, and horse feed. The fall we left there we had a good crop of wheat corn squash potatoes and different vegitables but couldnt sell anything. Couldnt sell the wheat for thirty cents a bushel. We left the whole thing there but we brought a thirty gallon barrel of honey with us when we moved back that I had worked for. One time when we were out in Ashley Mark Batty, Frank Allred, Martin Allred, Al Kerby and Zora Glenn and Annie and I and all of their familys desided to go down on Green river where Levi Holdaway lived for an outing. While there we all desided to go in swiming. We men desided to wade across Green river but when we got out there the current was so swift we gave it up so we stoped on a little island. While we were there here came the women folks trying to cross the river and they were holding hands and none of them could swim so if they had broke holts they might of all got drowned. Then we all came back together and Holdaway said to Zora Glenn get on my back and I will swim across that big hole or eddie in the river. Zora did not want to do it so I said get on his back and go and Annie will get on my back and I will swim across with her. So Zora got on his back and when they were about across I told Annie to get on mine and just keep her head out so she could breathe good and I would take her across the pond. Well when we were about half way across Annie must of got scared and she jumped right up on my shoulders and shoved my head down under water. I knew I had to make it to shore without any more breath, which I did not know whether I could do or not but I swam us out. I was out of breath when I got her and I out and I desided to never take no such chances again. When we got back to Wallsburg I run Fathers sawmill and we got along better having a steady job all winter. Ervin our first son was born the February after we got back from Ashley. The next summer I helped Father farm and I pitched one hundred tons of hay. Then we traded the place we had in Vernal for a farm around the hill above Wallsburg. We had to start and plow up sage brush and break up another farm. I run a self binder every fall for many years. Then Father and I bought a store from Lucina Boren and had the postoffice and store combined and lived in her home till we lost four of our children in a week from dighteria and measles. Then we bought a place from Elijah Davis and moved two buildings and put them together and fixed it for the store and post office. We had to freight our goods with horse team most of our goods we got in Provo from whole sale houses. It was two days work to go get a load of goods. 'One time after we had lost our' children and I was humbled right to the Earth and it was a question in my mind whether life was worth the struggle I was going to Provo and John McAffee lived down to the lower end of the valley. He came out and stopped me and said his little girl Nadine was in the house screaming with apencicitis and he wanted to know if I would come in and administer to her. I was broken hearted and it brought my trouble all back fresh again. I said If I could do anything I would. He said come on in then I asked him if' he held the Melchesideck Priesthood and he said no then I asked if there was anyone there that did and he said Whiting is working here. I said to go ask him about it and if he will help me. He went and got Will and came in, he was scared and said he held the Priesthood but had never done anything like that. But I encouraged him and told him he could anoint her and I would help him, and tell him what to say, and how to proced. We were both humble as two children. The child was growning and moaning every breath. Dr. Wherritt from Heber had been there in the morning and had went back to prepare for an operation and had pronounced it a bad case of apendicitis and was coming back as soon as, possible and get the girl to operate on her. John said to Will and I Dont wait so they gave Will the oil and I told him what to say. He anointed her and I sealed the anointing and in the prayer we commanded the pain to cease and everything of an evil influence to leave her body that she might, be well and sound in body and by that time she had stopped crying and when we took our hands off her head she was free from pain and it worked off and out of her system in a natural way and left her free. When the Dr. came back she was at ease and he was surprised and asked what they had done then John McAffee asked the Dr. about the operation and he said there is no use of an ope ration. The girl has never been bothered with apendicitis from that day to this that I have ever heard of. I was called on a mission a few months after we lost our children in nineteen-two, and this blessing was given to me before I left. Patriarchal blessing recorded in Book A page 216 No. 10. Patriarchal blessing given at Heber City July 28, 1902 by John M. Murdock Patriarch on the head of Daniel Don Louis Bigelow son of Daniel and Permelia Bigelow born in Heber City May 22, 1866. Brother Daniel Don Louis Bigelow by your desire I place my hands upon your head to pernounce upon you a Fathers blessing even a Patriarchal blessing that shall rest upon you from this time hensforth and forever, to be a comfort and a guide unto you through the journey of life an I pray God my heavenly Father that he will let a portion of Holy spirit rest upon me his humble servant and that it may be inspired thereby that the words I may speak may be the words of the Lord unto you in very deed. Thou art a true Iseralite through the leinage of Ephraim, the son of Joseph that was sold into Egypt, and as he become a savior unto his fathers house so shall you become a savior unto your Fathers house and to many of your kindred many of whom are unknown unto you at the present time, but shall be made known unto you by the revelation of the spirit that will come unto you in the due time of the Lord. A great work lies before you for the living and dead. Therefore seek unto the Lord for wisdom that you may be thourally prepared for the great work that lays before you. You are ordained in the spirit world to come to this Earth and become a preacher of rightousness long before the foundations of the Earth were laid, when the morning stars sang together and all of the sons of God shouted for joy your tongue shall become loosed as the pen of a ready writer you shall have power to convince the honest in heart, the rightous shall rejoice at the sound of your voice but the wicked will be enraged against you but in as much as you will be faithful and put your trust in the Lord no evil shall befall you, not a hair of your head shall fall by your enemies without the notice of your Father in Heaven, therefore dear brother be of good cheer the way will be opened up before you, the angel of your presencece shall stand by you to preserve and support you in every emergency. I seal upon you the blessing of health and prosperity. You have seen much sorrow and trouble in your earlier days but you have been strengthened of the Lord to bear up and stand fast to the truth and you will still continue and your mind will become brighter and brighter untill the perfect day. You shall have the desire of your heart in all things that shall be for your good while you shall live here upon the Earth. I seal you up unto eternal life by Authority of the Holy Partiarchal order that has been sealed upon me and say that you shall come forth in the morning of the first resurection and be crowned with honor, glory and with many of your kindred upon conditions of your faithfulness in keeping the comandments of the Lord untill the end of your days. In the name of Jesus Christ Amen. Isabella C. Murdock, Clerk. While I was on my first mission Elder Peterson and I went to a little town and inquired for a meeting house to hold a meeting in. We were refured to a preacher that had a church which he had built or the most of it and when we ask him if we could get the use of the house that night he said no. He said I would not let Mormons preach in that house. We elders inquired around among the neighbors and found where we could hold a meeting in a private home and while I was talking in meeting that night I thought about the preacher turning us down, and then I was prompted to say if that man did not repent and humble himself and be kind to the elders and let them have the use of that house the destroying elements such as heavy winds, a tornado or something of the kind would take the house down that it would be destroyed and left in ruin. Well in a little while after that I was called home and I had let the prophesy or what ever you might call it pass out of my mind. In about three months after I got a letter from Elder Peterson and he said that a cyclone had struck through that part of the country and torn that church house down and destroyed it completely. Then he ask me if I remembered what I had said about it. I never will forget what I had said and how I felt about the way the man turned us down. Now I am reminded what the patriarch said to me in my first blessing that the elements should obey my voice. Such things as this is a testimony to the believer. I stayed on that mission about nine months and was released to come home to take care of my wife. She had developed heart disease so I came to take care of her and our business. Dr. Cliff went to the Stake President and told them if they didn't release me I would not have any wife and they sent a telegram to have me released at once. We traveled without purse or script practically all the time. We kept the postoffice and store for ten years. On the thirty first day of December nineteen hundred and ten our darling girl Winona was born. Annie and the baby done fine at first, but on the ninth day Annie began to have pain in her leg and it was swollen. On the tenth day it was worse so I phoned Dr. Wherritt at Heber to come and we would see what he could do. When he came he said it was milkleg so he gave her some medicine and went. On the eleventh day her leg was worse and the twelfth day I phoned him to come again and he prescribed some black looking stuff that looked like wagon dope. It was in a little bottle about as big as a hens egg if the egg was turned up on its end. It cost two dollars a bottle and the bottle held just enough for one application. That done no good so the thirteenth day passed and the leg was getting worse and very painful, we kept that black medicine covered all over her leg and it was growing worse and more painful all the time. Annie said it hurt just like the tooth ache only just as much worse as the leg was biger than a tooth and it was by that time getting almost unbearable. On the fourteenth day we sent for the Dr. again and he came just about sun down and looked at her and she was suffering something terrible. Right here I might say that there was an epidemic going through the county that fall of women haveing milk leg and Dr. Wherritt had lost two or three cases just before then. When he did not change anything but said he could do nothing more and went out of the door. I followed him out and I asked him what encouragement or hope he could give me about her and he shook his head and said I can do no more than I am doing and by that time my heart was breaking over her condition. I went and finished up my chores and by that time it was getting dark and I went into the house to see her and asked how she was. She looked up in my face and said, "Don this is almost imbareable, I cant stand this pain like this much longer." Her lips were quivering and so was mine. By that time my heart was melted in my breast and we were both sheding tears. I turned and went out of the house into the back yard and it was a dark night then I knelt down out there alone and in the humility of my soul I implored my God If there was anything that could be done for her or anything I could do that he would make it known to me. Then all at once in a flash the inspiration or revelation call it what you will, came to me to go into the house and put the wash boiler on the stove and put a bucket of water in it then get a quart of wheat bran and put in it then a half pint of salt and stir it all up till it was almost to a boil then take a blanket and put in the boiler and get it filled with the water and bran then ring it out and wrap her leg from her body to her ankle, just as hot as she could ring it out or as hot as she could stand it. Then change the pack as often as it got cool. I had not only put about the second one on till she stopped moaning and crying. That saved her life. I did not send for the Dr. any more and in about three days he came back to see what had happened. We took him in and when he saw Annie practically out of pain and getting better he said what did you do for her. Then I told him about the hot packs I had put on and how they had helped right at once. He sure was surprised and went away baffled. But we heard after that he put hot packs on womens legs in all such cases. This is the fall of nineteen hundred and forty six, the Drs. that massage and rubbing Drs. use the hot packs on people and have different ways of steaming people. Then I was called on the second mission in nineteen-eleven. I was released from the school board to go on that mission and from all offices in the ward. We desided to sell the store and get rid of the postoffice, to leave my wife with less work and business worries. When I started on my second mission we went direct to the Southern States head mission office in Chattenooga, Tennessee to President Charles A Call's office and he asked me how I would like to go back to Kentucky where I was before. I told him all right, so he said for me to deposit my money there with his secretary and they would give us four Elders our dinners there and he would arrange for getting my grip and things necessary to go with us to Covengton KY. That afternoon and they did not give me the elders address there in Covengton. As soon as I was gone on the train I began to worry and pray about it because I would not get there till after dark so all I could do was to Pray to be directed to the right place. Sure enough it was after dark and a dark night it was, and in a strange town and place. I got off the train with my grip onto the platform and looked up and down the Ohio river. Then I desided to go west right straight toward the Ohio river and I could see the city of Concinatti across the river all lit up for miles away. I walked direct west about two blocks, then turned south and walked about a block and a half and looked up a stairs that was on a raise in the ground eight or ten lumber steps , I went up and knocked at the door. As it happened Elder Jensen came to the door and opened it, in surprise he said, are you Eder Bigelow I said I was and he said how did you get here. I said I was just directed by the spirit which way to come. He said come in we are glad to see you, and I said you are no glader than I am as they had forgotten at Chattenooga to give me any address. That night when I had my prayer I humbly thanked the Lord for directing me to the elders home. One night in the summer Elder Marrion Tanner and I was out in the country where it was very thinely settled and we had walked all the afternoon and had came to no house and it was way after dark. We were in the timber and we sat down and wondered how far it was to where anyone lived it was a warm night so we desided to lie down and stay there all night. So that was one night out. Another time we two elders took turns asking for a place to stay over night that afternoon it had been raining and we was turned down time after time. Then we ask for a place to stay at a womans house it was my turn to ask so I knocked at the door, it was raining quite hard, a woman came and asked what I wanted, I told her a place to stay. She said we cannot keep you here. I said it is raining and a bad night and if she would let us stay we would do without any supper and she said no you cant stay. I said wont you let us stay out here on this poarch we will be at least dry and out of the rain. She said no you had better go. We do not want you here at all. So we went on, it was way after dark and we came into a big grove of timber, we found some big trees and got under them with our umberellas spred out and I was leaning up against a big tree and in the night I felt a stream of water runing down the tree behind me so I just moved out from the tree and waited for daylight to come. When day came it was a happy dawn. Our baby girl was born while I was away on my mission. Soon after I got back we sold our place in town and in nineteen fifteen we moved into a new brick home of twelve rooms we had just completed. Just down to the lower end of town. We still owned our farm around the hill, we were hauling hay and an electric storm came on. A bolt of lightening came so close to us that it rang in our ears and knocked the horses down on their knees. One spring as we were clearing the farm around the hill we loaded up a load of sagebrush and small oaks, limbs and all. They were laying crossways of the wagon box and Annie and I climbed on top of the high load and was going to put the brush in a wash and when we got to the place we were going to fill up, the front wheel of the wagon droped into a ditch and threw us both over backwards and as we were going over we would have both lit on our heads but through a forethought I keeled on over and made a complete summersalt and as I lit on my feet I turned and threw out my arms and caught Annie under the neck and shoulders and saved her from falling on her head which might have broken her neck or proved fatal in some way. Annie was impressed while we were loading to leave and go to the house to pray she didnt know why but we have always believed by obeying the prompting of the spirit we were saved for it seemed like it was almost beyond human power for me to get on my feet as I did to save our lives. A number of years we lived in our home in town in the winter and in the summer went to the farm to take care of our cows and pigs. One year we raised some young chickens. One year feed was so scarce and high in price myself and Alton took the stock to the farm to get what feed they could pick and we fed them corn to help pull them through till the grass began to grow. We were camped in a wagon box in March and there came a cold wind and blizzard and we almost froze. We farmed and raised stock and cattle. We desided to get some sheep so we went to red creek and got motherless lambs and brought them home in a car we made .a number of trips. All that summer we feed them milk by hand we had quite a nice bunch of sheep they done fine for two or three years. Then one spring they began dying off but were fat and looked fine and they would lay down and die. We found the trouble was in their liver, it was called liver fluke. We would cut their liver open and the fluke would roll out like tea leaves. We found that there was a cure for that trouble and that the cause of the trouble was pasturing them on damp wet marshy ground. That had little black snales and they would craul up on the grass, the sheep eating the grass would go into their stomach, from there into the liver. When Father died he left his will with A. B. Morgan in Provo. He called all the heirs to Heber to court. Made me manager of the estate and said that he wanted me to help him, he held the title for about two and a half years trying to dispose of the property, and pay of the incumberance that was on it. It was all under a blanket mortgage to the state of Utah. He had no success making a transfer so he desided to let me take it over. After a consideration I wrote to my sister Emily and asked her if she could help me to raise the money to pay off the acrued interest and settle with Morgan and pay off the other heir's which we did. Then the first thing we done was to write to the state of Utah and sent them five hundred dollars and told them that was the last money I intended to pay as interest on that blanket mortgage and that they in order for us to pay it off would have to split the mortgage and let us sell the land to different individuals and have them pay a good cash payment down on the land they got, then we would send the state the cash we got on each piece of land and by that means we settled the mortgage all but about seven thousand dollars and Emily took four thousand on the Wheeler farm and I took three thousand on the farm across the valley. Emily assumed the responcibility of the four thousand dollars on the Wheeler farm. We arranged for a loan from the Federal Land Bank in California to get the three thousand dollars to pay off the mortgage to the state of Utah. When Alton was called on his misson to Canada I and the family tried to run the two farms and sold milk and butter and raised sheep to keep him on his mission and in that time my health had failed and I got so I couldnt pitch hay. But then by the time Alton came back I couldnt do any heavy work Alton took over the heavy work till Ervin came back then they both went in together for a few years then Ervin moved to Monroe and left Alton to asume the whole responcibility and he took both farms over. In the winters of nineteen thirty nine and forty Annie and I went to Salt Lake City and began to work in the Temple for our kindred dead. We worked there for three winters. Then we went to St. George and worked in the temple for four winters. While we were working in the two temples Annie and I done endowment work for sixteen hundred and sixty six people besides quite a lot of sealing for husbands and wives and stood proxy for a large number of children being sealed to their parents. In the fall before we went away, one morning before sunrise I got up before any of the folks and went over across the meadow caught a riding horse with just a rope and jumped on her back. I rode over by the main creek in the meadow and got the cows and started them for home when I got down to the lane part of them went the wrong way across the main creek. I went after them as fast as the horse could go. The farther they went the faster they went with the horse right after them till she was on a swift run, tryinig to head them off. The last one that stopped done it in two jumps and the horse stopped the same way. Having no saddle or anything to hold to I went over the horses head and lit on my head shoulder and side. When I got up I was daised for a few minutes and I looked around to see what had happened. The horse had stopped right there and I took her by the rope led her up to a ditch bank and jumped on her. I rode back after the cows when I got across the creek part of the cows had went back up in the meadow and I went up around them and got them and started home. When I got over to the mill Alton was up there in the mill yard I called to him and told him I had been threw off the horse so he came down and asked me if I was hurt I told him I didnt think so that I was just shaken up. He went to the house with me and helped me off the horse and went with me into the house and got me on the bed. Mother wanted him to send for a Dr. but I would not give up to it. I said I'd be all right in a little while. In the meantime Mother and Alton took it on themselves to get a Dr. but he was out and couldnt come at once. I grew worse from the time I got on the bed till finely I raised up and as soon as I did my strength all left me I wilted and fell down on the bed then I told Mother that something had to be done. They found out the Dr. couldnt come and he said they would have to bring me to the hospital. By this time I was so week I couldnt walk and Dewey Bigelow happened to be there so he and Alton carried me out and put me in the car and drove me to Heber at once. When they got me there I was hardly able to sit up and they stripped me off down to the waist and was going to take an exray picture of me and when the Dr. came in he put his stethoscope over my heart and a half minute and he droped them and grabed the adhesive tape and rapped it all around me and he put on three strips and then said take him and put him to bed. Alton got another man that was there and they carried me up stairs and layed me on the bed and the nurse followed right in and gave me a hipo for a heart stimulent. The Dr. told Winona to tell Mother she just as well prepare for the worst. They nursed me there for four days and I never turned over off my back. The fifth morning Dr. Neilson came in and said how are you. I said I'm still here and he said I think we can take you now and take an exray picture when they took the picture the nurse counted one two, three ribs broke and the Dr. says three four five, along the back and one in front. A cow had bunted me into the barn and broken that one in front a few days before. Winona took care of me while in the hospital and after they took the exray pictures they took me to her home in Midway and she took care of me for nearly three weeks the Dr. gave orders for me to come back and when I got back to the hospital they pulled my shirt off and the Dr. got holt of the bandage and yanked it off and it felt like it skinned my back and both my sides. I was covered with small boils where the bandage had been. He told me I could go home and it was up to me about taking care of myself for me never to get on a horse again. But the first time we went to Altons down at Leamington I rode that same horse again. Two different summers we went to California to visit Ervins and Winonas folks. One; spring when we went to California after we had been there a little while I used to go across a bridge over the Feather river between Yuba City and Marysville the bridge was about a half mile long and one day while I was fishing there over on the east side I saw three men coming up the river in a motor boat going up in under the bridge. Pretty soon I heard them call and holler for help and I looked up the river and their boat was standing on its end, the men all in the river about twenty five feet from the nearest bank the boat had ran crossways of a floating log coming down the river and it had thrown the men all out of the lower end. One of the men could swim and he started to swim to the bank the other two men was just paddling in the water calling for help and I was across the river about two hundred yards away and could do nothing for them. They floated down the river about two hundred yards screaming for help all the time to where there were some boys in a boat that was locked to the bank and the boys had a roap which they threw out and one of the men caught it and the boys pulled them out but about that time the other man went down under the water and was gone. The officers draged the river with hooks trying to find the drowned man for most of three days and finely gave it up and in about thirty days they found his body down the river thirty miles below where he was drowned. Another day when Jess and I was out in a boat on the river fishing here came a man down the river skating on top of the water with snow shoes they looked like. He was **** pulled by a motor boat, he was going so fast it looked like he was flying in a few minute here they came back up and the man on the skates came so close to our boat he threw water all over us and Jess said he'd better not try that again or I will hit him with my fish pole and see how he likes that. Another story they told that happened that spring on Feather river: A little old man went out fishing and they told him in order to catch big fish he had to have a big outfit to fish with. He went and bought the bigest hooks he could find and the bigest line and went down to the river and fished till he got tired and sleepy. To make sure his fish would not get away if he hooked one he tied the line around his waist and layed down on a log that was lying length ways of the river and went to sleep the next thing he knew he was in the river swiming and fighting for his life. A big fish had got hooked on the line and pulled him off into the river and if it had not been for some help he would of drowned but there were two men in a boat close by and they came to his rescue and got him in the boat then to get the fish. And when they took the fish and put him on the scales the fish weighed sixty four pounds and there were a number of men said that was right. When Jess was down there he said he saw the head and it looked like a big hogs head with the mouth open. There was no question but what there were some big striped bass in that river. I caught one that weighed six lbs. and another day one that weighed nine and a half lbs. There were some big salmon that run up that river too. Another experience I had while on that river I went out in a boat just afternoon alone and the wind began to blow from the north right down the river and the longer I stayed there the harder the wind blew till about night the wind was just howling and Mother and Winona came down there and said they thought the wind was dangerous and me out there in a boat. I was close enough to the bank to be able to talk to them. I desided to take the anchor up and see about getting to the bank and by that time the wind was blowing a teriffic gale and time I got the anchor up and into the boat the boat was turned round and going at a teriffic speed down the river and I had both oers in my hands but could take no effect with the speed of the boat so I just desided to turn the boat and head it for the brush"and timber on the side of the river and that is what I did and run it into the brush, tied the boat up and climbed out. Jess came and got the boat later. One summer we took a week off and went with Theron and Emily Stoker out on Red creek and to stinking springs on the little strawberry river. One morning as Theron and I was going down the river just below a saw mill we heard a blast in the river and as we went on down a couple of hundred yards we saw five men and one of them stood out on the hill to watch and stand guard but he did not see us till we were out in full sight of them all. So they just stood there and we went down to them. Four had been wadeing in the river after fish but we did not stop there long. We went on down the river and when we came back to camp at night we saw signs of them blasting fish all the way up the river. When we went to camp where Mother and Emily were they said those men had been blasting right in front of the tent, and they got the license number of the car as near as they could tell. We went to the game wardens camp and reported the men blasting fish in the river. The wardens went right after them and run them down for the job and finely caught four of the men and took the case to court and fined them one hundred dollars each, pretty dear fishing for them and they spoiled the fishing there for anyone else. Another morning Theron had a cold and did not go with me, and after going down the river about three miles I climbed out on the side of the steep mountain to have a look down the canyon. Finely I started back and came over a ridge and saw two men down on the river fishing along the river was lined with a thicket of underbrush eight or ten feet high so men could not get in and out of the river very well at that point. One of the men was out in the middle of the river just above a big beaver dam. That was nearly filled up with soft mud that had washed in from above in the canyon wall. I was about a hundred yards away from him or more on the steep mountain and I saw a big rock about half as big as a stove by me in a bed of dirt, so I thought how funny it would be to roll that rock down the mountain. I got behind it and gave it a heave with both feet so out she came and started rolling down at full speed jumping a half rod at a leap. Well the man that was in the middle of the river heard the noise and looked up and seen the rock coming straight toward him and the brush on both sides of him and he thought he was trapped so down the river he ran. He only got a rod or two till he sank down in the soft mud and water over his boot tops and was about to fall over head first so he threw his pole and stuck both hands out to save falling in head first. There he stood on all fores, hands and feet looking round for the rock to come but low and behold when the rock struck the thicket it never crushed through. If it had it would have stopped when it struck the mud the first time. I knew it could never reach the men before I rolled it down the hill. So both of us shook, he with fear and I with laughter. My motto has been always through life never to wrong no man or living thing and still is. One summer Alton was going over to Heber so I told him I would ride over on the river below Charleston and fish while he was gone and when I was getting out of the car Uvonne said "Grandpa catch a fish for me." I said all right I will if I can but when they came back I had not got any; fish so when we got over to Wallsburg in the lower end of the valley I asked Alton to let me out and I would walk home up the creek but I did not get home till after dark and Uvonne was in bed. I only caught one fish that night and the next morning after they were up I had cleaned the fish and it was a nice one. It hung off over a big plate on both sides and I took it in to her and she said to her mother. "Oh boy Oh boy he got me a fish." That delighted me more than it would to have eaten a plate full of fish myself. Some time along about the first week in January nineteen forty six Jess and Winona came to St. George and we had just recieved a letter from Emily telling that she was in a very bad condition and her legs were swollen with dropsy so Annie Jess and Winona desided to go to Provo and see her. They left Ken with me with the understanding that I should take him to a show. Well when night came Ken and I went and when the show was about half our Ken said I have got to go to the toilet. I was sitting there wondering what to do when he jumped up and was gone. The show was over crowded that night and people were standing all along the ile, in the back and outside, so I knew if I got up we would loose our seats. I wondered how he would ever find his way back through that crowd. Well he was gene eight or ten minutes and to my surprise here he came back and found me and I said you found your way did you? (Now remember he was only about THREE AND A HALF years old and could not read nor write a word) but he said, "Yes I found a place where it said, "FOR BOYS OR GIRLS EITHER", So I went in." Well that tickeled me more than anything I had seen in the show so I was well paid for my money. On the sixteenth of April nineteen forty six we moved back to Provo out in the river bottoms and lived in an apartment that Theron and Emily Stoker fixed for us with them. This summer I have bussied myself tending lambs rabbits and doing odd jobs around the place. In the fall of nineteen forty six on the sixth day of September I had a severe heart attack and came close to deaths door. All the Children were notified that I was very ill. They all came immediately and all of them were soon at my bedside excepting Ervin and he was in California in the mountains and as soon as he received the telegram he called Elva up by phone and asked about my condition and said he would come if it was necessary. As soon my sister Emily Batty heard of my sickness she came form Vernal 'to see me although critically ill I was happy to see loved one's. Just three weeks later I had another Heart attack and was very bad for thirty six hours. But now I am better again and up and going they tell me I will have to be careful. Well I wonder what that means and what careful means. Not to cut a stick of wood or carry it in or even carry a bucket of coal. So here I am, like the banker in California that had donated to the Relief Society and all other societies of relief that had called on him and he said he was just living to see what was coming next, and so am I. I want to say in conclusion of the sketch of my life I have always been of a religious turn .of mind. But always tried to avoid exteemes in any way, religious or any other. Still in the summer or fall after I was seventeen I began to study and reason on how the first God came into existence and wondered if I did not have just as good a chance to come into existence as the first God did away back there where time first began. But I came down to Provo that fall and heard President Carl G. Maeser bear testimony to the truthes of the Gospel and how he was converted and then my Mother was the greatest influence for good in my life and the testimony she bore to me was as true and faithful as the sun that shines every day. Then I began to reason the other way and that the Earth is here rolling around every twenty four hours and swinging around in its regular course giving winter and summer. Then one thing sure that is I am here and there is just as good, a chance for a God, to be in the heavens ruling and governing this Earth as that I am here and then with all the testimony of the bible and the old prophets then comes the Book of Mormon and the Doctern and Covenants and the Pearl of Great Price, Then Joseph Smiths testimony then this gospel of Jesus Christ and all the latter day works then last of all but not the least but the greatest the testimony of the Holy spirit and the testimony of the Holy Ghost or the still small voice that whispers to all people, for it is as the old Prophet Joel said in his second chapter and twenty eight Th verse -- I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy etc. So when we find all these reasons that there is a God the creator of Heaven and Earth we should conform our lives to the principles of eternal life, eternal development and eternal glory. If it is as God said to Moses in his first chapter and thirty ninety verse in the Pearl of Great Price: For behold, this is my work and my glory to bring to pass the immorality and eternal life of man; . Then should we not put forth an effort with all our mind might and strength to save our own souls, for after all the object of us coming here into this world is to get the body we have a tabernacle of flesh and bone for our spirit to dwell in that we might be like the Savior said of himself after his resurrection and that we like him might be made perfect and now this is my testimony and blessing unto all who may read these lines. So fair you well may we all when we meet at the judgement seat of God be satisfied with our works which we have done here on this Earth is my admonition and prayer. Signed By. Don L. Bigelow /s Typed by Emily May Bigelow Stoker The passing of another birthday, another mile stone in my life. I have decided to fill in some more in my lives story. The clipping out of the Provo Herald with my picture it gives a part of my doings on my birthday I want to add a little more to it, to explain our celebration. Elva invited Emily and her family and I down to her place for dinner and we sure enjoyed the dinner she served. Then I got several nice birthday cards, two nice whit handkerchiefs, one pair of sox, a nice tie pin clasp with chain, and two boxes of chocolate candy and one box of candied fruit. After dinner we had a treat on candy and fruit. But after all I sure missed my darling wife who has gone the ways of the world and left me alone in this lonesome lonely world to roam where I will or may. But I mus not say alone, I have six sweet noble children left here with me out of eleven. Five of them is with their Mother. Then twenty four grand children and seven great grand children which is my heritage and my life long hope that my name will be continued on through this world and the endless ages of eternity to come, or the end of the milieu which is the last stage of this worlds natural existence and my children's love is the greatest support and strength that I have to live for, in fact it is my all and the greatest stay of my life. May 25, 1947, I walked about three fourths of a mile and went to Sunday School and while there too part in the discussion of the lesson which I enjoyed very much. May 30, 1947, Theron Stoker took Emily and the rest of his family and I up to Wallsburg on decoration day. We took flowers Elva sent some beautiful ones and Theron and Emily took many beautiful ones too. The flowers I bought cost Five Dollars. We had enough to almost cover all the graves. Then Alton and family came up and brought many more beautiful ones, and about that time Okie and family came with another car load, so the graves were a mount of beautiful blossoms. I saw a lot of old friends and had a good talk with them and had a good time as much as I could under such a strain of sorrow. Then we came back down the canyon and stopped and ate our dinner in the canyon among the green trees and beautiful mountain scenery. On Saturday the thirty first I went down to Provo and bought me a telescope fish pole they sure are expensive. The pole cost me eight dollars it is a good steel pole with a reversible handle. Sunday June 1st Theron tool his family and I in the care and we all went to Sunday School and fast meeting. Sunday June eighth, Wilford Boren and wife came down home and got me and we stopped at Minas for a while then went on up the canyon and passed Park City and on to the head of Parleys canyons place, to help him set a new saw mill. Stayed there four days. It was raining and snowing nearly all of the time. It snowed right down on the foot hills. The last half day we got the mill running and sawed about eight hundred feet of inch lumber. Friday I got up, had breakfast, and bid them farewell and Wilford took me to Salt Lake City before eight o'clock A.M. I bought a ticket to Milford, Utah it cost $8.35. I stayed right there in the depot waiting til twelve five P. M. Got to Milford over three hours late. Went fishing late the next day and got no fish, but Jess got some and we had fish from then on for a month. This is June Twenty first. Longest day of the year. It rained all night and until eleven o'clock in the day, the rainiest wet spring I ever remember. June the thirtieth. We left Milford, Jess, Jay and I and went 140 miles to fish lake as dreary a place as I ever saw for fishing. Had Velma and Bob come down and Jess, Winona and all of us went to Beaver canyon and on the third of July caught my limit of trout, the first time in my life and I sure was thrilled that day. We had all the fish we wanted while there then we came back. Bob and Velma brought Elva and family and Emily and her family a lot of trout so they all had all they could eat. July 16, 1947, came from Milford to Leamington on the train, it cost me two dollars and thirty one cents. Went fishing with Alton little children in the Severe river for three or four days and got three messes of carp, still they tasted like fish. July 24, 1947, Late in the morning Alton took his family and I and went north to Provo, and went to a public park and Fern had a nice lunch fixed and we ate then continued on to Salt Lake City and we saw the sentential Perade. It lasted about two hours. The most interesting thing I saw on one of the big floats there was two big baskets with two little girls on in each basket hanging out one on each side of the float about twenty feet apart. Hanging out there like they were weighing human life in the balance. It made me think that people should so conduct their lives that they could be weighed in the balance all the timer get on an extreme either way at any time in their lives. On Saturday night, July 26th I went with Alton and Fern to Delta to Hawian traveling trupe musical programe which excelled anything I ever saw or heard in their line of entertainment. There were about twenty five or thirty people in the troupe and at the last there were about six women came out one at a time dressed in long trailing skirts all of different collors and shades representing the different islands of their home country. And those people looked whiter than most hawian people I ever saw. They were dressed up in bright collors and they went through all kinds of motions showing by their actions the expressions they wanted to convey instead of by words. This extraordinary entertainment I never will forget. Saturday, August 2, 1947. We came up to Midway to the Boren reunion got there late but saw a lot of the family and some of the older ones. Then went in swiming with Elvas family and swam the full lenght of that long bathing resort, pretty good for on at eight-one years. October 8, .1947, I went to Salt Lake City and went through the Temple twice while there then on the thirteenth I went to Vernal on the buss the fair was $4.84. I arrived in Vernal about eight fifty tow o'clock P. M. A dark night, after nine o'clock was directed to go one and a half blocks west across the street and one block south and across the street on the corner so I went up to the house on the corner, no lights but I went up on the east poach, knocked on a locked door and no answer. Knocked again and Sister Emily said who is it? I was standing there trying to think what to say to fool her when she said in a loader tone, "Who is there?" Then I had to answer so I said D L. Bigelow My wits came too late, after I thought I should have said "Honerable Patches". When I told Emily, she said, "If you had of said that to me I would of told you to take your patches and go on." "Honerable Patches" what Lewarence Knight said in "When a man is a man". Well we had a good laugh anyway, and Emily and her children just treated my royal. I had on of the best times in my life in that three weeks I was there and went down with Dan on his farm and saw a nice doe deer and Dan tried to lariatte some fish but had now luck. Told Emily when I came back and she said "Huh, how could he of lariatted fish?" I said, "Take a piece of bailing wire and fasten a piece of fine copper wire on it about a foot and a half long then make a loop about three or four inches round in the copper wire, then tell the fish to hold still till you get the loop down where he is and then pass the loop back behind the fishes head and ears, and when the fish winks and gets his eyes shut give the wire a jerk and if you are quicker than the fish you have him lariatted. Then all you get to do is to pull him out and get him in your hands and you have a fish. Then keep on that way till you get enough for a mess. Oh then you got a mess of lariatted fish. Ha! Ha! The boys and girls and in-laws all showed me a good time with big dinners and feasts. While in Vernal I went to Jensen Emily Batty and Berda Bascom and held a meeting Sunday night and talked and told the people that ever person should have and object or aim in life, that I had four. The first is to save ones own soul. The next was to have an honerable family. My wife had eleven children, six of them grew t maturity. We tried to instill in them the truthes of the eternal life. The next was to do some missionarry work. I went on two missons and Alton went on to Canada. Last of all I wanted to acomplish some Temple work for the dead. Annie and I done the endowment work for over sixteen hundred men and women in two temples. Then the night before I left Vernal Emily invited all of her children and their companion to a social party in the evening and we sure had a royal good time that night. On the sixth of November I came back to Salt Lake City with one of Woody B's truck drivers and went through the temple again, and hunted a place where I thout I could come back to in February and get a room to house up for the winter or hibernate for a few months. One time when we were out in Ashley valley we had a trunk in the house that was rounding on both sides and sloped towards each end, so it was rounding every way. Our little girl the second on was about two and a half years old, just old enough to talk plain. There was a chair at the end of the trunk so Ida climbed upon the chair then on top of the trunk and played there. Then she layed down on her back length ways of the trunk, when she discovered she was falling off now matter which way she turned so in her fright she called to her mother and said, "Mama It's a killing I." Then her mother came to her rescue, and when Annie told me about it we had a good laugh. In our courtship when Annie and I were young, I had some rivals, and among them was George Batty. One winter Annie and I had been going to dances and entertainments all the time when there was and for pass time. So Geo. Batty got up a house party or dance at Susan Gardners home and he did not invite me, so I felt like a lost sheep. Then Batty got in with Clint and told Clint what he was doing not inviting me and then he went with Clint to Annies home and told her all about the party and told her that I would not be there. Then he asked her to go with him, but she stood pat for me, and told him no. Then he tried to get her to go with Clint again Annie said no. So bless her she told me all about it the dance an all. She said she wished I had of come over and spent the evening with her. Which I sure, sure would have done, if I had of know her feelings and how she was staying home on my account. Right after that I asked her to keep company with me steady not long after that I had taken her to the dance hall to a party and when Geo. Batty was dancing with Annie he asked her to go home with him again she said no. But she did not tell me about this untill after we were married. So bless her darling soul no wonder she said in one of her poems "I started married life with the faith of a trusting child." God bless her should, till I can come to here. She has always been just as true to me as the sun that shines every twenty four hours. She told me one time, "Don I'll go anywhere with you." She went one t Ashley valley and twice to California. Now I will have to go where she is when the time comes for us to met again no more to part forever. Christmas morning 1947 I was here at home with Theron and Emily and all three of their little children and did they get a lot of presents? Yes from their loved ones, friends and neighbor's so we all had a wonderful Christmas. Then I went down and had Christmas dinner Elva and family so another good time we had. On new years day Theron, Emily, their children and I all went down to Elvas and had another good chicken dinner. Now then we have another Year nineteen forty eight ahead of us. Bringing that little spark of hope which we all look forward to which keeps us going on to the end of time looking for the mellenium or some other great day in the future. January the second 1948, at the time of this writing it is just about a year since my wife Annie took sick. She and I spent Christmas a year ago here with Theron, Emily and family and a good time we enjoyed, then Clyde and Elva came out here and got Annie and I and we went and had New Years dinner with them at Elva's home and as all good feasts, we appreciated it, and then Annie took sick. And got worse all the time till she passed on into the great beyond, where people come back no more. Elva and I was there with Annie and she was suffering something terrible, then she said, "Cant we all pray, that I can get ease and rest." So we all took it in turns and prayed that she might get rest. But she just got worse and her strength work out and she passed away in about three days after she took so bad, but as her patriarchal blessing told her to live faithful to the last she did. So "We have a more sure word of Prophesy where unto you do well if you take heed." The in the Doctrin and Covnants Sec. 131 verse 5 it was revealed to Joseph Smith, "The more sure word of Prophesy means a man's (or womens) knowing that he (or she) is sealed up unto eternal life, by revelation and the spirit of prophesy through the power of the holy Priesthood." now this blessing was sealed upon Annie's hand by John M. Murdock Patriarch. He says -- "I seal you up unto eternal life to come forth in the morning of the first resurection --. You will have a fullness of joy, and crowned with honor and glory in the presence of God, and the Holy angels. -- Read her Patriarchal blessing and get the full benifit of the wording in it. Then you will see that she has the testimony of three men all Prophets, Peter, Joseph Smith, and John M. Murdock, all testifying that as Peter says, second Epistle chapter 1 verse 10, Make your calling and election sure. I say, "Make your calling certain and your election sure, and Annie has complied with all the requirements of the church first, faith, second repentance, third baptism by imersion for the remission of sins, fourth laying on of hands for the reception of the Holy Ghost. Then she has went through the Temple and got the marks of the Holy Priesthood and was layed away in Temple clothes in robes of white with the marks of the Holy Priesthood on her garments and it was the most perfect funeral I ever saw anyone have. Now she is ready and waiting for the resurrection and the final judgement or statement, "Well done thou good and faithful Sister enter into my Glory and my joy and receive thy blessings acording to thy patriarchal blessing in the presence of God and Holy angels. I once heard of a man that was put in jail, and one of his friends came to visit him to cheer him up. So the visitor asked the jail bird what he had done to be put in jail. Well he said I saw some beautiful flowers over the fence and a pretty girl sitting there and I stayed to long looking at them and the officers caught me and put me in here. The consouling man said, why they could not put you in jail for that. They go me here just the same, said the jail bird whether they can or cant. Another one: A man lived here in Salt Lake and owned a good home and had had six wives and they every one died. He also had a big heard of sheep and a herd of cattle and two men came from the east to by him out every thing he owned. So he ordered his herders to bring in the cattle and sheep and load them on the cars. One of the buyers said let us go down in town and have dinner so the rancher went with the one and the other buyer stayed and ordered the trains to pull out for the eastern market to Chicago and the two buyers had not paid him for the property or stock.. The owner could not get the money so he go a lawyer and went east to stop the stock sale and it was too late. The stock were all sold and paid for, when he got there. The owner could not prove anything so they beat him out of all of it. Then the tramp or once well to do man came to a womans place and applied for a job. The woman had married a man in the Temple when they were young and had a family of children and her man died, then these business man went to work and in a few months the man and woman got married for time or this world, now the man's name that tells this is Albert Lindsey, eighty one years old, he was a witness to this marriage. After the woman had lived with this man a while she desided she would rather have him for eternity than her dead man, so she went and told President Grant she wanted a divorce from the dead man and wanted to marry this man that was alive no mater how many wives he had for eternity. So President Heber J. Grant said he had never had any revelation to make a woman stay with any man she did not want. He gave her a divorce and the woman went to the Temple and was sealed to this man for eternity. A man sitting on the other side of me said, You cannot rob the dead. Then Lindsey said, He was a wittness to both marriages, so it looks like the dead can be robbed as well as the living. Salt Lake, May 20, 1948. Went through the Temple this afternoon then packed up my house keeping dishes and clothes and went to stay with Bob and Velma all night. On the 21st went to bus station and down to Provo to my children and on the 22nd Elva and Clyde got up a party for me in the evening and ask a lot of the old Wallsburg people that live in Provo to the party and we sure had a good time. Tonight Monday the 24th Theron and Emily are having a party, chickery, up in the pasture, Elva and family, Winona and family and myself, so we expect another good time. Then Jess and Winona and boys and myself are going to start for California in the middle of the night. We are going in their car so to get across the desert in the cool of the night. We left for California about 9/30 P. M and went into California about a hundred miles and stoped on a stream and fished but caught nothing. Then went on to Ervins and got there in Central Valley about ten oclock making a little over twenty four hours in coming nearly a thousand miles, very good for a steady run. New morning we went fishing, went for three days in different places and different rivers. I only caught one fish 11 inches long. They say the water is too high. There has been floods in Oregon and Washington. We had planned to go up thru there and go to the Yellow Stone Park but on account of the flood conditions desided not to go. May 31, we went down below Redding seven or eight miles on the Sacramento river. I caught three trout that was more than any of the rest of the crowd got. Ervin boys went and all tegether we got enough for breakfast the next morning. On the trip we saw a beautiful hedge of red roses a half or three quarters of a mile long on a mans farm. The night we started back I ate something that made me sick all night and I began to wonder how long it was going to last, or how long I was. I began to think it did not matter much which one let up first. But I wanted to come straight home and got here all right. June 11th I went to Salt Lake then on to Milford. The ticket from Salt Lake to Milford cost $6.07. The train leaves at 1:10 A. M. Stayed at Velma all night and Bob took me to the Union Pacific depot a little after 8 AM arrived in Milford at 3 P. Jess and the boys were waiting for me at the depot. The next morning Richard Bigelow jay and I all went over to Minersville creek with Darrel Perkins before daylight Then Jess came in the afternoon and he caught two fish and all together we got a good mess then we all went the next day. Sunday Jess got the most of the fish and we had all the fish we wanted for two or three days. Then on Wednesday I caught the bigest fish caught that day. Thursday got a box of chocolate candy from Altons and Ferns family for Fathers day Friday got a greeting card letter with two dollars in it from Clyde and Elva and family. Sunday got a card and a dollar bill from Jess and Winona and a dollar from their two boys. Saturday Jess took his car and Richard and Jay and Ken and I went up Beaver Canyon and we had a lot of fishing but the fish were only about seven and eight inches long, it was fishing, all of which goes to make life. Monday June 21st the longest day of the year, it has been uncommon cold and backward spring for gardens to grow all spring right down to freezing point. Today I got a fathers day greeting card from Ervin and family with a dollar bill in it and also a card from Alton and his family it certainly is a comfort and blessing to have the love of my family of boys girls and grandchildren. Makes life worth while for the struggle. While I was almost worn out last night, after going fishing all day I took a warm bath before going to bed and felt better, an old man eighty two years old tramping up and down creeks and rivers is a hard job. July the third, left Milford and came to Lyndel and then on to Leamington to Altons ans spent the fourth of July there with his family. Went to Delta and seen the perade and heard the band play that Leda and Verna was in, which was very fine. Then came to Provo with Alton Tuesday morning found all well. About the 14th of July Emily had said she wanted a trout for dinner. I took my fish pole and caught some grass hoppers and went down the spring run here on the farm and caught one fish eleven and a half inches long and when I got back told her I got the fish for her supper. About the 16th of July 1948 Emily got poisoned with poison ivey. Her children got it some where and coma and put their arms around her neck and face. Two of them broke out and their's cleared up in a few days. Emily broke out all over the back of her neck and face. He neck and her left arm was raw, the awfulest sores I ever seen. Both of her eyes swelled shut so she couldnt see. To make it worse a bee stung her four times. They had Dr. Smith come out here, then we administered to her, but it spread all over her body and legs. Then she changed Doctors and began getting better, But finally went to the third Doctor. From after effects of the poison Ivey she was afflicted with boils all over her body. Emily is still troubled with her heart. August the 16th, I went down to Elvas at night stayed there and next morning before Clyde went to work he took Don and I down to the lake and I paid a dollar and a half for a boat and we stayed till three o'clock in the afternoon and each one of us caught a carp. A fine fishing trip. (NOT!) September 13, I packed one suit case with my temple clothes and one with other clothes, I had to travel with and Clyde and Elva came and took me to their place to stay for the night. The next morning I got up and had breakfast then told Elva I was going down to the lake. She asked me how I was going. I said walk. She said You cannot walk that far. I said, Oh yes I can. At nine o'clock I started out and went to the Post office I had to post a bundle to Winona then went on. Stopped under the shade of the trees and stopped and inquired several times how far it was to the lake still I kept on walking, and finely reached the lake shore, bought a bottle of orange soda water the Woman there said it was just five miles to the post office and I had walked every step of it in three hours, and a half. Eight tow years old. I got a ride back to town and got supper at Elvas and at five twenty started for Manti, finely got here and found a hotel room for one dollar a day. So next morning got up and went to the temple got there late. But went into the meeting and then went thru the temple twice for endowments for the dead. That night I found a room. Thursday I went thru the temple once and once on Friday. Thursday night I prayed earnestly to the Lord for him to give me a testimony that the work I was doing for the dead was excepted by them and was directed by the Lord. Well Friday after the session was over they called me to go and be a witness for the sealing of a number of husbands and wives and a hundred and thirty two children to their parents, that were all passed and gone to the other world. As soon as they started to do the sealings the spirit of the Lord came to me and rested down upon me so hard and it humbled me so I could not keep the tears from falling down off my face and three different men in different parts of the room noticed me wiping my eyes and I could not help it, or what they thought, and I never will question again whether the people we are doing this work for is excepting it as I know now they are and not only that. But I know the Lord is directing it. I done four names last week and eight this besides getting wood and coal and getting it pilled away for winter. On Saturday September twenty fifth I packed up my temple clothes and went to Provo. Then on the next Tuesday took my fishing bag and pole and went on the bus as far as I could and then thumbed my way down to the lake caught five carp one was a big on and I broke my pole getting him out, but after they are skinned an all the dark meant taken out of them and salted over night they sure taste like fish just the same. I washed two suits of temple clothes and ironed them and now am ready to go back to Manti. On Friday the 8th I went through the Manti temple twice, then went through the temple for endowments ten times the next week, besides being a witness for sealings 3 times. Morning of the nineteenth early Sister Johnson came and read a telegram about Dewey Bigelow's terrible accident, getting shot when he set his gun down so it slipped off a long and discharged and killed him. I got ready and went to Provo to see if I could do anything. They had the funeral on Thursday at 2:30. I came back to Manti Friday afternoon. This is December 20th have worked here in the Manti temple a big part of the fall, have done on the Mecham - Tuttle and missionary names all together 82. The last few days have been working doing names for the Blanding Ward getting 50 cents each and have done 14 names for them got a check tonight for $7.00 this seven and ten dollars Mother left to have temple work done is the only money I have received in direct pay. This makes nine winters I have been doing temple work. Three in Salt Lake Temple, Annie was with me then. We both worked four winters together in the St. George temple, then a year ago I worked in the Salt Lake temple and now this winter in the Manti temple. On December 23 the Buss was two hours late getting into Manti. I got tired waiting and went and carried my big suit case seven blocks. But finely it came and we started for Provo. When we got over the summit going down Spanish Fork canyon there was a terrible blizzard blowing the wind shield wiper stoped working the driver could not see so the buss run down of the road about five rods into the bar pit. Felt like the buss was going to tip over on its side but it did not. Still it was hard and tiresome to sit on the seats then were pitched so to one side. They sent to Provo for another buss and we had to wit there three hours and a half but no one was hurt. Finely the other buss came and we and we did not get into Provo till after dark that night. I went to Elvas and stayed all night, had a good nights sleep, then went to Emily the next day, stayed there Christmas week. I recieved about thirty Xmas cards this year. My friends sure remembered me. I had a splendid time with Elva and family Emily and family, sure is wonderful to have the love of a loving family. Then came back to Manti on the fifth of January. 1949, and went through the temple twice today. Manti; January. 19, 1949. We sure are having the terriblest hard winter here I ever have experienced, since I was a boy in Wallsburg. January. 21 1949, I went and measured the snow today out in the field and it measured from 17 to 19 inches so it would average about 18 inches deep on the level, and it has just kept up snowing all winter since it stated in November and the thermomiter has been runing from zero to 17 below and once they reported 22 below zero. So to sum it up one side and down the other it is the hardest winter I have seen since I was grown. Well by the way I have went through the temple twice today and tree times yesterday and three times Monday making twelve times this week and was witness for the sealing of eight-four children to parents. January 29, it still is winter they said at the Depot this morning the registor was 22 below zero, so winter is still hanging on but thank goodness one month is gone. The next day or two the regestor went to 25 below zero. They say in Provo the snow is three feet deep on the level, and in Wallsburg it is five feet deep and the thermomontor runing in twenty five below zero in Wasatch County. You know its the 18th of February and the cold weather has begin to let up and today is the 21 and the roads are getting bare but the snow is still piled up along the roads, side walks and along the trails out of houses but it is melting every where. Manti; Mar. 19, 1949. Yesterday in the temple the workers there were telling what a big time the town was going to have for all the old folkes over sixty five on Saturday the 19th so this morning about half past eleven the ex-Bishop came and got five of us in his car and took us to the Stake house where they had eighteen or twenty big long tables set for old people. I ask on man how many old folks there would be and he thought two hundred or more and they had a real old time chicken dinner. Mashed potatoes, gravy chicken and fluffy rolles and butter and more chicken all we wanted but this was my main hold besides a lot of dished I did not even touch. Then they had ice cream and cake. After dinner they had a splendid program and then took us across the street to a good picture show. Whenever I think of Manti I will remember what a wonderful dinner and time I had here this day. Sunday I got up and fasted and went to high Priests meeting and Sunday school, had a good time. When coming home Sister Johnson called me and I went over and she envited me to dinner. I excepted the invitation went in and she had roasted beef, mashed potatoes brown gravy and other old time farm dinner like we used to have then I stayed about two hours and had a good visit with them. Now today is Sunday March 27th and the first three sundays in January I fasted 24 hours each Sunday then there has been ten Sundays since then that I have fasted till after one o'clock each Sunday trying to overcome this laying awake nights and droping off in a dead sleep in meetings or sitting still in the temple, which I have fought with all the faith, prayers, and power of my body I could muster still I do not sleep nights very well and still drop off in that dead sleep in the temple. But while here I have received two most wonderful testimonies. After I had been here about six weeks laid awake till after twelve oclock started to pray and I ask the Lord to make it manifest to me whether the people that we were doing the temple work for was excepting it or not. After I had come down here living alone among strangers and spending all the money I was getting sacrificing my time tallent and my all I wanted to know if the people were excepting our work, and if the Lord was directing it. Well I went to the temple the next day without any answer, and after going through for the dean man they called me for a witness, in President Bent Peterson's room and no sooner than He started to seal those people over the alter than the big tears began running down over my cheeks. The spirit of the Lord came to me so strong that I knew the people were accepting the sealing and the Lord directing it. My prayer was answered and as a testimoney three men on three sides of the house were watching me wipe the tears away. Then another about ten days ago when going through for endowments I had gon up to the terestereal room ready to go thru the vale and while sitting there waiting right by my right side at the end of the bench I heard a woman's voice say, the Lord has excepted of your labor and sacrifice in this temple work and you have got it complete, and done You have finished your temple work. I looked up to see if I could see who spoke and no one was there, the person did not show themselves to me. Wednesday morning while in the temple may the 5th I got a phone call from Elva in Provo that Clara O Bigelow Fathers thrived wife died, the day before and would be burried Saturday at two oclock the funeral services held in Wallsburg and would be burried in the Wallsburg burial grounds. So I left Manti Friday morning went to Provo and attended the servicies then came back to Manti Monday at 5:20 p.m. and worked in the temple all the rest of the week. The left Manti Saturday morning and bid fare well to some of the best friends I have ever had in my life. They have written some of the best pieces of rememberence in my autograph album that is written there. Arived in Provo all OK found Elva and family, Emily and family about as well as usual neither one of the is having very good health, but was up and around. Then on the 22nd of May, my birthday Elva and her family and Winona and her family came from Milford, they all brought picnic and we had a plate dinner and we had a splendid time. I sang two old time songs, first one, "When the curtains of night are pinned back by the stars" and "Young Emily was a servant maid." There was one thing lacking, and that was all of my living children was not present. Still there was love and affection for the ones that was her. Then on the 26th Emily had the anniversary of her birthday. But we did not celebrate it, but gave her some nice presents and we enjoyed or lives together. Then on decorating day Elva, Alton, Emily and Winona all came and we went up to Wallsburg and had a holiday and decorated our folk's graves so it all goes to make up one grand union of love and labor in life. Tuesday July 26th I went and got a music lesson on the guitar. Then at night Clyde Carter took Don and I to Salt Lake City to the Union Pacific Depot and we started to Idaho at 11:20 pm. Arrived in Shelley next morning at 7:10. We went to Byrle's and had breakfast and stayed there all day. Next morning went to Dewey Petersons or Vada's place stayed one day then went to Carl Bigelow's, then back to Vada's and stayed about two days in a place and on the 2nd of August at 3:40 P. M. took the train back to Salt Lack City. Met Clyde at 10:30 and he brought us back to Provo in his car and we got in bed abut midnight. August 6, went to Midway to likes hot pots to attend the Boren reunion and had a chicken dinner, then a program, I sang two songs and went down to swim in the pool 60 ft long and I swam full length of it without stoping. Got the prize for being the oldest man and gave a dollar to help support the Boren reunion. Sept 14 I came out to Vernal with Bruce Watkins, Ivan and Ella Batty. We arrived at 12 o'clock midnight and I stayed at Ivans place the rest of the night. Had breakfast at Ivans and he took me to my Sister Emily Battys that morning. We are having a splendid wonderful visit. On the 18th Sunday we went to Zina Howard's and she gave us a splendid chicken dinner with dumplings and gravy. I had a good talk with Brother Will Howard. Then on the 21st Sister Emily and I were envited down to Zinas for another big feast. And on the 22nd had another wonderful chicken dinner o Dora Freestone's and I congratulated them on their splendid modern home with its big glass south front windows and also in the west. In the afternoon, Well and Mina took Emily and I up on Diamond Mountain and We saw Mina's oldest boys dry land wheat farm up there on top of the mountain. We saw one grainery about twenty feet long full of dry land wheat and since I came home they tell me he has about eight thousand bushel gathered, and there has come about two feet of snow so they think it is doubtful if he gets the rest thrashed, so it will be a bad loss and it sure is a big climb to get on top of the mountain. Then we went on farther and seen a modern home that Woody B has build up there for hunters and Mountaineers or travelers to stay in and over the door is rote "The Kings Palace." Then we came down to Jim Freestone's house and stayed there over night, and the next morning I went out to one of the ponds and caught nine trout and Will and Woody B. caught some so we had enough for a good trout dinner. In the afternoon we come over on Taylor mountain where I had got house logs out and hauled down to the valley fifty years ago and I built a house we lived in for two years while Annie and I lived and broke up a forty acre farm and went through and experienced the hardest times in our married lives in President Grover Cleavelands rue over the United States; now back to our trip, we had a trout dinner up on the top of Taylor Mountain and cam home to Emily's and made the hole trip in a less than twenty four hours. Sept. 27 I started from Vernal with a salesman about seven oclock at night just between sundown and dark a man I had never saw before. We talked gospel and everthing but love. I drove into Heber between 11 and 12 o'clock drove up in front of the Jensen Hotel and then he said we can stay here tonight. I got out of his car and asked him how much I owed him and he said not a thing I thanked him and we in and the proprieter said the room for each of us would cost two dollars a piece I went up stairs to bed, the sales man said I could ride to Provo with him the next day if I would wait till he canvased two stores, it might take till noon. So I desided to wait rather than to go all the way to Salt Lake City and then to Provo. So a little after noon here he came and said he was ready so I got my suit case and climbed in the car got home to Provo or right to the end of the lane. I got out and asked him again how much I owed him. He said not a cent I said her is tow dollars if you will take it, he said no and bid me good by wishing me the blessings of the Lord. Now when I got my check of Fifty dollar abut the fifth of Sept. I paid five dollars for hous rent, left me 45.00 so then I took $4.50 and gave to Bp. Orval Davis, a full tithing my outing to Vernal and back cost me less than five dollars. If I had paid my buss fair both ways around by S. L. City it would of cost fifteen or sixteen dollars. Did it pay me to pay my tithing? I say yes, Yes, and I saved more than three times the amount of my tithing. November. 8 Yesterday I got a card from Okie enviting me to come to their place and stay and go to the temple and attend Doris' wedding, I went and Doris was married on the 9th to Robert D. Scott. I was their right hand witness and Apostel John A. Widsoe pernounced the cerimony in the day. We went to a hotel for dinner on the night of the 10th they had a reception party and a dance for all friends. After watching them dance a while I came home to Provo with Elva and Clyde and stayed with them the rest of the night. December 9 Alton and Fern came in their new car from Springville and took Elva Clyde and I up to Wallsburg to Temp Borens funeral services and burrial. She was just a little over eight months older than I am and they layed her away in the Wallsburg Cemitary. The first winter snow came to stay in Provo this winter on the tenth of December 1949. This year is about gone the hollidays are here again, and New Year's day had passed, spent the hollidays with Elva and her family and Emily and her family, I truly thank the Lord for my children, grandchildren and great grand children, and I surely do love and appreciate my heritage. February 2. Left Provo 2;45 P. M. for S. L. City on a trip to California to visit Ervin and family took the grehound buss to arive in S. L. City went to Velmas to stay all night and Winona came that night. The next morning called a cab and went to depot at 6:00 A. M. and soon left for Ogden. Left Ogden at 8:45 A. M. to cross the desert for California. Arrived in Redding 2 P. M. Ervin came and go us and too us to his home in Central Valley the snow was about a foot deep there but that night it started to rain and in two days the snow was all gone. The weather cleared up and looked like spring or summer had come. Winona got a letter from home stating her boys were left alone so she desided to come back to Utah and we started back on the afternoon of 10th February. Had poor connections and the trains had a lot of lay-overs. Arrived in Ogden 9 P. M. February 13 and in Salt Lake City at 11P. M. Next day went to Free Allreds found sister Polly Allred there came from California the night before same night I did and we desided we would go to Vernal together to see Sister Emily Batty, who had had a light stroke two weeks before. So the next day I came to Provo, stayed one day and that night heard Polly had already gone to Vernal. So that night I got ready went to Elvas, stayed all night, next morning at 6:30 I started for Vernal, found Polly there and Emily up and walking around but very feeble. Stayed there with Will Howard and Zina four days then back to Salt Lake City, with Polly then on back home to Provo. Oh by the way the snow was twelve to fourteen inches deep in Ashley Valley. August 1, 1950 went over to Provo River in the afternoon and just after sundown caught a big german-brown trout, nineteen and a half inches long and it weighed four lbs and a few days before that I caught on a fly hook that was seventeen inches long out of the river. August. 5 the Boren Family, (only two left of the original family) all went to Canyon Glenn and had a family reunion. Enjoyed a splendid dinner had a very nice entertainment and program. Mina Merriotti took lead and charge of all the exercises. October 22 - Went to Sunday School today as usual. My eye-sight has failed looking at things far away. I could not see the figures across the room on the black board. An my hearing is very much impared, I could hear the teacher, Bro. Triplet give the lesson but could not hear the people around me in their discussion. So when I came home gave Emily her book and told her I did not think I would go to Sunday school any more. It has been a long time since I went regular to meetings on that account. So I bid farewell to all kind of meetings and entertainments. Now I want to say to all lovers of the truth, light, and knowledge Read the book "The Vision" or the degrees of Glory", especially to women more especially to young unmarried women and girls. Read the most wonderful directions counsel and instructions given to young unmarried women and girls given on pages as follow: Marriage out side the Church Pages 91--92. "Instructions recieved on heavenly things" pages "92-93 and Top of 94. Origin and destiny of women" Pages 145, 146, 147, and top of 148. This is December and another year almost to a close the world is at war in Korea and China, a terrible thing to send our young American boys to face those battles and to be shot in cold blood. Yes Christmas is gone, I spent the day with Emily and her family, and had a good time Yes old year gone and 1951 is here. The fifth of January makes four years since my darling wife passed to the great Beyond. There was no snow this year til after Xmas. But it snowed about two inches at night for two nights before new years day. But the snow would go off each day and on the 4th January, 1951 there was no snow on the ground in front of the house. January 11, 1951, No snow yet to amount to anything. This has been the most uncommon fall and winter I ever remember in my life here in this part of Utah. The thermomoter has only run down to ten below Zero on night. It is now February the twentieth and no snow on the fields. The sun is shining warm and it feels jut like spring or summer. The weather was fine until the first day in March. Then in the afternoon it began to snow, and the weather turned cold. For four or five days it was winter, then it began to warm up gradually and in a few days it was spring again. This is April 13th and this morning before sunrise I heard a mourning dove cooing in one of the big walnut trees so Spring is here, the grass is growing, the early flowers are beginning to bloom and I am glad; it is cheering me. Sunday, April 1, 1951. 1 went to Sunday school in the Edgemont Church house. I had fasted and after Sunday School I attended fast meeting and bore my testimony. The subject I used was faith and works as found in the second chapter of James. seventeenth and eighteenth verses. As he said so I say-- I will prove my faith by my works. Then I told the people went on two missions; spent the big part of three years in the mission field. Then I came home and got children through high school and in a few years started to work in the Salt Lake Temple. I worked there four years, then in the St. George Temple four years, and in the Manti Temple one year. The big part of nine years was spent doing temple work. I did the endowment work for over fifteen hundred men. Then I was witness for a great number of sealings for husbands and wives and thousands of children to parents, making a total of five thousand altogether in which I officiated and took part in. Then to complete my testimony I quoted Reveloation; 20: 12-13. "I saw the dead small and great stand before God. etc." And when I was coming through the crowd after meeting five different people congratulated me on my talk. I thanked them, and added that I felt very humble on my talk, as humble as a little child. Saturday night, April 21, 1951 I dreamed I was on a highway in a strange place and I met my angel mother and I was Just in the act of embracing her and taking her in my arms and I said to her, "Haven't you got some love and a kiss for me? And I woke up with one of the grandest feelings of love and affection I ever enjoyed in my life. The night of June 15, 1951, I went over to Springville, Hobblecreek, with Theron and Emily and their family. Next morning at five o'clock we started fishing and I cought ten trout from seven to fourteen inches long. We had a fish dinner and had a wonderful outing in the mountain scenery. On the seventeenth I got several Fathers cards with the expression of love and gratitude for me which is beyond expression of price. So Love, Love is the greatest of them all. Then I got from the children seven dollars in all which helps to bear the burden of life. July 10, 1951. Stoker and I had words and dissatisfaction about me having to crawl through a barbed wire gate every time I went for mail or to town. This happened in the morning and at night when he came from work he said he had been thinking of it all day and that house jut was not beg enough for both of us any longer and he wanted me to leave by the first of August. Well, I had six swarms of bees and a bunch of rabbits, about thirty. So I came down to Provo and told Elva and Winona about my trouble which I took to heart as I had tried my best to do everything I could to help him build fence, dig ditches, build gates and finally went down to their new coal yard and helped in a number of ways. Well, I was totally discouraged and as Elva had planned to go see Velma in Spokane, Washington, Elva and Winona set in to have me go with her. I said, "No, No." but finally they prevailed when they found out I had the money for the ticket. Then they wouldn't give it up so I decided to go. We started Friday night, July 13, Clyde took us to Salt Lake City in his car and Elva and I got on the train in the middle of the night and we arrived in Pocatello, Idaho, about five o'clock Saturday morning. They said we could have to lay over five hours, but the train was late and we had to wait nearly three hours more. We got started again about noon and rode all the rest of the day and all night and arrived in Spokane, Washington, between eight and nine Sunday morning. Bob and son and Velma met us at the depot. They took us home to their apartment and we enjoyed their friendship and hospitality. The next night Bob took us for a sight seeing ride up through the northeast part of the town, and out along the north highway along the Spokane River which runs in a deep gorge about thirty five to fifty feet deep. There is a steep bank down to the water which is, Bob Said, no telling how deep. He said one time there was a car which got out of control and it had a baby in it. It ran off the steep side of the hill into the river which runs dead. There is no movement which can be seen. The car which went off was not found for three weeks. Then down in the west part of town they have a cement dam and big cement buildings on both sides of the river. The water runs through big turbines which furnish power to generate electricity for the town. Then the river runs over a big ledge of rock a hundred yards wide and falls a hundred and fifty feet down under a big high bridge. That night Bob drove us down to a big ledge about forty feet high, to look where the river runs off and leaves the town. Now about getting food poisoning. Monday noon Velma and I ate a half of a meat sandwich which we had taken with us and it had become poison. In the afternoon both of us got sick; yea and sicker. We tried to vomit and you can guess the rest. I was sick like the fellow that said he was so sick he was afraid he couldn't die. The only reason I tried to live was that I did not want to die so far away from home. Seven hundred miles is too far away from home. So we came back from Washington without any special thing happening. Elva and Clyde cleared on of their best rooms and moved my things down to their place. So here I am waiting between life an death and I do not care how soon it comes. But I do not want to be fed on an oxygen tank at the last. August 24, 1931. Clyde A. Carter, Elva, Don, Carol Jean and I started on a trip to the sunny south in southern Utah. The first thing of note was the Big Rock Candy Mountain. It was light colored and slick like chalk. It almost glistened in the sunlight. It had hollows or ravines down the side of it. Then we went to Bryce Canyon National Park. It was quit. a climb. We drove right into the rangers station or information bureau. The agent told me the altitude was eight thousand feet above sea level, and the canyon was about five miles wide from rim to rim. W left the car there and walked about half or three quarters of a mile. When we reached the rim and looked off down any where from twenty five to a hundred and fifty feet there was hollow hills and high peak ridges and summits and as we followed in a southeast direction around the top the canyon got deeper and finally we were looking off a ledge straight down into a gorge, oh, a hundred and fifty feet deep I would say. There were great towers of rock running straight up, maybe ten feet thick at the bottom and stood straight up like big slabs standing on the ends, some no more than a foot and a half thick towards the top and seventy five feet high. Some of the wonders of the world. Then we started for Zion National Park. They said the mountain road cost a million dollars and I believed it before we got through. We went up, and over high grades and into a tunnel perported to be a mile long and a double highway all the way through. We went up and up. It goes along the canyon wall and there is three openings in it. The road widens out so as to give room to stop and look out down the mountain -a hundred feet or more. When we got through we were way up on the side of a big high ledge mountain three or four hundred yards so we had to go zig zag turn after turn to get down in the bottom of the canyon. It was getting late, between sundown and dark and as we started up the canyon there stood a big buck deer eating leaves off some brush about five rods from the road and he never paid any attention to our car running along. Well, we made for a camp ground. The next morning we went up a river about a mile or more and low behold it was the Virgin River that runs down by St. George. Then we turned round and went back down the river to Hurricane about twenty five miles from St. George. Then we went up highway 91 to Toquerville, Aunt Emma Hills mothers sister and family used to live there. Then we started home but decided to turn and go to Cedar Brakes, and see another sight. It was a terrible climb. The sight was something like Bryce only a lot higher. The altitude is ten thousand five hundred feet and after seeing it we went down the steepest canyon road I ever was an in my life, then we went on home. This is Sunday morning September twenty third, I got up, had a light breakfast, then walked to the church house. Attended High Priests meeting then to Sunday School. I got up close to the front and heard the most or what was said. I came home had dinner then Clyde said we would go for a ride, up over the loop in American Fork Canyon. Clyde, Elva, Winona, Carol Jean, Ken and I started out. We drove on top of the devide looking over into the north fork there we stoped and Elva had arranged a lovely chicken dinner for, us, and boy, was it good, yes, yes. We went on over into the North Fork and as the leaves on the trees and brush were turning red and yellow for the fall of the year, it was a wonderful sight to see. There I looked over the mountains of my boyhood days, from nine to eighteen years old, I spent my summers there. The winters I spent in Provo, going to the B. Y. Academy. And many was the memorable seans of my life recalled. I noted up on the side of the mountain the very spot where I shot my first, big buck deer and the canyon I saw three bear following one after the other. The first was a big black bear the next tow were cinnamon bear. Father shot at them and did they scatter and run in every direction. They went straight up over the mountain fast as they could climb or run. We came down North Fork and struck the highway in Provo Canyon and turned up the canyon, went up to the Deer Creek dam, but the sights in Provo canyon did not compare with the sights in the North Fork, up among these cliffs and water falls. Then back to home sweet home. Thursday 1 November 1951 Clyde Elva, Winona and I started at four P. M to go to Salt Lake Tempe got there a little after five and We all went through the temple. Winona got here endowments. Now it is up to each one of them to comply with a celestial law, in order to go where their Mother and the other five of Our children are. On the night of the fourteenth of November 1951 I heard some of the most beautiful strains of music It seams now that it was so real that I can almost recall the sounds, and it seames like a different kind of an instrument than I ever heard. This is 8 January 1952 I just went out in the lot behind the house measured the depth of the snow in a dozen different places and as near as I could get it the snow averages about eighteen inches deep. I went up to center street and then east towards the foot of the mountain to the State hospital and as the snow was so deep the deer were out there in herds I suppose I suppose I saw fifteen or more. One little fellow had one spike horn standing up above his ears. Sure looked odd. They are feeding those deer hay out by the Hospital. The snow has covered those big pine trees and is hanging there. Winona works at the hospital, last night wile coming home she saw about a dozen big bucks in one herd and one had lost or shed one of his horns, the other horn had four points showing. He was a big deer. In the spring of 1952 Elva had been suffering a severe sick head ache. That day I went in where she was and she had her head wrapped in a wet towel, the pain would affect her stomach and she would have to go to bed. I asked her if she would like to have me administer to her, she said Yes. I took the consecrated oil and anointed her head and prayed for her and I said "You shall receive this blessing acording to your faith. And from that time on she got better, and has never had the head ache since. For this wonderful blessing we unite in thanking the God of Heaven. In September 1952 Winona and I took some temple sheets, that sister Helen Snow had got out on the Bigelow line, and went to the Manti temple. The sheets contained 163 names of Husbands, wives and children, we had them all sealed in the temple. Since then this winter Clyde, Elva, Winona and I and our family have taken three more bunches of sheets and went to the Salt Lake Temple and had the sealing done on all of those sheets, which would make over five hundred sealings. The latter part of last summer I got so I wondered what the Lord was holding me here for. It is six years now since my wife passed to the great beyond but now since I have been the cause of getting all this sealing done I have quit wondering I am eighty six years old, and go to the Utahna every Tuesday night and waltz and dance ten or twelve time till midnight. My health, I would say is perfect, with the exception of my eyesight and hearing, are both impared. Other wise I feel fine, I walk from ten to thirty three blocks every day, I thank the Lord for my health, and I say to Him I'll go where you want me to go Dear Lord, I'll say what you want me to say, and I'll be what you want me to be. So Here am I. I might say a little about the weather, it has been warm and the sun shines just like spring time, it has done all winter, and tomorrow is the 28th or last day of February, 1953. In the last of January 1953 Winona had an ailment in the palm of her hand. She thought it was a sliver and she tried to pick it out but the more she picked the worse it got till it made a hole in her hand. So she went to a doctor, he examined it, and picked and dug at it and fineally lanced it in the place effected, and every day it got worse. It pained till she could not sleep night or day. Then the Doctor lanced id down to the bone. Still the hand got worse than the toothache and she held her hand straight up all the time. The next day or evening Clyde came to my room and said Winona wanted me to come and administer to her. I washed my hands and went in. Clyde anointed her head, I sealed the annointing and pronounced the blessing. Before we took our hands off her head the pain stoped and in a number of days the sore healed up and got well. She never went back to the doctor again. One day the first part of February I went in to Elvas kitchen and there sat Winona with her leg bare up to her knee the leg laying on Elvas table. I was surprised and said, "What is the matter." She said My leg pains till I can hardly stand on it. I put my left hand on the ankle it seamed natural, I moved my hand up a little farther and it was hot with fever, I moved my had up towards her knee and it was O. K. Then I layed both hands on the hot place on her leg. I stood right there and in a silent prayer and in the authority of the Holy Priesthood and the power of the Living God I rebuked the pain and commanded it to depart and be gone in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. Winona got up the pain gon. She went down to Emily Stokers and went to work worked all day and her leg never bothered her, and has'nt since. Monday 1 March 1953 we got a phone call from Vernal, that my sister Emily Batty had passed away, or died that morning. Wednesday I got up at 4:30 and went to the buss station and took the bus to Salt Lake City. About nine oclock took another bus to Vernal, arrived about one o'clock. Held the Funeral service at 11:00 A. M. Thursday. They had the most wonderful funeral service I ever attended. It seamed to me there mus of been from three to five hundred people in attendance. It looked like there were a hundred cars there. In the evening I came home with Grand Rasmusson. And on of Don Batty's boys, drove the car and all at once he threw on the brakes. I was half asleep and I just about headed into the back of their seat. A deer jumped in head of the car. April 24, 1953. I have been for years so I could not sleep nights and then when I would sit down in the day time and be still I would drop off to sleep no matter how hard I tried to keep awake, especially in meetings. I would have the worst time to keep awake, then again the last few months it has been worse on me nights. I have been dreaming bad dreams at night as soon as I went to bed. Then the devil would wake me up with one of those bad dreams. I would be nervous and lay awake, for hours rolling and tossing. Sometimes sitting up till eleven or twelve oclock at night afraid to try to go to sleep, or to bed. On Monday night I went to bed about eleven oclock and shortly after I droped off' to sleep. I dreamed I was in bed or sleeping in under an old big dark shed, and att at once I heard some big horses squeeling and fighting. I thought the horses Was almost as, big as elephants and they were within just a few feet of where I was lying and it was a very dark night. I seemed like I could almost feel, those big animals almost steping on me and I was Just num and could not move. I woke enough to begin to pray-- after praying I could move I began to crawl and got away a little ways then I stood up and I thought those animals was wild and I was in a big walled inclosure with them. Then I did wake up and got up out of bed and down on my knees and told the Lord what a wicked sin it was to have the devil turned loose on a person when they were lying down on their back asleep helpless, and had now way of defence to help themselves. I told the Lord I was like the Apostles of old. They said to the savour "Where shall we go". I told the Lord there was only one place to go and that was to the true and living God. Again I thought of poor old Job He said in his distress. "The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away and blessed by the name of the Lord." He did not realize it was the divil turned loose on him that had taken his children his property and every thing but his wife. But it was the evil one, the devil would of taken his life but the Lord forbid Him doing that. Then again Poor old David lost all he had, His family, wives, concubines and everything and greeved and mourned and wrote a hundred and fifty chapters in the bible called the Psalms of David. In the Doc. & Covenants, the Lord says I took his wives and gave them to another. There are others I could refer to but I do not want to do that in my history. So I will turn to myself and to the True and Living God. Who is the rock of my refuge. The One on whom I will stake my life, both now and forever. Provo, July 15, 1953 About the fore part of April I started to learn to use the typewriter or learn to type, and now In about three months I can manage to typeriter quite well and write sentences and I intend to try to write my letters on the typewriter from now on. Today the 24th of July I went to 5th West and 5th North where the Sons and Daughters of the Pioneers had a fine program and a good dinner all free. May 21 1953 I was hanging out clothes after washing in the afternoon Alton and fern drove up and in a few minutes Omerro and Mina Marriotti and Will Boren came. Then Alton ask me if I did not want to go with them to Manti tomorrow. Leda and Norman E. Johnson were going thru the Temple to be sealed for time and eternity I said I certainly do. The next day the twenty second was the anniversary of my birthday and I was eighty seven year old. So we all went and I was one of the witnesses to their sealing for ever. Another peculiar incident that had happened, in those two young peoples lives jut a number of days before on the twenty ninth of April the aniversary of mine and Annies weding day sixty years before we were married in the Manti temple--the young couple were married by a bishop in Los Angles California, on the twenty ninth of April nineteen fifty three. So they had a double weding on two historicle events in my life. On Saturday May 30, Alton Fern and family came and we all went up to Wallsburg on Decoration day. I had a good talk with Polly, Reed, Tressa and her girls, sure did enjoy visiting with Polly my only sister living. Then we came down Provo canyon to Canyon Glenn and had a splendid dinner Fern had fixed and brought. On Monday the first day of June Clyde took his car ,fifteen minutes to seven and Elva, I, another man and two women--six of u got in the car and went to Manti went thru two sessions. That made endowments for twelve people. Then came back by way of Nephi, got home before sundown I told those folks thot was one perfect day. July 31 1953 I went up to Wallsburg and stayed at Polly Allreds two days till Saturday evening had the best visit we have ever had since we were young and went to dances together, before we were either one married. Then Saturday evening the Boren family and heirs met in the Wallsburg Church house. Mina and Will are the only two children living out of thirteen. They all had supper and at eight oclock they started a program. Mina took charge of it. I opened by prayer and later I read a poem called "The Queries" and at the last Mina said she wanted to be excused from taking care of the reunion and runing the programs any longer. I said when we were coming home if Mina gave it up I have an idea that will be the last meeting they will ever have. The night of December. 26 1953 I went up to the Ladies Club House third North. Academy ave. There they had a very good program started at eight P. M? and It run till about half past nine. Then they started to dance I danced once then went down to the Utana and danced till twelve so that was another perfect day. Then on December 30th Joseph Clegg envited me down to his place at night said the def and blind was going to have a social or party at night, and He ask me to come to it. So while there they played a game, in which we had to give forfits, and to redeem mine I had to sit on a womans lap lay my head on her sholder and cry like a baby. After living alone for seven years batching it that was easy. Well after the game the family furnished a splendid lunch and then home ward bound. On the thirty first I went down town and bought Winona one of the nicest umberellas I could find and gave it to for a birthday present. She was born on the last day of the year. So farewell for nineteen fifty three. Provo, January 27, 1954 Last night when I first went to bed I dreamed a most beautiful dream it run like this. I thought I had a most beautiful home and it was up in the air about two feet of the ground and I was inside the house and my folks was all in bed. Annie and all of them and the house inside was finished with silk and saten of the most gordous brilliant colors. More beautiful than words can express or an artist could express or paint. Just the most beautiful that the imagination could think of. March 28, 1954 Sunday in the middle of the day I layed down and went to sleep I saw a vision of where my patriarchal blessing says until the perfect day--or the perfect day. Sunday April 11, 1954--I went to quarterly conference this morning and could not keep awake. I have had rhumatism in my knees for two days, and coming home all at once I felt like my lungs was a fire--I kept coming and it got worse, and time I got home the burning was almost imbearable I drank some root beer, then I make some red pepper tea and took than and layed down and felt better. But I think it was my heart. Back to top

Annie Boren Bigelow Autobiography

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Annie Marie Boren Bigelow Life History [This is a prose version of Annie Boren Bigelow's "Memory Thoughts of My Life, an autobiography written in verse." This was compiled November 1996 by Stephen L. Rawlins, husband to Carol Jean Carter Rawlins (granddaughter of Annie Bigelow). It covers only the first 67 pages of the original text (the history). The thought in doing this was to make the important historical events in this excellent autobiography more readily available to researchers. The total text of the original is 130 pages long and includes letters to her children and poetry. The complete original is available here with the tiltle "Memory Thoughts of My Life, an autobiography written in verse."] AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ANNIE MARIE BOREN BIGELOW My parents had thirteen children six sons and seven daughters. I was the fourth daughter and the seventh child. As of this writing (1946) only three of us, of which I am the oldest, are still living. I was born October 24th, 1873. When I was three months old a whooping cough epidemic almost took my life. Many thought I would die, but Father was not among them. He and the elders administered to me, and I was nurtured from month to month. There came a time when it appeared that I had died. They laid me on the bed and told my father I was gone. He responded, "She's not dead. God told us she would live." He opened my mouth with a teaspoon and blew his own breath into it. He never knew just why he did, but science has now discovered that this procedure can save lives. Although my first year was difficult, I overcame the problems, am now married and have been blessed with eleven children, of which five died as infants. At two years of age I was happy and well, and walking. Life was sweet. No doubt things came along to spoil my happiness, but they didn't last long. When I was three my Grandfather Mecham died. My cousin and I were good friends, often climbed a cherry tree where we talked and laughed. Among other things, this was one thing that our parents were not too happy about. One day we were told by an uncle to gather apples for a cow. When she bellowed we dropped the apples in the mud and ran away. My uncle scolded us "Why put them there?" From that time on I didn't care much for this uncle's company. At four my cousin and I often played in the water at the spring head. Getting into water was the joy of my life. But my aunt warned us to keep away from the water or we'd go under and sink like a rock. To me, thinking of going down under the water was the last place on Earth I cared to go. She gently took us by the hand and led us away, admonishing us to stay away from the spring. We didn't know what else to do, so we went to a pen where two young deer were being kept. My cousin dropped her straw hat into the pen and the deer tore it to shreds. We didn't know what else could happen to us. When I was five I remember that I was so frightened of Indians. I was always glad to be alive when they left town. I was terrified whenever we saw them coming to beg for bread. I remember that my brother brought me a magpie and told me that I could easily teach it how to talk. I thought how proud I would be if I could do this. But the experience I had with that bird was not so pleasant. In digging worms to feed it, I ran the tine of a pitchfork through my foot, and decided not to keep that bird. At six I started school in a little log school house. Today's students wouldn't be too impressed with a place like that one room, and one teacher for everyone. And yet I miss that one room school, where we were free, and had such a loving and warm relationship with everyone, big and little, old and young. We had readers for the first five grades, and when we finished these our education was complete. From then on we attended the school of hard knocks. Only a few were able to obtain a higher education. At seven I remember tending children at quiltings where our mothers worked. Quilting and rag bees were popular places to catch up on all of the gossip of the town. We kiddies had to wait for dinner, but were always glad we were to get a piece of pie or cake for desert. Then it was back to work for us. One of the important steps in my life occurred in my eighth year when I was baptized into the Mormon Church. From that day to this I have been trying to keep myself free from sin and temptation. At that time the Relief Society issued a call to store wheat for the poor and the needy. Mother headed this call, and with neighbors we gleaned wheat from the fields each fall. We saved bushels of wheat. During World War One the President said that our soldiers needed bread, so we sold the wheat to the Government. When I was nine we were traveling down the steep dangerous road in Provo Canyon when our wagon wheel came off. Out I went, hitting my head on a rock. Father took me into his arms and bathed my face in water to bring me back to full consciousness. That canyon still brings back thoughts of both beautiful scenes and frightful fears. One time we met a herd of Texas longhorn cattle that looked ready for a fight. Father pulled out to one side of the road and let them go by. It was a relief to be able to take a long breath again. Another time I was in Provo, and terribly homesick. When the chance came to get a ride on a wagon my cousin and I started up the canyon. The wagon turned over and we were pinned under the wagon box. When we were released my cousin's little girl seemed to be dead. The driver took her down to the river. My cousin couldn't walk, and my wrist was thrown out of place. We waited a long time, and thought we'd have to stay there, but fortunately some peddlers came along and gave us a ride. When we got down to the river the little girl was alive, but we wondered how we would all get home. I ended up riding up the canyon with one peddler, and my cousin, the girl's mother, rode with the other. I held the little girl and she held the little boy. The wagon was equipped with a double bed and a spring seat, and we took advantage of both to get any comfort we could. When I was eleven, we saved our shoes for Sunday wear. On other days we went barefoot. It hurt my pride to go barefoot at eleven. Father made our shoes. He tacked on the soles with wooden pegs on a wooden stand. We were proud of our father and his work. The shoes he made were strong, and thinking of them brings back sweet memories of the comfort they brought to my feet. At twelve I thought more of pleasure and fun and played all kinds of games including town ball, steal stick, and, of course, foot races. In the winter we coasted down the hill on sleds. Little did I dream during those moonlit nights that this life's road would have so many rough places. I never thought of the danger and problems that I now realize are just part of everyone's life. But I'll never forget the good times my chums and I had together during these years. Some people count thirteen as an unlucky number, but it isn't for everyone. We all have our ups and downs in every year, and my thirteenth was no different. Sports at that time were all the rage. Spelling matches were especially popular, and all in the class had to participate. One day Don asked Polly, Vira, and me to go with him for a horseback ride. We joyfully galloped away and spent a lovely summer day enjoying the beauties of nature. We sat on the cedar hill and looked around to see the beauties and listened to the joyful sounds of nature. There we talked about what married life would be like, but I thought that was too far in the future for me. Yet, I was the first of the three girls to marry. In just a few years I became Don's wife. At fourteen we enjoyed getting together, packing a lunch and going to the canyon, or sometimes to the river to spend a day. I remember our sleigh rides, and the joy we had tipping over and switching -- anything for a thrill. The boys took hot rocks to keep us warm. They were expected to take care of us and keep us safe. Horseback riding was really a treat, but a buggy was even more fun. But then, of course, at that time I had never ridden on a railroad train, a bus, a street car or an airplane. I remember sitting in the shade knitting socks and stockings with woolen yarn for my sister and me. When they got holes in them we had to learn darning to mend them. We measured our yarn to see who could knit the fastest. Both rich and poor wore woolen stockings for their health. We'd sit there for many hours talking and knitting wristlets, mittens, and anything else the family needed to wear. Clothes were our problem. We had few at best. No silk or lace dresses. No warm furs, no caps or hats, no handbags or money purses or anything like them. It was gingham or calico because we had no extra money for treats. But we felt greatly blessed. Sometimes we'd go to the county seat for vacation. At sixteen I felt the spirit of youth. I was full of vigor and energy, but I also enjoyed listening to sweet love songs, and memories that stirred my heart to beat faster. That summer I went to a sawmill to work for a large family and the mill hands. It was hard work. We washed on the board, scrubbed floors on our knees and ironed clothes with hand irons. It was always do this and do that, hurry here and hurry there. We kept busy. In the morning we put breakfast on the table, and then the mother of the family and I had twelve cows to milk. After working a long summer day, we knew we had the cows to milk again. When I think of the amount of work we had to do, I wonder how we ever got through it. At the end of the week I got one dollar and seventy five cents. In the fall there was no money left over for pleasure, but we had fun anyway with candy pulls and parties. We were content. At seventeen courtship and marriage came into my life. We were both so happy. We thought everything would be fine. Finally the dreams we had dreamed for so long were about to be brought to life. The lessons we had learned from life were an important part of this. If I could but tell you the thoughts that made my bosom swell. I will always remember how I felt then, and continue to cherish the flame of love we had then, and have kept alive these many years. We cannot go back, but in our memory these years will always be there. Language is inadequate to express the happiness of courtship I felt. The joys and happiness that we two lovers learned then has returned in later years through sweet tenderness and thoughtful care from my lover. Don and I pledged our hearts to each other, but had to go to Pa and Ma for their consent. I didn't want to be there when Don asked for me. I didn't want to share that part of the bargain. But later I said I'd help smooth the way for him. I told Mother that Don was going to call, and encouraged her to have the kids out of sight. When he came Pa, Ma and all of the brothers and sisters were there. We sat by the fireplace and told stories. The young folks enjoyed the company, so we had to wait until all were tired and went to bed before we could talk about our plans. We worked hard to prepare so that we could set our wedding day. On the 29th of April we were married, and I changed my name for a lifetime of happiness. I found my childhood sweetheart to be true. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Eighteen Years At the age of eighteen a girl is of age they say To choose the course she'll take If she keeps the law who can tell her nay Now she can her own choice make Now I will weave a robe of life to wear I must weave it with good deeds and thought I'll weave it from the pattern loved ones share A beautiful pattern that cannot be bought I'll join it together with loving care And have friendly deeds to spare I'll weave it with patience and its goodness share So the robe will be comfortable for me to wear. I'll weave in faith and hope with my work With obedience and courage rare I'll weave it with pride and never shirk While weaving that life robe to wear. I'll line that robe with sunshine and smiles And with kindness I'll strengthen the seams I'll fit my robe to all my trials And stitch the hem with sunbeams. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I was too young to fully realize the many joys and cares married life could hold. But I learned one must be wise and, especially, that it's important to share blessings with others. I couldn't possibly understand what was in store for me. When my husband and I were united, and he vowed to protect me forever. We began to plan how we wanted to live our lives. We likened our plan to that of a portrait of human character that would stand as a sturdy building beside life's highways. Constructed with sustaining pillars of self respect, the foundation of courage to do right, the floor of loyalty and guidance from above. The main entrance showing forth spiritual wakefulness and light, of good will and love. The color scheme of helpfulness and respectability. The roof of joy and hope. A dome to radiate good deeds and thought. A superintendent of building to lead the way the prophets would have us go. At nineteen, the next step in life was motherhood. On May 6th, 1892 our first child, Adora, came into our lives. How tenderly I pressed her head close to my breast. Such a dearest treasure and bundle of love. Both Don and I felt that we couldn't be happier or more content with this dear gift from God. On August 25th, 1893 another daughter, Ida, was born, with blue eyes, curly hair and a beautiful body. She gave a thrill to everyone. She was a gift money never bought, bringing her own love as only parents know how to share. The next April, with our family now numbering four, we decided to look for a suitable place to live that would make a comfortable home, and provide our children with an education. Don asked me if I would be willing to leave our birthplace, to battle the elements and break out some new farmland. We prayed about it, and when we received an answer we vowed to always stand firmly together, and take whatever came our way. We piled all of our belongings in a wagon and took them mile after mile, over hills and valleys on rough, long roads that included dugways that filled us with horror as we looked down into the deep canyons below. Day after day we traveled the road that now would take just hours in an automobile. I hope we will never travel it in a wagon again. When we reached Ashley Valley we thought a lot about our friends and loved ones from whom we had parted, and hoped our friendship with them would always stay true. Our journey was close to the end. In gratitude, we thanked our Father for His protection and care over that dangerous road, and the prospect of having a comfortable home. We had no home at first, and stayed with our sister Zora for a day or so. We had a good visit and rested. It was hard to find a place we could live in, but finally we found one, a two-room cottage without comfort or style. Our trouble began in that two-room cottage. One night our baby was stung by a scorpion. We worked day and night with our darling, and through faith and prayer God gave her back her health. We were determined to have a place of our own. All of our energy and efforts were bent toward obtaining one. We didn't want to stay in a rented house. We were happy, and it doesn't cost money to have a good time. The best of Earth's pleasures are free to those who know how to value their worth. Kind words and glad looks and smiles cost nothing. Yet all the wealth of a millionaire could not bring the pleasures we had waiting for a home, listening to our children's prattle and song. We found that in a national depression it was difficult to make a meager living and try to save some money. Scores of men were out of work. Want and hunger were felt all over the country, but we knew we had to be brave. We arose before dawn to see what we could trade to make some money. Our place was started with a load of wood. It amused the neighbors, but they supported us. Now we had to get the logs to build a humble home. It was not a mansion. At first we hung a blanket to the window and a quilt to the door. The floor was made of rough lumber and the roof of dirt. We were able to replace the quilt with a lumber door and put glass in the window, which allowed us to see the neighbors. We built the house on the corner of a forty-acre farm, more for convenience than anything else. We had very few neighbors, and they were scattered far apart. I was frightened of Indians, especially when everyone went away in the daytime. But we were settled in a home of our own. It took patience and hard labor to clear the land to grow crops. The sagebrush had to be grubbed and the rocks dug from the soil. Breaking up the land was not always easy, but we don't have complaints. Just some of the scars of hardship still remain. Indians camped on our land every fall when they hunted deer. It was not pleasant to have them so close. When we'd see one of their villages spring up over night I was filled with fear and horror. They'd come the first thing in the morning not to beg for bread, but they'd sit down at the table and expect to be served a meal. What else could we do but to share the food we had with them. They'd eat with delight and when they got their share they'd go. I truly hoped that we would not see more that day, but they'd keep coming. They were curious to know who dared come to live on land they had always camped on during the deer hunt. But soon they packed up and disappeared, which was alright with us. We didn't miss them. We knew we had another hard winter to face. Christmas came and went and another year came with things going along about the same. On January 30th 1895 we added another baby girl to family, Eva. This little bundle of love helped bring happiness into our home. We enjoyed her so. How much we welcomed spring that year. The sunshine and showers helped banish the fear that accompanied the long winter. But it meant that we had to get our crops in so that we'd have something to harvest in the fall. What a task it was break up the land and turn it over with a hand plow. It was slow and tedious, nothing like it is today. I was surprised to see Indians coming again, traveling fast on their horses. Because my little girls and I were alone, I pulled down the blinds pretending that we were not home. When they stopped to drink by the side of our house the babies sensed my fear and kept quiet. They remounted their horses and galloped away to town. They didn't stay long, and soon I saw them coming back. I asked myself what they could want now. Then I realized that it was some dried meat we had hanging up. A month later at sunset, two young braves rode up to our door. They demanded that I go with them as their squaw. I didn't know what to do. I was not sure what they intended to do with me. I trembled from head to foot and was white with fear. I prayed that my husband would come from town, and when his wagon came into view they dashed away. Time has never taken away the dreadful feeling I had that day. It is no wonder I had such fear whenever Indians came around. In the fall before hunting time we had the place securely fenced. When the Indians stopped you could almost hear them ask who had taken away their camping ground. Because it had taken all summer to get the land ready to sow, our crops were very light in the fall. Winter was coming on and life was hard. There was some work for Father bailing hay and working with his team hauling wood for one dollar a day. We joyfully weathered the storms, and felt optimistic about the future. We had a cow, and bought some chickens and a pig. When we could sell eggs it was for ten cents a dozen. We were lucky when we could sell them to a friend or neighbor. We planted cherry trees, shrubbery and a patch of strawberries. Flowers bloomed beautifully. The next fall we had a bumper crop. We enjoyed gathering the crops and putting them away, little dreaming that we would remain such a short time. In less than two years we had cleared all of our ground and felt that we had found the right place for a home. But things began to shape up differently. All of the time we lived in Vernal it was difficult to make a living. As long as we live, we'll never forget how difficult it was to leave our crops without receiving a cent for them after working so hard for them. Father Bigelow wrote for us to come back and take back the same chance we had before. We debated whether we should go, and decided we should. But we started back a few days too late, the storms overtook us, and we got hung up in the snow. At Current Creek the team couldn't make the grade. We tried taking part of the load up the hill, but the road was so steep and icy that the horses couldn't even make it then. Our cousin Frank Mecham was with us, and volunteered to ride horseback that night for help. In Strawberry Valley the snow gets deep, and there were no snow plows to clear the road. That night we thought the five of us would be alone, but we found the campground alive with Indians. I wondered how we could ever stay in such a place, but we had no choice. We shivered around the camp fire with cold and thought of the horrid stories we'd heard about Indians. We could only watch and pray. Fortunately they went away the next morning. It was a long cold ride for Frank, but the next day he returned with horse teams and a number of men. What a welcome sight! That night we spent a cheerful time around the campfire telling jokes and singing. Our little girls sang Oh, Happy Home, and Sweet Childhood Home. Oh, how the music rang. Those men remarked how joyous the world would be if we could only see the joys of life like innocent children. To always be cheerful through hardships. The next morning we started again, and with plenty of horsepower they easily took the load up the hill and onto the other side. No words can describe the gratitude we felt. We were happy to be back to the place of our birth. It seemed that there was no better place. Father started to work again on the sawmill, which gave us a sense security. On the 28th of February 1897 the stork brought another little one into our family. Our lives were thrilled with the coming of our first son, Ervin. Another blessing for parents, and our daughters were pleased with their little brother. It takes strength and determination to raise a large family. Father worked hard all day running the sawmill. It was hard work turning the logs all day long. In the spring when the sawing was over we started clearing and planting another farm. It was hard work for all of us. Summers and winters came and went. My first priority was taking care of the children. I was always willing to give my husband a helping hand, however, and to do the will of God as nearly as I could understand it. Much of the pleasure and amusements had to be laid aside to be with our children and protect them. My desire was to be tolerant and kind and disregard little failings in others. I wanted to be faithful to my friends and treasure the beauties of their lives. Elva was born April 25th, 1899. She grew nearer and dearer day by day, and things looked brighter that year. That made four daughters. Our happiness was renewed every time a new one came along. We were always going from place to place trying to find a more comfortable home for our growing family. This time we moved to a house in a meadow near a crystal stream. Fishing was good and we often caught some and fried them golden brown for dinner. They were delicious. Floralia was born November 25th, 1900. She was so gentle and full of love. Another darling sent from our Father. Her baby days were pleasant. I recall so fondly her childhood days with all of her beauty. We enjoyed our home for many years there on the farm with our children. Our lives were free and we had few worries and sorrows. Each of our homes bring back memories of fire light's soft glow, and the loving joy we had sometimes balanced with some grief. But as I look back the joys, pleasures and beauties are the things I remember. Living on a farm always includes worries, and wonder about what would be best to do next. We learned to be humble while living there, and trusted our Heavenly Father for protection. Our soul's desire was to teach our children right from wrong so that they would grow up pure and innocent. We tried to protect them, and teach them to live and uphold the truth. Our aim was to be a true example to them all, so that we could ask them to follow in our footsteps. We tried so hard to teach the Gospel plan, to live it not only on Sunday, but all week long; and to listen to council from the authorities. Each Sunday morning we got up early and walked a mile to Sunday School. Hand in hand the children walked along happily singing. To be on time we had to make plans, and make sure on Saturday all of our clothing was in place so that there wouldn't be any last minute surprises. In the summer we dressed the children all in white. What a beautiful sight it was to see these innocent and pure children. We prayed that they would always stay that way. We understood why God loves little children. I often see in vision those wonderful days that were so precious to us. Memories are the only things that last. We left a happy home to move to town, where we got a store that included the Post Office. With the two we hoped to make a better living. In a financial way, it was much better. Our income increased, but of course it kept us busy all day. We increased the stock in the store to better meet the demand. Christmas time was full of cheer that year. It seemed like Heaven on Earth. We hung trimmings and toys on the Christmas tree, and stockings were filled with candy and nuts. We loved to tell the story of Christ to our children as they sat sit by side listening closely to hear how Christ loved little children and blessed them, and desires to have them return to Him. We wanted our children to be comfortable and well dressed, so after the day's work was done I sewed until I had a complete wardrobe for each of them. The joys of that Christmas will always remain indelibly imprinted in our memories, because it was the last one we would spend with our complete family. When the year passed away we left fond memories. The year 1902 came in warm and bright and all nature seemed to enjoy it. But as the new year wended its way, it brought pain and sorrow that we will never forget. We had to walk by faith, not by sight. It was hard. February was the saddest month of the year. It brought so many tears, heart aches and sorrows. Sickness and death blasted our life. The black clouds gathered so fast and so thickly. Death came to our home so suddenly. Ida died. It left us in such despair that with broken hearts we called her back. She came back and stayed until the next night. She said "Mother, comb my hair good tonight so the angels will watch over me." She told us at one o'clock she would be going home and then, "Don't, with your sorrow, call me back again. Mother don't cry, for it is not right for me to come back like I did last night." Sure enough, at one o'clock she died. I couldn't cry. I just looked into space. Although my heart bled I couldn't cry. Her words "Mother don't cry" lingered with me. Well we remember that she pinched her father's chin and told him to be true, that she was leaving and, not coming back. The first shock of death took Ida on February 6th, 1902. On the seventh we held her funeral and buried her. Only God would be able to help us face the trials her vacancy left. Little did we think that tomorrow Eva's death would double our sorrow. On the eighth she faded and passed away. Oh, why does death bring such sorrow when we know all people are supposed to die? We hope some day, when our knowledge is perfect, to fully understand. On the morning of February 9th our baby, Floralia, died. Words cannot express the sorrow we felt when we were told that she was dead. It left us speechless with sorrow. Our hearts were torn with grief and despair. We had to put our trust in God so that we could bear our grief. We have to have God's spirit to make it through life. On February 10th we held a double funeral. My heart still bleeds when I think of it now. We tried so hard to save their lives, but they were buried side by side in one grave. When we got back from their grave, Adora was ill. We worked all night, but the angel of death hovered still. She grew gradually worse, and on February 11th she died. God only knows how much her death tried our faith. On the twelfth we laid her gently to rest. I had to help make her burial clothes. No one knows how this sent pains through my heart. We couldn't hold funeral services as we had before because we had two children left that we had to try to save. One more burden was added to our sorrow. It was measles and diphtheria that took their lives, and for that reason our friends were afraid to visit. We were left alone both day and night to pray and fight to save our two children. We were dumb with grief and fear. The ones that were left were near death's door. God saw our anguish and grief and let them stay. Oh, how our hearts were filled with gratitude to Him. Each child seemed to know that it was their appointed time to go. We watched them die with aching hearts. Their last words, "Mother don't cry" sewed up my tears. Our hearts grew heavier. Tears could have helped ease the pain. We prayed and prayed for relief, but it did not come. Day by day I tried so hard to hide my grief. Everything looked so dark. I prayed that I could cry. It broke our hearts to think of the vacant places. Every day we counted our troubles over and over. In one week four little girls were in the grave. With anguish we parted with the ones we loved so much. We said a farewell until we meet them above. No words can express how death can depress the spirit. Comfort can only come from God to ease the pain and grief of a stricken soul. We prayed, to the Lord to help relieve us of this grief and sorrow and help us be faithful to those we love, and prepare us to meet those who have gone. We had to walk by faith, and not by sight. We had to lock up our troubles and throw the key away. That is what we tried to do. For our family's sake we smiled through tears, although we continued to feel the sorrow. No pain or death could kill our love for the children God had sent us. I realized that I should try to settle down each night by the side of my faithful husband, hoping and planning for our future days. I prayed to God to bless us, and to grant me health and strength and determination to fill some useful niche in life. May I be eager and glad to bear a portion of each day's work share. We tried to employ our talents in helping all living in our neighborhood. Work always helps ease a troubled mind. No matter how we feel, the work must be done. Work gets tiresome without some play, but the two together can help the time pass. In putting up the mail one day I noticed a letter from Post Office Box B. I was alone. I opened it with a trembling hand. I knew we were being asked to withstand another trial. When my husband came home I could hardly speak a word. I gave him the letter with such sorrow and anguish in my soul. Before it was completely read neither of us had a dry eye. Oh, what pain it sent to my heart. To think that we would be parted. We were sorely tried to know just what we should do. My husband had received a call to serve a mission in just a few months. I would have to take care of things at home while Don was gone. My husband was set apart. Some thought that the call wasn't right. But we were willing to wear out rather than rust. Our friends seeing our sorrow tried to get some relief from that mission. All the Elder's names in his quorum were placed in a hat, and they drew lots to settle who should go. Strange, but Don's name came out first three times. So we were all convinced that it was God's will that he should go. God works in a mysterious way His wonders to perform. In humility we were parted for a little season. While doing His will He protected us from harm. Looking back we can see the hand of God was taking our mind from our troubles. It wasn't easy to say God's will be done. It was hard for us to part, but we appreciate our blessings, and accepted the call. Don was soon off for his mission. There was much we didn't understand, but we knew we must be willing to be led by God. We never questioned God's wisdom anymore. We were working toward our eternal salvation. Our financial means were seriously strained. We were deep in debt. But by trusting God all of our obligations in time were paid. Left for awhile alone with my family and business, it took courage. But a battle is never won by a weak heart. I realized I had a daughter and a son to protect, and I had to keep things going while my husband was gone. The time passed slowly. Winter came with snow and wind. No matter how cold, however, I had to open the store and the Post Office. I realize I must live by hope, not fear. I needed to forget the things that irked me, and think of the wonderful vision ahead. It would soon be Christmas and time for a tree. There was no joy this time like the year before. I had to forget the crosses that tried me and work for the ones I held so dear. Christmas was difficult for me that year. Oh, how hard it was to trim a tree alone. It filled my heart with thoughts of better days. How could I ever have the spirit of Christmas with so many of my loved ones gone! My troubles came back and almost crushed my aching heart. . My courage had failed to the point that I trembled with fear. Could I play Santa feeling so sad? It was almost more that I could do. I knew I had to smile for my children. I must hide my feelings for my loved one's sake. I had to be a good Santa with a true Christmas spirit. I played Santa to my two children that Christmas with an aching heart. I filled stockings and trimmed the tree with care. Making the children happy meant so much. I didn't let one thought or act mar their joy. I so much wanted them to be happy. When they were snugly tucked into bed I knelt in humble prayer and asked Father to help me keep the Christmas spirit that year. Then I went to bed with another prayer in my heart that I would always have honor. Give me a cheerful spirit. Teach me love and wisdom for the sake of my children. When I awoke Christmas morning after a good night's rest I could see in the children's faces that my prayers had been answered. I had made them happy at Christmas. When the new year came in I hoped that it would be kinder and more hopeful and more filled with peace and happiness. Before I was even twenty-nine I was left alone, for awhile, with two children to whom I was giving much love and devotion. Spring came with the songs of birds and the hum of bees. All nature was beautiful with flowers and trees in full bloom. If everyone would try to put sunshine in their soul we'd come nearer to reaching perfection. We loose so much in life working for the dollar and neglecting things far more important. I remember so well how hard I tried to carry the load until the mission that God had willed had been faithfully completed. Try as I may, my health failed. We had no resources to allow me to get the needed rest. I was doing the best I could, but I couldn't control the beat of my heart. The doctor said that we must have my husband return or he'll be left without a wife and have to raise his children alone. He said to me one day that I had to stop hard work or I would pay with my life. How could I when the work had to be done each day. I had to keep things going. Then he said that he was here to talk to me as a brother and not as my physician. He wanted to know how I felt about Don coming home. I told him that I would never ask while I was still alive. I want to be true to my husband and to God. He said that it would be wise for him to come home for a season. I'll tell the Stake President. Then he told me how his wife had been very ill and they sent him home before the end of his mission. He went out again, but was called back to help care for the sick. If your husband comes and helps nurse you to health it will mean more to him than anything in the world. You must get rest, and relief from the financial strain. He can go back when you get well. You have made the sacrifice and you will be blessed. God has weighed your spirit. A release from his mission will be honorable. You must trust now in the mercy of Heavenly Father. A few days later I had a call from my husband from Provo asking how things were with us. He said that he would be home in the morning. My husband took over the worry and the load, and gave me true love and devotion. Through faith and prayers my health started to mend. Eventually I could do some work to help tend my family. At thirty years of age it seemed that I had lived for ages, but I hadn't done much toward my education or in the Church. Our life's pleasure was ended for so long. I wanted to view the past with clearer eyes and see the beauties again. I wanted to be prepared for what the future had in store, and be more faithful. An epidemic of typhoid fever struck the town that fall, and I was the last of eighteen victims. My husband administered to me and said, "Annie, you'll get well. Not right now though." Those words of inspiration rang clear. It was a comfort to have that assurance as we faced one of the severest tests of our life. Our faith seemed to be at its lowest point, and this helped us put our trust in the Lord. For eight long weeks we feared for my life. We prayed that a husband and children would not lose their wife and mother. For weeks I had laid at death's door. Heavenly Father in his mercy helped us with another trial. We were truly grateful for the blessings we received when I started on the road to health. It was touching to hear the children pleading for my health. No wife had truer devotion than I did from my husband. He did all in his power to save my life. It's hard to maintain courage with poor health. But the support we had from friends and neighbors helped us get through. The faith we gained was important to us. As Christmas approached, on days that I was very low, my folks were afraid I would not make it. On Christmas morning my eyes were so dim that I could hardly see the presents my dear ones had brought to me. People looked like little specks, and everything seemed so far away. Humbly we prayed that God would send his blessings. I was rallying from the ravages of the fever when another dreaded disease, meningitis, pulled me back again. The pain was more than I could endure much longer, and my friends felt that my death seemed certain. The Elder's were faithful to come day or night to administer to me, buts still there was no relief from the pain. My whole body was helpless except for one arm. The pain was so severe, but when I remembered that when I had been blessed to get well, I stopped worrying. I felt the other side was near, but I longed to stay with my loved ones. I could see with each look the anguish in my husband's heart. I very much wanted to stay with him. One of the Elder's seeing my suffering and pain asked why our prayers were not answered. Maybe it is God's will that she should go. Brother Bigelow, with your consent to the bishop, I'll have him arrange to have her washed and anointed and dedicated to the Lord. The bishop heartily approved and that was done. That day he prayed for the Lord's will to be done, not ours, and acknowledged God's power and mercy. He asked Father, that if it was His will, to let this sister live. With those words the black clouds faded away and our faith and hopes were renewed. He said, Sister Bigelow, take courage, your work is not done. You'll raise your children with honor. At that moment I felt the spirit of the Lord throughout my whole body. I started to mend, and the terrible pain began to leave. I was soon able to get out of bed again. I'll never forget that blessing. The month of June came with the fragrance of roses filling the summer air. All nature was beautiful to behold, and it renewed our courage and hope. We were happy to hear the songs of birds and the hum of bees and the beauty of renewed vegetation. Who can deny the hand of God in this wonderful grand world? In looking for happiness we must all acknowledge that God is merciful and just. If we feel our cross is too heavy to bear we can lighten it by helping others bear theirs. I was still handicapped as a wife and mother for the sickness had left me with leakage of heart. Three doctors told me I'd never be strong again, but that if I were careful, I could live a long time. We knew we would have to seek a higher power, so with faith and determination we began to make plans for our future. We decided to go to the Salt Lake Temple to receive our Father's blessings. Our party consisted of four people, Mother Bigelow, Sister Fraughton, Don and me. The river was high, and covered much of the road from the river to the station. We thought we were safe waiting for the train, so the driver and the team started home. The train came on time, but we didn't get far before we stopped suddenly. A large bull had come walking down the track, and wouldn't be turned back by the train's whistle. The train hit it, and it went under the wheels. That threw the engine and one car off the track. Fortunately no one was hurt. The engineer told us we would have a long time to wait until a wrecker could come and put them back on the track. We all tried to be happy, but we had to stay in the train because there was no other place to go. Finally the wrecker came, and we were on our way. Instead of getting to Salt Lake on schedule at eight we stopped at Provo and stayed with friends because it was late and raining. We had waded through mud until we looked a sight. We were welcomed as we had always been before, with beds for all of us. The next morning we traveled to Salt Lake City and found a place where all of us could stay. In the temple, Sister Fraughton and I were baptized for our health that day. I was too ill to go through a session, so I went back to rest, and ponder my blessings, which had never been so sacred to me before. Sister Fraughten received another blessing, and said that if I would go back, I could probably get one. The Elders were blessing the sick. I went back again, hurrying because I didn't want to be late. When I opened the door I told the temple guide I'd come back to have a blessing and he said take off your shoes and follow me. I'll take you there. He opened the door and asked me to wait with two others who were left waiting. I prayed that I would not be too late. When all were gone the Elders came to me and asked what my trouble was. "We understand your husband is in the temple, so we'll have him come and stand in in the administration." I told them I had leakage of the heart. One put his hand upon my brow and said, "that's bad." My courage and faith failed. But a light soon filled his countenance and he said, "nothing is impossible with the Lord." Oh, how soon my faith picked up again. I knew the spirit of God rested on those men. They prayed that God would bless me and make me strong to do good work on this Earth. They told me my work was not yet finished, and that I'd live long to be an influence on good people I had never met. They said I'd raise my family and be able to work in the yard. This part of the blessing had already come true. I'm sure that if I live for the blessings I received that day that they will come to me. Such blessings stay with one through the years. I was healed by the power of God that day. The leak in my heart was gone. There was no more need of powder and pills. Now what I needed was time to rest. I know God lives with all my heart. May I never lose this knowledge, and may I instill it into the heart of my children and grandchildren. May the spirit I felt in the temple always stay with me to guide my footsteps. Help me treasure that influence all my life so that I can be a true wife and mother. If I could speak words of a poet's pen more freely I could express my feelings. Then I'd help others to rejoice as I do now. I'd somehow touch the spiritual chord of their lives. How much I miss when I fail to see the beauties of tasks held out to me. Life is a game of give and take. In that way we make joy and satisfaction. The more we give of our talents while we are alive the more love and sympathy we have in our hearts when dark clouds gather. The blossoms of love we give will never die. On my way to the temple I was very sad, and I left filled with joy. It is a joyous and sacred feeling when the Lord reveals His spirit to you. I resolved I'd live on a higher plain when I went home, and to faithfully fulfil the duties of life. I did not care for honor. I just wanted to humbly live as God would have me do. No matter how long or hard and weary the day I would try to be joyful and faithful. The road ahead seemed strange. We all go through pitfalls and temptations. May the light of God guide us around them on the road that leads to eternal light. Sometimes we stray and wander, and fail to obey God's commandments. But if we are humble, and if we put our trust in Him, God will make us strong enough to keep us from going wrong. A dear sister came to ask me to teach primary. I told her no, because I still too keenly felt the great loss of my children. Try as I may I could not get rid of that pain in my heart. But with her persuasion I accepted that call, and it was a blessing to me and my family. It was a trial, and the sweat ran off my brow during that first lesson. Oh, what a trial it was for me to work with those sweet children. I wished that I could lay my trials at Jesus' feet, but I gained the spirit of peace while working there. I was called to work in different organizations, and tried to do my best. I felt unable to be class leader in Mutual, but I put my heart and soul into it and gained confidence. I loved to work with children and youth. I desired to teach them the truths of the Gospel. Forgetting our feelings and working for others engenders a real spirit of brother and sisterhood. I tried very hard to overcome my weaknesses, and to treat everyone well. On October 17th 1904 another son, William, came into our home, bringing with him all of the happiness a new child gives to everyone in the family. I was so happy holding a new baby in my arms. I prayed that Heavenly Father would protect him. With my darling baby against my breast, and his dimpled hand on my face, I thought of the rare jewels our children are to us. October's flaming colors were everywhere, and we were delighted to share them with all nature. Never was a mother happier with her family than I. We joined together as a family in frolic, races and anything that was fun. Raising a family is such a rare blessing when fond parents share the responsibility and wrap their love around their children. At three months, William became critically ill with meningitis. We watched him closely as he went into a stupor. Words can't express the anguish we had watching him so still and white. All night we watched and prayed with broken hearts that God would not take him from us. A merciful Father heard our pleadings and let him live. When the stupor passed he woke up smiling. God had given him his health. The doctor said it was a miracle. Don't doubt God's power. On the 12th of July, 1906 our third son, Alton, was born. How thankful we were for him. We welcomed him with thankful hearts. At two Alton had an accident that scalded his hand. He was in such agony that he rubbed the skin from his hand before we could get it bandaged. We had to bandage each finger separately so that they would not grow together. We exercised faith, and we are thankful that it healed without a scar. Working in the Church helped my sad heart mend. I looked forward to meeting with those sweet children. I forced myself to join the youth amusements too. Being with the young people and helping them with their problems gave me new hope, and was a real pleasure. I was called to be the Relief Society Secretary, making three organizations I was working for. This new responsibility was a great deal of work. The teachers report had to be kept accurately and the annual fees accounted for, because, "by the books we are judged." Minutes of meetings had to be kept, and an annual report to the Stake was made each year. On May 25th, 1909, Emily was born. Another bundle of love from Heaven. Her coming again brought peace and cheer. Babies bring so much joy to a mother. We loved her with all of our hearts. She kept me busy. Although I've worked many hours for my children to take care of their needs and teach them, their love has repaid me each day I live. Winona, our seventh girl was born December 31st, 1910. Nothing better or sweeter could have been given to us. She came the last hour of the day, the last day of the week and the last week of the year. But not last in our love for her. I had gone through the pains of childbirth and felt fine until the 9th day. We were happy thinking that it wouldn't be long and I would be out of bed. But instead, the next morning my leg was swollen as large as two. The midwife who had been nursing me came and said to get a doctor. The doctor gave me little encouragement, and doubted that I would live. He did the best he could with his knowledge and medicine, but it could not relieve the pain. Out in the dark dooryard Don knelt in prayer. Seeing my suffering he felt that since there was no more the doctor could do, that we must place our trust in our Heavenly Father. Inspiration came to him beyond the power of men, telling him what to do. He took hot water, added salt and bran and applied it with blankets to my leg, as hot as I could stand it. The first application helped ease the pain, so he repeated it several times. Milk leg was thought to be incurable. But God in his power can heal anything if we are humble and willing to do His will. My life was saved only by His power. The doctor said if I ever did get well I'd never walk. Sometimes I was discouraged and wept because I was so weak, and wondered if the doctor was right. Again he proved to be wrong. I was confined to my bed for two months, and at first I was so weak I had to learn to walk all over again, but many are the miles I've walked since then. My husband was again called on a mission. The plans we had to build a home had to go. It takes money to keep a family and a man on a mission. We sacrificed our business and sold the store. My health wouldn't permit me to run it. Don was also trustee in the school district, and I was appointed to take his place until the school election, but I never got out of the job. I was elected for another term, even though it would soon be time for a new baby to arrive. They wouldn't take no for an answer, so what could I do. Our baby, Okie, was born on November 24th, 1912 with her father far away. This always left a thorn in my heart. Doing school work helped pass away the long time before my husband would return. She planted love in our hearts, and was so dear to us. We called her our missionary girl. She made the eleventh diamond in our crown. It seemed that each child came to sooth a broken heart. I have thought so much of each one, and how sweet and loving each were. My past thoughts bring happiness. The future glides by so quickly. I appreciate the precious gift of these memories of each of my children as they said humble prayers at my knee, and were all safe at night. I cherish the memory of those babies with their pleasant smiles and winning ways. With my husband away I worked and worried all winter, but I couldn't keep things from going wrong. When I watered our team in the morning everything seem ok, but one of them had bled to death before nine. Then one of our milk cows broke her neck and died. We tried to do our chores carefully, but these things just happen. I realize now that these things are just minor, but with a husband so far away, they were mighty inconvenient. The winter passed slowly. When spring came we were glad we had survived. But the spring farm work had to be done. The children and I did it without any help. It was impossible to get help, so we did it alone. We cut the hay and had it bunched, but before we could haul it, it rained. With a long steady rain it didn't dry until the lucern grew several inches high between the bunches. It was so hard to get the hay up, and most of it was spoiled from being too wet. But we had to haul it off so that another crop would grow. It was not an easy job for us. We shocked our grain and hauled it too. Then it was time to get the wood in for the winter. Ervin said he thought he could get from the creek bed rather than going to the mountains for it. I helped him cut the trees. Every morning we hitched up the team and worked on it. We sawed all day to get enough blocks to fill a wagon bed. The blocks were then split and the wood staked in the wood shed. Having a wood supply relieved us of the worry of having fuel for the winter. Through it all I didn't want to change my life for that of a younger woman. My next birthday I would be forty years old. I have traveled over crooked winding roads. Sometimes I went wrong and got off the right road. Many times I did wrong before I knew. May the good I do out weigh the ills, for it was a long hard road, and some of the hills were steep. Much in life depends on which road we choose. I prayed, that now I was forty, that Father would help me to see and count the blessings I knew came from Him. When I was put into the Relief Society secretary position, they didn't give me a chance to say no. Those in authority willed it, and that was that. It may be a good thing that we don't always know what lies in the future for us though. While I was sick I was not released until the time came to make me second counselor. On February 22nd, 1914, Don returned from his mission to be with his family. Hand in hand we went up the road of life together. Responsibility came to our six children by the score. With their help and that of my husband I was able to keep up with my work in the ward. Sometimes these duties were hard to take. We really had to first consider the responsibility of making a living for our family. I hadn't been released yet as Relief Society secretary. Every Tuesday I was expected to be in meeting in wind, rain or snow. Every Tuesday I had to plan my work in detail because I had to take three babies to meeting with me. I washed hands and faces and put my three little girls hair up in curls. In stormy weather I carried two babies in my arms. The older one walked proudly by me. Our older children went to school every day, so there was no one to leave them with. Father had to spend time at his work and business to make a living for his family. When the weather was fine taking the children was fun, because by my taking the lead they could run along behind me. They made little trouble and just sat on the bench by my side until meeting was over and we could go back home. I found that if I could profit by what the class leader taught it would help me live throughout the week. The lessons dealt with all phases of life to help mothers deal with their families. We were always glad to go to meeting, where we were taught to be cheerful. The lessons always taught something new. The president was there to guide and direct the counselors. The secretary kept a record of good deeds and acknowledged the good each member had done. When the call came to be first counselor I was released from secretary. With this new responsibility I prayed for power to help with the duties. Father helped me to overcome temptations and to do right so that I could feel good about myself. I have great faith in the Gospel. Why do I hesitate to frown on all evil before it is too late? I was learning fast to carry the load. The first day I was counselor I was called to lay out the dead. Our president was gone from home for a week, and so I was in the harness. That week one brother and one sister died. I had their burial clothes and funeral to look after. I enjoyed being counselor while I stayed in that calling. My only regrets are the mistakes I made. I hope the good deeds will balance these out. I will thank God for the privilege I had. All of the time the tempter lurks near. And sometimes he gets the upper hand. While we are trying to be good he works fast to keep us from doing our duty. He'll try to tempt us until we die. As I sat meditating one day I had a phone call from Bishop Fullmer asking if my husband and I could come in for a talk. He wanted to know if my husband and I would be willing for me to serve as Relief Society president to be the mother of the ward. In humility I accepted that responsibility. It took faith for my family. Whatever at that time seemed to me to be a burden proved to be a great blessing to me. I loved my two counselors. We were united in obtaining inspiration. We helped the young people's weddings, and worked with sickness and helped bury the dead. We had entertainments for the young and the old. We comforted the sorrowful when we were called to their homes. The Relief Society sisters helped everyone. We never knew when our work would be finished. Our greatest responsibility was to help those in need. When we were called on for a donation all responded freely for whatever we were asked. Working with the dear sisters left me with fond memories, and I still enjoy their company whenever we meet. One of our tasks was to make burial clothes. My home was the place we met most often. My family got the pleasure of serving dinner. It gave my daughters extra work, and brought happiness to both them and to me. There were no funeral homes. We had to prepare the bodies for burial in the home instead. We held the funeral at the Church house, which we had this to get ready, and to take care of the flowers as well. A lunch had to be prepared for family and friends after the funeral. I served as president in horse and buggy days. Things were different then. When the sisters came to conference from the county seat, a half dozen or more came to our home for their meals. We had to prepare lunch at noon and dinner at night, since there was no other way for them to be accommodated. With automobiles long distance has been taken away, so they can go home with comfort at the end of a day's meetings. When we went to Heber to conference it took a whole day with a horse team. We worked hard in the ward and tried to do our share, but I always made sure my family was properly cared for. My husband and children made certain things at home were taken care of. Our secretary was jovial, and a good kind woman, who was always on hand to meet members. We tried in our weak ways to help the sick and the dying. We worked hard and prayed that we'd be faithful in providing the needed comfort to those facing the hardships of those who suffered. It takes courage and humility to be a worthwhile friend regardless of the circumstances, but this kind of work molds character. Working with those in sickness and death almost breaks one's heart. Being president of the Relief Society is like being mother to the ward. One must accept the responsibility and trust in God that our hearts will be filled with compassion for everyone. Our labor was not for power, but for love. My fondest hope is to teach the children God gave me, and to guide them back, Father, to thee. The Boren family was having a reunion once a year to bring scattered family members together. We always enjoyed a good programs at these annual meetings. A reunion was planned to be in our home November the tenth, but William took critically ill and went to the hospital. On the 18th of November he died while we were there. And again we were brought down to the depths of anguish for our dear son. He had joined his sisters. His sickness came suddenly, and death followed quickly on its heals. We brought him home where friends gathered to share our burden. The Relief Society sisters came with love to give us strength. Yes, there was sorrow and weeping in our home that night. Our hearts were breaking. Such anguish we bore that day. It made us feel old. There is no use thinking we can explain such things. We must simply acknowledge our Father knoweth best. One more of our children is numbered with those who receive the blessings of eternity. We laid William softly down to sleep among the hills. We gently laid flowers on the grave while tears dropped like rain. I did not know what tears were until that day. I learned that tears, like rain, can bring refreshing peace to hearts parched with pain. How happy we'll be when time is no more, and our weary feet reach that eternal place, and we hear William's voice speak to us gently. And yet we feel we know our dear kind Lord has richly honored William. Could it be that he could no longer grant a stay to him in this world? Without him we are lonely, but his going brings joys and comfort as we contemplate the beauty of his soul. Could we ever go back to normal living? Could we adjust our lives in a lonely home now? Our friends gave us what comfort they could. Ervin and Elva married and had families of their own. We enjoyed them in our home until they were grown. Each of their families added a girl and a boy that brought new joy into our lives. In 1919 the flu raged and took such a toll of death and sorrow to the nation. Ervin's family in Provo had the flu, and I went to help. In a few days I was down with the rest. A fourteen year old girl was all of the help we had. We were greatly blessed that she remained free of the flu when it was taking whole families all over the nation. The next year the flu raged in our town, and nearly every family was sick. People were afraid to stay with the sick, so for weeks I was away from home night and day. The flu had gone almost completely through town when it invaded our home. I had helped with the sickness in most homes in town. It was almost impossible to get any help. God gave me the strength to care for my own. Boys did our chores and work outside, for which I will be eternally grateful. If we are humble, God will provide. From fifty to sixty years I have seen the beauties God gave us. Children's joys and laughter have enriched my life. I will try to live so I can forget the years that were filled with doubts and fears. In my sixtieth year I climb the rugged hill of life, counting on at least ten more that will be filled with both joy and, of course, problems. Tender memories cling round those bygone years when boys and girls tell me about their joys and fears. There is no turning back. Time's invisible fingers are indelibly written on our soul. I was asked to teach the Gospel Doctrine class a time or two. I had taught classes many times, but to teach parents was a great responsibility. With my limited knowledge I didn't know what to do. I accepted the call in humility, and I'm telling you that I studied and prayed and prayed and studied again. I knew my pupils would be very experienced men and women. It was only with inspiration from above that I could try to teach the Gospel. Words spoken aimlessly without sincere conviction fail to inspire. Humbly I prayed for inspiration. For any success I give praise to the Lord. My failures I made on my own. Those years gave me a testimony more precious than gold. Looking back I see that ofttimes we do things the hard way, but we learn by doing. When you interest a class and hold them spellbound, then the lesson has clicked, and you have found the key to their heart. I hope I have left a sacred memory with all that attended my class. I'll always share their friendship. I was called to be secretary to a missionary committee. We planned at night and worked during the day. Brother Boyden, Sister Nuttall, Sister Boren and I would get money to send to the missionaries. More faithful workers would be hard to find than those dear missionary friends. Every Monday night we held a meeting and planned a dance or a party to make money. While we served we helped two missionaries in the field. Some faithful members paid a dollar a month to the fund. Sometimes we solicited money, but were never turned down. We sold ice cream too. We proved many times that faith without works is dead. By working together we became life-long friends. When Alton was called on a mission it was hard to send him under the conditions that existed. It took all the courage we had to have him go. Our home was mortgaged and we were deep in debt. Money was scarce. To sponsor that mission we had to make sacrifices, but we were repaid in spiritual satisfaction. Our family worked unitedly in all kinds of weather from daylight to dark. In the winters our hands and feet almost froze doing chores. We then milked twelve or thirteen cows. Alton knew he had one hundred percent support from home wherever he went on his mission. We sent him with a prayer that he would take a leading part, and we were more than satisfied with his effort. I cannot express the happiness and joy that came from having a missionary husband and son. Sometimes my patience was tried by the fact that all of my time was taken trying to help my children get an education. They got up early to ride 12 miles in a bus. Lunch had to be packed every day, and dinner must be ready when they got back. Money was scare there on the farm. I remember the girls did their part to add their small earnings to the pot. Emily stayed home from school part of the time, but by taking weekly examinations she made her grade. When graduation time came and school was completed she received her diploma along with the rest of the students. Our girls worked on the farm like men to help Alton get through his mission. Don's health failed while Alton was away, but day after day the work was completed. From then on our troubles never eased until Alton was released from his mission. The girls helped mow and bunch the hay and then haul it. We shocked grain and pitched, hauled and stacked bundles. The trials should make us better men and women. Trials made our family grow close. In November 1936 I had a sever case of flu. I didn't get well all winter no matter what we tried. In March I went to the Intermountain Clinic, and from there to the LDS hospital. Five doctors, Tindell, Hatch, Maw, Vico and an intern I can't name, said I needed a number of operations, but my heart was too weak to withstand them. The surgical doctor said I was a poor risk for an operation, and that they better treat me medically. He thought that if they could get rid of gallstones and a poisonous goiter, I may get well. They decided to try to build up my physical condition by keeping me in bed for six weeks more. Then I went from the hospital to Winona's. In addition to her profession, she spent all of her extra time giving me such tender care. My heart never got strong enough for them to operate, so I went home to stay the summer. For five years the doctors kept me alive, but I was down and out. My husband and family took my responsibilities, so I didn't have to worry about work at all. Although I was sick, I didn't want the children to think that I was lazy. I crocheted doilies for cupboards and tables, and counted my time profitably spent. While doing seven bedspreads I watched the pattern grow with flowers and gay designs. While working on them I left cares behind. So you will find the stitches I made in your memory chest. The second time they took me to the hospital to stay for a while, but it wasn't long again before they took me away to stay with Winona in Park City. She gave me the best of care, and I enjoyed her company. On the twenty-ninth of April we had been married fifty years. Our children planned to celebrate our golden wedding day, but the big time was called off when the doctor said I could not go to Wallsburg. At that time we were living in Salt Lake City. The doctor's words were hard to take, but our children handled it tactfully and made it easier for us. They came to Salt Lake with presents and a feast, and we appreciated it. Ervin and Winona's families couldn't come, but they said that they would pay our way on a vacation. A year later we were on our way to sunny California for a two-month stay to see the children and to get a tighter grip on life. I was too ill to see much of California, but we had a good time. The children lived closely enough together that we could walk from place to place. We'd enjoyed those days. We learned to appreciate our family. The children did all they could to make our stay pleasant. My husband spent most of his time fishing. One lovely morning he landed the largest fish he ever had. It was 27 inches long and weighed 9 and one half pounds. Fishing in the Feather River was very good. When it was time to return to Utah to spend the rest of the summer and winter, the children saw us on the bus to Marysville. We'll always remember that trip. We lived in Salt Lake City three winters, and then moved to St. George, where we could work in the Temple. We had a great deal of difficulty finding a place to live within walking distance of the temple. We had no automobile, so we couldn't take a place beyond walking distance. At last we found one little room with no conveniences. It had a cupboard made of orange boxes, a little old stove, two chairs and a box for a wash stand. We had no hot water and did our washing by hand. There was no warm carpet, and the bed had a hard mattress with poor springs. The rent was high for such a place. All winter long we lived as they did in pioneer days. We were not the type to give up and go back home, so we played make believe and said things were fine. Going to the temple each day gave us strength to stay in spite of the inconvenience. When spring came and we had completed our winter's work we paid our rent, stored our things and set out on our second trip to California. It took one full night's ride on the bus to Los Angeles, where we were delayed for twelve hours. When we got there the station was crowded, and we were tired. The bus was to leave in an hour or so. We waited for a call for the bus to take us to our destination, and when it came we rushed to the door of the bus. But to our surprise they said the bus was full. Remember, it was war time, and there was no other means of transportation available. We had nothing to do but to wait for the next bus, which would not be until seven o'clock that night. We had traveled the first night so that we could see California during the day, but instead we traveled all of the way at night. After 496 miles we reached Yuba City after noon. But once with our family, it did not take long to forget our problems. We spent a wonderful time for two weeks or so, and then traveled 116 miles to Central Valley to see Ervin and his family for awhile. They treated us first class. We enjoyed the beautiful roses. It was a treat to pick ripe oranges from the tree. There were orchards and vineyards as far as the eye could see. A man who worked there took us to Shasta Dam. We first saw it from the top of the mountain. Even workmen had to show passes, and the only way we could visit was to go with one of them. The dam was well guarded. We rode down the canyon for miles after our inspection from the mountain, and went up on the elevator four hundred sixty-five feet high. It almost took my breath away. It was interesting to see how easily the work was done. It went like clock work. The machinery worked with such perfection you'd think it would be fun to work with it. They would press a button and a batch of cement was mixed. Press another button and the load was sent to the dam. We left the elevator to walk up three flights of steps leading to the tower. I just went up two flights and ran out of strength. The steps were built on the outside wall, and the only protection was a rail. Looking down to the ground made me dizzy, and I was afraid I would fall. The rest of the company got to the tower and could see for miles around. Our experience was interesting. It was amazing to see cement carried down on a wire by the ton. What a sight the dam would be when it was completed. It would back up water for thirty five miles in three rivers. We rode over the highest double decker bridge in the world. The Pit River was down under. It was a marvel to see it so far below. The train came through a tunnel and traveled on the lower deck of the bridge. Four automobiles could go abreast on the roadway. We went back to Winona's and celebrated our wedding day as well as theirs. In May we celebrated both Father's birthday and Mothers day. In June we celebrated Fathers day as well. We enjoyed a feast for all five celebrations. The Feather River was good fishing, and the rest of the vacation we enjoyed it every day. Sometimes we'd all take lunch, and we all enjoyed it so much. My husband would fish with Jess from a boat in the early dawn, and then fish alone while Jess was gone to work. They had plans to meet at the river each day when Jess got off work. Jess would say, "I'll be on the river 'till you come." One day Jess came home from work ill, but did not want to break his appointment with Don. He asked us to go tell him it would be best for him to stay home and rest. We went to the river and signaled Don, and thought he'd take up anchor and row in. But the wind was blowing so hard that he could not row the boat to shore. He was going down the river at such a rate that my blood ran cold. The Feather River was deep and wide, and I was afraid that if he capsized he would not be able to swim against the current. It was not long before the boat was out of sight around a bend. We offered a fervent silent prayer that Father would be safe. The strength Don received from an unseen power helped guide the boat safely to shore. Winona had run down the river as fast as she could go, and returned smiling with Father. When he had reached the bank, he tied the boat to a tree. He vowed that he'd not get trapped alone on the river. When he had to go alone, he'd fish from the shore. When the vacation was over we went to the railroad station to return home. A score or more soldiers were waiting, and we were afraid that there were so many that we couldn't get to the train. But fortunately we were soon on our way home. We were due in Salt Lake City the next night at eight, but the train was delayed five hours, so we were late again. People waiting at the station were frantic because they could not find a room. No other train left that night, and the train station would soon be closed. "There are no rooms to be had", we heard people say. Don didn't wait, but went out immediately and found a place for us. The second fall we went away from home we knew that we would never go back to Wallsburg to stay. It's hard to leave a home you have built and lived in for years. There are memories in each corner, and your thoughts go through the house and everywhere. I love these places my children have lived in. What a thrill went through my heart as I watched them play. These memories are fresh in my mind. We worked hard to be independent, but we got the wrong slant on the business wedge. Quite often one makes errors, but we tried to be cheerful for each other's sake. My advice is to use what means you need as you go along, and enjoy life. We worked to save for a rainy day, things didn't always work out. In the fall we again went to St. George before our rent was due. The place was already rented to another person. The landlady had rented to two people. We had a written agreement, and could have held the place, but we didn't want a fight, and simply turned it back. But we didn't know what we would do for another place to live. When we reached the sidewalk we met President Snow, and he solved our problem. He directed us to an apartment in the Stake House. We found out what comfort in a small apartment could be like. There was nobody to bother us, and the hot water was available day and night. We sold our home and stored our furniture. We knew we would have to rent until normal conditions were restored. Leila Snyder bought a home and made plans to build two apartments in it. We stayed with her in part of her home for the rest of the winter. The apartments were not yet ready, but she didn't want to live alone. When you move before things are ready you make a mistake. For a time things didn't work out too well. Moving and building at the same time isn't very pleasant. You have to do things twice. We just couldn't get materials to remodel. We sent for our furniture and stored it in one room. Day by day we hoped we'd soon be settled. Spring came and we were still in a mess. But it didn't do any good to complain. We simply had to wait to have a chimney built. Each day we must greet people with a smile, even though promises are broken. We couldn't keep things clean. The red mud of St. George clung to our feet and tracked everywhere. We longed for a place to hang our clothes. We were still living out of trunks and suitcases. Papers and receipts got lost, and it was a problem for us to keep going. We surely were uncomfortable for a little while. Don had to take over the carpentry work to get it finished. Two clothes closets had to be moved, windows and doors had to be rehung to face the other direction. One room had five doors leading into it. We filled two of them in and papered over them. When the chimney was built there was plastering to do, and we had no idea how long it would take to get that done. When the plasterer finally came, we were more than willing to settle his bill. Then the paper hanger came and did one room, but it all came off before it was finished, and the job had to be done over again. But who could put in on to stay? We found a sister with a large family who could do the work, but she would have to come over after school at night. We worked with her until ten each night, and finally got it finished. We had no place to put dishes until the cupboard was built, and so they remained packed away. To worry about these little perplexities doesn't make much sense, but they were really annoying. The saying is that we go from the frying pan into the fire, but we tried to be sensible. The third winter we had a comfortable home, and we gave many thanks to our Heavenly Father. We felt as though heaven was not very far away. We had plenty to eat and plenty to wear, and we slept peacefully. I'll tell you about another vacation. When we left it was early morning and the weather was warm. We arrived at the bus station on St. George, bought our tickets, and waited patiently for the bus. We left at seven ten on a crowded bus, but we were glad to be on our way to see our children. We got to Cedar City, and had only fifteen minutes to walk a block and catch the train. We boarded with two minutes left, and the train left on time. At Lund we changed trains, but had an hour to wait, so we were able to get something to eat. The Challenger, a swift, long train, picked us up, and we were on our way. We landed in Milford in the middle of the day and stayed with our children for a while. Jess met us at the station and took us home to a fish dinner. Then they took us on a fishing trip to the mountains where the water was clear and cold. Our first night we camped in a green meadow and saw some wild deer. We were disappointed that there were no cabins, but we slept under the stars without shelter and were glad. By morning, however, the night became cold, and we nearly froze. But the sun chased the dew away and we were content to stay longer. The scenery was so beautiful. The fishing was good, and the men got their share. We had plenty of fish to eat. The time passed quickly, and we had to return. The road down the mountain was narrow, steep and dangerous, and gave us plenty of thrills and chills. But rough roads are the price one must pay to get up to the lakes. The time we had to stay was too short, but we had other children we wanted to visit. We stayed in Milford a few days, and then left on the train again. Lyndle station was our next stop, and soon we would be nearing our destination. Fern and the girls met us at the railroad station and took us to their home It was a thrill to see them. We enjoyed our time with them. The nights were cool and the days warm. When they were through with their work we went sight seeing with the family. We rode miles and miles in the countryside, and enjoyed it. The night before we left some of their friends came over, and the next morning they took us to Provo. We spent the rest of our vacation in Provo and Salt Lake, with children, grandchildren, and tried to find time to renew friendships. The children, however, always had something planned for us to do. Family visits, chicken dinner, and driving in Provo Canyon. We'll always remember our visits there. They took us to Wallsburg to meet old friends who had shared our joys and sorrows, and that was a genuine treat. We felt the spring and summer were well spent. We were treated royally. But is was time to return to St. George for the winter. The next vacation we were happy to get onto the bus without any problem. Most of the passengers were asleep before we traveled far, but I sat there wide awake, thrilled to think about leaving all cares behind and meeting with our family again. For weeks we had counted each hour before we would be on our way. We rode over acres of barren land, which helped me understand why man has to make a living by the sweat of his brow, as Adam did. We traveled over rough roads to Beaver, and there were met by our loved ones, again without any problems. From there we went about thirty miles by automobile, and had a good time for ten days. Fishing to my husband is the best time you can have. It spurs up the spirit. We cut our visit short this time, and thought we would be able to go back in the fall. We went from Milford to Leamington for a few days, and spent the rest of our time in Provo and Salt Lake. The visits we had with our children were the best. We enjoyed a good visit with friends, but two months was the limit of our vacation this time, so we returned to St. George. I'm sorry to say we missed the fishing trip we had planned on our way back. Unexpected things come up. We can't always stay where we wish. We'll go back to St. George and make the best of the winter while we are there. Next summer we'll come back to share our joys with children. Our fourth winter in St. George was a pleasant one. As soon as a room was vacated it was taken up quickly. We were fortunate to have three rooms when higher rent came along. Property raised in price by one-half to two-thirds, so now we decided to move back north again, to be closer to our loved ones. We felt that we could accomplish a great deal of work by spring. Month by month passed before the temple was open, so we didn't get all of the work we had hoped to. Working in the temple brought peace to us. As long as we live that glad memory will stay. Just to look at the temple gave us inspiration. To work there helped us gain our salvation. We cannot explain the feelings we felt there. May that spirit always remain with us. We hope some day to go back to the temple again. We love temple work. We worked seven winters in the temple as much as we could. I hope the five hundred I worked for will appreciate it. When we left St. George we got up early to see our things packed on the truck. Our neighbors stood by to shake our hand, and express their true friendship. We said goodbye to those dear friends, and hoped we had not left behind any enemies. We left St. George on a bright April day to make our home in Provo. We traveled without worry, even though all of our belongings were with us. The beauties of nature appealed to me as never before. Even the waste sage brush and rocks told me that they were placed there by someone all wise. It was a long journey, about three hundred miles, and we observed many interesting things green valleys, and the contrast between spring and winter. It gave me a thrill to travel along the side of the mountain, and into the valley below with its streams of crystal clear water. The road was crooked and winding, but we enjoyed the joys and beauty of the day. Long will I remember that beautiful April day. Each town we came to was alive with girls and boys, the stores were well stocked, and well dressed men and women walked the streets. In green pasture we saw cattle and sheep, and I could see beauties in the clouds that floated by, and pines on the mountains. My gaze didn't miss the snow-capped mountains with streams flowing from them. Hills of cedar were everywhere, where wild deer try to hide from hunters. I would have liked to pick some of the wild flowers, but we traveled too quickly. But we did hear song birds singing their happy songs up in the trees. I kept thinking what the future had in store for me. How many times in life we didn't know what to do. I thought what a wonderful world this would be if only each could see their own faults. While the road was winding around each bend, it was taking us closer to our friends and family. I could only see beauty as we went steadily along. I can't recall a more interesting and pleasant day. We were nearing our home and our loved ones. A long day's journey had brought us to the end of the road. Our children met us with sincere joy and cheer. We were homesick and lonesome while we were away, and now hoped to stay close to our children. Now we have moved back on a farm. We have crystal water, and the air is free. I still like being a farmer's wife. I'm living in the garden of your childhood days. The sweet memory gives me joy. The love we cultivated in that garden long ago grows truer and stronger as the years march on. Those were happy golden hours. We learn by suffering the value of time. Dear children, turn over a new page and try seeing what forgiving little faults will do for you. Only kindly words, deeds or thoughts will help us be charitable like we were taught to be. Stand on your own feet and don't turn a cold shoulder to anyone. It is much better to suffer wrong. So wipe the slate clean and start over today. You don't have to have much wealth to be happy. It takes love and contentment, and good health. Don't hold back words that will give comfort and cheer, and your heart will be happier. The time to appreciate us and to give us love is while we are here. It will not take an ounce of love from your own family. A kind word, a letter, or even a card does not take love from anyone. But it can lift someone's worry and sorrow. Time counts as nothing when help and love is needed. Angry words pierce the heart. I'll not admit I'm feeble, even though I am over seventy years old. I can't tell you the joys and sorrows of seventy years. Our hearts must be free from anger now to have peace and happiness. In a shade past seventy I must still climb a hill. When you number the days, I've been in the shade a long time. Old age may make me slow, but I'll still try to help those that are in need. I count my blessings. I'm old, but God has given me better health. The years have been kind to me. Sunshine and shadows come and go. The darkest hour is just before the dawn. Happy will be the day when we understand why trials come to us. We have not been told why so many troubles come. But by faith we're given strength to grow old. The sorrows that came in our younger days have never healed. Why it should be we've never learned. Though my hair grows white and my footsteps lose their grace I still laugh at my grandchildren's happiness. When we pick roses the leaves wither and die, but they are still fragrant to the end of the day. Look closely and you will see what these later years have brought to me. Dear Lord, I do not care if I am growing old as long as my family hold true love for me. May I stand on life's hillside and look back and see a life well spent. It's hard to live and never stray from God's teachings. If could, I'd like to leave my testimony here and impress it upon your lives. I often wonder what my children think of my silver hair. Can you think of giving greater service than to give help to loved ones while you live? Each year the world has been good to us. Dear children you make me happy. When I see the beauties of your faces so clearly, with so much hope pride and joy I wrapped around each of you, I hear childhood voices calling. I remember the joys, not the tears. Time has marred life's beauty, but the declaration of love is supreme in my heart. Help me, Father, to be more thoughtful when I see sorrow and pain, and lend a helping hand. My life's work is swiftly passing, soon it will be done. May I leave a blessing to my children. 651 Pure thoughts are like silent friends to cheer our lonesome hours They smile from the garden of our soul like bright-eyed flowers At the foot of the mountain I gaze at the peak I must scale Oh give me strength as I climb up the rugged trail. Tender memories cluster around those bygone years. Now all our children have flown from the home nest, and are making homes for companions and children. The harvest time of our lives are when they come bounding home, and tell us they've found no happier place. Our family is worth all the heartaches and pain they've caused when with a loving smile they come home again. Now we have grandchildren and great grandchildren. How could anything to equal the joys they bring. I remember in my prime, spending most of my time with a loving family with such beautiful things. Six of our children married with our blessing. Our hope is that their love will be greater each year, with an aim to make a home and raise a family. We prayed that there would be no discord. Married life builds hope, faith and love. To raise an honorable family is a wonderful dream. We look at our family with pride. Five grandchildren were born to me between my fortieth and fiftieth years. Six came between my fiftieth and sixtieth. Seventeen were born between my sixtieth and seventieth. One born in my seventieth year made twenty nine. When thirteen of those grandchildren came to Earth I took care of their family. I rendered that service with a mother's love. Now I have six great grandchildren. Two of our grandchildren lived with us seven years. I held them so tenderly in my heart, and missed them so much when they left. Seventy-three years today ( October 24th, 1946) they laid me in my mother's arms. My birthplace was a new little village where my parents were pioneers. I honor them for having such a large family. They obeyed the commandments given to them by one all wise. We were taught in youth to follow the gospel light, and to do right and respect other's feelings. In December, nineteen hundred and forty-six, I end my story. May the blessings of the Lord be with you all of your life. May the joys of life come to comfort and cheer you. I sincerely wish you a MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR. Back to top Sitemap | Terms of use | Privacy policy

Thoughts and Memories of Don & Annie Bigelow by Okie Bigelow Heward

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Some Thoughts and Memories of Don & Annie Bigelow -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- (This was scanned into a computer file by Stephen Rawlins in Feb., 1997, from the document: DON AND ANNIE BIGELOW LIFE HISTORY, prepared by their children in 1988.) By: Okie Bigelow Heward We used to say that the meadow lark's song said, "Wallsburg is a pretty little place", and it is. This valley is completely surrounded by mountains. Because of this, it has been a favorable farming area. The temperature is somewhat warmer than other parts of Wasatch County and the growing season is a little bit longer. It has also been a successful dairy community. Because of the mountains, the valley seems to be shut off from the whole world.The mountains surround it like the protecting arms of someone you love he Indians used to call Wallsburg Round Valley. In the spring, the hills are covered with wild flowers that are beautiful. I remember seeing a whole hill covered with white lilies. Their fragrance filled the air. It was like a bit of heaven had dropped down to earth for me to enjoy. Wallsburg is more than a pretty little place in the fall. It is a beautiful place. The mountains turns from green to a beautiful carpet, blended with red yellow and it's green. The mountains there are really natures beautiful garden. After a while, the beauty changes to a blanket of white. When winter really comes to Wallsburg and the snow covers everything, it gets so cold that ice crystals form. When the sun does shine, these crystals sparkle like diamonds. At night when the telephone wires are covered with ice, you can hear them ring. The crunch of the snow under your feet is something your never forget. This time of year hearts and bodies were warmed by the wood fires that burned in each home. Friends and neighbors warmed your heart because those who lived there, in this small town were mostly good, honest people. My mother was an angel, if an angel ever lived here on earth. She was the kindest, most understanding, loving and diplomatic person that I have ever known. She gave birth to eleven children and as far as I know, each of her children felt the same way about mother. We loved mother so much that a look of disapproval was all it took to correct our behavior. I never remember of even being slapped much less getting a whipping. Oh! I remember one time when mother said to me, "I think you need a whipping. You go outside and find a stick that I can whip you with." I remember finding a very short stick but I knew mother would never accept that. I found a stick that was neither too short or too long I took it in the house to mother. By that time, I was so sorry for what I had said or done that mother of course did not use it. I am sure that mother in her great wisdom knew that was just exactly what would happen. I never remember mother even rasing her voice to us. Our most severe punishment was, she made us stand on a chair. Mother never made us sit in a chair in the corner, no, we stood on a chair, where there was no mistaking that we were being punished. True humiliation and repentance was found while you were standing on a chair. It was bad enough to be found in this predicament by one of the family but if anyone else saw you there, you just wanted to die. If there is unconditional love in this world, mother gave it to us children I remember loving to sit on the floor, next to mother's chair and feeling her loving, caressing hand stroke my forehead and hair. I remember she taught me about love. I said, "Mother I will never get married because I could never love anyone like I love you." Mother said, "Yes, you will because you will love your husband differently than you love me. You will also have a different love for your children." How very wise my mother was. Mother showed her love in many ways. She cooked, cleaned and sewed for us. She was an excellent seamstress. She spent hours sewing for us girls. She would let us find a picture of a dress that we like in the Sears and Roebuck catalogue. She would then make her own pattern and make the dress. I loved some of those dresses and was so proud to wear them. Mother was a good cook. One thing that made her such a good cook was we had our own milk, cream, butter and eggs. All of us remember our father saying, "This is surely good. That mother of yours has been in the cream jar again." Mother was well known for her good homemade ice cream. Sunday dinners were special. Mother prepared everything she could on Saturday. In the sumer, the peas were shelled, the beans were snapped or some other garden vegetable was prepared. We always raised a good garden so we had fresh vegetables in the summer. Mother bottled many of these for our winter meals. We raised our own chickens, pigs, cattle and sheep, so we had fried chicken, chicken and homemade noodles, cured pork chops, pork or beef roasts, the best homemade, bottled sausage I ever tasted or some other meat. There was always potatoes and gravy. We had ice cream, pie, cake, pudding or some other good thing for dessert. Mother always prepared for more than just our family. We never had to ask if we could bring a friend home for Sunday dinner. Sometimes the Stake Church people came to Sunday School with out warning. I remember mother sometimes hurrying about but we had those people in our home many times for dinner. Mother cooked just as well when dinner was for our family only. I remember with happiness the times that mother cooked dinner and we took it over to the farm where father was working, for a picnic. We spread a quilt on the grassy bank of the creek and enjoyed a wonderful dinner. I remember fried chicken, creamed peas with new potatoes and much more good food. If our mother was not an angel, no one will ever make me believe that she was not. Our father's nature was different than mother's. Father did raise his voice in authority. There never was a question if we displeased him. Yet father in his own way was kind and loving. I remember sitting on his lap while he sung to me. Sometimes he chorded on our pump organ or he played his guitar and we children sang with him. Someone said one of the best things a father could do for their children was to let them know that he loved their mother. There never was a question in anyone's mind about whether our father loved our mother. They loved each other. I have said that my father adored my mother. Many times I remember when we were sitting at the table father would reach over, pat my mother's knee and say, "Oh, I love those blue eyes." I have thought father was like the dogs that were used to herd sheep. Sometimes he would really bark but he never would bite. I remember my father said he would never whip a child because you beat one devil out and two in. Across from our home, the town ditch ran unfenced for a block or so. When a herd of sheep were driven up the road and they reached this unfenced ditch, it seemed that one would jump the ditch and most of the herd would follow. The herders on their horses could not get the sheep to jump back across the ditch. When they told their dogs to get them the dogs ran barking and the sheep immediately jumped back across the ditch. I felt that way about my father. I always obeyed even if I was not afraid that he would hurt me. We not only were brought up in a home filled with love but our home was also a house or prayer. Each morning and night before we ate, we kneeled down by our chairs and had family prayer. I remember that I thought that my father would pray forever. To a hungry child, father's prayers were far too long. Now I would love to hear just one of those prayers. Father prayed, as we all should, just like he was talking to the lord. Another thing that I didn't appreciate about father was the way we were usually awakened in the morning. We children slept in the basement. Father and mother's Bedroom was directly about ours. Father wore laced work shoes. The first thing when father got up he started singing some hymn. He then would stomp one foot and then the other to get his work shoes on. I thought that was a rude awakening. Now I think what a different world it would be if every child was awakened by hearing their father singing, Sweet Hour of Prayer, Count Your Blessing or some of the other hymns that remind me of father when we sing them in church. Father was a hard workers. He worked from day light till dark on our farm. He worked hard to provide the very best living that could be made on a farm. He gave us everything that his labors could afford. None of us children will ever forget the Christmas that we were awakened by music being played on a big, beautiful phonograph that father and mother had bought for us. I enjoyed playing records on this until I was married. I remember father saying, "I would rather have my children bring their friends to our home, than to go to someone's house to play." He went to the mountains and cut poles that were as high as most telephone poles and made a swing for us. He used big strong hay rope and made the seat large enough that two people could swing at once. Most of the young people in Wallsburg have had their turn in that swing. He bought a croquet set and set it up on our lawn for us to enjoy. The pegs and hoops were never taken down except to mow the lawn. Father taught me a lesson on day that I will never forget. One day my sisters, Emily, Winona and I were playing croquet. Just as I hit my ball, mother called for us to come help her for a few minutes. Emily and Winona ran to the house but I took time to move my ball with my foot, so that the next time when I hit the ball it would go through the hoop without difficulty. When we came back to resume our game, I heard my father's commanding voice say, "Okie, I want you to move your ball back where it was and I don't want you to ever cheat again as long as you live." I either didn't know or had forgotten that father was sitting on the porch watching us play. I don't think I have ever cheated since that time because when our father said, "don't you ever" you knew that he meant never. When father spoke to one of us, we knew we had better listen. His form of correction was a good talking to or a Scotch blessing, if you will. He would never let you hang your head in shame. He would strike you under your chin and say, "You look at me, I am talking to you." Believe me, you knew that you were being talked to. Father was a very religious man. He lived every word that he believed to the letter. To him there was only right and wrong. As I see it, he kept all of God's commandments and expected each of us children to do the same. He really taught by example. None of us could ever blame any wrong doing on our father's example. Mother believed the gospel as well as father did but mother was Relief Society president for sixteen years. She saw a lot of life. She learned to temper her religion with understanding. I think her philosophy was, I will try to live my religion to the letter, by I will understand when anyone is not perfect. The only home that I remember was the new home that father and mother built in 1915. The husband of one of mother's cousins built the house for them. His name was Ed Snyder. This home was the first brick home built in Wallsburg It also was the first house in Wallsburg to have a full, finished basement. The white bricks were shipped by train to the Wallsburg Station, then hauled by horse and wagon to the building sight. The house was built on the top of a low hill, not far from the center of town. It was quite impressive because it could be seen almost as soon as you entered the valley. For those days, it was a big, beautiful home. It was a well planned house. The living-dining room and parlor was on the front. The sliding doors between these two rooms went into the walls so the parlor could be closed off or the doors opened to form one big room. The door between the kitchen and dining room was a swinging door. Even if there was no water in the house, a room was made for a bathroom to be used for that purpose some day. There was only one bedroom upstairs but the basement was'finished into five good sized rooms. At the time the house was built, there was no electricity in Wallsburg but the builder wired the house for electricity. Father thought he could produce his own electricity by putting a turbine in the ditch that ran behind our house and the water fell down the hill. The school house where all of us children went to school was built in 1904. It also was built by Ed Snyder. There were two class rooms downstairs and two upstairs. A school teacher taught two grades in each room. The first four grades were taught downstairs and the fifth grade to the eight was taught upstairs. There was also a large room on the back. I suppose it was intended for an assembly room. A storage room for coal and other things were under the building. The floors were made of wood and were kept oiled. A big potbellyed coal stove with a protective metal shield around it provided the heat. There was no inside plumbing. There was an outhouse at the top of the school yard for the girls and one for the boys at the bottom of the grounds. If we wanted a drink of water we walked about half a block to a spring. We drank by cupping our hands and drinking from them. We always attended school regularly because our parents knew that education was very important. Besides our home and school, the "meeting house" as we used to call it, was an important part of our life. It served not only as our church by it was the only entertainment center that we had. Since It had a small stage, even our school plays were held in the meeting house. When there was a dance, the wooden benches that we sat on in church were moved with their backs to the walls. The floor was then a dance floor. I remember what must have been kerosene lamps on the walls. These were lit with a torch. This fascinated me. The electricity came to Wallsburg in 1929. Then, of course, the church had electric lights. As far as I know, the church was always heated by coal burning stoves. A bell on top of the church was not only rung on Sunday but every school day. Its ringing told us we would have to hurry or we would be late for school. Maybe because we lived on a farm, each of us children were taught early to work. Both Father and Mother came from good old pioneer stock so they both knew the importance of work and they taught we children as well. Yes, we had our ups and downs, our troubled times, our childhood quarrels and I was even a rebellious teenager. I only rebelled to myself though. I never disobeyed my parents that I can remember. I just thought that father was too strict. Sometimes I would think this but I never went any farther than thinking. I am thankful for having an angel for a mother and a father who loved us and cared enough to want us to be perfect. I am glad they taught us right from wrong and lived their teachinge Because we were loved, we felt a security that is missing in many lives. Their love for us helps me understand about god's constant love. I have many times on my knees, thanked the lord that I was born to my parents, Don L. and Annie Boren Bigelow. Okie Bigelow Heward

Memories of Don & Annie Bigelow by Elva B Carter

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Memories of Don & Annie Bigelow by Elva B Carter -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- [Scanned by Stephen Rawlins January 1997 from: "Memories of Clyde A. Carter and Elva B. Carter", a booklet written by Elva B. Carter for Christmas, 1984, with the help of her daughter Myrna C. Laird, who typed and compiled it.] My parents were also a devoted couple. One time Father was asked why they sat on opposite sides of the table. Father said, "So I can look at your mothers beautiful blue eyes." He was so good to Mother. Her health was not good. She could not raise her hands above her head to comb her hair when she got old, so Father put her hair up on curlers. She always looked like she had just been to a beauty parlor. My father was as honest as the day is long. His word was as good as his bond. Mother tried to please Father. She would always say, "What will your Father say?" They always said Father was the head of the house, but Mother turned the head. I thought my parents were about as perfect as they could be, and still live on this Earth. My father was a humble man, and I remember his saying, "If I had of known what I do now I would of done different!" He never swore, and he always used the word, "Thunderation" when he wanted to emphasize something. My Mother was very talented. She wrote poetry. In fact, she wrote her whole history in poetry form. On holidays they nearly always had a program in Wallsburg. It was generally held in the morning. Invariably Mother was asked to write a paper, and read it. She would sometimes write poetry to tell jokes, or to give advice. They were always informative, interesting, and humorous. We used to have family home evening which we all enjoyed. Father and Mother used to sing songs together, and Father would play his guitar. A favorite poem which he used to recite, was: Abou Ben Adam Abou Ben Adam, May his tribe increase, Awoke one nigh from a deep dream of peace. He saw within the moonlight in his room, Making it light, like a lily in bloom, An Angel writing in a book of gold, And said to the presence in the room, "What writest thou?" The vision raised his head, and With a' look of sweet accord, Replied, "I'm writing the names of those who love the Lord." "And is my name there?." asked Abou. "Nay, not so. " replied the angel. "I pray thee then, write my name as one who loves his fellow man. "The angel wrote, then vanished. The next night he came again and with a great awakening light, he said, "I'm writing the names of those of whom the love of the Lord has blessed. "And lo, Ben Adams name led all the rest. Father was a man who loved his fellow man! We had such tun times, and we enjoyed being together, and we always had special goodies to eat. Father thought Mother was the best cook. When he came to our homes for a good meal, he always complimented us and then said, "Your Mother sure taught you how to cook." My Grandmother, Permelia Mecham Bigelow really taught my father to be honest I've been told that my grandmother would not keep a pin that she picked up in her friends yard, because in Pioneer days pins were scarce. To us a pin seems like nothing. There was a terrible diphtheria epidemic in our valley. Nearly every family in the town lost someone, and the few who were well, had to care for the sick. In our family, four girls died within a week. Ervin took sick first, then Adora, Ida, Eva, me, and Floralia all caught it. For two days and nights, Mother and Father thought every breath I took would be my last. Afterwards Mother used to say, "Those little girls were too good to live," and it made me wonder why I had to live. Wasn't I good enough to die? Ervin and I were the only ones left in the family. Later on we were blessed with William, then Alton, Emily, Winona, and last Okie. (Attribute, and short sketch of the life of my mother, Annie Maria Boren Bigelow, written for a family reunion). She was born in Wallsburg, Wasatch County, on the 24th of October, 1873, the fourth daughter and seventh child of Jasper and Lucina Meacham Boren. Mother received her schooling in Wallsburg in a one room school house, with one teacher for all ages of children. She read and studied all her life, never being satisfied with her schooling and education. Mother was gifted in writing, especially poetry. She wrote many compositions and articles for programs, special occasions, for church and other entertainments. She wrote many poems throughout the years, finally writing her history in poetry form. Mother tells of her childhood; going to rag bees, (they sewed rags to make carpets and rugs, and they would tear old clothes into strips, then sew them together.) quilting bees, learning to knit stockings, to darn, to mend, and to sew. She told of going barefoot most of the time to save her shoes for Sunday, shoes her father had made, and of the pride the family felt for the splendid shoes he made for all the family. She told of games she loved to play, such as town ball, steal the stick, races they ran, and in the winter, of coasting down the hill. Mother told of gleaning wheat with her mother, her brothers and sisters, and there was a call from the church to store wheat, and when World War I was raging what a salvation this stored wheat proved to be. At the age of sixteen mother worked at a saw mill. She helped cook for a large family, and washed their clothes on a wash board, ironed with stove irons, scrubbed wooden floors, helped milk twelve cows morning and night, and at the end of the week, she received $1.75 for her long days of labor. At seventeen romance came into her life. At the first proposal of my father, she refused, saying that she was too young for marriage. Patiently Father courted her, until an opportune time, and told her this lyric: "If to me your heart resign --Then in turn I'll give you mine." Mother accepted his proposal, and they were married for time and eternity in the Manti temple on the 29th of April, 1891. Eleven children blessed this union, eight girls and three boys: Adora, Ida, Eva, Don Ervin, Elva, Floralia, William Wells, John Alton, Emily May, Winona, and Okie. With their first two small daughters, Father and Mother moved to Vernal to homestead 40 acres of land. There their third daughter was born. Many trials came to them pioneering, and trying to wrest a living from this then bleak land. Their property was situated where the Indians had camped for years, and Mother had many frightful experiences with the Indians. After two years my grandfather, Daniel Bigelow, persuaded my parents to return to Wallsburg to help him on his ranch. Their property in Vernal was traded for property "around the hill in Wallsburg." They later purchased grandmother Boren's store, and also took over the Post Office. Mother helped run the business, clerking in the store, helping with the purchasing of merchandise, which they hauled in covered wagons from Heber, Provo, and Salt Lake City. Mother was a shrewd business woman. She was very diplomatic, and very wise in handling difficult situations. February of the year 1902 brought tragedy into this happy home. Measles and diphtheria were raging in the town. Within one week four of their daughters died, two of them being buried in the same grave. In the fall of that year Father was called on a mission, leaving Mother to care for their two small children, run the business, and also the Post Office. Under the strain Mothers health failed, and Father was called from his mission. With loving care and much rest, her health began to improve, when an epidemic of typhoid broke out in the town. In mothers weakened condition, she contracted it, and for two months or more, her life hung in the balance. Through much faith, prayers, and fasting, she was promised she would recover, but when winter came she became ill again with meningitis paralyzing her whole body except one arm. The Elders of the ward and the family fasted and prayed for her; and again her life was spared, but she was left with leakage of the heart. Father took mother to the Salt Lake Temple, and there she received a blessing promising her that she would be healed and live to raise her family, and do a noble work in her ward and community. Then nine days after the birth of Winona, her tenth child, she again became seriously ill, developing milk leg. Several women in the county had already died that very year. Through fasting and prayer, Father was inspired what to do. He used hot packs on her legs. Later this method was practiced and recommended by the doctors in the county, and proved to be very successful. When Mother regained her health, she was called to work in the organizations of the Church. She first taught in the Primary, then Mutual. Then she was called to be Secretary of the Relief Society, and then Relief Society President. She was President for sixteen years. She went day and night to care for the sick and needy, to lay out the dead, and give comfort and solace to those in distress. After her release from the Relief Society she taught the Gospel Doctrine class in Sunday School, and for this she constantly prayed, studied diligently, and humbly and gave thanks to the Lord for the success she had in teaching this class. A missionary committee was called to raise money to help keep missionaries in the field, and Mother was an active member. Mother had a burning testimony of the Gospel. It took a great deal of courage, when Father was called on a second mission. Her last and eleventh child, Okie, was born while he was on this mission. Mother was appointed to finish out Father's term on the School Board, and then was elected to another term. In their later years Father and Mother devoted their time to working in the temples, and doing temple work. Mother was such fun to be with. She could take a joke, and had the ability to laugh with you, not at you, no matter who the joke was on. She was gentle, kind and understanding. She was a loving, devoted wife and mother, sacrificing much for those she loved. She lived the gospel, loved it, and devoted her life in service to family, friends and all with whom she associated. Mother died at my home in Provo, January 5, 1947, and was buried in the Wallsburg cemetery.

Don L Bigelow Life Sketch

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

A sketch of My Life - Don -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- [Written by Don L. Bigelow and typed by Emily Stoker. This copy was scanned from a typed original in the possession of Velma Carter Anderson, Spokane, WA, in January, 1997 by Stephen Rawlins of Richland, WA.] The following verses express the great hope, privilege and desire of my life. The world is as you take it And life is what you make it. Freedom Know this that every soul is free To choose his life and what he'll be For this eternal truth is given That God will force no man to Heaven He'll call persuade direct aright Bless us with wisdom love and light In nameless ways be good and kind But never force the human mind. Wisdom and reason make us men Take these away, what are we then Mere animals and just as well The beasts may think of heaven or hell. Don L. Bigelow was born May 22, 1866, at Heber City, Wasatch County, Utah in a little old log house with a dirt roof. In the early spring of 1866 there was an Indian scare. People were advised to move to the county seat, where they could be better protected in case of Indian raids. Indians had been killing people in different parts of the country. One incident which caused much alarm was two boys went up American Fork canyon for wood, the Indians killed them both. Another incident about that time a company of men and boys went up Springville hobblecreek to get wood. They went in bunches on account of the hostile Indians. Two boys brothers got delayed, and went after the crowd did. The boys were only ten and twelve years old. When they went in the canyon to follow the crowd they got on the wrong road. They tried to get a load of wood and night came on. So they tied the oxen up to the wagon so they wouldn't stray off and went to bed. About nine or ten o'clock they were awakened by two buck Indians. They were told to get up, put their shoes on, and untie the cattle from the wagon and unyoke them. Then they took the cattle and the boys follow them toward Strawberry valley. After they had drove them high to the high point of the night, the other boy began to cry. Then the Indians told him if he didn't stop crying they would kill him and leave him so he stoped crying. they went on till long toward morning. Then the Indians desided to stop and rest. They rolled up in their blankets and tied the largest boy to one of their feet. After the Indians went to sleep the oldest boy had taken an old razor blade in his pocket. He cut the rope with that, then woke his brother and they took their gun and six shooter, the Indians had taken their powder horn and ammunition, but the two guns were loaded. Then they started the oxen back on the trail. The boys got tired of walking and one of the oxen was used to bing rode. They both got on him, the little boy got sleepy and would nearly fall off but the older boy sensed the danger and kept him awake. When daylight and the sun came up about nine or ten they kept a watch on the trail behind them. They saw those two Indians coming behind them so they got off the ox and got behind some big rocks that were there close by, and waited till the Indians came close. The oldest boy took the rifle and the other on the six shooter, the older boy said "I will count to three and we will both shoot at once." They hit one Indian in the hip and crippled him for life. The Indians shot arrows at the boys and tried to kill them but the rocks protected them. In a little while they heard the white men coming. The Indians hid in the brush and sneeked off. The white men took the boys unharmed but frightened. Also they got the cattle went back on the trail and went home. Later the two Indians came to Springville and one of them limped from the bullet wound. They saw the boys and recognized, them and said "Them heap brave boys." After the Indian scare was over part of the people went back to Wallsburg. But my parents with others went to Provo to live for some time. While my parents were, moving back to Wallsburg up Provo canyon they tipped their wagon over in the river. Lost part of their belongings, and some chickens they were taking crated in a box went floping down the river and were lost. I said "What luck now we havnt got any home." I was just big enough to talk a little. When the people came back to Wallsburg they built a fort in a square. All the houses facing the center, for a protection from the Indians. The first lesson my Mother gave me in honesty was in that fort. My sister Emily and I were in Ann Wheelers dooryard and we found a button and a straight pin. We went home thinking what we found belonged to us. My Mothers words has stayed with me all my life. She said "Dont you know they belong to someone else? When you find things you must always try to find the owner. Now you found them in Ann Wheelers door yard, you must take them back and tell her you found them there and give them to her. You must tell her you are sorry and ask her forgiveness." In those days pins and buttons were scarce and hard to get. I remember living in the fort when I was about three or four years old the saying of Brigham Young was "It is better to feed the Indians than to fight them." So the men of the fort decided to buy a large steer that belonged to one of the men and each man was to pay an equal share and give the steer to the Indians. The buck Indians killed the steer just out south of the fort. A group of squaws came in and dressed the beef. The little Indians stood by and watched and so did I. After they got it dressed they gave Father or Grandfather a piece of liver. It was cooked at Grandmothers and I will always remember how good that liver was. Later I was told that Indians would not eat the liver that may have been the reason we got the liver. On July 28, 1872 I had a Patriarchel blessing given me by John Smith has been a guide to me through life. The power, of the Lord rested down on him so much it made him so weak he had to go lie down and rest after he was through giving it. Here is a copy of it. Wallsburg, Wasatch Co, Utah, Territory, July 28, 1872. A blessing by John Smith Patriarch upon the head of Daniel Don Louis Bigelow Son of Daniel and Permelia Bigelow. Born in Heber City, Wasatch Co, Utah Territory, May 22, 1866. Daniel Don Louis Bigelow in the name of Jesus Christ I lay my hands upon thy head and bless thee with a Fathers blessing which is also Patriarchel. Thou art numbered with the sons of zion of whom much is expected. Thou hast many years to live if thou wilt fill up the measure of thy creation. For the Lord has a work for thee to do in which thou shalt see his arm made bare in behalf of Isreal. Thou art of the lienage of Ephraim and an heir to the blessings of the new and everlasting covenant with the gifts of the Priesthood and I say unto thee honor and obey thy parents and as you grow in years grow in grace and in the knowledge of the truth and thou shalt become a mighty man, in Isreal and thy name shall go forth among the nations of the Earth and thou shalt have great faith and be mighty in healing the sick by the laying on of hands many shall seek thee for council and wonder at thy wisdom and if necessary thou shalt command the elements and the waves of the sea shall obey thy voice and thou shalt gather of this worlds goods around thee, all that shall be necessary in life. Thy name shall be handed down, in honorable rememberance and written in the Lambs book of life. This blessing I seal upon thy head and I thee up unto Eternal life to come forth in the morning of the ressurection, Even so Amen. When I was between seven and eight years old Father and two of his brothers and their familys were called to help settle southern Utah. They didnt all go together. Father had a herd of cattle. He hired a man to go help drive the cattle down. We didnt get started till late in the fall. We got snow bound in what they called wild cat canyon after the storm cleared up we rounded up the cattle and drove to Kanosh. From there to a place that was called the Black Rocks. There we wintered the cattle on what they called white sage and what little grass they could find. While there we lived in a covered wagon and a tent all winter and long toward spring President Brigham Young came that way on a mission tour and at Kanosh he held a meeting. Father told him how he had left his valuable land and a homestead he hadn't proved up on. President Young advised him to take his family and go back to Wallsburg and prove up on the ground. When the weather got good in the spring we moved back to Wallsburg. There were no pastures to keep the milk cows in so all of the town cows were taken by the young boys over a, hill called the little devide there they would graze over the big devide, then go down to the lower end of the valley on a green spot. So we boys had to take our dinners down on the green spot to heard the cows so they wouldnt get on the ground the men mowed for hay. A family lived down there by the name of Owens. Mrs Owens came down there one day with a six shooter and shot in the air to frighten us. She said we'd killed her geese and if we killed any more she would kill us. I hadn't killed any of her geese and didnt know about any being killed and the rest of the boys said they hadnt killed them. We were sure all of us badly frightened though, and promised not to harm her geese. The farmers lived along the main road and when we were driving the cows home one night going up the road Jim Lamb had two bad dogs that would bite. After we passed his house the boys were all larger than I and was ahead of me running close to the cows. Both of the dogs came out and run a head of me. One of them bit Cal Duke in the thigh and the blood run down off his leg and dripped off his heel. We were all bare footed at that time. I was baptised July 11, 1875 by Daniel Bigelow confirmed a member of the church by Wm. Nuttal about that time we moved from town out on a ranch where Father had built a homestead house. There we enjoyed life for a while. Then Father bought a saw mill in the north fork on Provo canyon. Although very young I had to help tend or round up the oxen that were turned out on the mountain to feed. Early in the morning before the work started Father told me to hunt the oxen I climbed up a steep hill through the brush. Went over in a quaking asp flat a half mile up the mountain around a hole and was coming down a trail that the oxen had made. I had an old big black dog with me. Coming down the trail the cattle had made I came into an opening about three rods square I sensed danger and my hair began to raise. I came to a thicket of willows and stopped. When I stoped just below the brush began to crack and break. I was scared stiff and couldnt move the old dog put his tail between his hind legs and howeled right behind me. The brush kept cracking and I desided it was a bear that had went on the trail and sure enough there was a bear track about eight or nine inches long. The bear had been coming up the trail and all we lacked meeting face to face was that willow bunch. The old dog was just as scared as I was. Another time when I went to get the horses, I found them and they were running away. I tried to head them and one of the horses whirled and kicked me in the head. It dented a place im my skull and left a gash in my forhead about two or three inches long. When Father got back that day from logging there was no Dr. this side of Provo and we had to have that gash sewed up and all they had was a round sewing needle so Father started to sew it up. When he pushed the needle toward the wound I could stand that but when the needle struck the opposite side the pain was almost inbearable. I wasn't crying but the tears would roll out of my eyes. When Father got it sewed up I certainly was glad to get it over with. When I was about sixteen years old the girls and I run the saw mill when Father went away to work. One day we all desided to go to Wallsburg the folks started out ahead of me in a wagon and they had a wild colt in the team. I was coming horse back behind them. They had just got to the top of a high dugway when the colt began to rearing and pushed the other horse off the dugway. Father called for them all to get out They all jumped out of the wagon except my sister Polly, before the wagon went off the dugway. The team and wagon with Polly in it rolled down the mountain together about thirty or forty yards. Mother was standing on the bank wringing her hands crying suposing Polly would be dead. Soon as the cloud of dust began to raise Polly came running up the side of the hill unhurt and didn't have as much as a scratch on her. But it smashed the wagon and bows up and broke the tounge out and the horses were tangled up and couldn't get away but they were unhurt. We stayed most of the summer in the North Fork. In the fall Aunt Lucy B. Young talked Father in the notion of going to St. George for the winter to work in the temple. That spring I was sixteen I had my endowments and worked in the temple and done some endowment work for the dead. There was where I was ordained an Elder by A. P. Windor on February eight, eighteen eighty two. We lived with Aunt Lucy that winter. Some time that winter Father came back to Wallsburg. We drove the team as far north as Minnersville, I came to drive the team back. From Minnersville I drove to Beaver there I loaded up some tithing potatoes. It was cold weather, the snow was eight or ten inches deep and I put my bedding over the potatoes to keep them from freezing. I drove all night and, when I got to St. George there was only a few of the potatoes that froze but tho most of them were all right. But I suffered severely with the cold to save the potatoes. While Father was gone Mother wanted to go to Tokerville to visit her sister Emma Hill. We stayed there with her three weeks then Father came there and we went back to St. George. We soon left there and started back home to Provo. The next spring we moved back to the saw mill. When the snow was three or four feet deep we went up the right hand fork and climbed the Timpinogas mountain almost half way to the top in the deep snow. There was a nice grove of white pine timber. A man by the name of Phillips' owned a sawmill about a mile below us in the canyon and to our surprise three of their men came in and went to cutting timber in the same grove we were. We cut logs all day then walked three miles back to the mill every night we were wet to our waists from wallowing in the snow. At day light we were up and going again. I helped haul the logs with oxen to the sawmill then hauled lumber to Provo with a horse team. The road through Provo canyon at that time was narrow and a one way road it was hard to pass a team. I run into a mans wagon one time the hind wheels locked together. The man got mad and swore, he said I could have driven farther around him. One spring before we moved in the canyon Father and I went up in the hills and came across the left hand fork of the North fork. When we got there we saw an old black bear and two brown cubs. Father took his gun and shot the old black bear. Of all the roaring and hollering that bear done it. It was under some big ledges and the scream and roars of the old bear went up that big high mountain of ledges and every time the sound would go from one shelf to another the sound would re-echo and it sounded terrible The little bears run down twenty or thirty yards to some big quakenasp trees and up the tree they climbed thirty five or forty feet high. Father shot them out of the trees with a shot gun. We skinned the old bear and cut steaks out of the hind quarter and roasted it on the coals. It was the corsest grained meat I ever ate, but it tasted like meat just the same for we were hungry. We had been all day without our dinner. When we were working all these summers we would come down to Provo and go to school three or four months each winter. I remember well going to the Brigham Young Acadamy down where the Farmers and Merchants Bank now stands or on third west and center street, and Carl G. Measer was the Principle. One spring that building burned down and the next winter they held school in the ware house over the ZCMI down just above the rail road track where I went to school the last time. After we moved back to the sawmill in the summer I took the gun and went up over the hills back of the sawmill and two big buck deer jumped up and started up the hill. One of them stopped and I shot him under the lower part of his neck. The deer reared over backwards and fell head first down the hill and when I got to him the bullet had cut off his jugler vain. He had bleed to death so that was the first deer I ever killed. Another time after we left the north fork and was moved back to Wallsburg our cows strayed off and I desided to go hunt for them. I was impressed to take my gun with me. So I went up back of the poles and around across the lane and up the valley above town around the point and as I was going up the road up on the bench where those springs are. Along about two or three o'clock in the afternoon I saw two big buck deer coming down the road. I got behind an oak bunch and the deer came down to the big spring and got a drink, then they went over through the oaks then I went up around above the oak brush and tied my horse there. I came carefully down through the brush and saw one of the deer standing by an oak bunch rubbing the velvet off his horns then I shot him, and in just a few minutes here came Parley Ford riding a horse on the run and asked me what I shot at. Supposing he had seen the deer I told him a deer and ask him if he had seen them and he said no. He and I started to hunt through the sage and oak brush for the deer. I had shot it I knew but we had no success and finely he said I have got to go. He had not been gone five minutes till I saw the deer laying down in the hollow behind me. That was a testimony to me that he should of had no part in it. Again I used to sleep outdoors in a grainery up in the stackyard one night as usual I went to bed and it was a dark night. I woke up in the middle of the night and it was like some one told me to get up and go up hobble creek to an old fish trap that had been put in the spring before. I got up and dressed and went and as I went and crawled under the willow bunch on my hands and knees I felt a big trout about seventeen or eighteen inches long lying there on that old dry willow trap. I scratched my hand along under his belly and up to his gills and stuck my fingers under his throat and got a good hold on him. Then crawled back out and came back and wraped him in a blanket so a cat wouldnt get him and went back to sleep. Next morning the folks asked me where I got that fish and when I told them they were just as surprised as I was the night before. That summer I logged in Daniels creek canyon for Fathers and McGuirs mill. The next summer I wouldnt go back to the mill and I stayed in Wallsburg and run the farm. I raised a good crop, that year we had twelve hundred bushels of grain and a large crop of hay. We built a sawmill there at Wallsburg, just below the town. One winter we cut two hundred thousand feet of lumber, hauled most of it to Provo and sold it to a man by the name of Ward that run a lumber yard for sixteen dollars a thousand. He said that was the most perfect sawed lumber he ever had come into his yard. Bishop Fraughton meet me on the street in Wallsburg and asked me how I would like to go on a mission. I told him I thought it would be better to get someone with more experience so I didnt go. I have always been sorry I missed that opportunity. I worked more or less for myself untill I was married, then I went on my own. One summer when I was about twenty three years old the Bishop had set me apart as a ward teacher and Aurther C. Whiting was living over on the ranch and Will Whiting his son was living there with his father and I was appointed to visit them. When I went over where they lived Will was there smoking so that was a good chance to talk to him on the word of wisdom so I began, but when I was about sixteen down in the north fork in Provo canyon my cousin Will Bigelow was there helping the mill and he was older then I was and he used tobacco. He used to give me a smoke and we smoked together. When Father found out I was smoking he talked to me and told me it was a bad filthy habit and it was also expensive and he wanted me to go to school the next winter down in Provo the Academy. He said if I would not use tobacco till after I was twenty one he did not think I would ever use it. So I quit and sure enough I have never used the weed from that day to this. Will Whiting was just young and I gave him about the same kind of a talk Father gave me and I told him if he would wait till he was grown or twenty one I doubted if ever he would. Well after that he quit and I think he went to the temple and was married and he never did use tobacco any more The first time Annie and I went together I took her to a charactor ball, I wore a pair of red pants that came to the knee, trimmed with white lace. We had the time of our lives. The first winter we went together long toward spring we were going home one night after a dance. I asked her how she would like to marry and be my wife. She said she was to young so I just had one thing to do and that was to wait and hope so the second winter as spring time aproached I told her I knew a little poem that was sacred to me. She asked what it was. I said, "Will you say yes if I tell it to you?" She said "I dont know tell it to me then I will answer." Then I said: "If you to me your heart resign Then in return I'll give you mine." Then she said "I will say yes to that." As spring came on and the flowers began to bloom I asked her to set the wedding day. We agreed that it should be on the twenty nineth of April so we could have our reception and dance on the first of May. We wanted to be married in the temple and the nearest one was in Manti, so we went as far as Provo in a wagon then went on the train to Manti and there we were sealed for time and all eternity. Anthony H. Lund sealed us. We were the last couple married in the temple that day and after he married us he gave us a most wonderful blessing. We have only been glad once and that was from that day to this. We always expected to be faithful and true to the covenants we made that day. One of the grand events in our lives was when our first child was born May sixth eighteen ninety two. On July thirty first eighteen hundred ninety two I was ordained a seventy. About that time I decided I had three objects in life. First was raise an honerable and noble family. Second was to do missionary work, and the third was to do temple work. About that time I was put in as secretary in the Sunday School. I was ward teacher for forty years and worked in the mutual and was class leader in the priesthood corum. I was called out many times to administer to the sick and went any time night or day. We moved to Vernal July eighteen ninety four and our third daughter was born there January thirtieth , eighteen ninety five. We stayed there for two years built a log house and stable correl and granery and cleared forty acres of land. We had the hardest time in our lives trying to get the necessities of life there. Money was hard to get for example: I took my team and hauled wood for six days and at the end of the six days I got a check for six dollars. I helped bail hay but I didnt get any money out of it only trade, and horse feed. The fall we left there we had a good crop of wheat corn squash potatoes and different vegitables but couldnt sell anything. Couldnt sell the wheat for thirty cents a bushel. We left the whole thing there but we brought a thirty gallon barrel of honey with us when we moved back that I had worked for. One time when we were out in Ashley Mark Batty, Frank Allred, Martin Allred, Al Kerby and Zora Glenn and Annie and I and all of their familys desided to go down on Green river where Levi Holdaway lived for an outing. While there we all desided to go in swiming. We men desided to wade across Green river but when we got out there the current was so swift we gave it up so we stoped on a little island. While we were there here came the women folks trying to cross the river and they were holding hands and none of them could swim so if they had broke holts they might of all got drowned. Then we all came back together and Holdaway said to Zora Glenn get on my back and I will swim across that big hole or eddie in the river. Zora did not want to do it so I said get on his back and go and Annie will get on my back and I will swim across with her. So Zora got on his back and when they were about across I told Annie to get on mine and just keep her head out so she could breathe good and I would take her across the pond. Well when we were about half way across Annie must of got scared and she jumped right up on my shoulders and shoved my head down under water. I knew I had to make it to shore without any more breath, which I did not know whether I could do or not but I swam us out. I was out of breath when I got her and I out and I desided to never take no such chances again. When we got back to Wallsburg I run Fathers sawmill and we got along better having a steady job all winter. Ervin our first son was born the February after we got back from Ashley. The next summer I helped Father farm and I pitched one hundred tons of hay. Then we traded the place we had in Vernal for a farm around the hill above Wallsburg. We had to start and plow up sage brush and break up another farm. I run a self binder every fall for many years. Then Father and I bought a store from Lucina Boren and had the postoffice and store combined and lived in her home till we lost four of our children in a week from dighteria and measles. Then we bought a place from Elijah Davis and moved two buildings and put them together and fixed it for the store and post office. We had to freight our goods with horse team most of our goods we got in Provo from whole sale houses. It was two days work to go get a load of goods. 'One time after we had lost our' children and I was humbled right to the Earth and it was a question in my mind whether life was worth the struggle I was going to Provo and John McAffee lived down to the lower end of the valley. He came out and stopped me and said his little girl Nadine was in the house screaming with apencicitis and he wanted to know if I would come in and administer to her. I was broken hearted and it brought my trouble all back fresh again. I said If I could do anything I would. He said come on in then I asked him if' he held the Melchesideck Priesthood and he said no then I asked if there was anyone there that did and he said Whiting is working here. I said to go ask him about it and if he will help me. He went and got Will and came in, he was scared and said he held the Priesthood but had never done anything like that. But I encouraged him and told him he could anoint her and I would help him, and tell him what to say, and how to proced. We were both humble as two children. The child was growning and moaning every breath. Dr. Wherritt from Heber had been there in the morning and had went back to prepare for an operation and had pronounced it a bad case of apendicitis and was coming back as soon as, possible and get the girl to operate on her. John said to Will and I Dont wait so they gave Will the oil and I told him what to say. He anointed her and I sealed the anointing and in the prayer we commanded the pain to cease and everything of an evil influence to leave her body that she might, be well and sound in body and by that time she had stopped crying and when we took our hands off her head she was free from pain and it worked off and out of her system in a natural way and left her free. When the Dr. came back she was at ease and he was surprised and asked what they had done then John McAffee asked the Dr. about the operation and he said there is no use of an ope ration. The girl has never been bothered with apendicitis from that day to this that I have ever heard of. I was called on a mission a few months after we lost our children in nineteen-two, and this blessing was given to me before I left. Patriarchal blessing recorded in Book A page 216 No. 10. Patriarchal blessing given at Heber City July 28, 1902 by John M. Murdock Patriarch on the head of Daniel Don Louis Bigelow son of Daniel and Permelia Bigelow born in Heber City May 22, 1866. Brother Daniel Don Louis Bigelow by your desire I place my hands upon your head to pernounce upon you a Fathers blessing even a Patriarchal blessing that shall rest upon you from this time hensforth and forever, to be a comfort and a guide unto you through the journey of life an I pray God my heavenly Father that he will let a portion of Holy spirit rest upon me his humble servant and that it may be inspired thereby that the words I may speak may be the words of the Lord unto you in very deed. Thou art a true Iseralite through the leinage of Ephraim, the son of Joseph that was sold into Egypt, and as he become a savior unto his fathers house so shall you become a savior unto your Fathers house and to many of your kindred many of whom are unknown unto you at the present time, but shall be made known unto you by the revelation of the spirit that will come unto you in the due time of the Lord. A great work lies before you for the living and dead. Therefore seek unto the Lord for wisdom that you may be thourally prepared for the great work that lays before you. You are ordained in the spirit world to come to this Earth and become a preacher of rightousness long before the foundations of the Earth were laid, when the morning stars sang together and all of the sons of God shouted for joy your tongue shall become loosed as the pen of a ready writer you shall have power to convince the honest in heart, the rightous shall rejoice at the sound of your voice but the wicked will be enraged against you but in as much as you will be faithful and put your trust in the Lord no evil shall befall you, not a hair of your head shall fall by your enemies without the notice of your Father in Heaven, therefore dear brother be of good cheer the way will be opened up before you, the angel of your presencece shall stand by you to preserve and support you in every emergency. I seal upon you the blessing of health and prosperity. You have seen much sorrow and trouble in your earlier days but you have been strengthened of the Lord to bear up and stand fast to the truth and you will still continue and your mind will become brighter and brighter untill the perfect day. You shall have the desire of your heart in all things that shall be for your good while you shall live here upon the Earth. I seal you up unto eternal life by Authority of the Holy Partiarchal order that has been sealed upon me and say that you shall come forth in the morning of the first resurection and be crowned with honor, glory and with many of your kindred upon conditions of your faithfulness in keeping the comandments of the Lord untill the end of your days. In the name of Jesus Christ Amen. Isabella C. Murdock, Clerk. While I was on my first mission Elder Peterson and I went to a little town and inquired for a meeting house to hold a meeting in. We were refured to a preacher that had a church which he had built or the most of it and when we ask him if we could get the use of the house that night he said no. He said I would not let Mormons preach in that house. We elders inquired around among the neighbors and found where we could hold a meeting in a private home and while I was talking in meeting that night I thought about the preacher turning us down, and then I was prompted to say if that man did not repent and humble himself and be kind to the elders and let them have the use of that house the destroying elements such as heavy winds, a tornado or something of the kind would take the house down that it would be destroyed and left in ruin. Well in a little while after that I was called home and I had let the prophesy or what ever you might call it pass out of my mind. In about three months after I got a letter from Elder Peterson and he said that a cyclone had struck through that part of the country and torn that church house down and destroyed it completely. Then he ask me if I remembered what I had said about it. I never will forget what I had said and how I felt about the way the man turned us down. Now I am reminded what the patriarch said to me in my first blessing that the elements should obey my voice. Such things as this is a testimony to the believer. I stayed on that mission about nine months and was released to come home to take care of my wife. She had developed heart disease so I came to take care of her and our business. Dr. Cliff went to the Stake President and told them if they didn't release me I would not have any wife and they sent a telegram to have me released at once. We traveled without purse or script practically all the time. We kept the postoffice and store for ten years. On the thirty first day of December nineteen hundred and ten our darling girl Winona was born. Annie and the baby done fine at first, but on the ninth day Annie began to have pain in her leg and it was swollen. On the tenth day it was worse so I phoned Dr. Wherritt at Heber to come and we would see what he could do. When he came he said it was milkleg so he gave her some medicine and went. On the eleventh day her leg was worse and the twelfth day I phoned him to come again and he prescribed some black looking stuff that looked like wagon dope. It was in a little bottle about as big as a hens egg if the egg was turned up on its end. It cost two dollars a bottle and the bottle held just enough for one application. That done no good so the thirteenth day passed and the leg was getting worse and very painful, we kept that black medicine covered all over her leg and it was growing worse and more painful all the time. Annie said it hurt just like the tooth ache only just as much worse as the leg was biger than a tooth and it was by that time getting almost unbearable. On the fourteenth day we sent for the Dr. again and he came just about sun down and looked at her and she was suffering something terrible. Right here I might say that there was an epidemic going through the county that fall of women haveing milk leg and Dr. Wherritt had lost two or three cases just before then. When he did not change anything but said he could do nothing more and went out of the door. I followed him out and I asked him what encouragement or hope he could give me about her and he shook his head and said I can do no more than I am doing and by that time my heart was breaking over her condition. I went and finished up my chores and by that time it was getting dark and I went into the house to see her and asked how she was. She looked up in my face and said, "Don this is almost imbareable, I cant stand this pain like this much longer." Her lips were quivering and so was mine. By that time my heart was melted in my breast and we were both sheding tears. I turned and went out of the house into the back yard and it was a dark night then I knelt down out there alone and in the humility of my soul I implored my God If there was anything that could be done for her or anything I could do that he would make it known to me. Then all at once in a flash the inspiration or revelation call it what you will, came to me to go into the house and put the wash boiler on the stove and put a bucket of water in it then get a quart of wheat bran and put in it then a half pint of salt and stir it all up till it was almost to a boil then take a blanket and put in the boiler and get it filled with the water and bran then ring it out and wrap her leg from her body to her ankle, just as hot as she could ring it out or as hot as she could stand it. Then change the pack as often as it got cool. I had not only put about the second one on till she stopped moaning and crying. That saved her life. I did not send for the Dr. any more and in about three days he came back to see what had happened. We took him in and when he saw Annie practically out of pain and getting better he said what did you do for her. Then I told him about the hot packs I had put on and how they had helped right at once. He sure was surprised and went away baffled. But we heard after that he put hot packs on womens legs in all such cases. This is the fall of nineteen hundred and forty six, the Drs. that massage and rubbing Drs. use the hot packs on people and have different ways of steaming people. Then I was called on the second mission in nineteen-eleven. I was released from the school board to go on that mission and from all offices in the ward. We desided to sell the store and get rid of the postoffice, to leave my wife with less work and business worries. When I started on my second mission we went direct to the Southern States head mission office in Chattenooga, Tennessee to President Charles A Call's office and he asked me how I would like to go back to Kentucky where I was before. I told him all right, so he said for me to deposit my money there with his secretary and they would give us four Elders our dinners there and he would arrange for getting my grip and things necessary to go with us to Covengton KY. That afternoon and they did not give me the elders address there in Covengton. As soon as I was gone on the train I began to worry and pray about it because I would not get there till after dark so all I could do was to Pray to be directed to the right place. Sure enough it was after dark and a dark night it was, and in a strange town and place. I got off the train with my grip onto the platform and looked up and down the Ohio river. Then I desided to go west right straight toward the Ohio river and I could see the city of Concinatti across the river all lit up for miles away. I walked direct west about two blocks, then turned south and walked about a block and a half and looked up a stairs that was on a raise in the ground eight or ten lumber steps , I went up and knocked at the door. As it happened Elder Jensen came to the door and opened it, in surprise he said, are you Eder Bigelow I said I was and he said how did you get here. I said I was just directed by the spirit which way to come. He said come in we are glad to see you, and I said you are no glader than I am as they had forgotten at Chattenooga to give me any address. That night when I had my prayer I humbly thanked the Lord for directing me to the elders home. One night in the summer Elder Marrion Tanner and I was out in the country where it was very thinely settled and we had walked all the afternoon and had came to no house and it was way after dark. We were in the timber and we sat down and wondered how far it was to where anyone lived it was a warm night so we desided to lie down and stay there all night. So that was one night out. Another time we two elders took turns asking for a place to stay over night that afternoon it had been raining and we was turned down time after time. Then we ask for a place to stay at a womans house it was my turn to ask so I knocked at the door, it was raining quite hard, a woman came and asked what I wanted, I told her a place to stay. She said we cannot keep you here. I said it is raining and a bad night and if she would let us stay we would do without any supper and she said no you cant stay. I said wont you let us stay out here on this poarch we will be at least dry and out of the rain. She said no you had better go. We do not want you here at all. So we went on, it was way after dark and we came into a big grove of timber, we found some big trees and got under them with our umberellas spred out and I was leaning up against a big tree and in the night I felt a stream of water runing down the tree behind me so I just moved out from the tree and waited for daylight to come. When day came it was a happy dawn. Our baby girl was born while I was away on my mission. Soon after I got back we sold our place in town and in nineteen fifteen we moved into a new brick home of twelve rooms we had just completed. Just down to the lower end of town. We still owned our farm around the hill, we were hauling hay and an electric storm came on. A bolt of lightening came so close to us that it rang in our ears and knocked the horses down on their knees. One spring as we were clearing the farm around the hill we loaded up a load of sagebrush and small oaks, limbs and all. They were laying crossways of the wagon box and Annie and I climbed on top of the high load and was going to put the brush in a wash and when we got to the place we were going to fill up, the front wheel of the wagon droped into a ditch and threw us both over backwards and as we were going over we would have both lit on our heads but through a forethought I keeled on over and made a complete summersalt and as I lit on my feet I turned and threw out my arms and caught Annie under the neck and shoulders and saved her from falling on her head which might have broken her neck or proved fatal in some way. Annie was impressed while we were loading to leave and go to the house to pray she didnt know why but we have always believed by obeying the prompting of the spirit we were saved for it seemed like it was almost beyond human power for me to get on my feet as I did to save our lives. A number of years we lived in our home in town in the winter and in the summer went to the farm to take care of our cows and pigs. One year we raised some young chickens. One year feed was so scarce and high in price myself and Alton took the stock to the farm to get what feed they could pick and we fed them corn to help pull them through till the grass began to grow. We were camped in a wagon box in March and there came a cold wind and blizzard and we almost froze. We farmed and raised stock and cattle. We desided to get some sheep so we went to red creek and got motherless lambs and brought them home in a car we made .a number of trips. All that summer we feed them milk by hand we had quite a nice bunch of sheep they done fine for two or three years. Then one spring they began dying off but were fat and looked fine and they would lay down and die. We found the trouble was in their liver, it was called liver fluke. We would cut their liver open and the fluke would roll out like tea leaves. We found that there was a cure for that trouble and that the cause of the trouble was pasturing them on damp wet marshy ground. That had little black snales and they would craul up on the grass, the sheep eating the grass would go into their stomach, from there into the liver. When Father died he left his will with A. B. Morgan in Provo. He called all the heirs to Heber to court. Made me manager of the estate and said that he wanted me to help him, he held the title for about two and a half years trying to dispose of the property, and pay of the incumberance that was on it. It was all under a blanket mortgage to the state of Utah. He had no success making a transfer so he desided to let me take it over. After a consideration I wrote to my sister Emily and asked her if she could help me to raise the money to pay off the acrued interest and settle with Morgan and pay off the other heir's which we did. Then the first thing we done was to write to the state of Utah and sent them five hundred dollars and told them that was the last money I intended to pay as interest on that blanket mortgage and that they in order for us to pay it off would have to split the mortgage and let us sell the land to different individuals and have them pay a good cash payment down on the land they got, then we would send the state the cash we got on each piece of land and by that means we settled the mortgage all but about seven thousand dollars and Emily took four thousand on the Wheeler farm and I took three thousand on the farm across the valley. Emily assumed the responcibility of the four thousand dollars on the Wheeler farm. We arranged for a loan from the Federal Land Bank in California to get the three thousand dollars to pay off the mortgage to the state of Utah. When Alton was called on his misson to Canada I and the family tried to run the two farms and sold milk and butter and raised sheep to keep him on his mission and in that time my health had failed and I got so I couldnt pitch hay. But then by the time Alton came back I couldnt do any heavy work Alton took over the heavy work till Ervin came back then they both went in together for a few years then Ervin moved to Monroe and left Alton to asume the whole responcibility and he took both farms over. In the winters of nineteen thirty nine and forty Annie and I went to Salt Lake City and began to work in the Temple for our kindred dead. We worked there for three winters. Then we went to St. George and worked in the temple for four winters. While we were working in the two temples Annie and I done endowment work for sixteen hundred and sixty six people besides quite a lot of sealing for husbands and wives and stood proxy for a large number of children being sealed to their parents. In the fall before we went away, one morning before sunrise I got up before any of the folks and went over across the meadow caught a riding horse with just a rope and jumped on her back. I rode over by the main creek in the meadow and got the cows and started them for home when I got down to the lane part of them went the wrong way across the main creek. I went after them as fast as the horse could go. The farther they went the faster they went with the horse right after them till she was on a swift run, tryinig to head them off. The last one that stopped done it in two jumps and the horse stopped the same way. Having no saddle or anything to hold to I went over the horses head and lit on my head shoulder and side. When I got up I was daised for a few minutes and I looked around to see what had happened. The horse had stopped right there and I took her by the rope led her up to a ditch bank and jumped on her. I rode back after the cows when I got across the creek part of the cows had went back up in the meadow and I went up around them and got them and started home. When I got over to the mill Alton was up there in the mill yard I called to him and told him I had been threw off the horse so he came down and asked me if I was hurt I told him I didnt think so that I was just shaken up. He went to the house with me and helped me off the horse and went with me into the house and got me on the bed. Mother wanted him to send for a Dr. but I would not give up to it. I said I'd be all right in a little while. In the meantime Mother and Alton took it on themselves to get a Dr. but he was out and couldnt come at once. I grew worse from the time I got on the bed till finely I raised up and as soon as I did my strength all left me I wilted and fell down on the bed then I told Mother that something had to be done. They found out the Dr. couldnt come and he said they would have to bring me to the hospital. By this time I was so week I couldnt walk and Dewey Bigelow happened to be there so he and Alton carried me out and put me in the car and drove me to Heber at once. When they got me there I was hardly able to sit up and they stripped me off down to the waist and was going to take an exray picture of me and when the Dr. came in he put his stethoscope over my heart and a half minute and he droped them and grabed the adhesive tape and rapped it all around me and he put on three strips and then said take him and put him to bed. Alton got another man that was there and they carried me up stairs and layed me on the bed and the nurse followed right in and gave me a hipo for a heart stimulent. The Dr. told Winona to tell Mother she just as well prepare for the worst. They nursed me there for four days and I never turned over off my back. The fifth morning Dr. Neilson came in and said how are you. I said I'm still here and he said I think we can take you now and take an exray picture when they took the picture the nurse counted one two, three ribs broke and the Dr. says three four five, along the back and one in front. A cow had bunted me into the barn and broken that one in front a few days before. Winona took care of me while in the hospital and after they took the exray pictures they took me to her home in Midway and she took care of me for nearly three weeks the Dr. gave orders for me to come back and when I got back to the hospital they pulled my shirt off and the Dr. got holt of the bandage and yanked it off and it felt like it skinned my back and both my sides. I was covered with small boils where the bandage had been. He told me I could go home and it was up to me about taking care of myself for me never to get on a horse again. But the first time we went to Altons down at Leamington I rode that same horse again. Two different summers we went to California to visit Ervins and Winonas folks. One; spring when we went to California after we had been there a little while I used to go across a bridge over the Feather river between Yuba City and Marysville the bridge was about a half mile long and one day while I was fishing there over on the east side I saw three men coming up the river in a motor boat going up in under the bridge. Pretty soon I heard them call and holler for help and I looked up the river and their boat was standing on its end, the men all in the river about twenty five feet from the nearest bank the boat had ran crossways of a floating log coming down the river and it had thrown the men all out of the lower end. One of the men could swim and he started to swim to the bank the other two men was just paddling in the water calling for help and I was across the river about two hundred yards away and could do nothing for them. They floated down the river about two hundred yards screaming for help all the time to where there were some boys in a boat that was locked to the bank and the boys had a roap which they threw out and one of the men caught it and the boys pulled them out but about that time the other man went down under the water and was gone. The officers draged the river with hooks trying to find the drowned man for most of three days and finely gave it up and in about thirty days they found his body down the river thirty miles below where he was drowned. Another day when Jess and I was out in a boat on the river fishing here came a man down the river skating on top of the water with snow shoes they looked like. He was **** pulled by a motor boat, he was going so fast it looked like he was flying in a few minute here they came back up and the man on the skates came so close to our boat he threw water all over us and Jess said he'd better not try that again or I will hit him with my fish pole and see how he likes that. Another story they told that happened that spring on Feather river: A little old man went out fishing and they told him in order to catch big fish he had to have a big outfit to fish with. He went and bought the bigest hooks he could find and the bigest line and went down to the river and fished till he got tired and sleepy. To make sure his fish would not get away if he hooked one he tied the line around his waist and layed down on a log that was lying length ways of the river and went to sleep the next thing he knew he was in the river swiming and fighting for his life. A big fish had got hooked on the line and pulled him off into the river and if it had not been for some help he would of drowned but there were two men in a boat close by and they came to his rescue and got him in the boat then to get the fish. And when they took the fish and put him on the scales the fish weighed sixty four pounds and there were a number of men said that was right. When Jess was down there he said he saw the head and it looked like a big hogs head with the mouth open. There was no question but what there were some big striped bass in that river. I caught one that weighed six lbs. and another day one that weighed nine and a half lbs. There were some big salmon that run up that river too. Another experience I had while on that river I went out in a boat just afternoon alone and the wind began to blow from the north right down the river and the longer I stayed there the harder the wind blew till about night the wind was just howling and Mother and Winona came down there and said they thought the wind was dangerous and me out there in a boat. I was close enough to the bank to be able to talk to them. I desided to take the anchor up and see about getting to the bank and by that time the wind was blowing a teriffic gale and time I got the anchor up and into the boat the boat was turned round and going at a teriffic speed down the river and I had both oers in my hands but could take no effect with the speed of the boat so I just desided to turn the boat and head it for the brush"and timber on the side of the river and that is what I did and run it into the brush, tied the boat up and climbed out. Jess came and got the boat later. One summer we took a week off and went with Theron and Emily Stoker out on Red creek and to stinking springs on the little strawberry river. One morning as Theron and I was going down the river just below a saw mill we heard a blast in the river and as we went on down a couple of hundred yards we saw five men and one of them stood out on the hill to watch and stand guard but he did not see us till we were out in full sight of them all. So they just stood there and we went down to them. Four had been wadeing in the river after fish but we did not stop there long. We went on down the river and when we came back to camp at night we saw signs of them blasting fish all the way up the river. When we went to camp where Mother and Emily were they said those men had been blasting right in front of the tent, and they got the license number of the car as near as they could tell. We went to the game wardens camp and reported the men blasting fish in the river. The wardens went right after them and run them down for the job and finely caught four of the men and took the case to court and fined them one hundred dollars each, pretty dear fishing for them and they spoiled the fishing there for anyone else. Another morning Theron had a cold and did not go with me, and after going down the river about three miles I climbed out on the side of the steep mountain to have a look down the canyon. Finely I started back and came over a ridge and saw two men down on the river fishing along the river was lined with a thicket of underbrush eight or ten feet high so men could not get in and out of the river very well at that point. One of the men was out in the middle of the river just above a big beaver dam. That was nearly filled up with soft mud that had washed in from above in the canyon wall. I was about a hundred yards away from him or more on the steep mountain and I saw a big rock about half as big as a stove by me in a bed of dirt, so I thought how funny it would be to roll that rock down the mountain. I got behind it and gave it a heave with both feet so out she came and started rolling down at full speed jumping a half rod at a leap. Well the man that was in the middle of the river heard the noise and looked up and seen the rock coming straight toward him and the brush on both sides of him and he thought he was trapped so down the river he ran. He only got a rod or two till he sank down in the soft mud and water over his boot tops and was about to fall over head first so he threw his pole and stuck both hands out to save falling in head first. There he stood on all fores, hands and feet looking round for the rock to come but low and behold when the rock struck the thicket it never crushed through. If it had it would have stopped when it struck the mud the first time. I knew it could never reach the men before I rolled it down the hill. So both of us shook, he with fear and I with laughter. My motto has been always through life never to wrong no man or living thing and still is. One summer Alton was going over to Heber so I told him I would ride over on the river below Charleston and fish while he was gone and when I was getting out of the car Uvonne said "Grandpa catch a fish for me." I said all right I will if I can but when they came back I had not got any; fish so when we got over to Wallsburg in the lower end of the valley I asked Alton to let me out and I would walk home up the creek but I did not get home till after dark and Uvonne was in bed. I only caught one fish that night and the next morning after they were up I had cleaned the fish and it was a nice one. It hung off over a big plate on both sides and I took it in to her and she said to her mother. "Oh boy Oh boy he got me a fish." That delighted me more than it would to have eaten a plate full of fish myself. Some time along about the first week in January nineteen forty six Jess and Winona came to St. George and we had just recieved a letter from Emily telling that she was in a very bad condition and her legs were swollen with dropsy so Annie Jess and Winona desided to go to Provo and see her. They left Ken with me with the understanding that I should take him to a show. Well when night came Ken and I went and when the show was about half our Ken said I have got to go to the toilet. I was sitting there wondering what to do when he jumped up and was gone. The show was over crowded that night and people were standing all along the ile, in the back and outside, so I knew if I got up we would loose our seats. I wondered how he would ever find his way back through that crowd. Well he was gene eight or ten minutes and to my surprise here he came back and found me and I said you found your way did you? (Now remember he was only about THREE AND A HALF years old and could not read nor write a word) but he said, "Yes I found a place where it said, "FOR BOYS OR GIRLS EITHER", So I went in." Well that tickeled me more than anything I had seen in the show so I was well paid for my money. On the sixteenth of April nineteen forty six we moved back to Provo out in the river bottoms and lived in an apartment that Theron and Emily Stoker fixed for us with them. This summer I have bussied myself tending lambs rabbits and doing odd jobs around the place. In the fall of nineteen forty six on the sixth day of September I had a severe heart attack and came close to deaths door. All the Children were notified that I was very ill. They all came immediately and all of them were soon at my bedside excepting Ervin and he was in California in the mountains and as soon as he received the telegram he called Elva up by phone and asked about my condition and said he would come if it was necessary. As soon my sister Emily Batty heard of my sickness she came form Vernal 'to see me although critically ill I was happy to see loved one's. Just three weeks later I had another Heart attack and was very bad for thirty six hours. But now I am better again and up and going they tell me I will have to be careful. Well I wonder what that means and what careful means. Not to cut a stick of wood or carry it in or even carry a bucket of coal. So here I am, like the banker in California that had donated to the Relief Society and all other societies of relief that had called on him and he said he was just living to see what was coming next, and so am I. I want to say in conclusion of the sketch of my life I have always been of a religious turn .of mind. But always tried to avoid exteemes in any way, religious or any other. Still in the summer or fall after I was seventeen I began to study and reason on how the first God came into existence and wondered if I did not have just as good a chance to come into existence as the first God did away back there where time first began. But I came down to Provo that fall and heard President Carl G. Maeser bear testimony to the truthes of the Gospel and how he was converted and then my Mother was the greatest influence for good in my life and the testimony she bore to me was as true and faithful as the sun that shines every day. Then I began to reason the other way and that the Earth is here rolling around every twenty four hours and swinging around in its regular course giving winter and summer. Then one thing sure that is I am here and there is just as good, a chance for a God, to be in the heavens ruling and governing this Earth as that I am here and then with all the testimony of the bible and the old prophets then comes the Book of Mormon and the Doctern and Covenants and the Pearl of Great Price, Then Joseph Smiths testimony then this gospel of Jesus Christ and all the latter day works then last of all but not the least but the greatest the testimony of the Holy spirit and the testimony of the Holy Ghost or the still small voice that whispers to all people, for it is as the old Prophet Joel said in his second chapter and twenty eight Th verse -- I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy etc. So when we find all these reasons that there is a God the creator of Heaven and Earth we should conform our lives to the principles of eternal life, eternal development and eternal glory. If it is as God said to Moses in his first chapter and thirty ninety verse in the Pearl of Great Price: For behold, this is my work and my glory to bring to pass the immorality and eternal life of man; . Then should we not put forth an effort with all our mind might and strength to save our own souls, for after all the object of us coming here into this world is to get the body we have a tabernacle of flesh and bone for our spirit to dwell in that we might be like the Savior said of himself after his resurrection and that we like him might be made perfect and now this is my testimony and blessing unto all who may read these lines. So fair you well may we all when we meet at the judgement seat of God be satisfied with our works which we have done here on this Earth is my admonition and prayer. Signed By. Don L. Bigelow /s Typed by Emily May Bigelow Stoker The passing of another birthday, another mile stone in my life. I have decided to fill in some more in my lives story. The clipping out of the Provo Herald with my picture it gives a part of my doings on my birthday I want to add a little more to it, to explain our celebration. Elva invited Emily and her family and I down to her place for dinner and we sure enjoyed the dinner she served. Then I got several nice birthday cards, two nice whit handkerchiefs, one pair of sox, a nice tie pin clasp with chain, and two boxes of chocolate candy and one box of candied fruit. After dinner we had a treat on candy and fruit. But after all I sure missed my darling wife who has gone the ways of the world and left me alone in this lonesome lonely world to roam where I will or may. But I mus not say alone, I have six sweet noble children left here with me out of eleven. Five of them is with their Mother. Then twenty four grand children and seven great grand children which is my heritage and my life long hope that my name will be continued on through this world and the endless ages of eternity to come, or the end of the milieu which is the last stage of this worlds natural existence and my children's love is the greatest support and strength that I have to live for, in fact it is my all and the greatest stay of my life. May 25, 1947, I walked about three fourths of a mile and went to Sunday School and while there too part in the discussion of the lesson which I enjoyed very much. May 30, 1947, Theron Stoker took Emily and the rest of his family and I up to Wallsburg on decoration day. We took flowers Elva sent some beautiful ones and Theron and Emily took many beautiful ones too. The flowers I bought cost Five Dollars. We had enough to almost cover all the graves. Then Alton and family came up and brought many more beautiful ones, and about that time Okie and family came with another car load, so the graves were a mount of beautiful blossoms. I saw a lot of old friends and had a good talk with them and had a good time as much as I could under such a strain of sorrow. Then we came back down the canyon and stopped and ate our dinner in the canyon among the green trees and beautiful mountain scenery. On Saturday the thirty first I went down to Provo and bought me a telescope fish pole they sure are expensive. The pole cost me eight dollars it is a good steel pole with a reversible handle. Sunday June 1st Theron tool his family and I in the care and we all went to Sunday School and fast meeting. Sunday June eighth, Wilford Boren and wife came down home and got me and we stopped at Minas for a while then went on up the canyon and passed Park City and on to the head of Parleys canyons place, to help him set a new saw mill. Stayed there four days. It was raining and snowing nearly all of the time. It snowed right down on the foot hills. The last half day we got the mill running and sawed about eight hundred feet of inch lumber. Friday I got up, had breakfast, and bid them farewell and Wilford took me to Salt Lake City before eight o'clock A.M. I bought a ticket to Milford, Utah it cost $8.35. I stayed right there in the depot waiting til twelve five P. M. Got to Milford over three hours late. Went fishing late the next day and got no fish, but Jess got some and we had fish from then on for a month. This is June Twenty first. Longest day of the year. It rained all night and until eleven o'clock in the day, the rainiest wet spring I ever remember. June the thirtieth. We left Milford, Jess, Jay and I and went 140 miles to fish lake as dreary a place as I ever saw for fishing. Had Velma and Bob come down and Jess, Winona and all of us went to Beaver canyon and on the third of July caught my limit of trout, the first time in my life and I sure was thrilled that day. We had all the fish we wanted while there then we came back. Bob and Velma brought Elva and family and Emily and her family a lot of trout so they all had all they could eat. July 16, 1947, came from Milford to Leamington on the train, it cost me two dollars and thirty one cents. Went fishing with Alton little children in the Severe river for three or four days and got three messes of carp, still they tasted like fish. July 24, 1947, Late in the morning Alton took his family and I and went north to Provo, and went to a public park and Fern had a nice lunch fixed and we ate then continued on to Salt Lake City and we saw the sentential Perade. It lasted about two hours. The most interesting thing I saw on one of the big floats there was two big baskets with two little girls on in each basket hanging out one on each side of the float about twenty feet apart. Hanging out there like they were weighing human life in the balance. It made me think that people should so conduct their lives that they could be weighed in the balance all the timer get on an extreme either way at any time in their lives. On Saturday night, July 26th I went with Alton and Fern to Delta to Hawian traveling trupe musical programe which excelled anything I ever saw or heard in their line of entertainment. There were about twenty five or thirty people in the troupe and at the last there were about six women came out one at a time dressed in long trailing skirts all of different collors and shades representing the different islands of their home country. And those people looked whiter than most hawian people I ever saw. They were dressed up in bright collors and they went through all kinds of motions showing by their actions the expressions they wanted to convey instead of by words. This extraordinary entertainment I never will forget. Saturday, August 2, 1947. We came up to Midway to the Boren reunion got there late but saw a lot of the family and some of the older ones. Then went in swiming with Elvas family and swam the full lenght of that long bathing resort, pretty good for on at eight-one years. October 8, .1947, I went to Salt Lake City and went through the Temple twice while there then on the thirteenth I went to Vernal on the buss the fair was $4.84. I arrived in Vernal about eight fifty tow o'clock P. M. A dark night, after nine o'clock was directed to go one and a half blocks west across the street and one block south and across the street on the corner so I went up to the house on the corner, no lights but I went up on the east poach, knocked on a locked door and no answer. Knocked again and Sister Emily said who is it? I was standing there trying to think what to say to fool her when she said in a loader tone, "Who is there?" Then I had to answer so I said D L. Bigelow My wits came too late, after I thought I should have said "Honerable Patches". When I told Emily, she said, "If you had of said that to me I would of told you to take your patches and go on." "Honerable Patches" what Lewarence Knight said in "When a man is a man". Well we had a good laugh anyway, and Emily and her children just treated my royal. I had on of the best times in my life in that three weeks I was there and went down with Dan on his farm and saw a nice doe deer and Dan tried to lariatte some fish but had now luck. Told Emily when I came back and she said "Huh, how could he of lariatted fish?" I said, "Take a piece of bailing wire and fasten a piece of fine copper wire on it about a foot and a half long then make a loop about three or four inches round in the copper wire, then tell the fish to hold still till you get the loop down where he is and then pass the loop back behind the fishes head and ears, and when the fish winks and gets his eyes shut give the wire a jerk and if you are quicker than the fish you have him lariatted. Then all you get to do is to pull him out and get him in your hands and you have a fish. Then keep on that way till you get enough for a mess. Oh then you got a mess of lariatted fish. Ha! Ha! The boys and girls and in-laws all showed me a good time with big dinners and feasts. While in Vernal I went to Jensen Emily Batty and Berda Bascom and held a meeting Sunday night and talked and told the people that ever person should have and object or aim in life, that I had four. The first is to save ones own soul. The next was to have an honerable family. My wife had eleven children, six of them grew t maturity. We tried to instill in them the truthes of the eternal life. The next was to do some missionarry work. I went on two missons and Alton went on to Canada. Last of all I wanted to acomplish some Temple work for the dead. Annie and I done the endowment work for over sixteen hundred men and women in two temples. Then the night before I left Vernal Emily invited all of her children and their companion to a social party in the evening and we sure had a royal good time that night. On the sixth of November I came back to Salt Lake City with one of Woody B's truck drivers and went through the temple again, and hunted a place where I thout I could come back to in February and get a room to house up for the winter or hibernate for a few months. One time when we were out in Ashley valley we had a trunk in the house that was rounding on both sides and sloped towards each end, so it was rounding every way. Our little girl the second on was about two and a half years old, just old enough to talk plain. There was a chair at the end of the trunk so Ida climbed upon the chair then on top of the trunk and played there. Then she layed down on her back length ways of the trunk, when she discovered she was falling off now matter which way she turned so in her fright she called to her mother and said, "Mama It's a killing I." Then her mother came to her rescue, and when Annie told me about it we had a good laugh. In our courtship when Annie and I were young, I had some rivals, and among them was George Batty. One winter Annie and I had been going to dances and entertainments all the time when there was and for pass time. So Geo. Batty got up a house party or dance at Susan Gardners home and he did not invite me, so I felt like a lost sheep. Then Batty got in with Clint and told Clint what he was doing not inviting me and then he went with Clint to Annies home and told her all about the party and told her that I would not be there. Then he asked her to go with him, but she stood pat for me, and told him no. Then he tried to get her to go with Clint again Annie said no. So bless her she told me all about it the dance an all. She said she wished I had of come over and spent the evening with her. Which I sure, sure would have done, if I had of know her feelings and how she was staying home on my account. Right after that I asked her to keep company with me steady not long after that I had taken her to the dance hall to a party and when Geo. Batty was dancing with Annie he asked her to go home with him again she said no. But she did not tell me about this untill after we were married. So bless her darling soul no wonder she said in one of her poems "I started married life with the faith of a trusting child." God bless her should, till I can come to here. She has always been just as true to me as the sun that shines every twenty four hours. She told me one time, "Don I'll go anywhere with you." She went one t Ashley valley and twice to California. Now I will have to go where she is when the time comes for us to met again no more to part forever. Christmas morning 1947 I was here at home with Theron and Emily and all three of their little children and did they get a lot of presents? Yes from their loved ones, friends and neighbor's so we all had a wonderful Christmas. Then I went down and had Christmas dinner Elva and family so another good time we had. On new years day Theron, Emily, their children and I all went down to Elvas and had another good chicken dinner. Now then we have another Year nineteen forty eight ahead of us. Bringing that little spark of hope which we all look forward to which keeps us going on to the end of time looking for the mellenium or some other great day in the future. January the second 1948, at the time of this writing it is just about a year since my wife Annie took sick. She and I spent Christmas a year ago here with Theron, Emily and family and a good time we enjoyed, then Clyde and Elva came out here and got Annie and I and we went and had New Years dinner with them at Elva's home and as all good feasts, we appreciated it, and then Annie took sick. And got worse all the time till she passed on into the great beyond, where people come back no more. Elva and I was there with Annie and she was suffering something terrible, then she said, "Cant we all pray, that I can get ease and rest." So we all took it in turns and prayed that she might get rest. But she just got worse and her strength work out and she passed away in about three days after she took so bad, but as her patriarchal blessing told her to live faithful to the last she did. So "We have a more sure word of Prophesy where unto you do well if you take heed." The in the Doctrin and Covnants Sec. 131 verse 5 it was revealed to Joseph Smith, "The more sure word of Prophesy means a man's (or womens) knowing that he (or she) is sealed up unto eternal life, by revelation and the spirit of prophesy through the power of the holy Priesthood." now this blessing was sealed upon Annie's hand by John M. Murdock Patriarch. He says -- "I seal you up unto eternal life to come forth in the morning of the first resurection --. You will have a fullness of joy, and crowned with honor and glory in the presence of God, and the Holy angels. -- Read her Patriarchal blessing and get the full benifit of the wording in it. Then you will see that she has the testimony of three men all Prophets, Peter, Joseph Smith, and John M. Murdock, all testifying that as Peter says, second Epistle chapter 1 verse 10, Make your calling and election sure. I say, "Make your calling certain and your election sure, and Annie has complied with all the requirements of the church first, faith, second repentance, third baptism by imersion for the remission of sins, fourth laying on of hands for the reception of the Holy Ghost. Then she has went through the Temple and got the marks of the Holy Priesthood and was layed away in Temple clothes in robes of white with the marks of the Holy Priesthood on her garments and it was the most perfect funeral I ever saw anyone have. Now she is ready and waiting for the resurrection and the final judgement or statement, "Well done thou good and faithful Sister enter into my Glory and my joy and receive thy blessings acording to thy patriarchal blessing in the presence of God and Holy angels. I once heard of a man that was put in jail, and one of his friends came to visit him to cheer him up. So the visitor asked the jail bird what he had done to be put in jail. Well he said I saw some beautiful flowers over the fence and a pretty girl sitting there and I stayed to long looking at them and the officers caught me and put me in here. The consouling man said, why they could not put you in jail for that. They go me here just the same, said the jail bird whether they can or cant. Another one: A man lived here in Salt Lake and owned a good home and had had six wives and they every one died. He also had a big heard of sheep and a herd of cattle and two men came from the east to by him out every thing he owned. So he ordered his herders to bring in the cattle and sheep and load them on the cars. One of the buyers said let us go down in town and have dinner so the rancher went with the one and the other buyer stayed and ordered the trains to pull out for the eastern market to Chicago and the two buyers had not paid him for the property or stock.. The owner could not get the money so he go a lawyer and went east to stop the stock sale and it was too late. The stock were all sold and paid for, when he got there. The owner could not prove anything so they beat him out of all of it. Then the tramp or once well to do man came to a womans place and applied for a job. The woman had married a man in the Temple when they were young and had a family of children and her man died, then these business man went to work and in a few months the man and woman got married for time or this world, now the man's name that tells this is Albert Lindsey, eighty one years old, he was a witness to this marriage. After the woman had lived with this man a while she desided she would rather have him for eternity than her dead man, so she went and told President Grant she wanted a divorce from the dead man and wanted to marry this man that was alive no mater how many wives he had for eternity. So President Heber J. Grant said he had never had any revelation to make a woman stay with any man she did not want. He gave her a divorce and the woman went to the Temple and was sealed to this man for eternity. A man sitting on the other side of me said, You cannot rob the dead. Then Lindsey said, He was a wittness to both marriages, so it looks like the dead can be robbed as well as the living. Salt Lake, May 20, 1948. Went through the Temple this afternoon then packed up my house keeping dishes and clothes and went to stay with Bob and Velma all night. On the 21st went to bus station and down to Provo to my children and on the 22nd Elva and Clyde got up a party for me in the evening and ask a lot of the old Wallsburg people that live in Provo to the party and we sure had a good time. Tonight Monday the 24th Theron and Emily are having a party, chickery, up in the pasture, Elva and family, Winona and family and myself, so we expect another good time. Then Jess and Winona and boys and myself are going to start for California in the middle of the night. We are going in their car so to get across the desert in the cool of the night. We left for California about 9/30 P. M and went into California about a hundred miles and stoped on a stream and fished but caught nothing. Then went on to Ervins and got there in Central Valley about ten oclock making a little over twenty four hours in coming nearly a thousand miles, very good for a steady run. New morning we went fishing, went for three days in different places and different rivers. I only caught one fish 11 inches long. They say the water is too high. There has been floods in Oregon and Washington. We had planned to go up thru there and go to the Yellow Stone Park but on account of the flood conditions desided not to go. May 31, we went down below Redding seven or eight miles on the Sacramento river. I caught three trout that was more than any of the rest of the crowd got. Ervin boys went and all tegether we got enough for breakfast the next morning. On the trip we saw a beautiful hedge of red roses a half or three quarters of a mile long on a mans farm. The night we started back I ate something that made me sick all night and I began to wonder how long it was going to last, or how long I was. I began to think it did not matter much which one let up first. But I wanted to come straight home and got here all right. June 11th I went to Salt Lake then on to Milford. The ticket from Salt Lake to Milford cost $6.07. The train leaves at 1:10 A. M. Stayed at Velma all night and Bob took me to the Union Pacific depot a little after 8 AM arrived in Milford at 3 P. Jess and the boys were waiting for me at the depot. The next morning Richard Bigelow jay and I all went over to Minersville creek with Darrel Perkins before daylight Then Jess came in the afternoon and he caught two fish and all together we got a good mess then we all went the next day. Sunday Jess got the most of the fish and we had all the fish we wanted for two or three days. Then on Wednesday I caught the bigest fish caught that day. Thursday got a box of chocolate candy from Altons and Ferns family for Fathers day Friday got a greeting card letter with two dollars in it from Clyde and Elva and family. Sunday got a card and a dollar bill from Jess and Winona and a dollar from their two boys. Saturday Jess took his car and Richard and Jay and Ken and I went up Beaver Canyon and we had a lot of fishing but the fish were only about seven and eight inches long, it was fishing, all of which goes to make life. Monday June 21st the longest day of the year, it has been uncommon cold and backward spring for gardens to grow all spring right down to freezing point. Today I got a fathers day greeting card from Ervin and family with a dollar bill in it and also a card from Alton and his family it certainly is a comfort and blessing to have the love of my family of boys girls and grandchildren. Makes life worth while for the struggle. While I was almost worn out last night, after going fishing all day I took a warm bath before going to bed and felt better, an old man eighty two years old tramping up and down creeks and rivers is a hard job. July the third, left Milford and came to Lyndel and then on to Leamington to Altons ans spent the fourth of July there with his family. Went to Delta and seen the perade and heard the band play that Leda and Verna was in, which was very fine. Then came to Provo with Alton Tuesday morning found all well. About the 14th of July Emily had said she wanted a trout for dinner. I took my fish pole and caught some grass hoppers and went down the spring run here on the farm and caught one fish eleven and a half inches long and when I got back told her I got the fish for her supper. About the 16th of July 1948 Emily got poisoned with poison ivey. Her children got it some where and coma and put their arms around her neck and face. Two of them broke out and their's cleared up in a few days. Emily broke out all over the back of her neck and face. He neck and her left arm was raw, the awfulest sores I ever seen. Both of her eyes swelled shut so she couldnt see. To make it worse a bee stung her four times. They had Dr. Smith come out here, then we administered to her, but it spread all over her body and legs. Then she changed Doctors and began getting better, But finally went to the third Doctor. From after effects of the poison Ivey she was afflicted with boils all over her body. Emily is still troubled with her heart. August the 16th, I went down to Elvas at night stayed there and next morning before Clyde went to work he took Don and I down to the lake and I paid a dollar and a half for a boat and we stayed till three o'clock in the afternoon and each one of us caught a carp. A fine fishing trip. (NOT!) September 13, I packed one suit case with my temple clothes and one with other clothes, I had to travel with and Clyde and Elva came and took me to their place to stay for the night. The next morning I got up and had breakfast then told Elva I was going down to the lake. She asked me how I was going. I said walk. She said You cannot walk that far. I said, Oh yes I can. At nine o'clock I started out and went to the Post office I had to post a bundle to Winona then went on. Stopped under the shade of the trees and stopped and inquired several times how far it was to the lake still I kept on walking, and finely reached the lake shore, bought a bottle of orange soda water the Woman there said it was just five miles to the post office and I had walked every step of it in three hours, and a half. Eight tow years old. I got a ride back to town and got supper at Elvas and at five twenty started for Manti, finely got here and found a hotel room for one dollar a day. So next morning got up and went to the temple got there late. But went into the meeting and then went thru the temple twice for endowments for the dead. That night I found a room. Thursday I went thru the temple once and once on Friday. Thursday night I prayed earnestly to the Lord for him to give me a testimony that the work I was doing for the dead was excepted by them and was directed by the Lord. Well Friday after the session was over they called me to go and be a witness for the sealing of a number of husbands and wives and a hundred and thirty two children to their parents, that were all passed and gone to the other world. As soon as they started to do the sealings the spirit of the Lord came to me and rested down upon me so hard and it humbled me so I could not keep the tears from falling down off my face and three different men in different parts of the room noticed me wiping my eyes and I could not help it, or what they thought, and I never will question again whether the people we are doing this work for is excepting it as I know now they are and not only that. But I know the Lord is directing it. I done four names last week and eight this besides getting wood and coal and getting it pilled away for winter. On Saturday September twenty fifth I packed up my temple clothes and went to Provo. Then on the next Tuesday took my fishing bag and pole and went on the bus as far as I could and then thumbed my way down to the lake caught five carp one was a big on and I broke my pole getting him out, but after they are skinned an all the dark meant taken out of them and salted over night they sure taste like fish just the same. I washed two suits of temple clothes and ironed them and now am ready to go back to Manti. On Friday the 8th I went through the Manti temple twice, then went through the temple for endowments ten times the next week, besides being a witness for sealings 3 times. Morning of the nineteenth early Sister Johnson came and read a telegram about Dewey Bigelow's terrible accident, getting shot when he set his gun down so it slipped off a long and discharged and killed him. I got ready and went to Provo to see if I could do anything. They had the funeral on Thursday at 2:30. I came back to Manti Friday afternoon. This is December 20th have worked here in the Manti temple a big part of the fall, have done on the Mecham - Tuttle and missionary names all together 82. The last few days have been working doing names for the Blanding Ward getting 50 cents each and have done 14 names for them got a check tonight for $7.00 this seven and ten dollars Mother left to have temple work done is the only money I have received in direct pay. This makes nine winters I have been doing temple work. Three in Salt Lake Temple, Annie was with me then. We both worked four winters together in the St. George temple, then a year ago I worked in the Salt Lake temple and now this winter in the Manti temple. On December 23 the Buss was two hours late getting into Manti. I got tired waiting and went and carried my big suit case seven blocks. But finely it came and we started for Provo. When we got over the summit going down Spanish Fork canyon there was a terrible blizzard blowing the wind shield wiper stoped working the driver could not see so the buss run down of the road about five rods into the bar pit. Felt like the buss was going to tip over on its side but it did not. Still it was hard and tiresome to sit on the seats then were pitched so to one side. They sent to Provo for another buss and we had to wit there three hours and a half but no one was hurt. Finely the other buss came and we and we did not get into Provo till after dark that night. I went to Elvas and stayed all night, had a good nights sleep, then went to Emily the next day, stayed there Christmas week. I recieved about thirty Xmas cards this year. My friends sure remembered me. I had a splendid time with Elva and family Emily and family, sure is wonderful to have the love of a loving family. Then came back to Manti on the fifth of January. 1949, and went through the temple twice today. Manti; January. 19, 1949. We sure are having the terriblest hard winter here I ever have experienced, since I was a boy in Wallsburg. January. 21 1949, I went and measured the snow today out in the field and it measured from 17 to 19 inches so it would average about 18 inches deep on the level, and it has just kept up snowing all winter since it stated in November and the thermomiter has been runing from zero to 17 below and once they reported 22 below zero. So to sum it up one side and down the other it is the hardest winter I have seen since I was grown. Well by the way I have went through the temple twice today and tree times yesterday and three times Monday making twelve times this week and was witness for the sealing of eight-four children to parents. January 29, it still is winter they said at the Depot this morning the registor was 22 below zero, so winter is still hanging on but thank goodness one month is gone. The next day or two the regestor went to 25 below zero. They say in Provo the snow is three feet deep on the level, and in Wallsburg it is five feet deep and the thermomontor runing in twenty five below zero in Wasatch County. You know its the 18th of February and the cold weather has begin to let up and today is the 21 and the roads are getting bare but the snow is still piled up along the roads, side walks and along the trails out of houses but it is melting every where. Manti; Mar. 19, 1949. Yesterday in the temple the workers there were telling what a big time the town was going to have for all the old folkes over sixty five on Saturday the 19th so this morning about half past eleven the ex-Bishop came and got five of us in his car and took us to the Stake house where they had eighteen or twenty big long tables set for old people. I ask on man how many old folks there would be and he thought two hundred or more and they had a real old time chicken dinner. Mashed potatoes, gravy chicken and fluffy rolles and butter and more chicken all we wanted but this was my main hold besides a lot of dished I did not even touch. Then they had ice cream and cake. After dinner they had a splendid program and then took us across the street to a good picture show. Whenever I think of Manti I will remember what a wonderful dinner and time I had here this day. Sunday I got up and fasted and went to high Priests meeting and Sunday school, had a good time. When coming home Sister Johnson called me and I went over and she envited me to dinner. I excepted the invitation went in and she had roasted beef, mashed potatoes brown gravy and other old time farm dinner like we used to have then I stayed about two hours and had a good visit with them. Now today is Sunday March 27th and the first three sundays in January I fasted 24 hours each Sunday then there has been ten Sundays since then that I have fasted till after one o'clock each Sunday trying to overcome this laying awake nights and droping off in a dead sleep in meetings or sitting still in the temple, which I have fought with all the faith, prayers, and power of my body I could muster still I do not sleep nights very well and still drop off in that dead sleep in the temple. But while here I have received two most wonderful testimonies. After I had been here about six weeks laid awake till after twelve oclock started to pray and I ask the Lord to make it manifest to me whether the people that we were doing the temple work for was excepting it or not. After I had come down here living alone among strangers and spending all the money I was getting sacrificing my time tallent and my all I wanted to know if the people were excepting our work, and if the Lord was directing it. Well I went to the temple the next day without any answer, and after going through for the dean man they called me for a witness, in President Bent Peterson's room and no sooner than He started to seal those people over the alter than the big tears began running down over my cheeks. The spirit of the Lord came to me so strong that I knew the people were accepting the sealing and the Lord directing it. My prayer was answered and as a testimoney three men on three sides of the house were watching me wipe the tears away. Then another about ten days ago when going through for endowments I had gon up to the terestereal room ready to go thru the vale and while sitting there waiting right by my right side at the end of the bench I heard a woman's voice say, the Lord has excepted of your labor and sacrifice in this temple work and you have got it complete, and done You have finished your temple work. I looked up to see if I could see who spoke and no one was there, the person did not show themselves to me. Wednesday morning while in the temple may the 5th I got a phone call from Elva in Provo that Clara O Bigelow Fathers thrived wife died, the day before and would be burried Saturday at two oclock the funeral services held in Wallsburg and would be burried in the Wallsburg burial grounds. So I left Manti Friday morning went to Provo and attended the servicies then came back to Manti Monday at 5:20 p.m. and worked in the temple all the rest of the week. The left Manti Saturday morning and bid fare well to some of the best friends I have ever had in my life. They have written some of the best pieces of rememberence in my autograph album that is written there. Arived in Provo all OK found Elva and family, Emily and family about as well as usual neither one of the is having very good health, but was up and around. Then on the 22nd of May, my birthday Elva and her family and Winona and her family came from Milford, they all brought picnic and we had a plate dinner and we had a splendid time. I sang two old time songs, first one, "When the curtains of night are pinned back by the stars" and "Young Emily was a servant maid." There was one thing lacking, and that was all of my living children was not present. Still there was love and affection for the ones that was her. Then on the 26th Emily had the anniversary of her birthday. But we did not celebrate it, but gave her some nice presents and we enjoyed or lives together. Then on decorating day Elva, Alton, Emily and Winona all came and we went up to Wallsburg and had a holiday and decorated our folk's graves so it all goes to make up one grand union of love and labor in life. Tuesday July 26th I went and got a music lesson on the guitar. Then at night Clyde Carter took Don and I to Salt Lake City to the Union Pacific Depot and we started to Idaho at 11:20 pm. Arrived in Shelley next morning at 7:10. We went to Byrle's and had breakfast and stayed there all day. Next morning went to Dewey Petersons or Vada's place stayed one day then went to Carl Bigelow's, then back to Vada's and stayed about two days in a place and on the 2nd of August at 3:40 P. M. took the train back to Salt Lack City. Met Clyde at 10:30 and he brought us back to Provo in his car and we got in bed abut midnight. August 6, went to Midway to likes hot pots to attend the Boren reunion and had a chicken dinner, then a program, I sang two songs and went down to swim in the pool 60 ft long and I swam full length of it without stoping. Got the prize for being the oldest man and gave a dollar to help support the Boren reunion. Sept 14 I came out to Vernal with Bruce Watkins, Ivan and Ella Batty. We arrived at 12 o'clock midnight and I stayed at Ivans place the rest of the night. Had breakfast at Ivans and he took me to my Sister Emily Battys that morning. We are having a splendid wonderful visit. On the 18th Sunday we went to Zina Howard's and she gave us a splendid chicken dinner with dumplings and gravy. I had a good talk with Brother Will Howard. Then on the 21st Sister Emily and I were envited down to Zinas for another big feast. And on the 22nd had another wonderful chicken dinner o Dora Freestone's and I congratulated them on their splendid modern home with its big glass south front windows and also in the west. In the afternoon, Well and Mina took Emily and I up on Diamond Mountain and We saw Mina's oldest boys dry land wheat farm up there on top of the mountain. We saw one grainery about twenty feet long full of dry land wheat and since I came home they tell me he has about eight thousand bushel gathered, and there has come about two feet of snow so they think it is doubtful if he gets the rest thrashed, so it will be a bad loss and it sure is a big climb to get on top of the mountain. Then we went on farther and seen a modern home that Woody B has build up there for hunters and Mountaineers or travelers to stay in and over the door is rote "The Kings Palace." Then we came down to Jim Freestone's house and stayed there over night, and the next morning I went out to one of the ponds and caught nine trout and Will and Woody B. caught some so we had enough for a good trout dinner. In the afternoon we come over on Taylor mountain where I had got house logs out and hauled down to the valley fifty years ago and I built a house we lived in for two years while Annie and I lived and broke up a forty acre farm and went through and experienced the hardest times in our married lives in President Grover Cleavelands rue over the United States; now back to our trip, we had a trout dinner up on the top of Taylor Mountain and cam home to Emily's and made the hole trip in a less than twenty four hours. Sept. 27 I started from Vernal with a salesman about seven oclock at night just between sundown and dark a man I had never saw before. We talked gospel and everthing but love. I drove into Heber between 11 and 12 o'clock drove up in front of the Jensen Hotel and then he said we can stay here tonight. I got out of his car and asked him how much I owed him and he said not a thing I thanked him and we in and the proprieter said the room for each of us would cost two dollars a piece I went up stairs to bed, the sales man said I could ride to Provo with him the next day if I would wait till he canvased two stores, it might take till noon. So I desided to wait rather than to go all the way to Salt Lake City and then to Provo. So a little after noon here he came and said he was ready so I got my suit case and climbed in the car got home to Provo or right to the end of the lane. I got out and asked him again how much I owed him. He said not a cent I said her is tow dollars if you will take it, he said no and bid me good by wishing me the blessings of the Lord. Now when I got my check of Fifty dollar abut the fifth of Sept. I paid five dollars for hous rent, left me 45.00 so then I took $4.50 and gave to Bp. Orval Davis, a full tithing my outing to Vernal and back cost me less than five dollars. If I had paid my buss fair both ways around by S. L. City it would of cost fifteen or sixteen dollars. Did it pay me to pay my tithing? I say yes, Yes, and I saved more than three times the amount of my tithing. November. 8 Yesterday I got a card from Okie enviting me to come to their place and stay and go to the temple and attend Doris' wedding, I went and Doris was married on the 9th to Robert D. Scott. I was their right hand witness and Apostel John A. Widsoe pernounced the cerimony in the day. We went to a hotel for dinner on the night of the 10th they had a reception party and a dance for all friends. After watching them dance a while I came home to Provo with Elva and Clyde and stayed with them the rest of the night. December 9 Alton and Fern came in their new car from Springville and took Elva Clyde and I up to Wallsburg to Temp Borens funeral services and burrial. She was just a little over eight months older than I am and they layed her away in the Wallsburg Cemitary. The first winter snow came to stay in Provo this winter on the tenth of December 1949. This year is about gone the hollidays are here again, and New Year's day had passed, spent the hollidays with Elva and her family and Emily and her family, I truly thank the Lord for my children, grandchildren and great grand children, and I surely do love and appreciate my heritage. February 2. Left Provo 2;45 P. M. for S. L. City on a trip to California to visit Ervin and family took the grehound buss to arive in S. L. City went to Velmas to stay all night and Winona came that night. The next morning called a cab and went to depot at 6:00 A. M. and soon left for Ogden. Left Ogden at 8:45 A. M. to cross the desert for California. Arrived in Redding 2 P. M. Ervin came and go us and too us to his home in Central Valley the snow was about a foot deep there but that night it started to rain and in two days the snow was all gone. The weather cleared up and looked like spring or summer had come. Winona got a letter from home stating her boys were left alone so she desided to come back to Utah and we started back on the afternoon of 10th February. Had poor connections and the trains had a lot of lay-overs. Arrived in Ogden 9 P. M. February 13 and in Salt Lake City at 11P. M. Next day went to Free Allreds found sister Polly Allred there came from California the night before same night I did and we desided we would go to Vernal together to see Sister Emily Batty, who had had a light stroke two weeks before. So the next day I came to Provo, stayed one day and that night heard Polly had already gone to Vernal. So that night I got ready went to Elvas, stayed all night, next morning at 6:30 I started for Vernal, found Polly there and Emily up and walking around but very feeble. Stayed there with Will Howard and Zina four days then back to Salt Lake City, with Polly then on back home to Provo. Oh by the way the snow was twelve to fourteen inches deep in Ashley Valley. August 1, 1950 went over to Provo River in the afternoon and just after sundown caught a big german-brown trout, nineteen and a half inches long and it weighed four lbs and a few days before that I caught on a fly hook that was seventeen inches long out of the river. August. 5 the Boren Family, (only two left of the original family) all went to Canyon Glenn and had a family reunion. Enjoyed a splendid dinner had a very nice entertainment and program. Mina Merriotti took lead and charge of all the exercises. October 22 - Went to Sunday School today as usual. My eye-sight has failed looking at things far away. I could not see the figures across the room on the black board. An my hearing is very much impared, I could hear the teacher, Bro. Triplet give the lesson but could not hear the people around me in their discussion. So when I came home gave Emily her book and told her I did not think I would go to Sunday school any more. It has been a long time since I went regular to meetings on that account. So I bid farewell to all kind of meetings and entertainments. Now I want to say to all lovers of the truth, light, and knowledge Read the book "The Vision" or the degrees of Glory", especially to women more especially to young unmarried women and girls. Read the most wonderful directions counsel and instructions given to young unmarried women and girls given on pages as follow: Marriage out side the Church Pages 91--92. "Instructions recieved on heavenly things" pages "92-93 and Top of 94. Origin and destiny of women" Pages 145, 146, 147, and top of 148. This is December and another year almost to a close the world is at war in Korea and China, a terrible thing to send our young American boys to face those battles and to be shot in cold blood. Yes Christmas is gone, I spent the day with Emily and her family, and had a good time Yes old year gone and 1951 is here. The fifth of January makes four years since my darling wife passed to the great Beyond. There was no snow this year til after Xmas. But it snowed about two inches at night for two nights before new years day. But the snow would go off each day and on the 4th January, 1951 there was no snow on the ground in front of the house. January 11, 1951, No snow yet to amount to anything. This has been the most uncommon fall and winter I ever remember in my life here in this part of Utah. The thermomoter has only run down to ten below Zero on night. It is now February the twentieth and no snow on the fields. The sun is shining warm and it feels jut like spring or summer. The weather was fine until the first day in March. Then in the afternoon it began to snow, and the weather turned cold. For four or five days it was winter, then it began to warm up gradually and in a few days it was spring again. This is April 13th and this morning before sunrise I heard a mourning dove cooing in one of the big walnut trees so Spring is here, the grass is growing, the early flowers are beginning to bloom and I am glad; it is cheering me. Sunday, April 1, 1951. 1 went to Sunday school in the Edgemont Church house. I had fasted and after Sunday School I attended fast meeting and bore my testimony. The subject I used was faith and works as found in the second chapter of James. seventeenth and eighteenth verses. As he said so I say-- I will prove my faith by my works. Then I told the people went on two missions; spent the big part of three years in the mission field. Then I came home and got children through high school and in a few years started to work in the Salt Lake Temple. I worked there four years, then in the St. George Temple four years, and in the Manti Temple one year. The big part of nine years was spent doing temple work. I did the endowment work for over fifteen hundred men. Then I was witness for a great number of sealings for husbands and wives and thousands of children to parents, making a total of five thousand altogether in which I officiated and took part in. Then to complete my testimony I quoted Reveloation; 20: 12-13. "I saw the dead small and great stand before God. etc." And when I was coming through the crowd after meeting five different people congratulated me on my talk. I thanked them, and added that I felt very humble on my talk, as humble as a little child. Saturday night, April 21, 1951 I dreamed I was on a highway in a strange place and I met my angel mother and I was Just in the act of embracing her and taking her in my arms and I said to her, "Haven't you got some love and a kiss for me? And I woke up with one of the grandest feelings of love and affection I ever enjoyed in my life. The night of June 15, 1951, I went over to Springville, Hobblecreek, with Theron and Emily and their family. Next morning at five o'clock we started fishing and I cought ten trout from seven to fourteen inches long. We had a fish dinner and had a wonderful outing in the mountain scenery. On the seventeenth I got several Fathers cards with the expression of love and gratitude for me which is beyond expression of price. So Love, Love is the greatest of them all. Then I got from the children seven dollars in all which helps to bear the burden of life. July 10, 1951. Stoker and I had words and dissatisfaction about me having to crawl through a barbed wire gate every time I went for mail or to town. This happened in the morning and at night when he came from work he said he had been thinking of it all day and that house jut was not beg enough for both of us any longer and he wanted me to leave by the first of August. Well, I had six swarms of bees and a bunch of rabbits, about thirty. So I came down to Provo and told Elva and Winona about my trouble which I took to heart as I had tried my best to do everything I could to help him build fence, dig ditches, build gates and finally went down to their new coal yard and helped in a number of ways. Well, I was totally discouraged and as Elva had planned to go see Velma in Spokane, Washington, Elva and Winona set in to have me go with her. I said, "No, No." but finally they prevailed when they found out I had the money for the ticket. Then they wouldn't give it up so I decided to go. We started Friday night, July 13, Clyde took us to Salt Lake City in his car and Elva and I got on the train in the middle of the night and we arrived in Pocatello, Idaho, about five o'clock Saturday morning. They said we could have to lay over five hours, but the train was late and we had to wait nearly three hours more. We got started again about noon and rode all the rest of the day and all night and arrived in Spokane, Washington, between eight and nine Sunday morning. Bob and son and Velma met us at the depot. They took us home to their apartment and we enjoyed their friendship and hospitality. The next night Bob took us for a sight seeing ride up through the northeast part of the town, and out along the north highway along the Spokane River which runs in a deep gorge about thirty five to fifty feet deep. There is a steep bank down to the water which is, Bob Said, no telling how deep. He said one time there was a car which got out of control and it had a baby in it. It ran off the steep side of the hill into the river which runs dead. There is no movement which can be seen. The car which went off was not found for three weeks. Then down in the west part of town they have a cement dam and big cement buildings on both sides of the river. The water runs through big turbines which furnish power to generate electricity for the town. Then the river runs over a big ledge of rock a hundred yards wide and falls a hundred and fifty feet down under a big high bridge. That night Bob drove us down to a big ledge about forty feet high, to look where the river runs off and leaves the town. Now about getting food poisoning. Monday noon Velma and I ate a half of a meat sandwich which we had taken with us and it had become poison. In the afternoon both of us got sick; yea and sicker. We tried to vomit and you can guess the rest. I was sick like the fellow that said he was so sick he was afraid he couldn't die. The only reason I tried to live was that I did not want to die so far away from home. Seven hundred miles is too far away from home. So we came back from Washington without any special thing happening. Elva and Clyde cleared on of their best rooms and moved my things down to their place. So here I am waiting between life an death and I do not care how soon it comes. But I do not want to be fed on an oxygen tank at the last. August 24, 1931. Clyde A. Carter, Elva, Don, Carol Jean and I started on a trip to the sunny south in southern Utah. The first thing of note was the Big Rock Candy Mountain. It was light colored and slick like chalk. It almost glistened in the sunlight. It had hollows or ravines down the side of it. Then we went to Bryce Canyon National Park. It was quit. a climb. We drove right into the rangers station or information bureau. The agent told me the altitude was eight thousand feet above sea level, and the canyon was about five miles wide from rim to rim. W left the car there and walked about half or three quarters of a mile. When we reached the rim and looked off down any where from twenty five to a hundred and fifty feet there was hollow hills and high peak ridges and summits and as we followed in a southeast direction around the top the canyon got deeper and finally we were looking off a ledge straight down into a gorge, oh, a hundred and fifty feet deep I would say. There were great towers of rock running straight up, maybe ten feet thick at the bottom and stood straight up like big slabs standing on the ends, some no more than a foot and a half thick towards the top and seventy five feet high. Some of the wonders of the world. Then we started for Zion National Park. They said the mountain road cost a million dollars and I believed it before we got through. We went up, and over high grades and into a tunnel perported to be a mile long and a double highway all the way through. We went up and up. It goes along the canyon wall and there is three openings in it. The road widens out so as to give room to stop and look out down the mountain -a hundred feet or more. When we got through we were way up on the side of a big high ledge mountain three or four hundred yards so we had to go zig zag turn after turn to get down in the bottom of the canyon. It was getting late, between sundown and dark and as we started up the canyon there stood a big buck deer eating leaves off some brush about five rods from the road and he never paid any attention to our car running along. Well, we made for a camp ground. The next morning we went up a river about a mile or more and low behold it was the Virgin River that runs down by St. George. Then we turned round and went back down the river to Hurricane about twenty five miles from St. George. Then we went up highway 91 to Toquerville, Aunt Emma Hills mothers sister and family used to live there. Then we started home but decided to turn and go to Cedar Brakes, and see another sight. It was a terrible climb. The sight was something like Bryce only a lot higher. The altitude is ten thousand five hundred feet and after seeing it we went down the steepest canyon road I ever was an in my life, then we went on home. This is Sunday morning September twenty third, I got up, had a light breakfast, then walked to the church house. Attended High Priests meeting then to Sunday School. I got up close to the front and heard the most or what was said. I came home had dinner then Clyde said we would go for a ride, up over the loop in American Fork Canyon. Clyde, Elva, Winona, Carol Jean, Ken and I started out. We drove on top of the devide looking over into the north fork there we stoped and Elva had arranged a lovely chicken dinner for, us, and boy, was it good, yes, yes. We went on over into the North Fork and as the leaves on the trees and brush were turning red and yellow for the fall of the year, it was a wonderful sight to see. There I looked over the mountains of my boyhood days, from nine to eighteen years old, I spent my summers there. The winters I spent in Provo, going to the B. Y. Academy. And many was the memorable seans of my life recalled. I noted up on the side of the mountain the very spot where I shot my first, big buck deer and the canyon I saw three bear following one after the other. The first was a big black bear the next tow were cinnamon bear. Father shot at them and did they scatter and run in every direction. They went straight up over the mountain fast as they could climb or run. We came down North Fork and struck the highway in Provo Canyon and turned up the canyon, went up to the Deer Creek dam, but the sights in Provo canyon did not compare with the sights in the North Fork, up among these cliffs and water falls. Then back to home sweet home. Thursday 1 November 1951 Clyde Elva, Winona and I started at four P. M to go to Salt Lake Tempe got there a little after five and We all went through the temple. Winona got here endowments. Now it is up to each one of them to comply with a celestial law, in order to go where their Mother and the other five of Our children are. On the night of the fourteenth of November 1951 I heard some of the most beautiful strains of music It seams now that it was so real that I can almost recall the sounds, and it seames like a different kind of an instrument than I ever heard. This is 8 January 1952 I just went out in the lot behind the house measured the depth of the snow in a dozen different places and as near as I could get it the snow averages about eighteen inches deep. I went up to center street and then east towards the foot of the mountain to the State hospital and as the snow was so deep the deer were out there in herds I suppose I suppose I saw fifteen or more. One little fellow had one spike horn standing up above his ears. Sure looked odd. They are feeding those deer hay out by the Hospital. The snow has covered those big pine trees and is hanging there. Winona works at the hospital, last night wile coming home she saw about a dozen big bucks in one herd and one had lost or shed one of his horns, the other horn had four points showing. He was a big deer. In the spring of 1952 Elva had been suffering a severe sick head ache. That day I went in where she was and she had her head wrapped in a wet towel, the pain would affect her stomach and she would have to go to bed. I asked her if she would like to have me administer to her, she said Yes. I took the consecrated oil and anointed her head and prayed for her and I said "You shall receive this blessing acording to your faith. And from that time on she got better, and has never had the head ache since. For this wonderful blessing we unite in thanking the God of Heaven. In September 1952 Winona and I took some temple sheets, that sister Helen Snow had got out on the Bigelow line, and went to the Manti temple. The sheets contained 163 names of Husbands, wives and children, we had them all sealed in the temple. Since then this winter Clyde, Elva, Winona and I and our family have taken three more bunches of sheets and went to the Salt Lake Temple and had the sealing done on all of those sheets, which would make over five hundred sealings. The latter part of last summer I got so I wondered what the Lord was holding me here for. It is six years now since my wife passed to the great beyond but now since I have been the cause of getting all this sealing done I have quit wondering I am eighty six years old, and go to the Utahna every Tuesday night and waltz and dance ten or twelve time till midnight. My health, I would say is perfect, with the exception of my eyesight and hearing, are both impared. Other wise I feel fine, I walk from ten to thirty three blocks every day, I thank the Lord for my health, and I say to Him I'll go where you want me to go Dear Lord, I'll say what you want me to say, and I'll be what you want me to be. So Here am I. I might say a little about the weather, it has been warm and the sun shines just like spring time, it has done all winter, and tomorrow is the 28th or last day of February, 1953. In the last of January 1953 Winona had an ailment in the palm of her hand. She thought it was a sliver and she tried to pick it out but the more she picked the worse it got till it made a hole in her hand. So she went to a doctor, he examined it, and picked and dug at it and fineally lanced it in the place effected, and every day it got worse. It pained till she could not sleep night or day. Then the Doctor lanced id down to the bone. Still the hand got worse than the toothache and she held her hand straight up all the time. The next day or evening Clyde came to my room and said Winona wanted me to come and administer to her. I washed my hands and went in. Clyde anointed her head, I sealed the annointing and pronounced the blessing. Before we took our hands off her head the pain stoped and in a number of days the sore healed up and got well. She never went back to the doctor again. One day the first part of February I went in to Elvas kitchen and there sat Winona with her leg bare up to her knee the leg laying on Elvas table. I was surprised and said, "What is the matter." She said My leg pains till I can hardly stand on it. I put my left hand on the ankle it seamed natural, I moved my hand up a little farther and it was hot with fever, I moved my had up towards her knee and it was O. K. Then I layed both hands on the hot place on her leg. I stood right there and in a silent prayer and in the authority of the Holy Priesthood and the power of the Living God I rebuked the pain and commanded it to depart and be gone in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. Winona got up the pain gon. She went down to Emily Stokers and went to work worked all day and her leg never bothered her, and has'nt since. Monday 1 March 1953 we got a phone call from Vernal, that my sister Emily Batty had passed away, or died that morning. Wednesday I got up at 4:30 and went to the buss station and took the bus to Salt Lake City. About nine oclock took another bus to Vernal, arrived about one o'clock. Held the Funeral service at 11:00 A. M. Thursday. They had the most wonderful funeral service I ever attended. It seamed to me there mus of been from three to five hundred people in attendance. It looked like there were a hundred cars there. In the evening I came home with Grand Rasmusson. And on of Don Batty's boys, drove the car and all at once he threw on the brakes. I was half asleep and I just about headed into the back of their seat. A deer jumped in head of the car. April 24, 1953. I have been for years so I could not sleep nights and then when I would sit down in the day time and be still I would drop off to sleep no matter how hard I tried to keep awake, especially in meetings. I would have the worst time to keep awake, then again the last few months it has been worse on me nights. I have been dreaming bad dreams at night as soon as I went to bed. Then the devil would wake me up with one of those bad dreams. I would be nervous and lay awake, for hours rolling and tossing. Sometimes sitting up till eleven or twelve oclock at night afraid to try to go to sleep, or to bed. On Monday night I went to bed about eleven oclock and shortly after I droped off' to sleep. I dreamed I was in bed or sleeping in under an old big dark shed, and att at once I heard some big horses squeeling and fighting. I thought the horses Was almost as, big as elephants and they were within just a few feet of where I was lying and it was a very dark night. I seemed like I could almost feel, those big animals almost steping on me and I was Just num and could not move. I woke enough to begin to pray-- after praying I could move I began to crawl and got away a little ways then I stood up and I thought those animals was wild and I was in a big walled inclosure with them. Then I did wake up and got up out of bed and down on my knees and told the Lord what a wicked sin it was to have the devil turned loose on a person when they were lying down on their back asleep helpless, and had now way of defence to help themselves. I told the Lord I was like the Apostles of old. They said to the savour "Where shall we go". I told the Lord there was only one place to go and that was to the true and living God. Again I thought of poor old Job He said in his distress. "The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away and blessed by the name of the Lord." He did not realize it was the divil turned loose on him that had taken his children his property and every thing but his wife. But it was the evil one, the devil would of taken his life but the Lord forbid Him doing that. Then again Poor old David lost all he had, His family, wives, concubines and everything and greeved and mourned and wrote a hundred and fifty chapters in the bible called the Psalms of David. In the Doc. & Covenants, the Lord says I took his wives and gave them to another. There are others I could refer to but I do not want to do that in my history. So I will turn to myself and to the True and Living God. Who is the rock of my refuge. The One on whom I will stake my life, both now and forever. Provo, July 15, 1953 About the fore part of April I started to learn to use the typewriter or learn to type, and now In about three months I can manage to typeriter quite well and write sentences and I intend to try to write my letters on the typewriter from now on. Today the 24th of July I went to 5th West and 5th North where the Sons and Daughters of the Pioneers had a fine program and a good dinner all free. May 21 1953 I was hanging out clothes after washing in the afternoon Alton and fern drove up and in a few minutes Omerro and Mina Marriotti and Will Boren came. Then Alton ask me if I did not want to go with them to Manti tomorrow. Leda and Norman E. Johnson were going thru the Temple to be sealed for time and eternity I said I certainly do. The next day the twenty second was the anniversary of my birthday and I was eighty seven year old. So we all went and I was one of the witnesses to their sealing for ever. Another peculiar incident that had happened, in those two young peoples lives jut a number of days before on the twenty ninth of April the aniversary of mine and Annies weding day sixty years before we were married in the Manti temple--the young couple were married by a bishop in Los Angles California, on the twenty ninth of April nineteen fifty three. So they had a double weding on two historicle events in my life. On Saturday May 30, Alton Fern and family came and we all went up to Wallsburg on Decoration day. I had a good talk with Polly, Reed, Tressa and her girls, sure did enjoy visiting with Polly my only sister living. Then we came down Provo canyon to Canyon Glenn and had a splendid dinner Fern had fixed and brought. On Monday the first day of June Clyde took his car ,fifteen minutes to seven and Elva, I, another man and two women--six of u got in the car and went to Manti went thru two sessions. That made endowments for twelve people. Then came back by way of Nephi, got home before sundown I told those folks thot was one perfect day. July 31 1953 I went up to Wallsburg and stayed at Polly Allreds two days till Saturday evening had the best visit we have ever had since we were young and went to dances together, before we were either one married. Then Saturday evening the Boren family and heirs met in the Wallsburg Church house. Mina and Will are the only two children living out of thirteen. They all had supper and at eight oclock they started a program. Mina took charge of it. I opened by prayer and later I read a poem called "The Queries" and at the last Mina said she wanted to be excused from taking care of the reunion and runing the programs any longer. I said when we were coming home if Mina gave it up I have an idea that will be the last meeting they will ever have. The night of December. 26 1953 I went up to the Ladies Club House third North. Academy ave. There they had a very good program started at eight P. M? and It run till about half past nine. Then they started to dance I danced once then went down to the Utana and danced till twelve so that was another perfect day. Then on December 30th Joseph Clegg envited me down to his place at night said the def and blind was going to have a social or party at night, and He ask me to come to it. So while there they played a game, in which we had to give forfits, and to redeem mine I had to sit on a womans lap lay my head on her sholder and cry like a baby. After living alone for seven years batching it that was easy. Well after the game the family furnished a splendid lunch and then home ward bound. On the thirty first I went down town and bought Winona one of the nicest umberellas I could find and gave it to for a birthday present. She was born on the last day of the year. So farewell for nineteen fifty three. Provo, January 27, 1954 Last night when I first went to bed I dreamed a most beautiful dream it run like this. I thought I had a most beautiful home and it was up in the air about two feet of the ground and I was inside the house and my folks was all in bed. Annie and all of them and the house inside was finished with silk and saten of the most gordous brilliant colors. More beautiful than words can express or an artist could express or paint. Just the most beautiful that the imagination could think of. March 28, 1954 Sunday in the middle of the day I layed down and went to sleep I saw a vision of where my patriarchal blessing says until the perfect day--or the perfect day. Sunday April 11, 1954--I went to quarterly conference this morning and could not keep awake. I have had rhumatism in my knees for two days, and coming home all at once I felt like my lungs was a fire--I kept coming and it got worse, and time I got home the burning was almost imbearable I drank some root beer, then I make some red pepper tea and took than and layed down and felt better. But I think it was my heart.

Annie Marie Boren (Bigelow) Memory Thoughts -- in Prose

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

[This is a prose version of Annie Boren Bigelow's Memory Thoughts of My Life, an autobiography written in verse. I transcribed this version in prose to condense it for those looking for historical facts. The original version in verse is also available with the title "Annie Marie Boren (Bigelow) Memory Thoughts in Verse"s This prose version covers only the first 67 pages of the original 130 pages and excludes letters to her children and her poetry. -- (Stephen L. Rawlins, husband to Carol Jean Carter Rawlins (granddaughter of Annie Bigelow).] My parents had thirteen children, six sons and seven daughters. I was the fourth daughter and the seventh child. As of this writing (1946) only three of us, of which I am the oldest, are still living. I was born October 24th, 1873. When I was three months old a whooping cough epidemic almost took my life. Many thought I would die, but Father was not among them. He and the elders administered to me, and I was nurtured from month to month. There came a time when it appeared that I had died. They laid me on the bed and told my father I was gone. He responded, "She's not dead. God told us she would live." He opened my mouth with a teaspoon and blew his own breath into it. He never knew just why he did, but science has now discovered that this procedure can save lives. Although my first year was difficult, I overcame the problems, am now married and have been blessed with eleven children, of which five died as infants. At two years of age I was happy and well, and walking. Life was sweet. No doubt things came along to spoil my happiness, but they didn't last long. When I was three my Grandfather Mecham died. My cousin and I were good friends, often climbed a cherry tree where we talked and laughed. Among other things, this was one thing that our parents were not too happy about. One day we were told by an uncle to gather apples for a cow. When she bellowed we dropped the apples in the mud and ran away. My uncle scolded us "Why put them there?" From that time on I didn't care much for this uncle's company. At four my cousin and I often played in the water at the spring head. Getting into water was the joy of my life. But my aunt warned us to keep away from the water or we'd go under and sink like a rock. To me, thinking of going down under the water was the last place on Earth I cared to go. She gently took us by the hand and led us away, admonishing us to stay away from the spring. We didn't know what else to do, so we went to a pen where two young deer were being kept. My cousin dropped her straw hat into the pen and the deer tore it to shreds. We didn't know what else could happen to us. When I was five I remember that I was so frightened of Indians. I was always glad to be alive when they left town. I was terrified whenever we saw them coming to beg for bread. I remember that my brother brought me a magpie and told me that I could easily teach it how to talk. I thought how proud I would be if I could do this. But the experience I had with that bird was not so pleasant. In digging worms to feed it, I ran the tine of a pitchfork through my foot, and decided not to keep that bird. At six I started school in a little log school house. Today's students wouldn't be too impressed with a place like that one room, and one teacher for everyone. And yet I miss that one room school, where we were free, and had such a loving and warm relationship with everyone, big and little, old and young. We had readers for the first five grades, and when we finished these our education was complete. From then on we attended the school of hard knocks. Only a few were able to obtain a higher education. At seven I remember tending children at quiltings where our mothers worked. Quilting and rag bees were popular places to catch up on all of the gossip of the town. We kiddies had to wait for dinner, but were always glad we were to get a piece of pie or cake for desert. Then it was back to work for us. One of the important steps in my life occurred in my eighth year when I was baptized into the Mormon Church. From that day to this I have been trying to keep myself free from sin and temptation. At that time the Relief Society issued a call to store wheat for the poor and the needy. Mother headed this call, and with neighbors we gleaned wheat from the fields each fall. We saved bushels of wheat. During World War One the President said that our soldiers needed bread, so we sold the wheat to the Government. When I was nine we were traveling down the steep dangerous road in Provo Canyon when our wagon wheel came off. Out I went, hitting my head on a rock. Father took me into his arms and bathed my face in water to bring me back to full consciousness. That canyon still brings back thoughts of both beautiful scenes and frightful fears. One time we met a herd of Texas longhorn cattle that looked ready for a fight. Father pulled out to one side of the road and let them go by. It was a relief to be able to take a long breath again. Another time I was in Provo, and terribly homesick. When the chance came to get a ride on a wagon my cousin and I started up the canyon. The wagon turned over and we were pinned under the wagon box. When we were released my cousin's little girl seemed to be dead. The driver took her down to the river. My cousin couldn't walk, and my wrist was thrown out of place. We waited a long time, and thought we'd have to stay there, but fortunately some peddlers came along and gave us a ride. When we got down to the river the little girl was alive, but we wondered how we would all get home. I ended up riding up the canyon with one peddler, and my cousin, the girl's mother, rode with the other. I held the little girl and she held the little boy. The wagon was equipped with a double bed and a spring seat, and we took advantage of both to get any comfort we could. When I was eleven, we saved our shoes for Sunday wear. On other days we went barefoot. It hurt my pride to go barefoot at eleven. Father made our shoes. He tacked on the soles with wooden pegs on a wooden stand. We were proud of our father and his work. The shoes he made were strong, and thinking of them brings back sweet memories of the comfort they brought to my feet. At twelve I thought more of pleasure and fun and played all kinds of games including town ball, steal stick, and, of course, foot races. In the winter we coasted down the hill on sleds. Little did I dream during those moonlit nights that this life's road would have so many rough places. I never thought of the danger and problems that I now realize are just part of everyone's life. But I'll never forget the good times my chums and I had together during these years. Some people count thirteen as an unlucky number, but it isn't for everyone. We all have our ups and downs in every year, and my thirteenth was no different. Sports at that time were all the rage. Spelling matches were especially popular, and all in the class had to participate. One day Don asked Polly, Vira, and me to go with him for a horseback ride. We joyfully galloped away and spent a lovely summer day enjoying the beauties of nature. We sat on the cedar hill and looked around to see the beauties and listened to the joyful sounds of nature. There we talked about what married life would be like, but I thought that was too far in the future for me. Yet, I was the first of the three girls to marry. In just a few years I became Don's wife. At fourteen we enjoyed getting together, packing a lunch and going to the canyon, or sometimes to the river to spend a day. I remember our sleigh rides, and the joy we had tipping over and switching -- anything for a thrill. The boys took hot rocks to keep us warm. They were expected to take care of us and keep us safe. Horseback riding was really a treat, but a buggy was even more fun. But then, of course, at that time I had never ridden on a railroad train, a bus, a street car or an airplane. I remember sitting in the shade knitting socks and stockings with woolen yarn for my sister and me. When they got holes in them we had to learn darning to mend them. We measured our yarn to see who could knit the fastest. Both rich and poor wore woolen stockings for their health. We'd sit there for many hours talking and knitting wristlets, mittens, and anything else the family needed to wear. Clothes were our problem. We had few at best. No silk or lace dresses. No warm furs, no caps or hats, no handbags or money purses or anything like them. It was gingham or calico because we had no extra money for treats. But we felt greatly blessed. Sometimes we'd go to the county seat for vacation. At sixteen I felt the spirit of youth. I was full of vigor and energy, but I also enjoyed listening to sweet love songs, and memories that stirred my heart to beat faster. That summer I went to a sawmill to work for a large family and the mill hands. It was hard work. We washed on the board, scrubbed floors on our knees and ironed clothes with hand irons. It was always do this and do that, hurry here and hurry there. We kept busy. In the morning we put breakfast on the table, and then the mother of the family and I had twelve cows to milk. After working a long summer day, we knew we had the cows to milk again. When I think of the amount of work we had to do, I wonder how we ever got through it. At the end of the week I got one dollar and seventy five cents. In the fall there was no money left over for pleasure, but we had fun anyway with candy pulls and parties. We were content. At seventeen courtship and marriage came into my life. We were both so happy. We thought everything would be fine. Finally the dreams we had dreamed for so long were about to be brought to life. The lessons we had learned from life were an important part of this. If I could but tell you the thoughts that made my bosom swell. I will always remember how I felt then, and continue to cherish the flame of love we had then, and have kept alive these many years. We cannot go back, but in our memory these years will always be there. Language is inadequate to express the happiness of courtship I felt. The joys and happiness that we two lovers learned then has returned in later years through sweet tenderness and thoughtful care from my lover. Don and I pledged our hearts to each other, but had to go to Pa and Ma for their consent. I didn't want to be there when Don asked for me. I didn't want to share that part of the bargain. But later I said I'd help smooth the way for him. I told Mother that Don was going to call, and encouraged her to have the kids out of sight. When he came Pa, Ma and all of the brothers and sisters were there. We sat by the fireplace and told stories. The young folks enjoyed the company, so we had to wait until all were tired and went to bed before we could talk about our plans. We worked hard to prepare so that we could set our wedding day. On the 29th of April we were married, and I changed my name for a lifetime of happiness. I found my childhood sweetheart to be true. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Eighteen Years At the age of eighteen a girl is of age they say To choose the course she'll take If she keeps the law who can tell her nay Now she can her own choice make Now I will weave a robe of life to wear I must weave it with good deeds and thought I'll weave it from the pattern loved ones share A beautiful pattern that cannot be bought I'll join it together with loving care And have friendly deeds to spare I'll weave it with patience and its goodness share So the robe will be comfortable for me to wear. I'll weave in faith and hope with my work With obedience and courage rare I'll weave it with pride and never shirk While weaving that life robe to wear. I'll line that robe with sunshine and smiles And with kindness I'll strengthen the seams I'll fit my robe to all my trials And stitch the hem with sunbeams. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I was too young to fully realize the many joys and cares married life could hold. But I learned one must be wise and, especially, that it's important to share blessings with others. I couldn't possibly understand what was in store for me. When my husband and I were united, and he vowed to protect me forever. We began to plan how we wanted to live our lives. We likened our plan to that of a portrait of human character that would stand as a sturdy building beside life's highways. Constructed with sustaining pillars of self respect, the foundation of courage to do right, the floor of loyalty and guidance from above. The main entrance showing forth spiritual wakefulness and light, of good will and love. The color scheme of helpfulness and respectability. The roof of joy and hope. A dome to radiate good deeds and thought. A superintendent of building to lead the way the prophets would have us go. At nineteen, the next step in life was motherhood. On May 6th, 1892 our first child, Adora, came into our lives. How tenderly I pressed her head close to my breast. Such a dearest treasure and bundle of love. Both Don and I felt that we couldn't be happier or more content with this dear gift from God. On August 25th, 1893 another daughter, Ida, was born, with blue eyes, curly hair and a beautiful body. She gave a thrill to everyone. She was a gift money never bought, bringing her own love as only parents know how to share. The next April, with our family now numbering four, we decided to look for a suitable place to live that would make a comfortable home, and provide our children with an education. Don asked me if I would be willing to leave our birthplace, to battle the elements and break out some new farmland. We prayed about it, and when we received an answer we vowed to always stand firmly together, and take whatever came our way. We piled all of our belongings in a wagon and took them mile after mile, over hills and valleys on rough, long roads that included dugways that filled us with horror as we looked down into the deep canyons below. Day after day we traveled the road that now would take just hours in an automobile. I hope we will never travel it in a wagon again. When we reached Ashley Valley we thought a lot about our friends and loved ones from whom we had parted, and hoped our friendship with them would always stay true. Our journey was close to the end. In gratitude, we thanked our Father for His protection and care over that dangerous road, and the prospect of having a comfortable home. We had no home at first, and stayed with our sister Zora for a day or so. We had a good visit and rested. It was hard to find a place we could live in, but finally we found one, a two-room cottage without comfort or style. Our trouble began in that two-room cottage. One night our baby was stung by a scorpion. We worked day and night with our darling, and through faith and prayer God gave her back her health. We were determined to have a place of our own. All of our energy and efforts were bent toward obtaining one. We didn't want to stay in a rented house. We were happy, and it doesn't cost money to have a good time. The best of Earth's pleasures are free to those who know how to value their worth. Kind words and glad looks and smiles cost nothing. Yet all the wealth of a millionaire could not bring the pleasures we had waiting for a home, listening to our children's prattle and song. We found that in a national depression it was difficult to make a meager living and try to save some money. Scores of men were out of work. Want and hunger were felt all over the country, but we knew we had to be brave. We arose before dawn to see what we could trade to make some money. Our place was started with a load of wood. It amused the neighbors, but they supported us. Now we had to get the logs to build a humble home. It was not a mansion. At first we hung a blanket to the window and a quilt to the door. The floor was made of rough lumber and the roof of dirt. We were able to replace the quilt with a lumber door and put glass in the window, which allowed us to see the neighbors. We built the house on the corner of a forty-acre farm, more for convenience than anything else. We had very few neighbors, and they were scattered far apart. I was frightened of Indians, especially when everyone went away in the daytime. But we were settled in a home of our own. It took patience and hard labor to clear the land to grow crops. The sagebrush had to be grubbed and the rocks dug from the soil. Breaking up the land was not always easy, but we don't have complaints. Just some of the scars of hardship still remain. Indians camped on our land every fall when they hunted deer. It was not pleasant to have them so close. When we'd see one of their villages spring up over night I was filled with fear and horror. They'd come the first thing in the morning not to beg for bread, but they'd sit down at the table and expect to be served a meal. What else could we do but to share the food we had with them. They'd eat with delight and when they got their share they'd go. I truly hoped that we would not see more that day, but they'd keep coming. They were curious to know who dared come to live on land they had always camped on during the deer hunt. But soon they packed up and disappeared, which was alright with us. We didn't miss them. We knew we had another hard winter to face. Christmas came and went and another year came with things going along about the same. On January 30th 1895 we added another baby girl to family, Eva. This little bundle of love helped bring happiness into our home. We enjoyed her so. How much we welcomed spring that year. The sunshine and showers helped banish the fear that accompanied the long winter. But it meant that we had to get our crops in so that we'd have something to harvest in the fall. What a task it was break up the land and turn it over with a hand plow. It was slow and tedious, nothing like it is today. I was surprised to see Indians coming again, traveling fast on their horses. Because my little girls and I were alone, I pulled down the blinds pretending that we were not home. When they stopped to drink by the side of our house the babies sensed my fear and kept quiet. They remounted their horses and galloped away to town. They didn't stay long, and soon I saw them coming back. I asked myself what they could want now. Then I realized that it was some dried meat we had hanging up. A month later at sunset, two young braves rode up to our door. They demanded that I go with them as their squaw. I didn't know what to do. I was not sure what they intended to do with me. I trembled from head to foot and was white with fear. I prayed that my husband would come from town, and when his wagon came into view they dashed away. Time has never taken away the dreadful feeling I had that day. It is no wonder I had such fear whenever Indians came around. In the fall before hunting time we had the place securely fenced. When the Indians stopped you could almost hear them ask who had taken away their camping ground. Because it had taken all summer to get the land ready to sow, our crops were very light in the fall. Winter was coming on and life was hard. There was some work for Father bailing hay and working with his team hauling wood for one dollar a day. We joyfully weathered the storms, and felt optimistic about the future. We had a cow, and bought some chickens and a pig. When we could sell eggs it was for ten cents a dozen. We were lucky when we could sell them to a friend or neighbor. We planted cherry trees, shrubbery and a patch of strawberries. Flowers bloomed beautifully. The next fall we had a bumper crop. We enjoyed gathering the crops and putting them away, little dreaming that we would remain such a short time. In less than two years we had cleared all of our ground and felt that we had found the right place for a home. But things began to shape up differently. All of the time we lived in Vernal it was difficult to make a living. As long as we live, we'll never forget how difficult it was to leave our crops without receiving a cent for them after working so hard for them. Father Bigelow wrote for us to come back and take back the same chance we had before. We debated whether we should go, and decided we should. But we started back a few days too late, the storms overtook us, and we got hung up in the snow. At Current Creek the team couldn't make the grade. We tried taking part of the load up the hill, but the road was so steep and icy that the horses couldn't even make it then. Our cousin Frank Mecham was with us, and volunteered to ride horseback that night for help. In Strawberry Valley the snow gets deep, and there were no snow plows to clear the road. That night we thought the five of us would be alone, but we found the campground alive with Indians. I wondered how we could ever stay in such a place, but we had no choice. We shivered around the camp fire with cold and thought of the horrid stories we'd heard about Indians. We could only watch and pray. Fortunately they went away the next morning. It was a long cold ride for Frank, but the next day he returned with horse teams and a number of men. What a welcome sight! That night we spent a cheerful time around the campfire telling jokes and singing. Our little girls sang Oh, Happy Home, and Sweet Childhood Home. Oh, how the music rang. Those men remarked how joyous the world would be if we could only see the joys of life like innocent children. To always be cheerful through hardships. The next morning we started again, and with plenty of horsepower they easily took the load up the hill and onto the other side. No words can describe the gratitude we felt. We were happy to be back to the place of our birth. It seemed that there was no better place. Father started to work again on the sawmill, which gave us a sense security. On the 28th of February 1897 the stork brought another little one into our family. Our lives were thrilled with the coming of our first son, Ervin. Another blessing for parents, and our daughters were pleased with their little brother. It takes strength and determination to raise a large family. Father worked hard all day running the sawmill. It was hard work turning the logs all day long. In the spring when the sawing was over we started clearing and planting another farm. It was hard work for all of us. Summers and winters came and went. My first priority was taking care of the children. I was always willing to give my husband a helping hand, however, and to do the will of God as nearly as I could understand it. Much of the pleasure and amusements had to be laid aside to be with our children and protect them. My desire was to be tolerant and kind and disregard little failings in others. I wanted to be faithful to my friends and treasure the beauties of their lives. Elva was born April 25th, 1899. She grew nearer and dearer day by day, and things looked brighter that year. That made four daughters. Our happiness was renewed every time a new one came along. We were always going from place to place trying to find a more comfortable home for our growing family. This time we moved to a house in a meadow near a crystal stream. Fishing was good and we often caught some and fried them golden brown for dinner. They were delicious. Floralia was born November 25th, 1900. She was so gentle and full of love. Another darling sent from our Father. Her baby days were pleasant. I recall so fondly her childhood days with all of her beauty. We enjoyed our home for many years there on the farm with our children. Our lives were free and we had few worries and sorrows. Each of our homes bring back memories of fire light's soft glow, and the loving joy we had sometimes balanced with some grief. But as I look back the joys, pleasures and beauties are the things I remember. Living on a farm always includes worries, and wonder about what would be best to do next. We learned to be humble while living there, and trusted our Heavenly Father for protection. Our soul's desire was to teach our children right from wrong so that they would grow up pure and innocent. We tried to protect them, and teach them to live and uphold the truth. Our aim was to be a true example to them all, so that we could ask them to follow in our footsteps. We tried so hard to teach the Gospel plan, to live it not only on Sunday, but all week long; and to listen to council from the authorities. Each Sunday morning we got up early and walked a mile to Sunday School. Hand in hand the children walked along happily singing. To be on time we had to make plans, and make sure on Saturday all of our clothing was in place so that there wouldn't be any last minute surprises. In the summer we dressed the children all in white. What a beautiful sight it was to see these innocent and pure children. We prayed that they would always stay that way. We understood why God loves little children. I often see in vision those wonderful days that were so precious to us. Memories are the only things that last. We left a happy home to move to town, where we got a store that included the Post Office. With the two we hoped to make a better living. In a financial way, it was much better. Our income increased, but of course it kept us busy all day. We increased the stock in the store to better meet the demand. Christmas time was full of cheer that year. It seemed like Heaven on Earth. We hung trimmings and toys on the Christmas tree, and stockings were filled with candy and nuts. We loved to tell the story of Christ to our children as they sat sit by side listening closely to hear how Christ loved little children and blessed them, and desires to have them return to Him. We wanted our children to be comfortable and well dressed, so after the day's work was done I sewed until I had a complete wardrobe for each of them. The joys of that Christmas will always remain indelibly imprinted in our memories, because it was the last one we would spend with our complete family. When the year passed away we left fond memories. The year 1902 came in warm and bright and all nature seemed to enjoy it. But as the new year wended its way, it brought pain and sorrow that we will never forget. We had to walk by faith, not by sight. It was hard. February was the saddest month of the year. It brought so many tears, heart aches and sorrows. Sickness and death blasted our life. The black clouds gathered so fast and so thickly. Death came to our home so suddenly. Ida died. It left us in such despair that with broken hearts we called her back. She came back and stayed until the next night. She said "Mother, comb my hair good tonight so the angels will watch over me." She told us at one o'clock she would be going home and then, "Don't, with your sorrow, call me back again. Mother don't cry, for it is not right for me to come back like I did last night." Sure enough, at one o'clock she died. I couldn't cry. I just looked into space. Although my heart bled I couldn't cry. Her words "Mother don't cry" lingered with me. Well we remember that she pinched her father's chin and told him to be true, that she was leaving and, not coming back. The first shock of death took Ida on February 6th, 1902. On the seventh we held her funeral and buried her. Only God would be able to help us face the trials her vacancy left. Little did we think that tomorrow Eva's death would double our sorrow. On the eighth she faded and passed away. Oh, why does death bring such sorrow when we know all people are supposed to die? We hope some day, when our knowledge is perfect, to fully understand. On the morning of February 9th our baby, Floralia, died. Words cannot express the sorrow we felt when we were told that she was dead. It left us speechless with sorrow. Our hearts were torn with grief and despair. We had to put our trust in God so that we could bear our grief. We have to have God's spirit to make it through life. On February 10th we held a double funeral. My heart still bleeds when I think of it now. We tried so hard to save their lives, but they were buried side by side in one grave. When we got back from their grave, Adora was ill. We worked all night, but the angel of death hovered still. She grew gradually worse, and on February 11th she died. God only knows how much her death tried our faith. On the twelfth we laid her gently to rest. I had to help make her burial clothes. No one knows how this sent pains through my heart. We couldn't hold funeral services as we had before because we had two children left that we had to try to save. One more burden was added to our sorrow. It was measles and diphtheria that took their lives, and for that reason our friends were afraid to visit. We were left alone both day and night to pray and fight to save our two children. We were dumb with grief and fear. The ones that were left were near death's door. God saw our anguish and grief and let them stay. Oh, how our hearts were filled with gratitude to Him. Each child seemed to know that it was their appointed time to go. We watched them die with aching hearts. Their last words, "Mother don't cry" sewed up my tears. Our hearts grew heavier. Tears could have helped ease the pain. We prayed and prayed for relief, but it did not come. Day by day I tried so hard to hide my grief. Everything looked so dark. I prayed that I could cry. It broke our hearts to think of the vacant places. Every day we counted our troubles over and over. In one week four little girls were in the grave. With anguish we parted with the ones we loved so much. We said a farewell until we meet them above. No words can express how death can depress the spirit. Comfort can only come from God to ease the pain and grief of a stricken soul. We prayed, to the Lord to help relieve us of this grief and sorrow and help us be faithful to those we love, and prepare us to meet those who have gone. We had to walk by faith, and not by sight. We had to lock up our troubles and throw the key away. That is what we tried to do. For our family's sake we smiled through tears, although we continued to feel the sorrow. No pain or death could kill our love for the children God had sent us. I realized that I should try to settle down each night by the side of my faithful husband, hoping and planning for our future days. I prayed to God to bless us, and to grant me health and strength and determination to fill some useful niche in life. May I be eager and glad to bear a portion of each day's work share. We tried to employ our talents in helping all living in our neighborhood. Work always helps ease a troubled mind. No matter how we feel, the work must be done. Work gets tiresome without some play, but the two together can help the time pass. In putting up the mail one day I noticed a letter from Post Office Box B. I was alone. I opened it with a trembling hand. I knew we were being asked to withstand another trial. When my husband came home I could hardly speak a word. I gave him the letter with such sorrow and anguish in my soul. Before it was completely read neither of us had a dry eye. Oh, what pain it sent to my heart. To think that we would be parted. We were sorely tried to know just what we should do. My husband had received a call to serve a mission in just a few months. I would have to take care of things at home while Don was gone. My husband was set apart. Some thought that the call wasn't right. But we were willing to wear out rather than rust. Our friends seeing our sorrow tried to get some relief from that mission. All the Elder's names in his quorum were placed in a hat, and they drew lots to settle who should go. Strange, but Don's name came out first three times. So we were all convinced that it was God's will that he should go. God works in a mysterious way His wonders to perform. In humility we were parted for a little season. While doing His will He protected us from harm. Looking back we can see the hand of God was taking our mind from our troubles. It wasn't easy to say God's will be done. It was hard for us to part, but we appreciate our blessings, and accepted the call. Don was soon off for his mission. There was much we didn't understand, but we knew we must be willing to be led by God. We never questioned God's wisdom anymore. We were working toward our eternal salvation. Our financial means were seriously strained. We were deep in debt. But by trusting God all of our obligations in time were paid. Left for awhile alone with my family and business, it took courage. But a battle is never won by a weak heart. I realized I had a daughter and a son to protect, and I had to keep things going while my husband was gone. The time passed slowly. Winter came with snow and wind. No matter how cold, however, I had to open the store and the Post Office. I realize I must live by hope, not fear. I needed to forget the things that irked me, and think of the wonderful vision ahead. It would soon be Christmas and time for a tree. There was no joy this time like the year before. I had to forget the crosses that tried me and work for the ones I held so dear. Christmas was difficult for me that year. Oh, how hard it was to trim a tree alone. It filled my heart with thoughts of better days. How could I ever have the spirit of Christmas with so many of my loved ones gone! My troubles came back and almost crushed my aching heart. . My courage had failed to the point that I trembled with fear. Could I play Santa feeling so sad? It was almost more that I could do. I knew I had to smile for my children. I must hide my feelings for my loved one's sake. I had to be a good Santa with a true Christmas spirit. I played Santa to my two children that Christmas with an aching heart. I filled stockings and trimmed the tree with care. Making the children happy meant so much. I didn't let one thought or act mar their joy. I so much wanted them to be happy. When they were snugly tucked into bed I knelt in humble prayer and asked Father to help me keep the Christmas spirit that year. Then I went to bed with another prayer in my heart that I would always have honor. Give me a cheerful spirit. Teach me love and wisdom for the sake of my children. When I awoke Christmas morning after a good night's rest I could see in the children's faces that my prayers had been answered. I had made them happy at Christmas. When the new year came in I hoped that it would be kinder and more hopeful and more filled with peace and happiness. Before I was even twenty-nine I was left alone, for awhile, with two children to whom I was giving much love and devotion. Spring came with the songs of birds and the hum of bees. All nature was beautiful with flowers and trees in full bloom. If everyone would try to put sunshine in their soul we'd come nearer to reaching perfection. We loose so much in life working for the dollar and neglecting things far more important. I remember so well how hard I tried to carry the load until the mission that God had willed had been faithfully completed. Try as I may, my health failed. We had no resources to allow me to get the needed rest. I was doing the best I could, but I couldn't control the beat of my heart. The doctor said that we must have my husband return or he'll be left without a wife and have to raise his children alone. He said to me one day that I had to stop hard work or I would pay with my life. How could I when the work had to be done each day. I had to keep things going. Then he said that he was here to talk to me as a brother and not as my physician. He wanted to know how I felt about Don coming home. I told him that I would never ask while I was still alive. I want to be true to my husband and to God. He said that it would be wise for him to come home for a season. I'll tell the Stake President. Then he told me how his wife had been very ill and they sent him home before the end of his mission. He went out again, but was called back to help care for the sick. If your husband comes and helps nurse you to health it will mean more to him than anything in the world. You must get rest, and relief from the financial strain. He can go back when you get well. You have made the sacrifice and you will be blessed. God has weighed your spirit. A release from his mission will be honorable. You must trust now in the mercy of Heavenly Father. A few days later I had a call from my husband from Provo asking how things were with us. He said that he would be home in the morning. My husband took over the worry and the load, and gave me true love and devotion. Through faith and prayers my health started to mend. Eventually I could do some work to help tend my family. At thirty years of age it seemed that I had lived for ages, but I hadn't done much toward my education or in the Church. Our life's pleasure was ended for so long. I wanted to view the past with clearer eyes and see the beauties again. I wanted to be prepared for what the future had in store, and be more faithful. An epidemic of typhoid fever struck the town that fall, and I was the last of eighteen victims. My husband administered to me and said, "Annie, you'll get well. Not right now though." Those words of inspiration rang clear. It was a comfort to have that assurance as we faced one of the severest tests of our life. Our faith seemed to be at its lowest point, and this helped us put our trust in the Lord. For eight long weeks we feared for my life. We prayed that a husband and children would not lose their wife and mother. For weeks I had laid at death's door. Heavenly Father in his mercy helped us with another trial. We were truly grateful for the blessings we received when I started on the road to health. It was touching to hear the children pleading for my health. No wife had truer devotion than I did from my husband. He did all in his power to save my life. It's hard to maintain courage with poor health. But the support we had from friends and neighbors helped us get through. The faith we gained was important to us. As Christmas approached, on days that I was very low, my folks were afraid I would not make it. On Christmas morning my eyes were so dim that I could hardly see the presents my dear ones had brought to me. People looked like little specks, and everything seemed so far away. Humbly we prayed that God would send his blessings. I was rallying from the ravages of the fever when another dreaded disease, meningitis, pulled me back again. The pain was more than I could endure much longer, and my friends felt that my death seemed certain. The Elder's were faithful to come day or night to administer to me, but still there was no relief from the pain. My whole body was helpless except for one arm. The pain was so severe, but when I remembered that when I had been blessed to get well, I stopped worrying. I felt the other side was near, but I longed to stay with my loved ones. I could see with each look the anguish in my husband's heart. I very much wanted to stay with him. One of the Elder's seeing my suffering and pain asked why our prayers were not answered. Maybe it is God's will that she should go. Brother Bigelow, with your consent to the bishop, I'll have him arrange to have her washed and anointed and dedicated to the Lord. The bishop heartily approved and that was done. That day he prayed for the Lord's will to be done, not ours, and acknowledged God's power and mercy. He asked Father, that if it was His will, to let this sister live. With those words the black clouds faded away and our faith and hopes were renewed. He said, Sister Bigelow, take courage, your work is not done. You'll raise your children with honor. At that moment I felt the spirit of the Lord throughout my whole body. I started to mend, and the terrible pain began to leave. I was soon able to get out of bed again. I'll never forget that blessing. The month of June came with the fragrance of roses filling the summer air. All nature was beautiful to behold, and it renewed our courage and hope. We were happy to hear the songs of birds and the hum of bees and the beauty of renewed vegetation. Who can deny the hand of God in this wonderful grand world? In looking for happiness we must all acknowledge that God is merciful and just. If we feel our cross is too heavy to bear we can lighten it by helping others bear theirs. I was still handicapped as a wife and mother for the sickness had left me with leakage of heart. Three doctors told me I'd never be strong again, but that if I were careful, I could live a long time. We knew we would have to seek a higher power, so with faith and determination we began to make plans for our future. We decided to go to the Salt Lake Temple to receive our Father's blessings. Our party consisted of four people, Mother Bigelow, Sister Fraughton, Don and me. The river was high, and covered much of the road from the river to the station. We thought we were safe waiting for the train, so the driver and the team started home. The train came on time, but we didn't get far before we stopped suddenly. A large bull had come walking down the track, and wouldn't be turned back by the train's whistle. The train hit it, and it went under the wheels. That threw the engine and one car off the track. Fortunately no one was hurt. The engineer told us we would have a long time to wait until a wrecker could come and put them back on the track. We all tried to be happy, but we had to stay in the train because there was no other place to go. Finally the wrecker came, and we were on our way. Instead of getting to Salt Lake on schedule at eight we stopped at Provo and stayed with friends because it was late and raining. We had waded through mud until we looked a sight. We were welcomed as we had always been before, with beds for all of us. The next morning we traveled to Salt Lake City and found a place where all of us could stay. In the temple, Sister Fraughton and I were baptized for our health that day. I was too ill to go through a session, so I went back to rest, and ponder my blessings, which had never been so sacred to me before. Sister Fraughten received another blessing, and said that if I would go back, I could probably get one. The Elders were blessing the sick. I went back again, hurrying because I didn't want to be late. When I opened the door I told the temple guide I'd come back to have a blessing and he said take off your shoes and follow me. I'll take you there. He opened the door and asked me to wait with two others who were left waiting. I prayed that I would not be too late. When all were gone the Elders came to me and asked what my trouble was. "We understand your husband is in the temple, so we'll have him come and stand in in the administration." I told them I had leakage of the heart. One put his hand upon my brow and said, "that's bad." My courage and faith failed. But a light soon filled his countenance and he said, "nothing is impossible with the Lord." Oh, how soon my faith picked up again. I knew the spirit of God rested on those men. They prayed that God would bless me and make me strong to do good work on this Earth. They told me my work was not yet finished, and that I'd live long to be an influence on good people I had never met. They said I'd raise my family and be able to work in the yard. This part of the blessing had already come true. I'm sure that if I live for the blessings I received that day that they will come to me. Such blessings stay with one through the years. I was healed by the power of God that day. The leak in my heart was gone. There was no more need of powder and pills. Now what I needed was time to rest. I know God lives with all my heart. May I never lose this knowledge, and may I instill it into the heart of my children and grandchildren. May the spirit I felt in the temple always stay with me to guide my footsteps. Help me treasure that influence all my life so that I can be a true wife and mother. If I could speak words of a poet's pen more freely I could express my feelings. Then I'd help others to rejoice as I do now. I'd somehow touch the spiritual chord of their lives. How much I miss when I fail to see the beauties of tasks held out to me. Life is a game of give and take. In that way we make joy and satisfaction. The more we give of our talents while we are alive the more love and sympathy we have in our hearts when dark clouds gather. The blossoms of love we give will never die. On my way to the temple I was very sad, and I left filled with joy. It is a joyous and sacred feeling when the Lord reveals His spirit to you. I resolved I'd live on a higher plain when I went home, and to faithfully fulfill the duties of life. I did not care for honor. I just wanted to humbly live as God would have me do. No matter how long or hard and weary the day I would try to be joyful and faithful. The road ahead seemed strange. We all go through pitfalls and temptations. May the light of God guide us around them on the road that leads to eternal light. Sometimes we stray and wander, and fail to obey God's commandments. But if we are humble, and if we put our trust in Him, God will make us strong enough to keep us from going wrong. A dear sister came to ask me to teach primary. I told her no, because I still too keenly felt the great loss of my children. Try as I may I could not get rid of that pain in my heart. But with her persuasion I accepted that call, and it was a blessing to me and my family. It was a trial, and the sweat ran off my brow during that first lesson. Oh, what a trial it was for me to work with those sweet children. I wished that I could lay my trials at Jesus' feet, but I gained the spirit of peace while working there. I was called to work in different organizations, and tried to do my best. I felt unable to be class leader in Mutual, but I put my heart and soul into it and gained confidence. I loved to work with children and youth. I desired to teach them the truths of the Gospel. Forgetting our feelings and working for others engenders a real spirit of brother and sisterhood. I tried very hard to overcome my weaknesses, and to treat everyone well. On October 17th 1904 another son, William, came into our home, bringing with him all of the happiness a new child gives to everyone in the family. I was so happy holding a new baby in my arms. I prayed that Heavenly Father would protect him. With my darling baby against my breast, and his dimpled hand on my face, I thought of the rare jewels our children are to us. October's flaming colors were everywhere, and we were delighted to share them with all nature. Never was a mother happier with her family than I. We joined together as a family in frolic, races and anything that was fun. Raising a family is such a rare blessing when fond parents share the responsibility and wrap their love around their children. At three months, William became critically ill with meningitis. We watched him closely as he went into a stupor. Words can't express the anguish we had watching him so still and white. All night we watched and prayed with broken hearts that God would not take him from us. A merciful Father heard our pleadings and let him live. When the stupor passed he woke up smiling. God had given him his health. The doctor said it was a miracle. Don't doubt God's power. On the 12th of July, 1906 our third son, Alton, was born. How thankful we were for him. We welcomed him with thankful hearts. At two Alton had an accident that scalded his hand. He was in such agony that he rubbed the skin from his hand before we could get it bandaged. We had to bandage each finger separately so that they would not grow together. We exercised faith, and we are thankful that it healed without a scar. Working in the Church helped my sad heart mend. I looked forward to meeting with those sweet children. I forced myself to join the youth amusements too. Being with the young people and helping them with their problems gave me new hope, and was a real pleasure. I was called to be the Relief Society Secretary, making three organizations I was working for. This new responsibility was a great deal of work. The teachers report had to be kept accurately and the annual fees accounted for, because, "by the books we are judged." Minutes of meetings had to be kept, and an annual report to the Stake was made each year. On May 25th, 1909, Emily was born. Another bundle of love from Heaven. Her coming again brought peace and cheer. Babies bring so much joy to a mother. We loved her with all of our hearts. She kept me busy. Although I've worked many hours for my children to take care of their needs and teach them, their love has repaid me each day I live. Winona, our seventh girl was born December 31st, 1910. Nothing better or sweeter could have been given to us. She came the last hour of the day, the last day of the week and the last week of the year. But not last in our love for her. I had gone through the pains of childbirth and felt fine until the 9th day. We were happy thinking that it wouldn't be long and I would be out of bed. But instead, the next morning my leg was swollen as large as two. The midwife who had been nursing me came and said to get a doctor. The doctor gave me little encouragement, and doubted that I would live. He did the best he could with his knowledge and medicine, but it could not relieve the pain. Out in the dark dooryard Don knelt in prayer. Seeing my suffering he felt that since there was no more the doctor could do, that we must place our trust in our Heavenly Father. Inspiration came to him beyond the power of men, telling him what to do. He took hot water, added salt and bran and applied it with blankets to my leg, as hot as I could stand it. The first application helped ease the pain, so he repeated it several times. Milk leg was thought to be incurable. But God in his power can heal anything if we are humble and willing to do His will. My life was saved only by His power. The doctor said if I ever did get well I'd never walk. Sometimes I was discouraged and wept because I was so weak, and wondered if the doctor was right. Again he proved to be wrong. I was confined to my bed for two months, and at first I was so weak I had to learn to walk all over again, but many are the miles I've walked since then. My husband was again called on a mission. The plans we had to build a home had to go. It takes money to keep a family and a man on a mission. We sacrificed our business and sold the store. My health wouldn't permit me to run it. Don was also trustee in the school district, and I was appointed to take his place until the school election, but I never got out of the job. I was elected for another term, even though it would soon be time for a new baby to arrive. They wouldn't take no for an answer, so what could I do. Our baby, Okie, was born on November 24th, 1912 with her father far away. This always left a thorn in my heart. Doing school work helped pass away the long time before my husband would return. She planted love in our hearts, and was so dear to us. We called her our missionary girl. She made the eleventh diamond in our crown. It seemed that each child came to sooth a broken heart. I have thought so much of each one, and how sweet and loving each were. My past thoughts bring happiness. The future glides by so quickly. I appreciate the precious gift of these memories of each of my children as they said humble prayers at my knee, and were all safe at night. I cherish the memory of those babies with their pleasant smiles and winning ways. With my husband away I worked and worried all winter, but I couldn't keep things from going wrong. When I watered our team in the morning everything seem OK, but one of them had bled to death before nine. Then one of our milk cows broke her neck and died. We tried to do our chores carefully, but these things just happen. I realize now that these things are just minor, but with a husband so far away, they were mighty inconvenient. The winter passed slowly. When spring came we were glad we had survived. But the spring farm work had to be done. The children and I did it without any help. It was impossible to get help, so we did it alone. We cut the hay and had it bunched, but before we could haul it, it rained. With a long steady rain it didn't dry until the lucern grew several inches high between the bunches. It was so hard to get the hay up, and most of it was spoiled from being too wet. But we had to haul it off so that another crop would grow. It was not an easy job for us. We shocked our grain and hauled it too. Then it was time to get the wood in for the winter. Ervin said he thought he could get from the creek bed rather than going to the mountains for it. I helped him cut the trees. Every morning we hitched up the team and worked on it. We sawed all day to get enough blocks to fill a wagon bed. The blocks were then split and the wood stacked in the wood shed. Having a wood supply relieved us of the worry of having fuel for the winter. Through it all I didn't want to change my life for that of a younger woman. My next birthday I would be forty years old. I have traveled over crooked winding roads. Sometimes I went wrong and got off the right road. Many times I did wrong before I knew. May the good I do out weigh the ills, for it was a long hard road, and some of the hills were steep. Much in life depends on which road we choose. I prayed, that now I was forty, that Father would help me to see and count the blessings I knew came from Him. When I was put into the Relief Society secretary position, they didn't give me a chance to say no. Those in authority willed it, and that was that.It may be a good thing that we don't always know what lies in the future for us though. While I was sick I was not released until the time came to make me second counselor. On February 22nd, 1914, Don returned from his mission to be with his family. Hand in hand we went up the road of life together. Responsibility came to our six children by the score. With their help and that of my husband I was able to keep up with my work in the ward. Sometimes these duties were hard to take. We really had to first consider the responsibility of making a living for our family. I hadn't been released yet as Relief Society secretary. Every Tuesday I was expected to be in meeting in wind, rain or snow. Every Tuesday I had to plan my work in detail because I had to take three babies to meeting with me. I washed hands and faces and put my three little girls hair up in curls. In stormy weather I carried two babies in my arms. The older one walked proudly by me. Our older children went to school every day, so there was no one to leave them with. Father had to spend time at his work and business to make a living for his family. When the weather was fine taking the children was fun, because by my taking the lead they could run along behind me. They made little trouble and just sat on the bench by my side until meeting was over and we could go back home. I found that if I could profit by what the class leader taught it would help me live throughout the week. The lessons dealt with all phases of life to help mothers deal with their families. We were always glad to go to meeting, where we were taught to be cheerful. The lessons always taught something new. The president was there to guide and direct the counselors. The secretary kept a record of good deeds and acknowledged the good each member had done. When the call came to be first counselor I was released from secretary. With this new responsibility I prayed for power to help with the duties. Father helped me to overcome temptations and to do right so that I could feel good about myself. I have great faith in the Gospel. Why do I hesitate to frown on all evil before it is too late? I was learning fast to carry the load. The first day I was counselor I was called to lay out the dead. Our president was gone from home for a week, and so I was in the harness. That week one brother and one sister died. I had their burial clothes and funeral to look after. I enjoyed being counselor while I stayed in that calling. My only regrets are the mistakes I made. I hope the good deeds will balance these out. I will thank God for the privilege I had. All of the time the tempter lurks near. And sometimes he gets the upper hand. While we are trying to be good he works fast to keep us from doing our duty. He'll try to tempt us until we die. As I sat meditating one day I had a phone call from Bishop Fullmer asking if my husband and I could come in for a talk. He wanted to know if my husband and I would be willing for me to serve as Relief Society president to be the mother of the ward. In humility I accepted that responsibility. It took faith for my family. Whatever at that time seemed to me to be a burden proved to be a great blessing to me. I loved my two counselors. We were united in obtaining inspiration. We helped the young people's weddings, and worked with sickness and helped bury the dead. We had entertainments for the young and the old. We comforted the sorrowful when we were called to their homes. The Relief Society sisters helped everyone. We never knew when our work would be finished. Our greatest responsibility was to help those in need. When we were called on for a donation all responded freely for whatever we were asked. Working with the dear sisters left me with fond memories, and I still enjoy their company whenever we meet. One of our tasks was to make burial clothes. My home was the place we met most often. My family got the pleasure of serving dinner. It gave my daughters extra work, and brought happiness to both them and to me. There were no funeral homes. We had to prepare the bodies for burial in the home instead. We held the funeral at the Church house, which we had this to get ready, and to take care of the flowers as well. A lunch had to be prepared for family and friends after the funeral. I served as president in horse and buggy days. Things were different then. When the sisters came to conference from the county seat, a half dozen or more came to our home for their meals. We had to prepare lunch at noon and dinner at night, since there was no other way for them to be accommodated. With automobiles long distance has been taken away, so they can go home with comfort at the end of a day's meetings. When we went to Heber to conference it took a whole day with a horse team. We worked hard in the ward and tried to do our share, but I always made sure my family was properly cared for. My husband and children made certain things at home were taken care of. Our secretary was jovial, and a good kind woman, who was always on hand to meet members. We tried in our weak ways to help the sick and the dying. We worked hard and prayed that we'd be faithful in providing the needed comfort to those facing the hardships of those who suffered. It takes courage and humility to be a worthwhile friend regardless of the circumstances, but this kind of work molds character. Working with those in sickness and death almost breaks one's heart. Being president of the Relief Society is like being mother to the ward. One must accept the responsibility and trust in God that our hearts will be filled with compassion for everyone. Our labor was not for power, but for love. My fondest hope is to teach the children God gave me, and to guide them back, Father, to thee. The Boren family was having a reunion once a year to bring scattered family members together. We always enjoyed a good programs at these annual meetings. A reunion was planned to be in our home November the tenth, but William took critically ill and went to the hospital. On the 18th of November he died while we were there. And again we were brought down to the depths of anguish for our dear son. He had joined his sisters. His sickness came suddenly, and death followed quickly on its heals. We brought him home where friends gathered to share our burden. The Relief Society sisters came with love to give us strength. Yes, there was sorrow and weeping in our home that night. Our hearts were breaking. Such anguish we bore that day. It made us feel old. There is no use thinking we can explain such things. We must simply acknowledge our Father knoweth best. One more of our children is numbered with those who receive the blessings of eternity. We laid William softly down to sleep among the hills. We gently laid flowers on the grave while tears dropped like rain. I did not know what tears were until that day. I learned that tears, like rain, can bring refreshing peace to hearts parched with pain. How happy we'll be when time is no more, and our weary feet reach that eternal place, and we hear William's voice speak to us gently. And yet we feel we know our dear kind Lord has richly honored William. Could it be that he could no longer grant a stay to him in this world? Without him we are lonely, but his going brings joys and comfort as we contemplate the beauty of his soul. Could we ever go back to normal living? Could we adjust our lives in a lonely home now? Our friends gave us what comfort they could. Ervin and Elva married and had families of their own. We enjoyed them in our home until they were grown. Each of their families added a girl and a boy that brought new joy into our lives. In 1919 the flu raged and took such a toll of death and sorrow to the nation. Ervin's family in Provo had the flu, and I went to help. In a few days I was down with the rest. A fourteen year old girl was all of the help we had. We were greatly blessed that she remained free of the flu when it was taking whole families all over the nation. The next year the flu raged in our town, and nearly every family was sick. People were afraid to stay with the sick, so for weeks I was away from home night and day. The flu had gone almost completely through town when it invaded our home. I had helped with the sickness in most homes in town. It was almost impossible to get any help. God gave me the strength to care for my own. Boys did our chores and work outside, for which I will be eternally grateful. If we are humble, God will provide. From fifty to sixty years I have seen the beauties God gave us. Children's joys and laughter have enriched my life. I will try to live so I can forget the years that were filled with doubts and fears. In my sixtieth year I climb the rugged hill of life, counting on at least ten more that will be filled with both joy and, of course, problems. Tender memories cling round those bygone years when boys and girls tell me about their joys and fears. There is no turning back. Time's invisible fingers are indelibly written on our soul. I was asked to teach the Gospel Doctrine class a time or two. I had taught classes many times, but to teach parents was a great responsibility. With my limited knowledge I didn't know what to do. I accepted the call in humility, and I'm telling you that I studied and prayed and prayed and studied again. I knew my pupils would be very experienced men and women. It was only with inspiration from above that I could try to teach the Gospel. Words spoken aimlessly without sincere conviction fail to inspire. Humbly I prayed for inspiration. For any success I give praise to the Lord. My failures I made on my own. Those years gave me a testimony more precious than gold. Looking back I see that ofttimes we do things the hard way, but we learn by doing. When you interest a class and hold them spellbound, then the lesson has clicked, and you have found the key to their heart. I hope I have left a sacred memory with all that attended my class. I'll always share their friendship. I was called to be secretary to a missionary committee. We planned at night and worked during the day. Brother Boyden, Sister Nuttall, Sister Boren and I would get money to send to the missionaries. More faithful workers would be hard to find than those dear missionary friends. Every Monday night we held a meeting and planned a dance or a party to make money. While we served we helped two missionaries in the field. Some faithful members paid a dollar a month to the fund. Sometimes we solicited money, but were never turned down. We sold ice cream too. We proved many times that faith without works is dead. By working together we became life-long friends. When Alton was called on a mission it was hard to send him under the conditions that existed. It took all the courage we had to have him go. Our home was mortgaged and we were deep in debt. Money was scarce. To sponsor that mission we had to make sacrifices, but we were repaid in spiritual satisfaction. Our family worked unitedly in all kinds of weather from daylight to dark. In the winters our hands and feet almost froze doing chores. We then milked twelve or thirteen cows. Alton knew he had one hundred percent support from home wherever he went on his mission. We sent him with a prayer that he would take a leading part, and we were more than satisfied with his effort. I cannot express the happiness and joy that came from having a missionary husband and son. Sometimes my patience was tried by the fact that all of my time was taken trying to help my children get an education. They got up early to ride 12 miles in a bus. Lunch had to be packed every day, and dinner must be ready when they got back. Money was scare there on the farm. I remember the girls did their part to add their small earnings to the pot. Emily stayed home from school part of the time, but by taking weekly examinations she made her grade. When graduation time came and school was completed she received her diploma along with the rest of the students. Our girls worked on the farm like men to help Alton get through his mission. Don's health failed while Alton was away, but day after day the work was completed. From then on our troubles never eased until Alton was released from his mission. The girls helped mow and bunch the hay and then haul it. We shocked grain and pitched, hauled and stacked bundles. The trials should make us better men and women. Trials made our family grow close. In November 1936 I had a sever case of flu. I didn't get well all winter no matter what we tried. In March I went to the Intermountain Clinic, and from there to the LDS hospital. Five doctors, Tindell, Hatch, Maw, Vico and an intern I can't name, said I needed a number of operations, but my heart was too weak to withstand them. The surgical doctor said I was a poor risk for an operation, and that they better treat me medically. He thought that if they could get rid of gallstones and a poisonous goiter, I may get well. They decided to try to build up my physical condition by keeping me in bed for six weeks more. Then I went from the hospital to Winona's. In addition to her profession, she spent all of her extra time giving me such tender care. My heart never got strong enough for them to operate, so I went home to stay the summer. For five years the doctors kept me alive, but I was down and out. My husband and family took my responsibilities, so I didn't have to worry about work at all. Although I was sick, I didn't want the children to think that I was lazy. I crocheted doilies for cupboards and tables, and counted my time profitably spent. While doing seven bedspreads I watched the pattern grow with flowers and gay designs. While working on them I left cares behind. So you will find the stitches I made in your memory chest. The second time they took me to the hospital to stay for a while, but it wasn't long again before they took me away to stay with Winona in Park City. She gave me the best of care, and I enjoyed her company. On the twenty-ninth of April we had been married fifty years. Our children planned to celebrate our golden wedding day, but the big time was called off when the doctor said I could not go to Wallsburg. At that time we were living in Salt Lake City. The doctor's words were hard to take, but our children handled it tactfully and made it easier for us. They came to Salt Lake with presents and a feast, and we appreciated it. Ervin and Winona's families couldn't come, but they said that they would pay our way on a vacation. A year later we were on our way to sunny California for a two-month stay to see the children and to get a tighter grip on life. I was too ill to see much of California, but we had a good time. The children lived closely enough together that we could walk from place to place. We'd enjoyed those days. We learned to appreciate our family. The children did all they could to make our stay pleasant. My husband spent most of his time fishing. One lovely morning he landed the largest fish he ever had. It was 27 inches long and weighed 9 and one half pounds. Fishing in the Feather River was very good. When it was time to return to Utah to spend the rest of the summer and winter, the children saw us on the bus to Marysville. We'll always remember that trip. We lived in Salt Lake City three winters, and then moved to St. George, where we could work in the Temple. We had a great deal of difficulty finding a place to live within walking distance of the temple. We had no automobile, so we couldn't take a place beyond walking distance. At last we found one little room with no conveniences. It had a cupboard made of orange boxes, a little old stove, two chairs and a box for a wash stand. We had no hot water and did our washing by hand. There was no warm carpet, and the bed had a hard mattress with poor springs. The rent was high for such a place. All winter long we lived as they did in pioneer days. We were not the type to give up and go back home, so we played make believe and said things were fine. Going to the temple each day gave us strength to stay in spite of the inconvenience. When spring came and we had completed our winter's work we paid our rent, stored our things and set out on our second trip to California. It took one full night's ride on the bus to Los Angeles, where we were delayed for twelve hours. When we got there the station was crowded, and we were tired. The bus was to leave in an hour or so. We waited for a call for the bus to take us to our destination, and when it came we rushed to the door of the bus. But to our surprise they said the bus was full. Remember, it was war time, and there was no other means of transportation available. We had nothing to do but to wait for the next bus, which would not be until seven o'clock that night. We had traveled the first night so that we could see California during the day, but instead we traveled all of the way at night. After 496 miles we reached Yuba City after noon. But once with our family, it did not take long to forget our problems. We spent a wonderful time for two weeks or so, and then traveled 116 miles to Central Valley to see Ervin and his family for awhile. They treated us first class. We enjoyed the beautiful roses. It was a treat to pick ripe oranges from the tree. There were orchards and vineyards as far as the eye could see. A man who worked there took us to Shasta Dam. We first saw it from the top of the mountain. Even workmen had to show passes, and the only way we could visit was to go with one of them. The dam was well guarded. We rode down the canyon for miles after our inspection from the mountain, and went up on the elevator four hundred sixty-five feet high. It almost took my breath away. It was interesting to see how easily the work was done. It went like clock work. The machinery worked with such perfection you'd think it would be fun to work with it. They would press a button and a batch of cement was mixed. Press another button and the load was sent to the dam. We left the elevator to walk up three flights of steps leading to the tower. I just went up two flights and ran out of strength. The steps were built on the outside wall, and the only protection was a rail. Looking down to the ground made me dizzy, and I was afraid I would fall. The rest of the company got to the tower and could see for miles around. Our experience was interesting. It was amazing to see cement carried down on a wire by the ton. What a sight the dam would be when it was completed. It would back up water for thirty five miles in three rivers. We rode over the highest double decker bridge in the world. The Pit River was down under. It was a marvel to see it so far below. The train came through a tunnel and traveled on the lower deck of the bridge. Four automobiles could go abreast on the roadway. We went back to Winona's and celebrated our wedding day as well as theirs. In May we celebrated both Father's birthday and Mothers day. In June we celebrated Fathers day as well. We enjoyed a feast for all five celebrations. The Feather River was good fishing, and the rest of the vacation we enjoyed it every day. Sometimes we'd all take lunch, and we all enjoyed it so much. My husband would fish with Jess from a boat in the early dawn, and then fish alone while Jess was gone to work. They had plans to meet at the river each day when Jess got off work. Jess would say, "I'll be on the river 'till you come." One day Jess came home from work ill, but did not want to break his appointment with Don. He asked us to go tell him it would be best for him to stay home and rest. We went to the river and signaled Don, and thought he'd take up anchor and row in. But the wind was blowing so hard that he could not row the boat to shore. He was going down the river at such a rate that my blood ran cold. The Feather River was deep and wide, and I was afraid that if he capsized he would not be able to swim against the current. It was not long before the boat was out of sight around a bend. We offered a fervent silent prayer that Father would be safe. The strength Don received from an unseen power helped guide the boat safely to shore. Winona had run down the river as fast as she could go, and returned smiling with Father. When he had reached the bank, he tied the boat to a tree. He vowed that he'd not get trapped alone on the river. When he had to go alone, he'd fish from the shore. When the vacation was over we went to the railroad station to return home. A score or more soldiers were waiting, and we were afraid that there were so many that we couldn't get to the train. But fortunately we were soon on our way home. We were due in Salt Lake City the next night at eight, but the train was delayed five hours, so we were late again. People waiting at the station were frantic because they could not find a room. No other train left that night, and the train station would soon be closed. "There are no rooms to be had", we heard people say. Don didn't wait, but went out immediately and found a place for us. The second fall we went away from home we knew that we would never go back to Wallsburg to stay. It's hard to leave a home you have built and lived in for years. There are memories in each corner, and your thoughts go through the house and everywhere. I love these places my children have lived in. What a thrill went through my heart as I watched them play. These memories are fresh in my mind. We worked hard to be independent, but we got the wrong slant on the business wedge. Quite often one makes errors, but we tried to be cheerful for each other's sake. My advice is to use what means you need as you go along, and enjoy life. We worked to save for a rainy day, things didn't always work out. In the fall we again went to St. George before our rent was due. The place was already rented to another person. The landlady had rented to two people. We had a written agreement, and could have held the place, but we didn't want a fight, and simply turned it back. But we didn't know what we would do for another place to live. When we reached the sidewalk we met President Snow, and he solved our problem. He directed us to an apartment in the Stake House. We found out what comfort in a small apartment could be like. There was nobody to bother us, and the hot water was available day and night. We sold our home and stored our furniture. We knew we would have to rent until normal conditions were restored. Leila Snyder bought a home and made plans to build two apartments in it. We stayed with her in part of her home for the rest of the winter. The apartments were not yet ready, but she didn't want to live alone. When you move before things are ready you make a mistake. For a time things didn't work out too well. Moving and building at the same time isn't very pleasant. You have to do things twice. We just couldn't get materials to remodel. We sent for our furniture and stored it in one room. Day by day we hoped we'd soon be settled. Spring came and we were still in a mess. But it didn't do any good to complain. We simply had to wait to have a chimney built. Each day we must greet people with a smile, even though promises are broken. We couldn't keep things clean. The red mud of St. George clung to our feet and tracked everywhere. We longed for a place to hang our clothes. We were still living out of trunks and suitcases. Papers and receipts got lost, and it was a problem for us to keep going. We surely were uncomfortable for a little while. Don had to take over the carpentry work to get it finished. Two clothes closets had to be moved, windows and doors had to be rehung to face the other direction. One room had five doors leading into it. We filled two of them in and papered over them. When the chimney was built there was plastering to do, and we had no idea how long it would take to get that done. When the plasterer finally came, we were more than willing to settle his bill. Then the paper hanger came and did one room, but it all came off before it was finished, and the job had to be done over again. But who could put in on to stay? We found a sister with a large family who could do the work, but she would have to come over after school at night. We worked with her until ten each night, and finally got it finished. We had no place to put dishes until the cupboard was built, and so they remained packed away. To worry about these little perplexities doesn't make much sense, but they were really annoying. The saying is that we go from the frying pan into the fire, but we tried to be sensible. The third winter we had a comfortable home, and we gave many thanks to our Heavenly Father. We felt as though heaven was not very far away. We had plenty to eat and plenty to wear, and we slept peacefully. I'll tell you about another vacation. When we left it was early morning and the weather was warm. We arrived at the bus station on St. George, bought our tickets, and waited patiently for the bus. We left at seven ten on a crowded bus, but we were glad to be on our way to see our children. We got to Cedar City, and had only fifteen minutes to walk a block and catch the train. We boarded with two minutes left, and the train left on time. At Lund we changed trains, but had an hour to wait, so we were able to get something to eat. The Challenger, a swift, long train, picked us up, and we were on our way. We landed in Milford in the middle of the day and stayed with our children for a while. Jess met us at the station and took us home to a fish dinner. Then they took us on a fishing trip to the mountains where the water was clear and cold. Our first night we camped in a green meadow and saw some wild deer. We were disappointed that there were no cabins, but we slept under the stars without shelter and were glad. By morning, however, the night became cold, and we nearly froze. But the sun chased the dew away and we were content to stay longer. The scenery was so beautiful. The fishing was good, and the men got their share. We had plenty of fish to eat. The time passed quickly, and we had to return. The road down the mountain was narrow, steep and dangerous, and gave us plenty of thrills and chills. But rough roads are the price one must pay to get up to the lakes. The time we had to stay was too short, but we had other children we wanted to visit. We stayed in Milford a few days, and then left on the train again. Lyndle station was our next stop, and soon we would be nearing our destination. Fern and the girls met us at the railroad station and took us to their home It was a thrill to see them. We enjoyed our time with them. The nights were cool and the days warm. When they were through with their work we went sight seeing with the family. We rode miles and miles in the countryside, and enjoyed it. The night before we left some of their friends came over, and the next morning they took us to Provo. We spent the rest of our vacation in Provo and Salt Lake, with children, grandchildren, and tried to find time to renew friendships. The children, however, always had something planned for us to do. Family visits, chicken dinner, and driving in Provo Canyon. We'll always remember our visits there. They took us to Wallsburg to meet old friends who had shared our joys and sorrows, and that was a genuine treat. We felt the spring and summer were well spent. We were treated royally. But is was time to return to St. George for the winter. The next vacation we were happy to get onto the bus without any problem. Most of the passengers were asleep before we traveled far, but I sat there wide awake, thrilled to think about leaving all cares behind and meeting with our family again. For weeks we had counted each hour before we would be on our way. We rode over acres of barren land, which helped me understand why man has to make a living by the sweat of his brow, as Adam did. We traveled over rough roads to Beaver, and there were met by our loved ones, again without any problems. From there we went about thirty miles by automobile, and had a good time for ten days. Fishing to my husband is the best time you can have. It spurs up the spirit. We cut our visit short this time, and thought we would be able to go back in the fall. We went from Milford to Leamington for a few days, and spent the rest of our time in Provo and Salt Lake. The visits we had with our children were the best. We enjoyed a good visit with friends, but two months was the limit of our vacation this time, so we returned to St. George. I'm sorry to say we missed the fishing trip we had planned on our way back. Unexpected things come up. We can't always stay where we wish. We'll go back to St. George and make the best of the winter while we are there. Next summer we'll come back to share our joys with children. Our fourth winter in St. George was a pleasant one. As soon as a room was vacated it was taken up quickly. We were fortunate to have three rooms when higher rent came along. Property raised in price by one-half to two-thirds, so now we decided to move back north again, to be closer to our loved ones. We felt that we could accomplish a great deal of work by spring. Month by month passed before the temple was open, so we didn't get all of the work we had hoped to. Working in the temple brought peace to us. As long as we live that glad memory will stay. Just to look at the temple gave us inspiration. To work there helped us gain our salvation. We cannot explain the feelings we felt there. May that spirit always remain with us. We hope some day to go back to the temple again. We love temple work. We worked seven winters in the temple as much as we could. I hope the five hundred I worked for will appreciate it. When we left St. George we got up early to see our things packed on the truck. Our neighbors stood by to shake our hand, and express their true friendship. We said goodbye to those dear friends, and hoped we had not left behind any enemies. We left St. George on a bright April day to make our home in Provo. We traveled without worry, even though all of our belongings were with us. The beauties of nature appealed to me as never before. Even the waste sage brush and rocks told me that they were placed there by someone all wise. It was a long journey, about three hundred miles, and we observed many interesting things green valleys, and the contrast between spring and winter. It gave me a thrill to travel along the side of the mountain, and into the valley below with its streams of crystal clear water. The road was crooked and winding, but we enjoyed the joys and beauty of the day. Long will I remember that beautiful April day. Each town we came to was alive with girls and boys, the stores were well stocked, and well dressed men and women walked the streets. In green pasture we saw cattle and sheep, and I could see beauties in the clouds that floated by, and pines on the mountains. My gaze didn't miss the snow-capped mountains with streams flowing from them. Hills of cedar were everywhere, where wild deer try to hide from hunters. I would have liked to pick some of the wild flowers, but we traveled too quickly. But we did hear song birds singing their happy songs up in the trees. I kept thinking what the future had in store for me. How many times in life we didn't know what to do. I thought what a wonderful world this would be if only each could see their own faults. While the road was winding around each bend, it was taking us closer to our friends and family. I could only see beauty as we went steadily along. I can't recall a more interesting and pleasant day. We were nearing our home and our loved ones. A long day's journey had brought us to the end of the road. Our children met us with sincere joy and cheer. We were homesick and lonesome while we were away, and now hoped to stay close to our children. Now we have moved back on a farm. We have crystal water, and the air is free. I still like being a farmer's wife. I'm living in the garden of your childhood days. The sweet memory gives me joy. The love we cultivated in that garden long ago grows truer and stronger as the years march on. Those were happy golden hours. We learn by suffering the value of time. Dear children, turn over a new page and try seeing what forgiving little faults will do for you. Only kindly words, deeds or thoughts will help us be charitable like we were taught to be. Stand on your own feet and don't turn a cold shoulder to anyone. It is much better to suffer wrong. So wipe the slate clean and start over today. You don't have to have much wealth to be happy. It takes love and contentment, and good health. Don't hold back words that will give comfort and cheer, and your heart will be happier. The time to appreciate us and to give us love is while we are here. It will not take an ounce of love from your own family. A kind word, a letter, or even a card does not take love from anyone. But it can lift someone's worry and sorrow. Time counts as nothing when help and love is needed. Angry words pierce the heart. I'll not admit I'm feeble, even though I am over seventy years old. I can't tell you the joys and sorrows of seventy years. Our hearts must be free from anger now to have peace and happiness. In a shade past seventy I must still climb a hill. When you number the days, I've been in the shade a long time. Old age may make me slow, but I'll still try to help those that are in need. I count my blessings. I'm old, but God has given me better health. The years have been kind to me. Sunshine and shadows come and go. The darkest hour is just before the dawn. Happy will be the day when we understand why trials come to us. We have not been told why so many troubles come. But by faith we're given strength to grow old. The sorrows that came in our younger days have never healed. Why it should be we've never learned. Though my hair grows white and my footsteps lose their grace I still laugh at my grandchildren's happiness. When we pick roses the leaves wither and die, but they are still fragrant to the end of the day. Look closely and you will see what these later years have brought to me. Dear Lord, I do not care if I am growing old as long as my family hold true love for me. May I stand on life's hillside and look back and see a life well spent. It's hard to live and never stray from God's teachings. If could, I'd like to leave my testimony here and impress it upon your lives. I often wonder what my children think of my silver hair. Can you think of giving greater service than to give help to loved ones while you live? Each year the world has been good to us. Dear children you make me happy. When I see the beauties of your faces so clearly, with so much hope pride and joy I wrapped around each of you, I hear childhood voices calling. I remember the joys, not the tears. Time has marred life's beauty, but the declaration of love is supreme in my heart. Help me, Father, to be more thoughtful when I see sorrow and pain, and lend a helping hand. My life's work is swiftly passing, soon it will be done. May I leave a blessing to my children. Pure thoughts are like silent friends to cheer our lonesome hours They smile from the garden of our soul like bright-eyed flowers At the foot of the mountain I gaze at the peak I must scale Oh give me strength as I climb up the rugged trail. Tender memories cluster around those bygone years. Now all our children have flown from the home nest, and are making homes for companions and children. The harvest time of our lives are when they come bounding home, and tell us they've found no happier place. Our family is worth all the heartaches and pain they've caused when with a loving smile they come home again. Now we have grandchildren and great grandchildren. How could anything to equal the joys they bring. I remember in my prime, spending most of my time with a loving family with such beautiful things. Six of our children married with our blessing. Our hope is that their love will be greater each year, with an aim to make a home and raise a family. We prayed that there would be no discord. Married life builds hope, faith and love. To raise an honorable family is a wonderful dream. We look at our family with pride. Five grandchildren were born to me between my fortieth and fiftieth years. Six came between my fiftieth and sixtieth. Seventeen were born between my sixtieth and seventieth. One born in my seventieth year made twenty nine. When thirteen of those grandchildren came to Earth I took care of their family. I rendered that service with a mother's love. Now I have six great grandchildren. Two of our grandchildren lived with us seven years. I held them so tenderly in my heart, and missed them so much when they left. Seventy-three years today ( October 24th, 1946) they laid me in my mother's arms. My birthplace was a new little village where my parents were pioneers. I honor them for having such a large family. They obeyed the commandments given to them by one all wise. We were taught in youth to follow the gospel light, and to do right and respect other's feelings. In December, nineteen hundred and forty-six, I end my story. May the blessings of the Lord be with you all of your life. May the joys of life come to comfort and cheer you. I sincerely wish you a MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR.

My Life Sketch, By Polly Adora Bigelow Allred

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

This history was dictated to her daughter Tressa Allred Roundy in 1953 or 1954. I was born Feb. 18, 1871, to Daniel and Permelia Mecham Bigelow, in Wallsburg Utah, which was called Round Valley at that time. In those early days, when it was necessary to protect ourselves from the Indians; a fort had been built to enclose the small cabins of the settlers. The fort took in about two blocks of Spring Creek, from Earl Boren’s place to the Ford Estate place. It was inside this crude little fort on a bleak February day almost eighty three years ago that I was born and in that same little fort, not many cabins away and six days later, was born a baby boy to James and Jennie McKenzie Allred. This little baby boy whom was named Franklin McKenzie Allred was to become my future husband. My father had secured a large tract of land as a homestead which is known as “the Bigelow” and is now Bert’s and Tressa’s ranch. I have many happy childhood memories of that place and the little home of logs which “Pa” built for us. Among my first recollections are the pleasant evenings around the old fireplace where my father would read from the “Book of Mormon” while my mother sewed clothing for the family. I learned to love that book, the history of “Lehi” and his posterity, the great Nephite nation on this American continent, of which our Indians are the remnant. The first celebration I can remember was on a 4th of July when I was about 5 years old. The men had built a bowery on the lot (across from the fort) that is now George Batty’s. The lot was nice and green and after the program in the Bowery everyone enjoyed lunch and games of all kinds. I thought it was the most wonderful 4th of July ever. Later on a log house was built on the same lot, which in turn served as meeting house, school house and recreation hall. My brother Don Bigelow and my sister Emily Batty spent their first school years there. When I was seven years old we moved to Provo where I went to school at the “Brigham Young Academy”, which is now the B.Y.U. It had just been established a few years then and was in an old ware house where the farmers & merchants Bank now stands. There were between 300 and 500 students there then and Brother Karl G. Maeser was the first President and also the Instructor in English. He had a daughter about my age who was one of my best friends. Her name was Nettie Maeser. One day Nettie and I were walking up the street from school when Brother Maeser came along and took us each by the hand and walked with us up the street. This was a very proud moment in my life that I have never forgotten. When I was eleven years old our family went down to St. George to do temple work. It took us many weeks to make the trip in a covered wagon. While there I had the privilege of being baptized for about sixty people. Soon after this my father went into polygamy and married a widow woman who had three small girls, the oldest one being about my age. We loved each other as though we were real sisters. Many years later Pa took a third wife and raised three large families. We all got along very well. When I was seventeen years old we moved back to Wallsburg. I had finished school and had a certificate for teaching the lower grades. By this time the town had grown to about 800 people and the little log school house was over crowded. I was given about fifty or sixty beginners to teach in the young men's hall which stood about where the old Relief Society house now stands. A few people I taught live here now, James Graham, Wilmueth Lamb, Mark Mecham, and others who have moved away. I taught for about one year, then went to Salt Lake to live with my Aunt Lucy Bigelow Young, who was a wife of President Brigham Young. When I was eighteen years old, the Allred family, who had moved away many years before came back to Wallsburg and I met and became engaged to Franklin M. Allred and was married four years later. It was a long courtship, but a happy one which left many happy memories for my later years. I remember the theatres we took part in together both before and after we were married. In those days of slow travel we stayed within our own town and made our own amusements. Many winters we put on as many as three or four theatres and took them all around the county and as far as Kamas. Sister Sarah Glenn was our manager and coach. Joe Kerby painted the scenery and curtains for the Stage which served for many years. We copied all our parts from one book and also made all our own costumes. With the money we earned on our shows we made the first payment on an organ for our meeting house. Those were pleasant years! The happiest day of my life was Nov 3rd 1893 my wedding day. We were married by Bishop Franklin A Fraughton at the home of my grandmother Mecham which is now Lamond Givens place. It was a lovely warm sunny day, and all our friends were gathered on the front yard to witness the ceremony which was performed on the front porch. I felt like a princess in my pink silk moiré and lace dress and veil, which I had made myself, and I thought Frank was the most handsome man that had ever lived. We had a reception right after the ceremony and a dance at night for all. We made our first home at the Allred’s house, which is now the Cullen Batty home. Here our first child was born our daughter, May. My Father gave me a beautiful organ for a wedding present, which was a joy to our family till it was lost in a fire. We also had a piano later on. We later moved to Vernal, Utah, where we lived for about a year then returned to Wallsburg. As the years passed we were blessed with eight more lovely children which to us were gifts from Heaven. I worked in all 3 organizations for children and woman in the church, saw that all my children went to their meetings and helped in political and civic jobs of our town and county. I worked at different times in my brother Don’s store, and also raised chickens, grew vegetables and did some sewing to help pay for our large family’s needs thru the years, music lessons for our girls and scouting for our boys. We had our good years and our hard years, our pleasures and our problems. But as trials and sorrow must come to all people I later had my share. My husband Frank passed away April 24, 1919 after an extended illness, leaving 7 of our 9 children at home, Bessie 20, Franklin 18, Tressa, Free, Reed, George and Win. The troubles and sorrows I pray to forget and treasure in my memory only the good things and the blessings of my long life.

Brief Biography of Daniel Don Louis Bigelow

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Daniel Don Louis Bigelow was born May 22, 1866 in Heber City, Wasatch County, Utah, United Sates of America. Though his family was from Wallsburg, Daniel Don Louis Bigelow, who was called Don, was born in the middle of an Indian scare that affected all of Utah. Due to this scare people were advised to gather at the county seats, and for Wasatch County that meant Heber City. After the Indian scare Don and his family moved back to Wallsburg, where Don’s father, who was named Daniel, bought a saw mill. At the age of sixteen Don, along with his sister, were in charge of running the saw mill during the summer when their father was away. In the winter time Don attended Brigham Young Academy in Provo where he got as much education as he could. From an early age Don was taught to listen to the prompting of the Holy Ghost, which helped guide him throughout his life. For instance, once when Don was trying to find a stray ox he felt impressed to stop suddenly on the trail he was following. Just below where he was on the trail the brush began crackling as something moved through it. After the animal making the brush crackle had passed Don found a bear track between 8 and 9 inches long. He was very glad that he had followed the prompting and hadn’t come face to face with the bear. When Don was 24 he met Annie Maria Boren. They “went together” the whole winter, but when Don asked Annie if she would marry him at the end of that first winter she replied that she was too young to get married. Not to be deterred Don decided that the best option was to wait for another year. After a year had passed he again proposed to Annie, this time she said yes. They were married in the Manti temple on April 29, 1891. Don was called to serve a mission in 1902, only months after he and Annie had lost their first four children, all in the course of a week, to diphtheria and measles. He served in Kentucky, but his first mission only lasted nine months. After nine months on his mission he was called home to take care of his wife who was extremely ill. Under his care Annie got better, and they were able to continue their life. In 1910, after giving birth to their daughter Winona, Annie began to have extreme pain in her leg, which the doctor diagnosed as milk leg. The doctor did all he could to treat it, but the pain would not leave and the swelling refused to go down. On the fourteenth day of her illness the doctor said he could do no more for her and left the house. Distraught, Don prayed to the Lord for inspiration on how he could help his wife. There in the dark farm yard Don received revelation from the Lord that instructed him on exactly how to treat his wife’s illness. He went into the house a put a bucket of water on to boil to which he added a quart of wheat bran and a half pint of salt. He boiled this concoction and then soaked a blanket in the boiling mixture. This blanket he then wrapped around Annie’s leg, and he changed the blanket every time it got cool. This treatment eased the pain, reduced the swelling and likely saved Annie’s life. A few days later the doctor returned and was amazed by Annie’s recovery. Don told him how the recovery had come about and the doctor began to use the same treatment on his other patience that were also afflicted with milk leg. From 1911 to 1915 Daniel Don Louis Bigelow had the opportunity once again to serve a mission. He was called to serve in the Southern States mission and was assigned to serve once again in Kentucky. In 1915 Don came home from his mission and once again became a farmer. When his son was called to serve in Canada, Don ran both his farm and his son’s farm. But by the time his son, Alton, came back from his mission Don’s health was beginning to fail and he could no longer do much of the farm work, so Alton took over both farms. In his older years when his health was failing Don became very involved in family history work. He would go to the temple every opportunity he had, and many times he would go multiple times a day every day of the week and then use Saturday and Sunday to visit with family members and friends. By the end of his life he calculated that he had done the endowment work for over fifteen hundred men, and had assisted in some way in five thousand sealings. Doing the work for his ancestors meant a lot to him and he was overjoyed to have had the opportunity to do that work. Daniel Don Louis Bigelow died in Provo, Utah on July 5, 1954 after a long life of service to his fellow men and to the Lord.

Life timeline of Don L. Bigelow

1866
Don L. Bigelow was born on 22 May 1866
Don L. Bigelow was 12 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Don L. Bigelow was 17 years old when Krakatoa begins to erupt; the volcano explodes three months later, killing more than 36,000 people. Krakatoa, or Krakatau, is a volcanic island situated in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in the Indonesian province of Lampung. The name is also used for the surrounding island group comprising the remnants of a much larger island of three volcanic peaks which was obliterated in a cataclysmic 1883 eruption.
Don L. Bigelow was 25 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Don L. Bigelow was 38 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Don L. Bigelow was 46 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Don L. Bigelow was 54 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Don L. Bigelow was 65 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Don L. Bigelow was 78 years old when World War II: The Allied invasion of Normandy—codenamed Operation Overlord—begins with the execution of Operation Neptune (commonly referred to as D-Day), the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy in France. The Allied soldiers quickly break through the Atlantic Wall and push inland in the largest amphibious military operation in history. The Allies of World War II, called the United Nations from the 1 January 1942 declaration, were the countries that together opposed the Axis powers during the Second World War (1939–1945). The Allies promoted the alliance as a means to control German, Japanese and Italian aggression.
Don L. Bigelow died on 5 Jul 1954 at the age of 88
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Don L. Bigelow (22 May 1866 - 5 Jul 1954), BillionGraves Record 216455 Wallsburg, Wasatch, Utah, United States

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