Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum

15 Oct 1854 - 7 Aug 1921

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Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum

15 Oct 1854 - 7 Aug 1921
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Deseret Elizabeth Hooks Meldrum By T.W. Meldrum 1955 (Taken from the David Meldrum Sr. Family Histories book p. 31-22) Deseret Elizabeth Hooks was the 2nd child and daughter of James Hooks and Elizabeth Conrad, and was born October 15, 1854 at Brownstown, Wayne Co., Michigan. One hundred years ago 1

Life Information

Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum

Born:
Died:

Alberta (Temple Hill) Cemetery

Township Road 64
Raymond, County of Warner, Alberta
Canada
Transcriber

pattywilliams

September 27, 2014
Transcriber

Alex 1499

August 6, 2015
Photographer

Tascione

September 10, 2014

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Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: pattywilliams Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Deseret Elizabeth Hooks Meldrum By T.W. Meldrum 1955 (Taken from the David Meldrum Sr. Family Histories book p. 31-22) Deseret Elizabeth Hooks was the 2nd child and daughter of James Hooks and Elizabeth Conrad, and was born October 15, 1854 at Brownstown, Wayne Co., Michigan. One hundred years ago 1854, Michigan was frontier country, but the people were pushing always westward, making farms, clearing timber and seeking a livelihood or riches in other ways, such as trading, buying and selling land, animals or whatever else they had to offer. The Conrad’s (Deseret Elizabeth’s mother and her folks) came from the State of New York and previous to that from Pennsylvania (a Dutch Colony). Her mother Elizabeth Conrad, having been born at Seneca, Ontario Co., New York, April 7, 1830, (being a day after the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized and not far 25-30 miles from Fayette, Seneca co., New York, where that great event took place, in fact, her older brother John Conrad was born there but unfortunately he died the dame day that he was born Oct. 26, 1830.) Deseret’s father, James Hooks was born in England, possibly in the County of Norfolk, and near Whissonnette, Sept. 5, 1830, where his mother Martha Mann Thing/Hooks was born. His father Thomas Hooks immigrated to America in the year 1836, but we are unable as yet to find out what port he arrived at or what ship he came to America in, nor any record of his marriage to Martha Mann Thing. The home where Deseret lived in Michigan was surrounded by heavy forest of maple, oak, hickory and other hard woods and soft woods. Wild animals were abundant, such as bears, wild cats, deer, etc. the wild cat at night would cry out something like unto a baby crying, and seemed to put fear into the children and others and would keep them indoors after dark Deseret’s mother Elizabeth received the Gospel from two Mormon Missionaries, Israel Evans and Nymphus Murdock of Salt Lake City, Utah and she was baptized in the Detroit River Oct. 21, 1869 by Israel Evans. Her husband being out west to California at the time, Elizabeth with her four children three girls and one boy came to Utah in the fall of 1870 by railroad (the Union Pacific Railroad having been completed to Salt Lake City the year previous 1869). Charles Conrad, her bother met them at Salt Lake City and brought them to Provo, in a wagon a 45 mile trip. Sometime later her husband came from California and built her a log cabin in the east part of Provo where she lived until her death. Deseret was baptized a member of the Church by her uncle, Charles Conrad in 1871 at the age of 16 years. Unhappily her father, James Hooks couldn’t see the light of the Gospel, and when one of the ward bishops didn’t pay him for work he got disheartened and went back to Michigan and never returned, the family saw him no more. Deseret (ET or Ettie as she was called) met and was courted by David Meldrum, and after a time they travelled to Salt Lake City and were married for time and eternity in the Endowment House at the City on Feb. 14, 1873. David was the 2nd son of George and Jane Barclay Meldrum. To this couple were born ten children, 7 boys and 3 girls (one baby girl however was stillborn) all growing to maturity except the stillborn girl and a boy Benjamin Howard who died at the age of two of membranous croup. All married and had family except one son Charles Alvin, the youngest who never married. Father and mother Meldrum built a large one roomed log cabin in the north east part of Provo where the three elder brothers, David, James Arthur and Bryan Barton were born, then father built a brick home on the corner of the same lot where the balance of the family were born. Father used the log cabin for a blacksmith shop for years. After living in Provo, Utah for 31 years and as there was an opening of new country in Canada (Southern Alberta) about this time, their son James Arthur received a call from the church to go and settle there, which he did travelling there by team, 750 mile. He helped to fund the town of Magrath, Alberta when he wrote back to Utah to his parents about that land being the land of opportunity and plenty of work available for a blacksmith there. The prairies were being broken up by ploughs and plough points had to be sharpened and machinery repaired, so he urged father to go to Canada. So in the spring of 1903 father moved to Alberta and started a blacksmith shop in the town of Raymond where the Knight Sugar Co., had built a sugar factory the year previous. He built a one roomed house (later two other rooms were added) on the same lot as the blacksmith shop. He lived there until his death Feb. 12, 1918. Mother came to Canada the following year in 1904. The rest of the family at home stayed at Provo to go to school or work until such time that father could bring us to Canada. My brother Parley had come to Canada with his brother James Arthur when he made a return trip to Provo to get material and also to get married. I had not arrived in Alberta until Aug. 1910 except for a month visit when I came here with me Grandmother Hooks in 1907. Mother was stricken with a paralytic stroke in 1916 and it left her without the power of speech and she continued this way until her death five years later. She died of another stroke Aug. 7, 1921, at the age of 91 ½ years. Mother was buried in the Raymond Cemetery beside her husband who had predeceased her my three and a half years. Mother lived a very honourable life and was a staunch member of the church.

David Meldrum Sr. Family Histories

Contributor: pattywilliams Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

In this Family Search site - under the "Search" tab, you can search "books". Then in the "books" you can search "David Meldrum Sr. Family Histories" and you can read a beautiful 81 page history of: George Meldrum and his wife, Jane Barclay Meldrum Elizabeth Conrad Hooks Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad David Meldrum Sr. and his wife, Deseret Elizabeth Hooks Meldrum David Meldrum Jr. James Arthur Meldrum (who I am a descendant of) Bryan Barton Meldrum Nora Elizabeth Meldrum Heggie Edith Deseret Meldrum Simonsen William Parley Meldrum Thomas Wilford Meldrum Charles Alvin Meldrum

Deseret Elizabeth Hooks

Contributor: pattywilliams Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

None

Glimpses from Old Letters to Canada 1902

Contributor: pattywilliams Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

David Meldrum Jr., Magrath, Alberta, N.W.T. Canada Provo City, June 6, 1902 Dear son and daughter, We received your letter last Sunday which we were waiting for with much anxiety for we had heard of the terrible storm. Feel thankful that you are safe. We have not heard from the boys for a month unless we get one today, which I hope we will. I expect that you have all met before this or at least I hope so and that all is well. How do you like the looks of the country now, for it is not all storm? We would like a little down here now. Brother Johnson will start to load next Tuesday if all is well. Your pa got some lucern seed and grass like that across the road. Johnson is going to take some things for several parties and I think we will have to put your name on all the things that belong to you folks. I saw Mary's ma yesterday. She is going over to the farm to live. Her grandma won't give her any peace. She has rented her house to Mrs. Hickman. She will go as soon as your things are gone. Nora is cleaning upstairs today and next week we will pull up down here. I will be glad when it is done for it is getting very warm weather. Some are cutting hay but it is a very light crop. I do hope the storm did not do much damage to the boys. Well, how is Bessie and her baby? And Parley would be tickled to pieces to see you I know. Hoping this finds you as well as it leaves us. I remain as ever, Your loving mother, D.E.M. Kiss the babies for me and love to all the rest of you. Provo, June 10, 1902 My dear son, I will now send you a few lines to let you know that we have put your things on the car this morning. I can't tell you now whither they will start this afternoon or tomorrow. Bro. Knight is sending some things by Johnson also, and if Johnson can't scrape enough money to pay for the car, your pa will have to see that your portion is paid before they can get off. I am so tired helping to get the things off, for I went over to Mary's Ma and russelled around to get the cupboard empty and packed ready by nine o'clock, and I think we have all of your things as far as I know. I will try to enumerate the articles and pa branded them with that little horn brand, then put D.M. on all the things, sacks and all. It may get rubbed off some of them. You will have to take two wagons or a hayrack for Uncle George had them stacked sky high. Mary's Ma is going to move to the farm tomorrow. Ma -James sleigh and tongue -Planet Jr. in a box and handles -4 sacks of seed potatoes -1 sack lucern seed -1 sack O. grass seed - a sack with those wheels for Parley -Keg of vinegar -a small box with things for Bessie and Bryan These are the things which we sent from our house. I do not know if he sent the horn brand, but Nora thought he did. From Mary's Mother- 3 pieces of stove pipe 1 elbow Keg of pickles Cupboard Table and 4 chairs and one rocker Bedstead and small trunk and three small boxes Bed springs and stove 1 large box I think I have them all as near as I can remember. My, if we do not hear from the boys today I shall think that something serious has happened. Pa helped load your things in. They weighed a little over 25 hundred pounds. Love to all, Must send this right away Mother Provo City, June 17, 1902 Dear Dave and Mary, I thought perhaps I ought to explain about a few things. We put your tent in the big box. Mary's Ma made her a rug and put in also a cushion for chair and I put in some lace for her pillow slips--I think there is enough of it. I made a quilt and put in the big box for Bryan. Mary's mother wrapped her knives and forks in a roll of carpet in the safe. The safe key is in one of the drawers. We put the table legs in the safe. There was a sack of potatoes that burst when they were loading your things so Mary's Ma gave us a seamless sack that had her brand on - a big C. One sack was early six week potatoes. We sent the side board for the top bed of a wagon. The end gate was rotten. There is a small box I fixed some things in for Bessie and Bryan. The things for Bryan are pinned up together and the cushion can go to whoever needs it the most. If Bessie wants it she can have it. If not give it to Bryan. I put it in to fill up the box. I sent some ginger for Jim and a shirt for Parley. Your father paid Johnson $13. That is what he said it came to for your share, unless there will be some for loading and unloading. That is not as much as I was thinking it would be. Mary's Ma got her letter. We are cleaning the bedrooms today. Love and best wishes to you all, Your Mother Letter From Nora Provo City, July 15, 1902 Dear Brother and Sister, I will now write a word or two to let you know that we are all well but nearly baked or fried. I hardly know which it is--almost unbearable but there is a little breeze coming up now and perhaps it will cool the air a little. How is Canada by this time? I guess there is no danger of you people choking to death as long as it storms so much and you have such floods. What kind of a time did you have on Dominion Day? We had a glorious time on the fourth. It rained all day and froze like sixty at night. They expect to have quite a time here on the 24th but if it is as hot as it is today, I will stay at home. I haven't seen your Ma, Mary, since she went over to the lake bottom.................The berries are coming on now and we are quite busy................I can't think of any more to say it is so warm so goodbye for this time. God bless you all and write soon Your ever loving sister, Nora XXXXXXX How is that dear sweet little Velma? Kiss her a dozen times for me. How I would like to see her. Is her hair still red? It is pretty anyway. How are her teeth coming? I know they must hurt her. XXXXXXX Dear Children, As Nora was writing to you I will write a few lines also. We received your letter the day after the fourth and one from Jim also. Was glad to hear that you got your things all right. I guess you have had plenty of rain? How has it served you in your tent? How do you like it by now? Who do you have for neighbors? How is Millie Wilde Peterson? Do you ever see her? How is the baby? I suppose she does not feel very well when she is after her teeth.......Have you a job of any kind? John Saxey is getting the roof on his new house. You might run your jib for a job of that sort. Well, I will stop with love to all. I am as ever, Your Mother Provo City, August 17, 1902 Dear Son and Family, Received your letter alright. Glad you are all well. We are first rate except myself. I am feeling under the weather, but I have to dig around anyway. How do you like it up there by now? I guess it did not look very inviting, but when you make it more homelike you will feel better, if you only have good health as the main thing. How is sweet little Velma? How we would like to see you all.... How are you getting along with your house? What kind of one are you putting up? More than one room? Hope you will have it fixed up good before cold weather on account of the baby. Now I hope you and Mary go to meeting a little more than you did down here. Now next time you write tell us all the particulars and how you are fixed comfortable and do not wait so long before you write for it nearly worries me to pieces. I know that you are tired when you stop at night, but take time for that and Mary can write if she don't like the writing business. I am glad that you have some good neighbors. Go out and be sociable with them for if you stay at home too much, you will not care to go. I have done that too much myself. How far do you live from the centre of town? We are putting up and drying apricots. How is your fruit hanging out? I will close now. Your ever loving Mother Kisses to all Provo City, Sept. 14, 1902 Dear Dave and Mary, We received your most welcome letter a week last Friday.....I do not feel very good for I have so much to do that I am tired right out at night so I can hardly wiggle, but I guess the fruit will soon be gone. I sent Edith over and got a dozen of your glass jars, and I am filling them so when Wilde’s or Petersons go up we can send them for you. Now tell me which kind you would rather have or shall I mix them. You won’t want all the same kind I guess. I did not know you had bottles over there or I would of got them before. It was quite cold nights a while ago with frost up in the valley-wheat on the Weber frozen-potatoes frozen black 3 or 4 weeks ago in the valley. Uncles in the canyon-wheat not high enough to cut-has not rained since 4th of July-that was not much. Pa says for you to keep a stiff upper lip and stick with it a while and perhaps things will turn out all right yet. You have not had the grasshoppers that folks in Sanpete have. They have been having a picnic catching them.... Well, I am glad that you have a small place to be in if it is a lean-to. If it is warm and comfortable you can hang a curtain at one end for a bedroom for a while if you have no other partition. That is as large as I had if not larger till I had three children. Dave might make you a dugout cellar for a few things... Am glad you have some good neighbors. Has any of them a sewing machine so you could do a little sewing when you need it? You must have lots of cheek. That is the way to get through this world... Tomorrow is Velma’s birthday. My how time flies. Just kiss her a big kiss for me, for we would all like to see her..... Now Dave, what do you want us to send you when we send up the fruit and grass seed in the shape of plants or cuttings? Say it will soon be tater digging. Wish you was here to pick up some. Hoping this will find you all well, I remain as ever, Your Mother, D.E.M. Oct. 5, 1902 Pa saw Uncle Jesse Knight and he told him about the steam thresher business. My you must be getting up in the world to sport bunks and doctors..... I am about done with the fruit and am very glad, for I can’t get to do a stitch of sewing, and the children need some done. I have stayed home so much that I am tired plum out. Have you seen any of the boys lately? I suppose they are all busy but I think that Bessie might write or have Parley do so. If all goes well I think I shall come and see how you all are next year some time, when you get to raising sugar beets. I think I could of got a return ticket now but I do not want to go for winter...... We was thinking of sending a few bushels of potatoes. Pa said they were 21 cents a bu. last week and Saturday Reece said that Decker was offering 18 cents a bu. Hardly worth digging.... I got some catnip seed and if half of it grows you will have enough to seed down Canada in a year. Grandpa Meldrum says his sugar stock shares pays him better than anything else and he is buying more. I think if you can get some for work I would invest some any way. Oct. 20,1902 I got a very nice letter from Josie last Monday. Have not heard from Jim for two months. I think you would be wise to take the land you speak of that is not very far-just a nice ride and Pa thinks so too. Johnson is going up on Tuesday. We have sent four barrels-three of potatoes (they are 15 cents a bushel) and one of the shrubs. Also your glass jars in a box and a box with some notions for the children. I think Pa put your initials on and they should go as household goods. There is one barrel of early potatoes expressly for seed-some in a sack is “early six weeks.” I want you to plant those walnuts this fall. The shrubs and plants you can divide with the boys. Pa said you could plant the strawberry plants yourself. We will send more in a little while. There are raspberries and currants-3 kinds. You can tell the bed bug currants by the smell. I believe there is some gooseberries, two kinds of pie plant that at the bottom of barrel is the latest of the two and is called Peach. The other is the large early. Pa sent some flowers for the girls-rose bushes and I do not know what all. There is a crimson rambler, a climber for Mary. Pa says to take good care of it for it is a hardy rose. Put it by your window. I was not home or I would have labelled them and he did not have time. Pa has just paid Johnson for the freight on those barrels so your draft came alright. If you get them and they grow, it will be worth a great deal to you. We will send some poplar cuttings later.......Have you got your carpet down? I would have some of it anyway to keep the cold out. D.E.M. Nov. 13, 1902 I wanted to let you know about the things. Your Ma fetched your stuff over last Thursday. There is a big box like the one you packed your things in and two small boxes. One has three cans of honey for you, Bryan and James. The other box is what your mother sent with fruit. Open the big box first. The dried fruit is in it, also grass seed. The grape cuttings that Pa sent and Mary’s Ma sent a few roots. They are wrapped up in a piece of carpet to keep them moist. Pa says to bury them in the ground till spring then plant out. The same with your poplar and Balm of Gilead. Poplar are whitest cuttings. I put in a coat of Alvin’s I thought Velma could run about in. There is an old coat and vest of Elmer’s that Parley could wear to do chores. There is a new suit for him also. I sent your gun twister or what you call it. Also Byran’s gun he wanted sent. There is a pasteboard box for Mary’s and Bessie’s babies. A few walnuts in the honey box for Parley. I would have liked to send a few little notions for Christmas but could not. We are quarantined for Edith is just over the small pox and we are all exposed......Edith went over to the Academy to a hand shake and the next morning after there were several students came down with it. She being small and delicate got it 20 days later. She was not so very sick. Say Mary, you get something thicker than them calico wrappers for winter. I imagine you as you were last winter. You looked so cold in them. Don’t get sick for it is colder there than here. D.E.M. Dec. 7, 1902 We are over the small pox but the flag isn’t down. They say small pox is all over town. An awful lot of it. I’m glad ours is over with. Nora Dec. 7, 1902 Well I wish I was in Canada because half of the family is there and rest might just as well be there too. Edith Provo City, Dec. 21, 1902 Dear Son and Daughter, .............Sister Duke told Nora they had a letter from Emily and she said they were still threshing and it was so very cold. The will have to have more big threshers. I do not think I would like to thresh when it is so cold but I guess they have to get it done. Well, how are you anyway? Can you keep warm? But if you have good health that is the best of all. If Dave had said he wanted a barrel for water before we sent the things we would have sent one for we had plenty of them oak barrels. I think you would get tired of carrying water so far. I do feel so sorry that you have not got a cow. I wish you had one as good as our little Agnes...... Pa saw Bishop Knight of Raymond today. Pa was asking about you. Oh, yes, Esther Brimhall was to the shop telling him of you and that part of the country. How is Velma? It don’t seem as if she was big enough to walk. We think of her as we saw her last, and Alvin says, “Sweetheart her. I could squeeze her gizzard out.” I bet she is quite a chatterbox and gets into mischief. I bet you have to keep the water bucket off the floor. Well, Dave, are you working or has it froze so much you can’t. Pa has not had any work to speak of for two months before we had the small pox and of course there is not much now. I know he would like to go up there in the early spring if he can scrape up enough to go and come back. He thinks it will take about a hundred dollars but I think it won’t take that much hardly. What or where are you going for Christmas? Write and tell us all about how you spend your holiday. Say don’t your blankets and big heavy quilt come handy to keep you warm? Wishing you a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Would like to have you here for the holidays so we could have a good romp with Velma. Hoping this will find you all enjoying good health. I remain, Your loving Mother D.E. Meldrum

Letter to Canada from Utah 1903

Contributor: pattywilliams Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Provo City, Utah, Jan. 11, 1903 Dear Brother and Sister, Yours of 29th was received. Glad to learn that you were all well as this leaves us. It was Conference yesterday and today. I stayed home to get dinner. President Joseph F. Smith and Apostle Clawson was down. I am glad you are going to have a well. I hope you will succeed in getting water. That is a long way down to dig. You will need a pump to get it up with. Nora Jan. 25, 1903 Bryan said he was ovr to see you on New Year's and that Josie had been very sick ever since, for the trip was more than she could stand. I guess it shook her up too much. She is on the improve now. I expect before you get this you will see by the paper that your Grandma Meldrum has passed away. She died Monday (Jan. 19, 1903) at half past three. She ate her breakfast and dinner the same day but was feeling weaker than usual, but they hardly thought she would go so quick. It is a blessing for her; she is out of her misery and she did not know Grandpa only occasionally. Aunt Adelaide has the small pox. I have been selling butter and milk again since the first of the month. I was doing pretty well before the small pox struck; then did not have sales for two months. I can tell you we missed the dollars. I put some down to use for shortening and cooking. Now I sell 6 pounds a week and ten or twelve quarts of milk--get a quarter for butter--was 30 cents before Christmas. You said you were digging a well. You be sure and keep the hole covered so that a child or any other will not fall down it. Edith and Wilford both got promoted. Edith is in seventh grade and Wilford in first reader. Your loving Mother, D.E.M. Feb. 13 I am knitting Velma a pair of mittens, but I guess she will not need them by the time you get them. They will do for another winter. I made Jim's baby some for her birthday. Oh, do you ever go to meeting up there? I think you should and set an example for your children. Mother D.E.M. Feb. 20 1903 Was pleased to learn that you had struck water at 44 feet, but you must remember that well water is not soft like our river water. Our well water was quite hard. If you had a good oak barrel to draw it in for wash day it would be quite a help. Mother Feb.20 Oh, how Mother would like to go up and visit you all. I hope the way will be opened that we can send her in the spring or summer. It would do her so much good to have an out. Nora Provo City, Mar. 21, 1903 ............How did you enjoy your surprise? How is Pa? Did he get there alright? You can tell him that he don't need to hurry home for the weather is not very pleasant. Last Tuesday and Wednesday it snowed quite hard--six to eight inches. The sun is out pretty today but the air is quite cool. I hope he will enjoy himself and have a good time.... I saw Mrs. Knight the other day and had a little talk with her. She told me what a sweet baby you had. She expects to leave here in about two weeks.... Alvin don't know what to do without Pa. He wanders around like a lost duck. Nora Provo City, April 7, 1903 It is Grandma Hook's birthday today (73 years) Pa is thinking of going back to Canada the last of this month. I hope he can for he don't have much to do here. Nora Provo City, April 6, 1903 Dear Children, They are all well but myself.....It must be sort of lagrippe... Your father got home all right a week ago this morning. I guess he enjoyed his trip all right. Pa says that Parley is as broad as he is long. Well, I guess he enjoyed stopping with you for a while, but they must be careful about trying to cross those streams. I suppose he came horseback..... Very likely you will see your Pa again in two or three weeks for he is fixing to go up again. Mother D.E.M. April 13, 1903 Dear Children, We got your letter of the sixth last Thursday and were quite surprised about the new baby. I thought that was to be a month or so later on, but am glad all are feeling so well. That is the time to be careful and not overdo. My golly, it is a good thing you know how to play girl. Take good care of Mary. (Ened was born April 5, 1903) Mary's Ma was over Wednesday and stayed all night but went away next morning just before we got your letter..... Don't let Mary draw water those well buckets until she gets quite strong. Your loving Mother, D.E.M. Provo City, April 22, 1903 My Dear Children, We received your letter last Thursday and was glad to hear that you were progressing nicely and hope you feel quite strong, but be cautious and careful how you do, even if everything is not done so slick as it ought to be. How is Velma? Does she like the baby? I hope they are good-natured for it wears one out to care for them..... Say, are Jim's folks looking for an increase in the family too? I hear so but they have never mentioned it. (Lawren was born May 31, 1903) Lizzie Bean says if Mary is going to have twelve children that she will have to pitch in, but I think you have started pretty good already. I am quite tired as we have washed and then gone to town, but Pa said I could write and tell you that he would start back the last of this month or the first of May. He will go up with a car load of salt and potatoes for Knight and Allen, so it will no cost him very much. He has been pulling down his forge, and will have the shop moved up here in a few days. He has let John Furguson have the garden and lots to look after. He thinks he can have work up there and he has not had very much here at his trade. I want to came and see you all myself, but he thinks if he goes I can't but we will see if I can get the means. Nora says to go and she will look after things here. My love to all, Your Mama D.E.M. Provo, May 1, 1903 Dear Children, .......I would not have written tonight for I am so tired but your pa wanted me to tell you that he is going to load and get off tomorrow if all is well. He was intending to go Thursday, but had to wait for a party over to Lehi to fetch their things over as they are sending about 2500 lb. along on their house fixings. Your pa is taking his potatoes along. Allen advised him to. He thought he could sell them alright and perhaps people would be glad of them for seed. I will send Mary some butter and I want her to get her fill for once......Well, how is baby? Is she cross or is she good like her pa? What are you going to call her anyway? I am very glad your cuttings and plants are so nice. Hope you have good luck with them. Will send a few strawberry plants along. You will have to take care of Pa a bit if he stays in Raymond...... We will start to clean house when we get your pa off. My I would like to go. Anyway some time this summer, then I could see all of you. Mother D.E.M. Provo, May 18, 1903 ................I am glad that pa got there all right and hope everything will be fine with him and all of you. Am also glad if Dave has a good job for all summer and can stay with it. This is the last week of the District school and I don't know what I will do the the boys--the little rascals keep wrangling so much I will have to tie them up if I keep them at home.... No, you must write and tell me how pa is getting along for I don't think he will write much if he can get out of it.....I would like to be with you very much. Perhaps you have plenty of room out of doors. Alvin don't like it a bit because pa went off. Kiss the babies for me. Mother D.E.M. May 31, 1903 Dear Brother, ......Sorry Mary has been suffering with her teeth. Saw Francis Kirkham. He said he saw Pa on the Monday before and that he was well and was putting up a shop next to him. Will Pa's shop be very far from you? Your loving sister, Nora Sept. 6, 1903 There is quite a lot of scarlet fever-eleven cases. I hope Ma can bring Parley home with her when she comes.

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: Alex 1499 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Deseret Elizabeth Hooks Meldrum By T.W. Meldrum 1955 (Taken from the David Meldrum Sr. Family Histories book p. 31-22) Deseret Elizabeth Hooks was the 2nd child and daughter of James Hooks and Elizabeth Conrad, and was born October 15, 1854 at Brownstown, Wayne Co., Michigan. One hundred years ago 1854, Michigan was frontier country, but the people were pushing always westward, making farms, clearing timber and seeking a livelihood or riches in other ways, such as trading, buying and selling land, animals or whatever else they had to offer. The Conrad’s (Deseret Elizabeth’s mother and her folks) came from the State of New York and previous to that from Pennsylvania (a Dutch Colony). Her mother Elizabeth Conrad, having been born at Seneca, Ontario Co., New York, April 7, 1830, (being a day after the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized and not far 25-30 miles from Fayette, Seneca co., New York, where that great event took place, in fact, her older brother John Conrad was born there but unfortunately he died the dame day that he was born Oct. 26, 1830.) Deseret’s father, James Hooks was born in England, possibly in the County of Norfolk, and near Whissonnette, Sept. 5, 1830, where his mother Martha Mann Thing/Hooks was born. His father Thomas Hooks immigrated to America in the year 1836, but we are unable as yet to find out what port he arrived at or what ship he came to America in, nor any record of his marriage to Martha Mann Thing. The home where Deseret lived in Michigan was surrounded by heavy forest of maple, oak, hickory and other hard woods and soft woods. Wild animals were abundant, such as bears, wild cats, deer, etc. the wild cat at night would cry out something like unto a baby crying, and seemed to put fear into the children and others and would keep them indoors after dark Deseret’s mother Elizabeth received the Gospel from two Mormon Missionaries, Israel Evans and Nymphus Murdock of Salt Lake City, Utah and she was baptized in the Detroit River Oct. 21, 1869 by Israel Evans. Her husband being out west to California at the time, Elizabeth with her four children three girls and one boy came to Utah in the fall of 1870 by railroad (the Union Pacific Railroad having been completed to Salt Lake City the year previous 1869). Charles Conrad, her bother met them at Salt Lake City and brought them to Provo, in a wagon a 45 mile trip. Sometime later her husband came from California and built her a log cabin in the east part of Provo where she lived until her death. Deseret was baptized a member of the Church by her uncle, Charles Conrad in 1871 at the age of 16 years. Unhappily her father, James Hooks couldn’t see the light of the Gospel, and when one of the ward bishops didn’t pay him for work he got disheartened and went back to Michigan and never returned, the family saw him no more. Deseret (ET or Ettie as she was called) met and was courted by David Meldrum, and after a time they travelled to Salt Lake City and were married for time and eternity in the Endowment House at the City on Feb. 14, 1873. David was the 2nd son of George and Jane Barclay Meldrum. To this couple were born ten children, 7 boys and 3 girls (one baby girl however was stillborn) all growing to maturity except the stillborn girl and a boy Benjamin Howard who died at the age of two of membranous croup. All married and had family except one son Charles Alvin, the youngest who never married. Father and mother Meldrum built a large one roomed log cabin in the north east part of Provo where the three elder brothers, David, James Arthur and Bryan Barton were born, then father built a brick home on the corner of the same lot where the balance of the family were born. Father used the log cabin for a blacksmith shop for years. After living in Provo, Utah for 31 years and as there was an opening of new country in Canada (Southern Alberta) about this time, their son James Arthur received a call from the church to go and settle there, which he did travelling there by team, 750 mile. He helped to fund the town of Magrath, Alberta when he wrote back to Utah to his parents about that land being the land of opportunity and plenty of work available for a blacksmith there. The prairies were being broken up by ploughs and plough points had to be sharpened and machinery repaired, so he urged father to go to Canada. So in the spring of 1903 father moved to Alberta and started a blacksmith shop in the town of Raymond where the Knight Sugar Co., had built a sugar factory the year previous. He built a one roomed house (later two other rooms were added) on the same lot as the blacksmith shop. He lived there until his death Feb. 12, 1918. Mother came to Canada the following year in 1904. The rest of the family at home stayed at Provo to go to school or work until such time that father could bring us to Canada. My brother Parley had come to Canada with his brother James Arthur when he made a return trip to Provo to get material and also to get married. I had not arrived in Alberta until Aug. 1910 except for a month visit when I came here with me Grandmother Hooks in 1907. Mother was stricken with a paralytic stroke in 1916 and it left her without the power of speech and she continued this way until her death five years later. She died of another stroke Aug. 7, 1921, at the age of 91 ½ years. Mother was buried in the Raymond Cemetery beside her husband who had predeceased her my three and a half years. Mother lived a very honourable life and was a staunch member of the church.

David Meldrum Sr. Family Histories

Contributor: Alex 1499 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

In this Family Search site - under the "Search" tab, you can search "books". Then in the "books" you can search "David Meldrum Sr. Family Histories" and you can read a beautiful 81 page history of: George Meldrum and his wife, Jane Barclay Meldrum Elizabeth Conrad Hooks Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad David Meldrum Sr. and his wife, Deseret Elizabeth Hooks Meldrum David Meldrum Jr. James Arthur Meldrum (who I am a descendant of) Bryan Barton Meldrum Nora Elizabeth Meldrum Heggie Edith Deseret Meldrum Simonsen William Parley Meldrum Thomas Wilford Meldrum Charles Alvin Meldrum

Deseret Elizabeth Hooks

Contributor: Alex 1499 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

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Glimpses from Old Letters to Canada 1902

Contributor: Alex 1499 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

David Meldrum Jr., Magrath, Alberta, N.W.T. Canada Provo City, June 6, 1902 Dear son and daughter, We received your letter last Sunday which we were waiting for with much anxiety for we had heard of the terrible storm. Feel thankful that you are safe. We have not heard from the boys for a month unless we get one today, which I hope we will. I expect that you have all met before this or at least I hope so and that all is well. How do you like the looks of the country now, for it is not all storm? We would like a little down here now. Brother Johnson will start to load next Tuesday if all is well. Your pa got some lucern seed and grass like that across the road. Johnson is going to take some things for several parties and I think we will have to put your name on all the things that belong to you folks. I saw Mary's ma yesterday. She is going over to the farm to live. Her grandma won't give her any peace. She has rented her house to Mrs. Hickman. She will go as soon as your things are gone. Nora is cleaning upstairs today and next week we will pull up down here. I will be glad when it is done for it is getting very warm weather. Some are cutting hay but it is a very light crop. I do hope the storm did not do much damage to the boys. Well, how is Bessie and her baby? And Parley would be tickled to pieces to see you I know. Hoping this finds you as well as it leaves us. I remain as ever, Your loving mother, D.E.M. Kiss the babies for me and love to all the rest of you. Provo, June 10, 1902 My dear son, I will now send you a few lines to let you know that we have put your things on the car this morning. I can't tell you now whither they will start this afternoon or tomorrow. Bro. Knight is sending some things by Johnson also, and if Johnson can't scrape enough money to pay for the car, your pa will have to see that your portion is paid before they can get off. I am so tired helping to get the things off, for I went over to Mary's Ma and russelled around to get the cupboard empty and packed ready by nine o'clock, and I think we have all of your things as far as I know. I will try to enumerate the articles and pa branded them with that little horn brand, then put D.M. on all the things, sacks and all. It may get rubbed off some of them. You will have to take two wagons or a hayrack for Uncle George had them stacked sky high. Mary's Ma is going to move to the farm tomorrow. Ma -James sleigh and tongue -Planet Jr. in a box and handles -4 sacks of seed potatoes -1 sack lucern seed -1 sack O. grass seed - a sack with those wheels for Parley -Keg of vinegar -a small box with things for Bessie and Bryan These are the things which we sent from our house. I do not know if he sent the horn brand, but Nora thought he did. From Mary's Mother- 3 pieces of stove pipe 1 elbow Keg of pickles Cupboard Table and 4 chairs and one rocker Bedstead and small trunk and three small boxes Bed springs and stove 1 large box I think I have them all as near as I can remember. My, if we do not hear from the boys today I shall think that something serious has happened. Pa helped load your things in. They weighed a little over 25 hundred pounds. Love to all, Must send this right away Mother Provo City, June 17, 1902 Dear Dave and Mary, I thought perhaps I ought to explain about a few things. We put your tent in the big box. Mary's Ma made her a rug and put in also a cushion for chair and I put in some lace for her pillow slips--I think there is enough of it. I made a quilt and put in the big box for Bryan. Mary's mother wrapped her knives and forks in a roll of carpet in the safe. The safe key is in one of the drawers. We put the table legs in the safe. There was a sack of potatoes that burst when they were loading your things so Mary's Ma gave us a seamless sack that had her brand on - a big C. One sack was early six week potatoes. We sent the side board for the top bed of a wagon. The end gate was rotten. There is a small box I fixed some things in for Bessie and Bryan. The things for Bryan are pinned up together and the cushion can go to whoever needs it the most. If Bessie wants it she can have it. If not give it to Bryan. I put it in to fill up the box. I sent some ginger for Jim and a shirt for Parley. Your father paid Johnson $13. That is what he said it came to for your share, unless there will be some for loading and unloading. That is not as much as I was thinking it would be. Mary's Ma got her letter. We are cleaning the bedrooms today. Love and best wishes to you all, Your Mother Letter From Nora Provo City, July 15, 1902 Dear Brother and Sister, I will now write a word or two to let you know that we are all well but nearly baked or fried. I hardly know which it is--almost unbearable but there is a little breeze coming up now and perhaps it will cool the air a little. How is Canada by this time? I guess there is no danger of you people choking to death as long as it storms so much and you have such floods. What kind of a time did you have on Dominion Day? We had a glorious time on the fourth. It rained all day and froze like sixty at night. They expect to have quite a time here on the 24th but if it is as hot as it is today, I will stay at home. I haven't seen your Ma, Mary, since she went over to the lake bottom.................The berries are coming on now and we are quite busy................I can't think of any more to say it is so warm so goodbye for this time. God bless you all and write soon Your ever loving sister, Nora XXXXXXX How is that dear sweet little Velma? Kiss her a dozen times for me. How I would like to see her. Is her hair still red? It is pretty anyway. How are her teeth coming? I know they must hurt her. XXXXXXX Dear Children, As Nora was writing to you I will write a few lines also. We received your letter the day after the fourth and one from Jim also. Was glad to hear that you got your things all right. I guess you have had plenty of rain? How has it served you in your tent? How do you like it by now? Who do you have for neighbors? How is Millie Wilde Peterson? Do you ever see her? How is the baby? I suppose she does not feel very well when she is after her teeth.......Have you a job of any kind? John Saxey is getting the roof on his new house. You might run your jib for a job of that sort. Well, I will stop with love to all. I am as ever, Your Mother Provo City, August 17, 1902 Dear Son and Family, Received your letter alright. Glad you are all well. We are first rate except myself. I am feeling under the weather, but I have to dig around anyway. How do you like it up there by now? I guess it did not look very inviting, but when you make it more homelike you will feel better, if you only have good health as the main thing. How is sweet little Velma? How we would like to see you all.... How are you getting along with your house? What kind of one are you putting up? More than one room? Hope you will have it fixed up good before cold weather on account of the baby. Now I hope you and Mary go to meeting a little more than you did down here. Now next time you write tell us all the particulars and how you are fixed comfortable and do not wait so long before you write for it nearly worries me to pieces. I know that you are tired when you stop at night, but take time for that and Mary can write if she don't like the writing business. I am glad that you have some good neighbors. Go out and be sociable with them for if you stay at home too much, you will not care to go. I have done that too much myself. How far do you live from the centre of town? We are putting up and drying apricots. How is your fruit hanging out? I will close now. Your ever loving Mother Kisses to all Provo City, Sept. 14, 1902 Dear Dave and Mary, We received your most welcome letter a week last Friday.....I do not feel very good for I have so much to do that I am tired right out at night so I can hardly wiggle, but I guess the fruit will soon be gone. I sent Edith over and got a dozen of your glass jars, and I am filling them so when Wilde’s or Petersons go up we can send them for you. Now tell me which kind you would rather have or shall I mix them. You won’t want all the same kind I guess. I did not know you had bottles over there or I would of got them before. It was quite cold nights a while ago with frost up in the valley-wheat on the Weber frozen-potatoes frozen black 3 or 4 weeks ago in the valley. Uncles in the canyon-wheat not high enough to cut-has not rained since 4th of July-that was not much. Pa says for you to keep a stiff upper lip and stick with it a while and perhaps things will turn out all right yet. You have not had the grasshoppers that folks in Sanpete have. They have been having a picnic catching them.... Well, I am glad that you have a small place to be in if it is a lean-to. If it is warm and comfortable you can hang a curtain at one end for a bedroom for a while if you have no other partition. That is as large as I had if not larger till I had three children. Dave might make you a dugout cellar for a few things... Am glad you have some good neighbors. Has any of them a sewing machine so you could do a little sewing when you need it? You must have lots of cheek. That is the way to get through this world... Tomorrow is Velma’s birthday. My how time flies. Just kiss her a big kiss for me, for we would all like to see her..... Now Dave, what do you want us to send you when we send up the fruit and grass seed in the shape of plants or cuttings? Say it will soon be tater digging. Wish you was here to pick up some. Hoping this will find you all well, I remain as ever, Your Mother, D.E.M. Oct. 5, 1902 Pa saw Uncle Jesse Knight and he told him about the steam thresher business. My you must be getting up in the world to sport bunks and doctors..... I am about done with the fruit and am very glad, for I can’t get to do a stitch of sewing, and the children need some done. I have stayed home so much that I am tired plum out. Have you seen any of the boys lately? I suppose they are all busy but I think that Bessie might write or have Parley do so. If all goes well I think I shall come and see how you all are next year some time, when you get to raising sugar beets. I think I could of got a return ticket now but I do not want to go for winter...... We was thinking of sending a few bushels of potatoes. Pa said they were 21 cents a bu. last week and Saturday Reece said that Decker was offering 18 cents a bu. Hardly worth digging.... I got some catnip seed and if half of it grows you will have enough to seed down Canada in a year. Grandpa Meldrum says his sugar stock shares pays him better than anything else and he is buying more. I think if you can get some for work I would invest some any way. Oct. 20,1902 I got a very nice letter from Josie last Monday. Have not heard from Jim for two months. I think you would be wise to take the land you speak of that is not very far-just a nice ride and Pa thinks so too. Johnson is going up on Tuesday. We have sent four barrels-three of potatoes (they are 15 cents a bushel) and one of the shrubs. Also your glass jars in a box and a box with some notions for the children. I think Pa put your initials on and they should go as household goods. There is one barrel of early potatoes expressly for seed-some in a sack is “early six weeks.” I want you to plant those walnuts this fall. The shrubs and plants you can divide with the boys. Pa said you could plant the strawberry plants yourself. We will send more in a little while. There are raspberries and currants-3 kinds. You can tell the bed bug currants by the smell. I believe there is some gooseberries, two kinds of pie plant that at the bottom of barrel is the latest of the two and is called Peach. The other is the large early. Pa sent some flowers for the girls-rose bushes and I do not know what all. There is a crimson rambler, a climber for Mary. Pa says to take good care of it for it is a hardy rose. Put it by your window. I was not home or I would have labelled them and he did not have time. Pa has just paid Johnson for the freight on those barrels so your draft came alright. If you get them and they grow, it will be worth a great deal to you. We will send some poplar cuttings later.......Have you got your carpet down? I would have some of it anyway to keep the cold out. D.E.M. Nov. 13, 1902 I wanted to let you know about the things. Your Ma fetched your stuff over last Thursday. There is a big box like the one you packed your things in and two small boxes. One has three cans of honey for you, Bryan and James. The other box is what your mother sent with fruit. Open the big box first. The dried fruit is in it, also grass seed. The grape cuttings that Pa sent and Mary’s Ma sent a few roots. They are wrapped up in a piece of carpet to keep them moist. Pa says to bury them in the ground till spring then plant out. The same with your poplar and Balm of Gilead. Poplar are whitest cuttings. I put in a coat of Alvin’s I thought Velma could run about in. There is an old coat and vest of Elmer’s that Parley could wear to do chores. There is a new suit for him also. I sent your gun twister or what you call it. Also Byran’s gun he wanted sent. There is a pasteboard box for Mary’s and Bessie’s babies. A few walnuts in the honey box for Parley. I would have liked to send a few little notions for Christmas but could not. We are quarantined for Edith is just over the small pox and we are all exposed......Edith went over to the Academy to a hand shake and the next morning after there were several students came down with it. She being small and delicate got it 20 days later. She was not so very sick. Say Mary, you get something thicker than them calico wrappers for winter. I imagine you as you were last winter. You looked so cold in them. Don’t get sick for it is colder there than here. D.E.M. Dec. 7, 1902 We are over the small pox but the flag isn’t down. They say small pox is all over town. An awful lot of it. I’m glad ours is over with. Nora Dec. 7, 1902 Well I wish I was in Canada because half of the family is there and rest might just as well be there too. Edith Provo City, Dec. 21, 1902 Dear Son and Daughter, .............Sister Duke told Nora they had a letter from Emily and she said they were still threshing and it was so very cold. The will have to have more big threshers. I do not think I would like to thresh when it is so cold but I guess they have to get it done. Well, how are you anyway? Can you keep warm? But if you have good health that is the best of all. If Dave had said he wanted a barrel for water before we sent the things we would have sent one for we had plenty of them oak barrels. I think you would get tired of carrying water so far. I do feel so sorry that you have not got a cow. I wish you had one as good as our little Agnes...... Pa saw Bishop Knight of Raymond today. Pa was asking about you. Oh, yes, Esther Brimhall was to the shop telling him of you and that part of the country. How is Velma? It don’t seem as if she was big enough to walk. We think of her as we saw her last, and Alvin says, “Sweetheart her. I could squeeze her gizzard out.” I bet she is quite a chatterbox and gets into mischief. I bet you have to keep the water bucket off the floor. Well, Dave, are you working or has it froze so much you can’t. Pa has not had any work to speak of for two months before we had the small pox and of course there is not much now. I know he would like to go up there in the early spring if he can scrape up enough to go and come back. He thinks it will take about a hundred dollars but I think it won’t take that much hardly. What or where are you going for Christmas? Write and tell us all about how you spend your holiday. Say don’t your blankets and big heavy quilt come handy to keep you warm? Wishing you a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Would like to have you here for the holidays so we could have a good romp with Velma. Hoping this will find you all enjoying good health. I remain, Your loving Mother D.E. Meldrum

Letter to Canada from Utah 1903

Contributor: Alex 1499 Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Provo City, Utah, Jan. 11, 1903 Dear Brother and Sister, Yours of 29th was received. Glad to learn that you were all well as this leaves us. It was Conference yesterday and today. I stayed home to get dinner. President Joseph F. Smith and Apostle Clawson was down. I am glad you are going to have a well. I hope you will succeed in getting water. That is a long way down to dig. You will need a pump to get it up with. Nora Jan. 25, 1903 Bryan said he was ovr to see you on New Year's and that Josie had been very sick ever since, for the trip was more than she could stand. I guess it shook her up too much. She is on the improve now. I expect before you get this you will see by the paper that your Grandma Meldrum has passed away. She died Monday (Jan. 19, 1903) at half past three. She ate her breakfast and dinner the same day but was feeling weaker than usual, but they hardly thought she would go so quick. It is a blessing for her; she is out of her misery and she did not know Grandpa only occasionally. Aunt Adelaide has the small pox. I have been selling butter and milk again since the first of the month. I was doing pretty well before the small pox struck; then did not have sales for two months. I can tell you we missed the dollars. I put some down to use for shortening and cooking. Now I sell 6 pounds a week and ten or twelve quarts of milk--get a quarter for butter--was 30 cents before Christmas. You said you were digging a well. You be sure and keep the hole covered so that a child or any other will not fall down it. Edith and Wilford both got promoted. Edith is in seventh grade and Wilford in first reader. Your loving Mother, D.E.M. Feb. 13 I am knitting Velma a pair of mittens, but I guess she will not need them by the time you get them. They will do for another winter. I made Jim's baby some for her birthday. Oh, do you ever go to meeting up there? I think you should and set an example for your children. Mother D.E.M. Feb. 20 1903 Was pleased to learn that you had struck water at 44 feet, but you must remember that well water is not soft like our river water. Our well water was quite hard. If you had a good oak barrel to draw it in for wash day it would be quite a help. Mother Feb.20 Oh, how Mother would like to go up and visit you all. I hope the way will be opened that we can send her in the spring or summer. It would do her so much good to have an out. Nora Provo City, Mar. 21, 1903 ............How did you enjoy your surprise? How is Pa? Did he get there alright? You can tell him that he don't need to hurry home for the weather is not very pleasant. Last Tuesday and Wednesday it snowed quite hard--six to eight inches. The sun is out pretty today but the air is quite cool. I hope he will enjoy himself and have a good time.... I saw Mrs. Knight the other day and had a little talk with her. She told me what a sweet baby you had. She expects to leave here in about two weeks.... Alvin don't know what to do without Pa. He wanders around like a lost duck. Nora Provo City, April 7, 1903 It is Grandma Hook's birthday today (73 years) Pa is thinking of going back to Canada the last of this month. I hope he can for he don't have much to do here. Nora Provo City, April 6, 1903 Dear Children, They are all well but myself.....It must be sort of lagrippe... Your father got home all right a week ago this morning. I guess he enjoyed his trip all right. Pa says that Parley is as broad as he is long. Well, I guess he enjoyed stopping with you for a while, but they must be careful about trying to cross those streams. I suppose he came horseback..... Very likely you will see your Pa again in two or three weeks for he is fixing to go up again. Mother D.E.M. April 13, 1903 Dear Children, We got your letter of the sixth last Thursday and were quite surprised about the new baby. I thought that was to be a month or so later on, but am glad all are feeling so well. That is the time to be careful and not overdo. My golly, it is a good thing you know how to play girl. Take good care of Mary. (Ened was born April 5, 1903) Mary's Ma was over Wednesday and stayed all night but went away next morning just before we got your letter..... Don't let Mary draw water those well buckets until she gets quite strong. Your loving Mother, D.E.M. Provo City, April 22, 1903 My Dear Children, We received your letter last Thursday and was glad to hear that you were progressing nicely and hope you feel quite strong, but be cautious and careful how you do, even if everything is not done so slick as it ought to be. How is Velma? Does she like the baby? I hope they are good-natured for it wears one out to care for them..... Say, are Jim's folks looking for an increase in the family too? I hear so but they have never mentioned it. (Lawren was born May 31, 1903) Lizzie Bean says if Mary is going to have twelve children that she will have to pitch in, but I think you have started pretty good already. I am quite tired as we have washed and then gone to town, but Pa said I could write and tell you that he would start back the last of this month or the first of May. He will go up with a car load of salt and potatoes for Knight and Allen, so it will no cost him very much. He has been pulling down his forge, and will have the shop moved up here in a few days. He has let John Furguson have the garden and lots to look after. He thinks he can have work up there and he has not had very much here at his trade. I want to came and see you all myself, but he thinks if he goes I can't but we will see if I can get the means. Nora says to go and she will look after things here. My love to all, Your Mama D.E.M. Provo, May 1, 1903 Dear Children, .......I would not have written tonight for I am so tired but your pa wanted me to tell you that he is going to load and get off tomorrow if all is well. He was intending to go Thursday, but had to wait for a party over to Lehi to fetch their things over as they are sending about 2500 lb. along on their house fixings. Your pa is taking his potatoes along. Allen advised him to. He thought he could sell them alright and perhaps people would be glad of them for seed. I will send Mary some butter and I want her to get her fill for once......Well, how is baby? Is she cross or is she good like her pa? What are you going to call her anyway? I am very glad your cuttings and plants are so nice. Hope you have good luck with them. Will send a few strawberry plants along. You will have to take care of Pa a bit if he stays in Raymond...... We will start to clean house when we get your pa off. My I would like to go. Anyway some time this summer, then I could see all of you. Mother D.E.M. Provo, May 18, 1903 ................I am glad that pa got there all right and hope everything will be fine with him and all of you. Am also glad if Dave has a good job for all summer and can stay with it. This is the last week of the District school and I don't know what I will do the the boys--the little rascals keep wrangling so much I will have to tie them up if I keep them at home.... No, you must write and tell me how pa is getting along for I don't think he will write much if he can get out of it.....I would like to be with you very much. Perhaps you have plenty of room out of doors. Alvin don't like it a bit because pa went off. Kiss the babies for me. Mother D.E.M. May 31, 1903 Dear Brother, ......Sorry Mary has been suffering with her teeth. Saw Francis Kirkham. He said he saw Pa on the Monday before and that he was well and was putting up a shop next to him. Will Pa's shop be very far from you? Your loving sister, Nora Sept. 6, 1903 There is quite a lot of scarlet fever-eleven cases. I hope Ma can bring Parley home with her when she comes.

Life timeline of Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum

1854
Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum was born on 15 Oct 1854
Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum was 6 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum was 25 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum was 34 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum was 40 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum was 51 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum was 60 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum died on 7 Aug 1921 at the age of 66
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Deseret Elizabeth Meldrum (15 Oct 1854 - 7 Aug 1921), BillionGraves Record 15614623 Raymond, County of Warner, Alberta, Canada

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