Daisie L Johnson (Campbell)

21 Oct 1904 - 25 Nov 1989

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Daisie L Johnson (Campbell)

21 Oct 1904 - 25 Nov 1989
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SKETCHES FROM THE LIFE OF IRVING AMMON JOHNSON WRITTEN BY HIS WIFE DAISIE CAMPBELL JOHNSON It had been a long night of anxious waiting in the Nephi and Zina Goulding Johnson home. Only minutes before the rosy light of morning softly beamed a light above the hill and grandma Goulding laid a red curly

Life Information

Daisie L Johnson (Campbell)

Born:
Married: 5 Sep 1923
Died:

Georgetown Cemetery

about 3 miles south of Cannonville on Kodacrome Way (a few hundred yards to the west)
Cannonville, Garfield, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father; Mother; Their children, He Saved Soles, In His Will Is Our Peace, Married Sep 14, 1935; sealed Sept 27, 1952, Wife of Seth Johnson Peace Perfect Peace A Loving Wife, A Mother Dear, A friend to all, Lies Buried Here, Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta G Johnson, married June 29, 1956; children Clara S, A. True, Marilyn K., Richard W., Joyce F, A Devoted Husband and a Loving Father a True Latter Day Saint, Beloved Father

Headstone Description

Father - Joseph Edward
Mother - Susan J
Children: Joseph E, Alfred D, Karma J, US ARMY WORLD WAR II, says and Baby, Children: Saundra, Ronald Lee, Sheila, Nila, Sue Ellen, Children: Billy, Sherman, Gwen, Deane, David, Dimion, Karen, Rebecca, Mother
Father, Sealed Sept 27, 1952
Children: Larry W - Ladona - Myrna L - Alma D - Ramona J - Joseph D, Son of Adelbert & Mary J Heaps, Children of Nephi & Zina Johnson, Children of Irving A & Daisie C Johnson, Utah
Cpl 12 Infantry
World War II BSM-PH, Married Irving A Johnson Sept 5, 1923, A loving wife & mother...
A friend to all..., Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta C. Johnson, Wife: Shana
Daughter: Kori Lee, Sealed June 28, 1939, US ARMY
WORLD WAR II, DEAN: US ARMY WORLD WAR II, UTAH CPL 1050 BASE UNIT AAF
WORLD WAR II, PFC US ARMY
WORLD WAR I, Children: Clara S - A True - Marilyn K - Richard W - Joyce F, Wife of Cyrus Mangum, Daugh of Marion..., Son of R. W. & Clara E Pinney, Magleby Mortuary, Husband of Sarah A Dutton, Daughter of Richard C & Susanah D. Pinney
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Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: Mary Hennig Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

SKETCHES FROM THE LIFE OF IRVING AMMON JOHNSON WRITTEN BY HIS WIFE DAISIE CAMPBELL JOHNSON It had been a long night of anxious waiting in the Nephi and Zina Goulding Johnson home. Only minutes before the rosy light of morning softly beamed a light above the hill and grandma Goulding laid a red curly haired, red faced 9 lb. baby boy in father Nephi’s waiting arms. After 2 previous, unsuccessful unhappy premature births how happy Nephi and Zina were, that god permitted them to keep this one. They were so thankful that their prayers had at last been answered. This was the beginning of a busy eventful and healthy life for Irving Ammon Johnson. Born 25th. of August 1897 in Henrieville, Garfield County, Utah. Some of the memories of his early life related by his lovely parents were when Irving was just a toddler, grandma took his shoes off to keep him from running away to aunt Clara Pinney’s house. One day she went to look for him and found him half way across the lot crawling on his hands and knees, so another method must be sought. She finally tied him to the bedpost. Aunt Clara and uncle Rob Pinney’s only child was called back to heaven at birth, therefore they had no family of their own, but were both favorite of the neighborhood children. Often Uncle Rob took Irving to the sawmill. When he was eight years old, a chain came loose and the logs began rolling down the hill. Irving happened to be in its path, and was seriously injured and was ill about two years. This was in the summer of 1905 there was no doctors within 15 miles and only team and wagon and buggy for transportation. These people were very faithful and obedient to Gods command. So with Gods help and through the power of the priesthood and tender loving care, he was nursed back to life and health. For two years he didn’t go to school. But with his loved ones all around to teach and help him, his education suffered very little. Irving was baptized a member of the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints when 9 years old 6th of June 1906, by M. Frank Sargent, in an irrigation pond in Henrieville, Utah and was confirmed a member by W. P. Willis. It was ankle deep in mud with pollywogs darting every which way in the pond. In 1903, Irving’s father took up a homestead, and built a farm on sheep flat about 10 miles west of Cannonville. They lived there in summer then back to town in winter, and he had been in school in Henrieville before the accident. Later they moved to Cannonville in autumn in 1907. Irving was well enough to go back to school and was 10 years old. It was in the summer that he was ten years old that he got his first job. Elder Prince was one of his teachers. When the kids didn’t know their lessons, he would sit them in the corner with a dunce hat on their head. Other teachers were Mr. Cokerhance, Frank Savage, Tom Johnson, Irving’s uncle, Jack Fletcher and George Anderson and at the age of 12 or 13 years and no doubt Irving was the ringleader of the gang, Uncle Tom was out of sorts at the kids for disobeying his orders. He chased Irving upon the red rock and tried to catch him and punish him. But as usual he avoided Uncle Tom and the punishment. The summer that Irving was 12 years old, he went to Pireah with a mining company as water boy. They took boilers and steam engines by ox and team to the Colorado River to run steamboats with, to transport gold from the mines to the market. Irving’s job was to bring water to the workers. On the way down to the river they used bull hide bogies or bags running across the horses back, he filled the bags with fresh water from the streams as they made progress over rough country, valleys, hills and sometimes mountains from Georgetown hills to the Colorado River. They had many mishaps, once the boiler engine worked loose from the wagon and rolled down to the bottom of the hill and had to be brought back up again and began all over. Irving worked each day trying to keep the workers supplied with water. By the time they reached the river it was time for him to return home and back to school. When thirteen years old Irving went down to the lower country with Uncle Rob Penny and Quince Kimball where they had staked a gold claim. Irving & Kimball hauled wood from the last chance, a place quite some distance away to the claim point for the boiler to pump water for washing the gold. One night closure neglected to put up the bars on the rail fence and the horses got out in the night and came home. Uncle Rob sent Irving to find them and bring them back. He left the camp and Mexican Bar at daylight, fifty miles away and arrived home within 24 hours later. On the way he came across some Navajo Indians, bringing some blankets into to town to trade for horses and food. They had a few horses, but would not let him ride one. They told him he could hang from the tail of one, but no ride. When the Navajos camped for the night, Irving kept on coming toward home alone. The night had become quite cool, and he had to walk fast to keep warm. He walked up the Wahweep Creek to Johns Valley and on home to Cannonville. Borrowed a horse from his father and went to Henrieville where he found the run a way horses and then back to Uncle Rob’s. Another summer at age 15, Irving went to house rock valley, in the spring of 1912 with the Bar Z Cattle Company, to work for a man named Ephriam Mansfield. Elmer took him down to the valley, when the boss saw him he said “ I want a man not a kid” and Elmer answered, “anything I can do, he can do” around the cow camp. The boss said he would try him. Irving worked and wrangled horses for about five months until school time again. From the time he became a young cowboy he rode with the cattle in helping his father taking the cattle down to the lower country in winter and back home to the fields in summer. He was out of school by now, and one winter George Henderson, Marion Mangum and Irving took the tribe to Pireah sheep camp. The road they were to take followed the creek about twenty-five miles. In wintertime they found the creek frozen over for fear of breaking through the ice they had to take another route. Down over the Brush Head Mountain avoiding the slick rock into the cottonwood wash. They had three wagons loaded with supplies for the sheep camp, including one load of oats for the horses. In order to get down over the mountain they had to brake the wagon wheels with chains sliding down one at time. He went down sandy slopes and down to the bottom into the sandy wash. They ate beans for supper and they all became very ill. Another winter Irving and Johnny Davis were taking supplies to a sheep camp down deep creek wash, Irving took his load down first, breaking through the ice occasionally. When Johnny went down with his load they also broke through, but Irving had just ordinary shoes on his horses. The horses became frightened and began to flounder around cutting their legs with their sharp shoes and also the ice. The injured horses were not able to pull the wagons back home, and Johnny left his wagon to bring home later and let his horses be pulled home after Irving's wagon. When Irving was about sixteen, with team and wagon he hauled freight from Maryville, also lumber and shingles from different sawmills to help with the building of the new chapel in the town called Cannonville. It was on April 6Th, 1917 World War I was declared. When Kaiser Bill planned to conquer the world by sinking all the US ships, which brought us into war with Germany. The draft age was 21. Irving fibbed about his aged and enlisted. Roy Henderson, Ted Graff, Ira Elmer and Irving volunteered and went into the service of their country. For some reason the others were discharged later. Irving was large for his age and strong and healthy was over six feet tall. He was still in the service when the Armistice was signed on November 11, 1918, but was not discharged until February 1919. A welcome home banquet was given in Widtsoe. The MIA girls served and I was one of them but I didn’t see him. He was just one of the service men being honored. After Irving returned from the army he used his time caring for his cattle, helping his father and doing odd jobs until January. He then was called on a mission for the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was ordained an elder on January 17, by James M. Sargent and left for the Eastern States mission January 21st 1920. In 1919 when Marion Henry moved to Boulder, a deal was made for Irving to round up his stray cattle and sell them and send the money to Marion. Marion, George Graff & others bought cattle for $100.00 a head all for a town calf. They bought Willis Creek Cattle Ranch from Uncle Sixtus Johnson. Irving and father didn’t buy any cattle at that time. In the spring of 1921, he was back east on his mission when the depression hit the country. And because of this great depression, the missionaries were released. But while there he had mumps and was hospitalized about 7 weeks. It strained his savings and with the depression on not much help from the folks at home or the church there fore he returned home May 2nd 1921, by slow train and landed in Widtsoe May 7th. When Uncle Rob was called to be the bishop of the Widtsoe Ward he and Aunt Clara left their home in Henriville. He had a hotel built across the street from the all occasion town hall, which served as chapel, schoolhouse, Primary and Relief society and for all recreation. On his return, Irving stopped to visit Aunt Clara and Uncle Rob in route to his home in Cannonville and stayed over the weekend. On Sunday morning he came to Sunday School with some of his friends and there we met the 9th of May. I was teaching the small children’s class. We had no classrooms only removable petitions across the middle of the hall. Therefore two or more class’ was held in the same room. With my back to the young adult class giving lessons to my children I heard a strange voice I had never heard before discussing the lesson. I looked around, and it was then I lost my heart. I finished my lesson and turned the children out the back door, then went to sit beside my boyfriend Van Barney as I usually did. When Sunday School was over my best friend Laura Goulding introduced us. Laura was Irving’s cousin who worked at the hotel. She later became my sister-in-law. Aunt Clara, Laura’s father, Eliza Goulding, and Irving’s mother Zina were brothers and sisters. I suppose it was just habit that young folks would congregate at the post office, which was across from the hotel before going home for lunch and back to church at 2:00 p.m. Laura and Irving had already gone back to the hotel before the gang broke up, Laura called from the back door and said, “you kids come over here Elder Johnson has a bear story to tell you.” The boys chose not to go but we girls ran across the street to hear the story. To this day, I don’t remember the story. It was just a way of getting us over there. We visited awhile and each girl left for home except me. Irving held my hand and would not let me go. But I didn’t mind at all. Aunt Clara invited me to stay for lunch; I did and went to church with them forgetting everyone else. Irving talked in church, and after church I got permission from my parents to go back to the hotel with him. He told us of many experiences while on his mission back in New York. He showed us snapshots. Some were taken in Maine and other states. Where the snow was so deep it came up to the rooftops in some places. With a dear friend accompanying us on the organ we spent a wonderful evening singing hymns also popular songs. Irving had a beautiful voice. We entertained the hotel guest and friends including by brother Orlan, who was Laura’s boyfriend and later married him. When the party broke up at 10:00 p.m., Irving walked me home, which seemed like such a short one block, it was the beginning of a beautiful courtship. Irving stayed a few days and then continued on his journey home to see his parents and family in Cannonville. Now I must go back a few years and bring myself into the story. It didn’t just happen that way. God has a reason for all things. This was in bringing us together. Now this is how I came to be in Widtsoe at this time. My parents, John Richard and Avery Jeanette Deuel Campbell owned a ranch in sweet water canyon four miles east in Johns Valley, where we lived in summer then back to Escalante in winter for school for most of we children were born. But we always went to Widtsoe to church and other activities during the summer. Then in the autumn of 1919 my father bought a home in Widtsoe and we children went to school there. 1919 & 1920, my first year in the 8th grade, my boyfriend Van Barney’s brother in law was my teacher. His name was Russell Page. I think I was the teacher’s pet. I did not learn much. I know I didn’t earn my credit but I graduated, and the next year I took the 8th grade again. I learned Mr. Anderson was my teacher, and I graduated again. This time I knew I had earned it. I felt I had gone to my freshman year of high school. In 1920-1921 mother’s health was not so good. In 1920-1922, I stayed at home and cared for her that winter. In the autumn of 1922 I went to Escalante to my sophomore year. By then my mothers health had improved greatly. Mr. Anderson was a very good teacher; he tried to teach us evolution. One boy in our class Raymond Stoddard, said “Mr. Anderson maybe your ancestors are hanging around in the trees by their tails, but mine are not. “ During those awful depression years of 1921 and 1922 Irving and his father went out of the cattle business. Such jobs as herding sheep were available. The winter of 1922-1923 he went to the sheep herd for his cousin Jeff Johnson who lived in Escalante. He came home in the spring and went to work at the sawmill for Uncle Rob. And school being out, I returned to Widtsoe and to work at the hotel for Aunt Clara. I worked there all summer, then on the 5th of September 1923, in the Salt Lake LDS temple for time and all eternity. Accompanied by my parents. Father took us to Salt Lake City in his Model T Ford. There were no highways or freeways as of today, just a winding dirt road. The neighbors little nephew had spent the summer with us in Widtsoe, so we went by way of Manti on the way home, stayed over night, then on to Salt Lake the next day. After a day or two of sight seeing and shopping we returned home. One place we visited while there that was very special to me was the State Capitol. We took the trolley up and decided to walk back in order to visit other places on the way. I was wearing new shoes and before we reached our hotel I was carrying them in my hands. My feet hurt. After we left the temple, we met some friends of Irving's and when he said this is my wife, his friends said, “how do you do Mrs. Johnson?” I looked around to see where Mrs. Johnson was. I had always been introduced as Miss Campbell. On our arrival back in Widtsoe, there was of course a reception and dance. We received many useful gifts, among them a large silver spoon, which I still have in my possession. I made my own wedding dress. And have the lace with the collar from the wedding dress, which is now yellowed with age but so precious to me. After this and a few days with loved ones and friends, we went on horseback by way of ruby’s inn and Bryce Canyon, across the hills to sheep flat ranch where Irving’s folks lived in summer until crops were harvested then we moved to town for school. We went to Cannonville with them and lived there our first winter. We both worked in the MIA as counselors. In the spring of 1924 we went back to Widtsoe, where Irving again went to work at the sawmill. In the fall of 1923 after Irving and I were married my parents moved to St George and put the children in school there. Nola, Milo, Cloyd, Mavin and Katy, then back home in the spring. Mother and father worked in the temple they no doubt, came back to Johns Valley to escape the heat. It was wonderful being back home with my family and friends, first of May, and I was five months pregnant. The 12th of July was the date set for our blessed event. I suppose 24 hours made little or no difference. At six a. m. 11th of July 1924, our darling son was born, after a long night with only the light from our coal oil lamp. We gratefully welcomed the dawn and our 9-lb. healthy baby boy was ushered into our humble home. With the help of sister Addie Chapman the midwife who came in and helped and cared for all the new mothers in the valley, my mother, Irving and all was well. Most people believed that the stork brings all the babies. There was such a calm feeling of peace with his arrival, I’m certain he was delivered by the angels in heaven. As the days wore on, the sun shone brightly, and there was peace in our valley, Johns valley. When Irving’s parents came from Cannonville to get acquainted with their first grandchild, Mother Johnson said she had dreamed his name should be Dorr. We were pleased with the name and he was blessed and given the name of Irving Dorr Johnson. After a few days the grandparents returned to the ranch and took Dorr and I with them for a visit. The baby was then about one month old. Later Irving came and brought us home. When Dorr was six months old he had a serious illness. There was no doctor in the valley but our Heavenly Father was our physician. And his grandmother being a nurse, we decided to bring him to Cannonville. The snow was quite deep. Irving put a washtub half filled with sand on the front end of the bobsled, built a fire in the tub and a stack of wood to keep the fire going. Stretched a tent over the back and with plenty of blankets to keep Irving, Dorr & I warm. The snow was quite deep across the mountain, Irving set out on the front to drive and keep the fire going. We left Widtsoe about 10:00 a m, arrived in Cannonville late afternoon, January1925. Grandma said the baby had slight pneumonia but she soon had it checked and Dorr became well again. We stayed there until spring and went back home. By the time Dorr was eleven months old he was walking alone. He was a fat healthy child. My brother Mavin said he looked like a guilty chip monk that had been in some farmer’s wheat bin. His cheeks were so fat. In autumn we moved to Cannonville. We lived across the street from Irving’s parents. There was where our dear sweet Ven came to us weighing7-½ lbs., on the 10th of November 1925, so sweet and lovable, with big brown eyes and dark hair. I think we may have been expecting a girl, but he was so adorable we gladly welcomed him. As he grew he was a little less heavy than Dorr. Healthy and walked alone at 10 months. Before he was three he could dress himself, and was always up early following his daddy around before he would leave for work. Later we bought a house and lot from Loren Twitchell. The house was awfully small, only three rooms, but it was ours, block 4 on the southeast end of town. On April 23, 1927 our dear little Dean was born. Weighed 6 ½ lbs., and six weeks premature. Again I think we expected a girl, but when I was told he had red hair, which I called pink, I said ok, we’ll keep him, don’t send him back. He later had infection in his ears, but with tender loving care he grew and was a healthy child. He walked at one year. Two years later on 14th of march, 1929 our first daughter came to us, weighed 9lbs, and was so loveable and healthy even today my neighbor Betty Nelson said she was the most beautiful baby she had ever seen. Betty had four of her own. As baby Ardis grew she was chubby and a little awkward on her feet. She didn’t learn to walk alone until about 14 months. Dean was just two when Ardis was born and he learned to sing, "You are as Welcome as the Flowers in May" to her. The boys were all so thrilled to have a little sister. Eighteen months later on the 10th of September 1930, another little daughter came to us. Weighing in at 7-½ lbs. such a darling and bringing her love. I was alone; Irving was at the ranch working. Being alone expecting a child I knew the signal, I walked to Grandma Johnson’s for help, and walked back. As soon as she heard she sent someone to Tropic for the midwife and sent to the ranch for Irving, she came to help me. But before sister Riding arrived, grandma had delivered the baby, just as she did most of our babies and many other in our community. Rather different from Ardis, Jan Dolores was active and walked alone at eleven months. As she grew, I called her my little Sandbox Sally. Jan loved to play in the sandbox. Ardis was my little Sawdust Man. On the 29th of January 1932, on a cold winter night about 1-½ years later, our sweet laughing eyed Dixie smiled into our lives. Weighed 8-½ lbs. so cuddly she must have been happy because she smiled so much. She was walking quite well at one year. Our neighbor said "you might see a smile without Dixie, but you’ll never see Dixie without a smile." Two years later in the winter of 1934,our children all had whooping cough and measles at the same time. This was before the baby clinic began. And our new arrival was due, which was our fair hair Golden boy, when he arrived 28th of January 1934, 7 ½ lbs. grandma isolated us in the bedroom. Hanging blankets over the door, she and Dr. Duggin's cared for the children. She kept us in the bedroom until all danger was passed. The children didn’t see little Golden Dal for about a month only through the east window from outside. Grandma held him up to the window. During Golden’s babyhood days, he became ill with a childhood disease, and didn’t learn to walk until he was about sixteen months. He grew to be a healthy child. When Golden was eighteen months old another darling little boy came to our home weighed nine lbs. A few days before he was born, my sister Veota Rothrock came to stay with us. Grandma went to Panguitch to be with Zina, when baby Garth was born in July, and Danial Meril was born July 6th, 1935. On Grandfather Goulding Reunion Day held in Henrieville, we gave him the name of Danial, and aunt Veota gave him the name of Meril. He was a happy healthy child, and a welcome to our home. But he only stayed with us 2 ½ years. He contracted bronchitis pneumonia and the 6th of March 1938 God called him home. But he sent us our sweet little fairy on November 13, 1937 and weighed 7 ½ lbs. Was four months old when Meril used to rock her cradle and sing to her, “little sister fairy,” The name fairy stayed with her through childhood. Colette Denase took her first step at 10 ½ months old. When little Meril left us our attention was centered on she and Golden. Colette was twenty months old when little Karel darling came to us. Dereta Karel was born seventeenth of June 1939, weighing 8 lbs. We were happy to have another little girl to be a playmate for fairy. So sweet and lovable and walked alone by one year. She was our baby for about six years. It seemed that Karel would be our last one. But in early spring of 1944 we discovered that there would be another one. On the 29th of November 1944 Claren Delane weighing 9 lbs. came to us. He was born while Dorr was in the service during World War II. Claren was so sweet and lovable we all adored him after such a long time without a baby in the home, we were all glad to welcome him. He walked at eleven months. I have always been so grateful for my wonderful mother in law; she was always there when we needed her. We always had our babies at home and she brought most of them into the world before the midwife arrived. Due to grandfather Nephi’s illness, his ill health, he needed her attention. I went to Panguitch and Claren Delane was born in the maternity home. Just one year before the hospital was built. When Claren was born we wrote to Dorr, who was in the hospital in England, after being wounded in action, and ask him to send a name for his baby brother. He wrote back and said he couldn’t think of any thing except bimbo, so Bimmy was his pet name through childhood. Claren stayed with us only 12 ½ years then God called him home the 30th of June 1957. This was while we lived in Nevada. He was ill only 16 days with Encephalitis and was in the Washoe Medical Center in Reno when he passed away. We learn many things and many lessons by our experiences while raising our family. We parents must learn along with our children and keep on learning. There was laughter and fun also sorrow and tears; I like to remember the happy times. The cute little things they did as babies growing into childhood. The way they learned and progressed in school, the advancement in church organizations, the fun things we did at home evening which we then called it home night. It was usually on Friday night, Saturday was bath night to get ready for Sunday. The rest of the nights being school nights, they hadn’t much time to be out on the town, except in summer months. We made our own entertainment. I am thankful there was no TV to interfere with homework. Irving took part in church activities some of the time; he was Sunday School superintendent for years, about 1937, 38 and 39. Irving was ward teacher, scout advisor among other for many years in Cannonville. When world war two was declared, all able-bodied men and boys were drafted, Dorr went in the army; Ven like his father volunteered and he choose the navy. With not much help that we had, Irving and Dean did very little at the sawmill. When the boys returned Irving sold out in Johns valley to his partner, Levi Bybee and set up his sawmill at Sheep Flat Ranch, which he and his sons operated. Later when the depression hit the country, Irving sold out again and moved to Nevada where he worked for civil service at N.A.D. Hawthorne, about 12 years, He was 65, 25th of August 1962. At the end of the year, he retired and moved back to Cannonville, tore the old house down and built a new home. Irving was elected captain of the chapter for Mineral County DAV May 7th, 1972. He was a life member; he still held this position at the time of our departure. After our return home, he became quite active in church and town affairs, he was the priesthood class leader, home teacher, little league manager four years, four years on town board, four years as town president, mayor and was still priesthood class leader at the time of his death. May 9 1978. His life span here on earth was from August 25, 1897 to 9th of May 1978 at the age of 81. Written by Daisie Campbell Johnson wife of Irving Ammon Johnson. He was born 25th of August 1897 just 6 days before the 9th month of the year, September. weighing at birth 9lbs. His mother had miscarried the first two pregnancies so mother put her to bed until all danger was passed, and Irving was carried the full nine months. At the age of 9 years, he was baptized a member of the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints, also the next summer he obtained his first job at nine years of age. When world war one broke he volunteered at age 19, the age for enlisting was 20; he served his country for two years, 1918 and 1919. After his discharge he worked at different jobs until January 20, 1920, and was called on a mission to the eastern states. He served until the depression hit the country, and was released in May 1921. He stopped in Widtsoe to see his aunt and uncle and came to Sunday School 9th of May 1921; we met and fell in love. Our courtship lasted 29 months. We were married on the 5th of September 1923, I was age 19. Eleven children blessed our home, nine of which we raised to maturity. Karel our youngest daughter number nine of nine is expecting our 39th grandchild in September, which is the 9th month of the year in 1979. About 1969, Irving’s health began to fail, and worsen through the years. He was in and out of the veteran’s hospital many times, and then on January 30th 1978 the day after Dixie’s birthday we took him to the hospital for the last time. They discovered he had an aneurysm. On May 1st they preformed surgery, then May 9th 1978 at 2:03 am, just 9 days later he passed away. At the time of this writing, it has been 9 months, February 9th, 1979. We met May 9th 1921, and parted May 9th 1978. GRANDPA’S LITTLE BLUE HAT It was springtime and the little blue hat Was a fathers day specialty. Presented to him with loving hearts, By Colette and family. He loved that little hat of blue As King Midas loves his crown He wore it in and out around the yard And sometimes into town. A shady bill for honest brown eyes When morning sun climbed high At midday or through afternoon And him and the hat were nigh. Those memories of grandpas hat Are treasures held most dear. To the hearts of all his loved ones Both far away and near. The mischief in his shinning eyes Still twinkle like a star No need has he now for his hat of blue, Grandpa has crossed the bar. The little hat is waiting still In the same special place as before With gentle hands he placed it there As he quietly passed through the door. JUST REMINISCING In fancy I see the hands of time Turn back within their flight, To those tender moments of yesteryear, When young hearts were gay and light In early May when first we met Mid Sundays joyful song The sun light on Irving's golden hair These precious memories linger on Time goes by and later When we took our hand in hand In Gods Holy Temple for all eternity We were sealed under his great plan Then Irving brings me to Cannonville In September of twenty three I gaze in awe at what I see I look down upon this beautiful scene With its touch of human race Comes the awareness of Gods creative hand This truly is the place We took up the art of homemaking As mother and as pa Who could possibly guess in fifty years? We would harvest such a marvelous crop Our family in pieces as time moves on We learn about r and all Six sturdy and healthy boys Who respond to our beck & call To complete this circle of gods family plan He sends us five lovely daughters Lively and happy each busy day Learning things that young ladies ott to Life’s journey is not always kind We had our share of sorrows But we tried to forget unpleasant things And look forward to the better tomorrow As the children grow up and one by one Prepare to fly from the nest We miss them yes but must realize It’s truly all for the best Minus two are married and have families of their own They are all so busy as their mother and pa Fulfilling their duties in their time on earth And helping to harvest it all While fancy fades Reality brings us together With loving hearts they still come at our call Regardless of time or the weather All of those who have been added Our grandchildren and great We welcome each with rejoicing Our score is seventy-eight Within the circle of our love Through the years to seventy three Each have taken their rightful place, On the branch of our family tree Daisie Johnson 5 Sept. 1973 Our Golden Wedding Anniversary.

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: Mary Hennig Created: 2 years ago Updated: 1 month ago

SKETCHES FROM MY LIFE STORY BY DAISIE LAVETTA CAMPBELL JOHNSON This little story begins with the first day of my life. Twenty first of October 21, 1904 in the town of Escalante, Garfield County, Utah. A brisk autumn wind accompanied by snow flurry sent the dry leafs scurrying softly across the yard, gently for only a moment up to the door, as if they realized that the event that was materializing in the little cottage. As my father restlessly paced the floor of the new living room, dimly lighted by the flicker of the fire in the fireplace. As he patiently waited with a prayer in his heart that all would be well with mother and babe, and as with all expected fathers, many thoughts no doubt ran through his mind. Would it be another boy? The last two have been boys or a little girl this time. At last his patience was rewarded about 2:00 am I, Daisie Lavetta was ushered into the loving arms of my fond parents. John Richard and Avery Jeanette Deuel Campbell by our dear aunt Mary Alice Church, one of the villages mid wives. I have been told that before we leave our heavenly home we are given a choice of whose home we wish to enter here on earth. And I am truly thankful for wisdom in my dearly beloved parents; to me they are so wonderful. How great would be our earthly life if all my decision were made as wisely. I was the fifth child in a family of ten children. Never do I remember during the years hearing my parents say you children go on to church, instead they always said come on children let us go to church. Nor do I remember any tea, coffee or intoxicating drinks or playing cards in our home. We always had our family prayers also home evening that was called home night, before I go on with my story. I should relate a little incident of my earliest recollection, which is of a large brown tent stretched firmly on the hard bare ground as a shelter from the weather. Our bedrolls were spread down at night and rolled up in the morning to make room for breakfast cooked over a campfire outside the tent. It was a beautiful day in the spring of 1906 my father, mother and my 10 year old brother Larvin were busy my older sister, also Orlan and Arzy age 6 and 4. Both with there own interest and didn’t have time to listen to a little girl age 2 ½, asked for a drink of water. Milo was just a baby. Maybe I was like most kids that age just wanted attention. One thing I knew was where I could get a nice drink of water. In my memory now I see the cool spring water with the shinning pebbles as it made its way down the canyon toward the new cabin that was under construction. Later father changed the silo to bring the water nearer to the cabin. Before starting to build while deciding on a perfect location, we took our time to plant a few early seeds so crops could be growing while he hauled logs to a field to build a summer home for his family. We had camped previously near an old deserted sawmill where there was wood available at the edge of the timber, one mile from the cabin site with the water clear and cool, bubbling up from the springs not far from camp. There are many times we children had washed our hands or lay on our stomachs and drank from the clear water. I trudged along up the road toward the spring. The sun grew hotter and the sand in the wagon tracks oozed between my bare toes. Quite often I sat to rest and play in the sand, which we’d do sometimes. But before I had time to reach my destination, I had been missed at the cabin site. And the next thing I knew father had me in his arms and was telling me how glad he was to have found me before I reached the timbers. The day before while chopping logs he had seen a huge black bear. A few weeks later Larvin had seen a bear while bringing home the milk cows. And years later while reminiscing father told me that it was not just a bear story. My parents were both humorous and fun loving people. Father told us many interesting stories. Some of which were fictitious fairytales of course. We could almost always tell when he was telling a fairytale by the mischief shining in his eyes. Beings I was born soon after my family arrived in Escalante, Larvin or my brother Arzy was born two years previously. Father said they were driving along down the mountain in the surrey with the fringe on top drawn by two beautiful black mares nearing the ranch. In the distance down the road we saw a huge bird on a large rock by the side of the road. Holding in its mouth an object that resembled a bundle as the stark carries. As we neared this rock by the side of the road an eagle replaced its bundle on the rock and flew among the trees, as its treasure was safe. The black mares reared with excitement, as if they realized that something wonderful was happening. Father said he secured the bundle and laid it safely in mother arms. Mother beamed as she looked down into a pair of dark brown eyes, which of course were mine. So if anyone tells you that only storks bring babies don’t you believe it, in this place it was neither. We lived in Escalante in the winter where we children went to school. With the long wonderful days of summer seems longer then than now we went barefoot, but on Sunday be had to wear shoes. We loved to go to Widtsoe to Sunday school and primary 4 miles away. We had to get up early in order to be on time for Sunday School. Which was 10:00 am. Of course we had no other way but to go in the surrey with the fringe on top, the black mares and the surrey were real. I remember them well. We were a music loving family; later on in years some of the children played musical instruments. But we all learned to sing. We children were taught to sing at an early age. With my parents, Sunday school, Primary and other activities. We progressed very well. I remember my first appearance in public at about six years of age. Nola was four and I don’t remember the occasion, but the program was held in an old two story church house where the new stake center now stands in Escalante. I remember standing upon a table up in front while mother stood behind us for moral support I suppose. We sang “two little children,” I wondered if we sang loud enough to drum out the sound of our knees knocking together, we were so scared. Mother and father always sang in the church choir and other public appearance of different nature. I had not been feeling well, mother and father went to church and left Veota to care for me, mother had tucked me into bed with a bag of hot salt on my aching ear before they left for church. When I awoke and discovered I had been left home alone, I was truly upset. When Veota wasn’t looking I slipped out the back door and ran as fast I could down to the church. As I ran through the wind by the time I arrived at the chapel my ear was aching again but all I was interested in was getting to the top of the high step and to my mother. It seemed ages before I reached the top, a long time for a four-year-old. I was glad I was tall enough to reach the doorknob. As I entered everyone looked to see what the frugality could be. Still crying with tears streaming down my face running up the aisle with my nose running just as fast. Before I got very far, my mother had me in her comforting arms hurriedly moving back toward the door. By this time my sister had missed me and met mother at the foot of the steps. Mother was very brave in hiding her embarrassment as she went back to help sing the closing song. We still lived in the little blue cottage where I was born during the time we resided in the humble abode of my birth. My sister Nola was born 17th of Sept. 1906. Also my brother Milo 8th of Sept 1908 where we had in the fall of 1910. After returning home from the sweet water ranch near Widtsoe, we as usual spent the summer father placed his family in a large frame house a few miles south of Escalante on Uncle Campbell’s farm for reasons unknown to me. It was a large house with a lovely fireplace on the east side of the living room and a stairway leading up to the bedrooms where we children slept. Christmas as in most homes was and still is the most joyous occasion, but this one stands out more in my childhood memory mother had told us that a new baby was to arrive soon. And that Santa just might bring it on Christmas Eve. After the tree was trimmed and the usual prayers were said mother didn’t seem to be in a usual hurry to get us up the stairs as we sat by the fireplace where the bedtime Christmas stories about baby Jesus were told. She had barely finished when in the distant we heard the jingle of sleigh bells, which of course we were all so eager to hear. Closer and closer they came, then whoa, whoa dasher, whoa dancer was heard in a loud male voice. In seconds the door was thrown open and there stood Santa Claus with a large pack on his back. Just one look and up the stairs Nola and I scrambled. But before we reached the top father had us in his arms descending the stairs regardless of our resistance. Our father’s protective arms calmed our fears as we watched with wide-eyed wonderment as Santa place the presents under the tree and filled the stocking hung along the mantel peace with goodies. As he disappeared out the door, I could not contain my curiosity any longer and I ask why he didn’t come down the chimney. They explained that it was a cold night we had to have such a large fire he might get burned. They didn’t explain about the new baby that night but I wondered. And had to be satisfied and hustled up the stairs to dreamland. I often wondered why my older brother Larvin wasn’t home to see Santa Claus, and later when we ask him he said, “oh, I was at the mutual dance in town” I’m sure he was, but I couldn’t understand why a dance could be more important than seeing Santa clause. Christmas morning as dreams of sugarplums faded and we opened our eyes to morning light I see my father now with his back to the fire his hands behind his back smiling as we dashed down the stairs. The rattle of pans in the kitchen where Veota helped mother fix breakfast when descending the stairs I couldn’t let the other kids be first to reach the bottom, so I quickly climbed upon and slid down the banister and was first in my fathers arms. I looked around for my mother with great expectations I moved to her bedroom door and she was not there, neither was the little new baby. When I came back to the fire, mother had come in from the kitchen and was helping the smaller children dress. I looked at the packages under the tree, also the stockings; none of them looked large enough to conceal a baby. Mother must have read the fresh new look in my eyes, and explained that the new baby was not here yet but they were expecting it to arrive within the next few days. We were content with that, and busied ourselves opening our Christmas packages what joy, Nola and I each had a china doll. Dolls were not made as durable then as today. Our parents explained that we had to be very careful and not drop them or they would break. Curiosity got the best of me, and a few days later, I hit my doll hand with the hammer. And I cried broken heartily when the little hand shattered. Oranges were very hard to come by in those days and for each of us to get an orange was really something wonderful. My grief over the broken doll was somewhat eased as the morning of the 29th of December arrived and also our new baby brother. When Milo heard him cry he said “ chicken, quack, quack” Milo was only two and had never heard a baby before. We were all so happy to have a new baby in the home. I could hardly wait to hold him and when Mary Alice laid him in my arms I thought my heart would burst with pride. The snow was quite deep and the older children went to town to school in a sleigh. Spring and back to the ranch for the summer hooray. There are many happy eventful memories in my childhood. Some not so happy. I recalled that in the autumn of 1912 father decided to take us down to winder for the winter. It later became Widtsoe. With a family of eight to care for, mother was busy as usual, but not to busy for church activities. The bishop ask her to be primary president. She of course accepted. I was now seven and allowed to go to primary. All activities were held in the same building and also school. When school was dismissed early on Friday for primary, the older children babysat. Thanksgiving holiday was excitement in the air. As usual there had to be a children ’s dance. Sister Liza Meacham played the organ and a priesthood member played the violin my mother Avery Jeanette at most presided and always entered in the fun. Sometime a boy was brave enough to ask a girl to dance. But most always girls ask the boy. And when a boy named Leonard Thompson me to dance, I became ill, and went to my mother and pleaded with her to take me home. I had such a headache, I could not think just right, so I just had to suffer on until the party was over. The reason father came to winder is that he got the contract carrying the U.S. mail. He traveled to Escalante and back and Larvin went to Antimony and back, most always by team and buggy by sleigh or horseback. When either at the ranch or in town, friends or relatives stopped by our home either going to or from Escalante by buggy or wagon was the transportation. They usually made it to our place by night. One friend I remember Orrin barker called me his girlfriend usually when I saw him coming in I ran and hid. One evening mother was busy fixing supper when Orin came in, I was at least I thought safely hidden under the kitchen table covered by a large table cloth that hung almost to the floor. Mother had just sat a large pitcher of milk on the table when Orin rushed under the table after me upsetting table, milk and all. Luckily we milked our own cows and had plenty of milk on hand. He felt rather embarrassed and gave mother a handful of change to help make up for the damage. Of course I received some of it. That winter we children had the measles. In February my brother Orlan had rheumatic fever and was bedfast until spring. But aside from all of the troubles and illness another great event was taking place, a new addition to our family. On May 2nd 1913, a baby brother had arrived. I think mother had expected a girl and planned on naming her may so changed it to Mavin. Father and mother acted as switchboard operators for that vicinity. There stood a large telephone pole in front of our house. One day some folks stopped while we kids were playing. The boys were climbing the pole. The folks said they would give me fifty cents if I could climb to the top. I did and I got my fifty cents. I felt like a millionaire. The summer the first car came to our valley, this was a great event. Every one flocked around to see it. A shiny new Model T Ford. The driver told us for as many as could to climb in and would take up for a ride around town. When it came time for us to ride I was almost home. My brother Larvin was faster on foot than I, he grabbed me and climbed into the back seat with me on his lap regardless of all protests. I wasn’t so afraid then. A large part of the summer I lived at Aunt Ysutta and uncle ferry church’s farm down at the Henderson valley the north end of john’s valley. They had no children of their own. Sometimes they made trips to salt Lake City and brought back for me little gifts. One I remember so well was a little red riding hood, also red and white drinking cups. And also red carrot called beads. The cups and beads I still have in my possessions. We lived in winter two years or I should say two winters, the ranch in summer. By these time fathers mail contract ended after the crops were harvested, he took his family back to Escalante. The 21st of October I was eight and this was the first really great event of my life. We had no heated fonts for baptism the children of proper age were taken down to Uncle John’s fishpond at the north east of town. I walked down in to the water with mud squishing up between my toes, the fish darting in every which direction. I loved all things of nature, and was not afraid. I loved the water; we children went swimming in father’s irrigation ditch at the ranch every summer. I was baptized a member of the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints, 12th of august 1913 by Wilford word and confirmed by Danny Wilcox. My father build a nice new home in Escalante, one half block south of the chapel, where we resided in winter and where we went to school in the fall of 1919, until be moved to Widtsoe. We lived in this home in Escalante. My brother Larvin had typhoid fever. And was bedfast about six months. He was so ill and wasn’t expected to live at times. Through the power of the priesthood and our prayers and faith he was healed. When the terrible flu epidemic came in 1918 we escaped it, also my older sister Veota was married to Raul Rothrock in 1915. Something in Escalante in 1919. When they went to Seattle Washington they had 3 children. These were happy events for years. In those days girls didn’t graduate from primary until age 14, which was church regulations. When I graduated and entered mutual, I now must mention another very special event, which took place in the summer of 1917. We were as usual at the ranch at Sweetwater canyon. Father told us that mother was not well, and he must take her to Escalante. He said Nola and I must go to take care of her. They left the three older boys; Larvin, Orlan and Arzy to take care for themselves and 2 small brothers Milo and Cloyd. We took little Mavin with us. We had been there only a few days, then one morning when I came down stairs mother called to me from the bedroom. She said “come here and see what crawled in bed with me last night. Oh what a happy surprise, a tiny new baby. I was so happy I could hardly control my emotions when she told me it was a baby sister. We hadn’t had a baby in the family for four years. To us was such a long time, and then after having three brothers in a row to get a baby sister was such joy. I was twelve and Nola was ten between the two of us we cared for mother and the baby and Mavin. When the baby was a few days old, father returned to the ranch to see about the boys and finish his farming. Aunt Mary Alice shirts came in and gave mother and baby special care. When harvesting the summer crops, father always set aside a tenth of everything for tithing and always the best. As I said before father was fun loving and humorous one day he said, “I guess the baby will have to go for tithing she is the tenth. Such a chorus of “no, no, no” and a lot of tears were shed. Father and mother laughed so hard, that we soon knew that he was teasing us and we still kept our baby sister, Katie Maxine. Born 6th July 1917. In October 1919 we started school in Widtsoe which had grown and name changed from winter to Widtsoe after the Apostle John A. Widtsoe. At fifteen I felt quite grown up and could go to the town’s activities. I am so thankful for the watchful and protecting care and guidance of my loving parents. They were always there when we needed them. Soon after my 15th birthday I was ask to be primary teacher, later Sunday School teacher and it was here in Sunday School that Irving and I met. Here is where our life stories connect and go on from there together. Our engagement: I shall always remember when Irving asked me to be his wife. We went horseback riding, which we often did even though the skies looked like rain it was a calm and beautiful day when we were together. We had ridden a few miles up the road towards Pine Lake where the stately pines swaying slightly in the breeze, just enjoying the scenery and each other’s company then the rain came. There was not much shelter for the horses, but we found the shelter of a large pine tree. And set together with Irving’s raincoat over our shoulders and watched the rain. Among other things we talked about, our ambitions and the things we wanted to accomplish. I said I planned on going back to school and finish high school. Which would be two more years and Irving said, “I wonder what I’m going to do during that time. He was seven years my senior. He had already accomplished so much. Two years in the service of his country two years on an LDS mission and many others and I just only a teenager and the end of my sophomore year but when he ask me to marry him everything else was forgotten. I could hardly believe my ears. I was so in love with him and of course my answer was yes. How long we sat there under the tree or how long it rained I don’t remember but we finally discovered that evening was neigh, and the rained had ceased, it had been such a beautiful day. Each day I thank god for beauty and the rosy light of morning and the glorious sunlight. At evening take joy in the magical sunset and enjoy tranquility of the twilight. While here let me live where Jesus lived, and walk with me and when I leave this earth so I can walk with him.

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: GlacierSiren Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

SKETCHES FROM THE LIFE OF IRVING AMMON JOHNSON WRITTEN BY HIS WIFE DAISIE CAMPBELL JOHNSON It had been a long night of anxious waiting in the Nephi and Zina Goulding Johnson home. Only minutes before the rosy light of morning softly beamed a light above the hill and grandma Goulding laid a red curly haired, red faced 9 lb. baby boy in father Nephi’s waiting arms. After 2 previous, unsuccessful unhappy premature births how happy Nephi and Zina were, that god permitted them to keep this one. They were so thankful that their prayers had at last been answered. This was the beginning of a busy eventful and healthy life for Irving Ammon Johnson. Born 25th. of August 1897 in Henrieville, Garfield County, Utah. Some of the memories of his early life related by his lovely parents were when Irving was just a toddler, grandma took his shoes off to keep him from running away to aunt Clara Pinney’s house. One day she went to look for him and found him half way across the lot crawling on his hands and knees, so another method must be sought. She finally tied him to the bedpost. Aunt Clara and uncle Rob Pinney’s only child was called back to heaven at birth, therefore they had no family of their own, but were both favorite of the neighborhood children. Often Uncle Rob took Irving to the sawmill. When he was eight years old, a chain came loose and the logs began rolling down the hill. Irving happened to be in its path, and was seriously injured and was ill about two years. This was in the summer of 1905 there was no doctors within 15 miles and only team and wagon and buggy for transportation. These people were very faithful and obedient to Gods command. So with Gods help and through the power of the priesthood and tender loving care, he was nursed back to life and health. For two years he didn’t go to school. But with his loved ones all around to teach and help him, his education suffered very little. Irving was baptized a member of the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints when 9 years old 6th of June 1906, by M. Frank Sargent, in an irrigation pond in Henrieville, Utah and was confirmed a member by W. P. Willis. It was ankle deep in mud with pollywogs darting every which way in the pond. In 1903, Irving’s father took up a homestead, and built a farm on sheep flat about 10 miles west of Cannonville. They lived there in summer then back to town in winter, and he had been in school in Henrieville before the accident. Later they moved to Cannonville in autumn in 1907. Irving was well enough to go back to school and was 10 years old. It was in the summer that he was ten years old that he got his first job. Elder Prince was one of his teachers. When the kids didn’t know their lessons, he would sit them in the corner with a dunce hat on their head. Other teachers were Mr. Cokerhance, Frank Savage, Tom Johnson, Irving’s uncle, Jack Fletcher and George Anderson and at the age of 12 or 13 years and no doubt Irving was the ringleader of the gang, Uncle Tom was out of sorts at the kids for disobeying his orders. He chased Irving upon the red rock and tried to catch him and punish him. But as usual he avoided Uncle Tom and the punishment. The summer that Irving was 12 years old, he went to Pireah with a mining company as water boy. They took boilers and steam engines by ox and team to the Colorado River to run steamboats with, to transport gold from the mines to the market. Irving’s job was to bring water to the workers. On the way down to the river they used bull hide bogies or bags running across the horses back, he filled the bags with fresh water from the streams as they made progress over rough country, valleys, hills and sometimes mountains from Georgetown hills to the Colorado River. They had many mishaps, once the boiler engine worked loose from the wagon and rolled down to the bottom of the hill and had to be brought back up again and began all over. Irving worked each day trying to keep the workers supplied with water. By the time they reached the river it was time for him to return home and back to school. When thirteen years old Irving went down to the lower country with Uncle Rob Penny and Quince Kimball where they had staked a gold claim. Irving & Kimball hauled wood from the last chance, a place quite some distance away to the claim point for the boiler to pump water for washing the gold. One night closure neglected to put up the bars on the rail fence and the horses got out in the night and came home. Uncle Rob sent Irving to find them and bring them back. He left the camp and Mexican Bar at daylight, fifty miles away and arrived home within 24 hours later. On the way he came across some Navajo Indians, bringing some blankets into to town to trade for horses and food. They had a few horses, but would not let him ride one. They told him he could hang from the tail of one, but no ride. When the Navajos camped for the night, Irving kept on coming toward home alone. The night had become quite cool, and he had to walk fast to keep warm. He walked up the Wahweep Creek to Johns Valley and on home to Cannonville. Borrowed a horse from his father and went to Henrieville where he found the run a way horses and then back to Uncle Rob’s. Another summer at age 15, Irving went to house rock valley, in the spring of 1912 with the Bar Z Cattle Company, to work for a man named Ephriam Mansfield. Elmer took him down to the valley, when the boss saw him he said “ I want a man not a kid” and Elmer answered, “anything I can do, he can do” around the cow camp. The boss said he would try him. Irving worked and wrangled horses for about five months until school time again. From the time he became a young cowboy he rode with the cattle in helping his father taking the cattle down to the lower country in winter and back home to the fields in summer. He was out of school by now, and one winter George Henderson, Marion Mangum and Irving took the tribe to Pireah sheep camp. The road they were to take followed the creek about twenty-five miles. In wintertime they found the creek frozen over for fear of breaking through the ice they had to take another route. Down over the Brush Head Mountain avoiding the slick rock into the cottonwood wash. They had three wagons loaded with supplies for the sheep camp, including one load of oats for the horses. In order to get down over the mountain they had to brake the wagon wheels with chains sliding down one at time. He went down sandy slopes and down to the bottom into the sandy wash. They ate beans for supper and they all became very ill. Another winter Irving and Johnny Davis were taking supplies to a sheep camp down deep creek wash, Irving took his load down first, breaking through the ice occasionally. When Johnny went down with his load they also broke through, but Irving had just ordinary shoes on his horses. The horses became frightened and began to flounder around cutting their legs with their sharp shoes and also the ice. The injured horses were not able to pull the wagons back home, and Johnny left his wagon to bring home later and let his horses be pulled home after Irving's wagon. When Irving was about sixteen, with team and wagon he hauled freight from Maryville, also lumber and shingles from different sawmills to help with the building of the new chapel in the town called Cannonville. It was on April 6Th, 1917 World War I was declared. When Kaiser Bill planned to conquer the world by sinking all the US ships, which brought us into war with Germany. The draft age was 21. Irving fibbed about his aged and enlisted. Roy Henderson, Ted Graff, Ira Elmer and Irving volunteered and went into the service of their country. For some reason the others were discharged later. Irving was large for his age and strong and healthy was over six feet tall. He was still in the service when the Armistice was signed on November 11, 1918, but was not discharged until February 1919. A welcome home banquet was given in Widtsoe. The MIA girls served and I was one of them but I didn’t see him. He was just one of the service men being honored. After Irving returned from the army he used his time caring for his cattle, helping his father and doing odd jobs until January. He then was called on a mission for the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was ordained an elder on January 17, by James M. Sargent and left for the Eastern States mission January 21st 1920. In 1919 when Marion Henry moved to Boulder, a deal was made for Irving to round up his stray cattle and sell them and send the money to Marion. Marion, George Graff & others bought cattle for $100.00 a head all for a town calf. They bought Willis Creek Cattle Ranch from Uncle Sixtus Johnson. Irving and father didn’t buy any cattle at that time. In the spring of 1921, he was back east on his mission when the depression hit the country. And because of this great depression, the missionaries were released. But while there he had mumps and was hospitalized about 7 weeks. It strained his savings and with the depression on not much help from the folks at home or the church there fore he returned home May 2nd 1921, by slow train and landed in Widtsoe May 7th. When Uncle Rob was called to be the bishop of the Widtsoe Ward he and Aunt Clara left their home in Henriville. He had a hotel built across the street from the all occasion town hall, which served as chapel, schoolhouse, Primary and Relief society and for all recreation. On his return, Irving stopped to visit Aunt Clara and Uncle Rob in route to his home in Cannonville and stayed over the weekend. On Sunday morning he came to Sunday School with some of his friends and there we met the 9th of May. I was teaching the small children’s class. We had no classrooms only removable petitions across the middle of the hall. Therefore two or more class’ was held in the same room. With my back to the young adult class giving lessons to my children I heard a strange voice I had never heard before discussing the lesson. I looked around, and it was then I lost my heart. I finished my lesson and turned the children out the back door, then went to sit beside my boyfriend Van Barney as I usually did. When Sunday School was over my best friend Laura Goulding introduced us. Laura was Irving’s cousin who worked at the hotel. She later became my sister-in-law. Aunt Clara, Laura’s father, Eliza Goulding, and Irving’s mother Zina were brothers and sisters. I suppose it was just habit that young folks would congregate at the post office, which was across from the hotel before going home for lunch and back to church at 2:00 p.m. Laura and Irving had already gone back to the hotel before the gang broke up, Laura called from the back door and said, “you kids come over here Elder Johnson has a bear story to tell you.” The boys chose not to go but we girls ran across the street to hear the story. To this day, I don’t remember the story. It was just a way of getting us over there. We visited awhile and each girl left for home except me. Irving held my hand and would not let me go. But I didn’t mind at all. Aunt Clara invited me to stay for lunch; I did and went to church with them forgetting everyone else. Irving talked in church, and after church I got permission from my parents to go back to the hotel with him. He told us of many experiences while on his mission back in New York. He showed us snapshots. Some were taken in Maine and other states. Where the snow was so deep it came up to the rooftops in some places. With a dear friend accompanying us on the organ we spent a wonderful evening singing hymns also popular songs. Irving had a beautiful voice. We entertained the hotel guest and friends including by brother Orlan, who was Laura’s boyfriend and later married him. When the party broke up at 10:00 p.m., Irving walked me home, which seemed like such a short one block, it was the beginning of a beautiful courtship. Irving stayed a few days and then continued on his journey home to see his parents and family in Cannonville. Now I must go back a few years and bring myself into the story. It didn’t just happen that way. God has a reason for all things. This was in bringing us together. Now this is how I came to be in Widtsoe at this time. My parents, John Richard and Avery Jeanette Deuel Campbell owned a ranch in sweet water canyon four miles east in Johns Valley, where we lived in summer then back to Escalante in winter for school for most of we children were born. But we always went to Widtsoe to church and other activities during the summer. Then in the autumn of 1919 my father bought a home in Widtsoe and we children went to school there. 1919 & 1920, my first year in the 8th grade, my boyfriend Van Barney’s brother in law was my teacher. His name was Russell Page. I think I was the teacher’s pet. I did not learn much. I know I didn’t earn my credit but I graduated, and the next year I took the 8th grade again. I learned Mr. Anderson was my teacher, and I graduated again. This time I knew I had earned it. I felt I had gone to my freshman year of high school. In 1920-1921 mother’s health was not so good. In 1920-1922, I stayed at home and cared for her that winter. In the autumn of 1922 I went to Escalante to my sophomore year. By then my mothers health had improved greatly. Mr. Anderson was a very good teacher; he tried to teach us evolution. One boy in our class Raymond Stoddard, said “Mr. Anderson maybe your ancestors are hanging around in the trees by their tails, but mine are not. “ During those awful depression years of 1921 and 1922 Irving and his father went out of the cattle business. Such jobs as herding sheep were available. The winter of 1922-1923 he went to the sheep herd for his cousin Jeff Johnson who lived in Escalante. He came home in the spring and went to work at the sawmill for Uncle Rob. And school being out, I returned to Widtsoe and to work at the hotel for Aunt Clara. I worked there all summer, then on the 5th of September 1923, in the Salt Lake LDS temple for time and all eternity. Accompanied by my parents. Father took us to Salt Lake City in his Model T Ford. There were no highways or freeways as of today, just a winding dirt road. The neighbors little nephew had spent the summer with us in Widtsoe, so we went by way of Manti on the way home, stayed over night, then on to Salt Lake the next day. After a day or two of sight seeing and shopping we returned home. One place we visited while there that was very special to me was the State Capitol. We took the trolley up and decided to walk back in order to visit other places on the way. I was wearing new shoes and before we reached our hotel I was carrying them in my hands. My feet hurt. After we left the temple, we met some friends of Irving's and when he said this is my wife, his friends said, “how do you do Mrs. Johnson?” I looked around to see where Mrs. Johnson was. I had always been introduced as Miss Campbell. On our arrival back in Widtsoe, there was of course a reception and dance. We received many useful gifts, among them a large silver spoon, which I still have in my possession. I made my own wedding dress. And have the lace with the collar from the wedding dress, which is now yellowed with age but so precious to me. After this and a few days with loved ones and friends, we went on horseback by way of ruby’s inn and Bryce Canyon, across the hills to sheep flat ranch where Irving’s folks lived in summer until crops were harvested then we moved to town for school. We went to Cannonville with them and lived there our first winter. We both worked in the MIA as counselors. In the spring of 1924 we went back to Widtsoe, where Irving again went to work at the sawmill. In the fall of 1923 after Irving and I were married my parents moved to St George and put the children in school there. Nola, Milo, Cloyd, Mavin and Katy, then back home in the spring. Mother and father worked in the temple they no doubt, came back to Johns Valley to escape the heat. It was wonderful being back home with my family and friends, first of May, and I was five months pregnant. The 12th of July was the date set for our blessed event. I suppose 24 hours made little or no difference. At six a. m. 11th of July 1924, our darling son was born, after a long night with only the light from our coal oil lamp. We gratefully welcomed the dawn and our 9-lb. healthy baby boy was ushered into our humble home. With the help of sister Addie Chapman the midwife who came in and helped and cared for all the new mothers in the valley, my mother, Irving and all was well. Most people believed that the stork brings all the babies. There was such a calm feeling of peace with his arrival, I’m certain he was delivered by the angels in heaven. As the days wore on, the sun shone brightly, and there was peace in our valley, Johns valley. When Irving’s parents came from Cannonville to get acquainted with their first grandchild, Mother Johnson said she had dreamed his name should be Dorr. We were pleased with the name and he was blessed and given the name of Irving Dorr Johnson. After a few days the grandparents returned to the ranch and took Dorr and I with them for a visit. The baby was then about one month old. Later Irving came and brought us home. When Dorr was six months old he had a serious illness. There was no doctor in the valley but our Heavenly Father was our physician. And his grandmother being a nurse, we decided to bring him to Cannonville. The snow was quite deep. Irving put a washtub half filled with sand on the front end of the bobsled, built a fire in the tub and a stack of wood to keep the fire going. Stretched a tent over the back and with plenty of blankets to keep Irving, Dorr & I warm. The snow was quite deep across the mountain, Irving set out on the front to drive and keep the fire going. We left Widtsoe about 10:00 a m, arrived in Cannonville late afternoon, January1925. Grandma said the baby had slight pneumonia but she soon had it checked and Dorr became well again. We stayed there until spring and went back home. By the time Dorr was eleven months old he was walking alone. He was a fat healthy child. My brother Mavin said he looked like a guilty chip monk that had been in some farmer’s wheat bin. His cheeks were so fat. In autumn we moved to Cannonville. We lived across the street from Irving’s parents. There was where our dear sweet Ven came to us weighing7-½ lbs., on the 10th of November 1925, so sweet and lovable, with big brown eyes and dark hair. I think we may have been expecting a girl, but he was so adorable we gladly welcomed him. As he grew he was a little less heavy than Dorr. Healthy and walked alone at 10 months. Before he was three he could dress himself, and was always up early following his daddy around before he would leave for work. Later we bought a house and lot from Loren Twitchell. The house was awfully small, only three rooms, but it was ours, block 4 on the southeast end of town. On April 23, 1927 our dear little Dean was born. Weighed 6 ½ lbs., and six weeks premature. Again I think we expected a girl, but when I was told he had red hair, which I called pink, I said ok, we’ll keep him, don’t send him back. He later had infection in his ears, but with tender loving care he grew and was a healthy child. He walked at one year. Two years later on 14th of march, 1929 our first daughter came to us, weighed 9lbs, and was so loveable and healthy even today my neighbor Betty Nelson said she was the most beautiful baby she had ever seen. Betty had four of her own. As baby Ardis grew she was chubby and a little awkward on her feet. She didn’t learn to walk alone until about 14 months. Dean was just two when Ardis was born and he learned to sing, "You are as Welcome as the Flowers in May" to her. The boys were all so thrilled to have a little sister. Eighteen months later on the 10th of September 1930, another little daughter came to us. Weighing in at 7-½ lbs. such a darling and bringing her love. I was alone; Irving was at the ranch working. Being alone expecting a child I knew the signal, I walked to Grandma Johnson’s for help, and walked back. As soon as she heard she sent someone to Tropic for the midwife and sent to the ranch for Irving, she came to help me. But before sister Riding arrived, grandma had delivered the baby, just as she did most of our babies and many other in our community. Rather different from Ardis, Jan Dolores was active and walked alone at eleven months. As she grew, I called her my little Sandbox Sally. Jan loved to play in the sandbox. Ardis was my little Sawdust Man. On the 29th of January 1932, on a cold winter night about 1-½ years later, our sweet laughing eyed Dixie smiled into our lives. Weighed 8-½ lbs. so cuddly she must have been happy because she smiled so much. She was walking quite well at one year. Our neighbor said "you might see a smile without Dixie, but you’ll never see Dixie without a smile." Two years later in the winter of 1934,our children all had whooping cough and measles at the same time. This was before the baby clinic began. And our new arrival was due, which was our fair hair Golden boy, when he arrived 28th of January 1934, 7 ½ lbs. grandma isolated us in the bedroom. Hanging blankets over the door, she and Dr. Duggin's cared for the children. She kept us in the bedroom until all danger was passed. The children didn’t see little Golden Dal for about a month only through the east window from outside. Grandma held him up to the window. During Golden’s babyhood days, he became ill with a childhood disease, and didn’t learn to walk until he was about sixteen months. He grew to be a healthy child. When Golden was eighteen months old another darling little boy came to our home weighed nine lbs. A few days before he was born, my sister Veota Rothrock came to stay with us. Grandma went to Panguitch to be with Zina, when baby Garth was born in July, and Danial Meril was born July 6th, 1935. On Grandfather Goulding Reunion Day held in Henrieville, we gave him the name of Danial, and aunt Veota gave him the name of Meril. He was a happy healthy child, and a welcome to our home. But he only stayed with us 2 ½ years. He contracted bronchitis pneumonia and the 6th of March 1938 God called him home. But he sent us our sweet little fairy on November 13, 1937 and weighed 7 ½ lbs. Was four months old when Meril used to rock her cradle and sing to her, “little sister fairy,” The name fairy stayed with her through childhood. Colette Denase took her first step at 10 ½ months old. When little Meril left us our attention was centered on she and Golden. Colette was twenty months old when little Karel darling came to us. Dereta Karel was born seventeenth of June 1939, weighing 8 lbs. We were happy to have another little girl to be a playmate for fairy. So sweet and lovable and walked alone by one year. She was our baby for about six years. It seemed that Karel would be our last one. But in early spring of 1944 we discovered that there would be another one. On the 29th of November 1944 Claren Delane weighing 9 lbs. came to us. He was born while Dorr was in the service during World War II. Claren was so sweet and lovable we all adored him after such a long time without a baby in the home, we were all glad to welcome him. He walked at eleven months. I have always been so grateful for my wonderful mother in law; she was always there when we needed her. We always had our babies at home and she brought most of them into the world before the midwife arrived. Due to grandfather Nephi’s illness, his ill health, he needed her attention. I went to Panguitch and Claren Delane was born in the maternity home. Just one year before the hospital was built. When Claren was born we wrote to Dorr, who was in the hospital in England, after being wounded in action, and ask him to send a name for his baby brother. He wrote back and said he couldn’t think of any thing except bimbo, so Bimmy was his pet name through childhood. Claren stayed with us only 12 ½ years then God called him home the 30th of June 1957. This was while we lived in Nevada. He was ill only 16 days with Encephalitis and was in the Washoe Medical Center in Reno when he passed away. We learn many things and many lessons by our experiences while raising our family. We parents must learn along with our children and keep on learning. There was laughter and fun also sorrow and tears; I like to remember the happy times. The cute little things they did as babies growing into childhood. The way they learned and progressed in school, the advancement in church organizations, the fun things we did at home evening which we then called it home night. It was usually on Friday night, Saturday was bath night to get ready for Sunday. The rest of the nights being school nights, they hadn’t much time to be out on the town, except in summer months. We made our own entertainment. I am thankful there was no TV to interfere with homework. Irving took part in church activities some of the time; he was Sunday School superintendent for years, about 1937, 38 and 39. Irving was ward teacher, scout advisor among other for many years in Cannonville. When world war two was declared, all able-bodied men and boys were drafted, Dorr went in the army; Ven like his father volunteered and he choose the navy. With not much help that we had, Irving and Dean did very little at the sawmill. When the boys returned Irving sold out in Johns valley to his partner, Levi Bybee and set up his sawmill at Sheep Flat Ranch, which he and his sons operated. Later when the depression hit the country, Irving sold out again and moved to Nevada where he worked for civil service at N.A.D. Hawthorne, about 12 years, He was 65, 25th of August 1962. At the end of the year, he retired and moved back to Cannonville, tore the old house down and built a new home. Irving was elected captain of the chapter for Mineral County DAV May 7th, 1972. He was a life member; he still held this position at the time of our departure. After our return home, he became quite active in church and town affairs, he was the priesthood class leader, home teacher, little league manager four years, four years on town board, four years as town president, mayor and was still priesthood class leader at the time of his death. May 9 1978. His life span here on earth was from August 25, 1897 to 9th of May 1978 at the age of 81. Written by Daisie Campbell Johnson wife of Irving Ammon Johnson. He was born 25th of August 1897 just 6 days before the 9th month of the year, September. weighing at birth 9lbs. His mother had miscarried the first two pregnancies so mother put her to bed until all danger was passed, and Irving was carried the full nine months. At the age of 9 years, he was baptized a member of the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints, also the next summer he obtained his first job at nine years of age. When world war one broke he volunteered at age 19, the age for enlisting was 20; he served his country for two years, 1918 and 1919. After his discharge he worked at different jobs until January 20, 1920, and was called on a mission to the eastern states. He served until the depression hit the country, and was released in May 1921. He stopped in Widtsoe to see his aunt and uncle and came to Sunday School 9th of May 1921; we met and fell in love. Our courtship lasted 29 months. We were married on the 5th of September 1923, I was age 19. Eleven children blessed our home, nine of which we raised to maturity. Karel our youngest daughter number nine of nine is expecting our 39th grandchild in September, which is the 9th month of the year in 1979. About 1969, Irving’s health began to fail, and worsen through the years. He was in and out of the veteran’s hospital many times, and then on January 30th 1978 the day after Dixie’s birthday we took him to the hospital for the last time. They discovered he had an aneurysm. On May 1st they preformed surgery, then May 9th 1978 at 2:03 am, just 9 days later he passed away. At the time of this writing, it has been 9 months, February 9th, 1979. We met May 9th 1921, and parted May 9th 1978. GRANDPA’S LITTLE BLUE HAT It was springtime and the little blue hat Was a fathers day specialty. Presented to him with loving hearts, By Colette and family. He loved that little hat of blue As King Midas loves his crown He wore it in and out around the yard And sometimes into town. A shady bill for honest brown eyes When morning sun climbed high At midday or through afternoon And him and the hat were nigh. Those memories of grandpas hat Are treasures held most dear. To the hearts of all his loved ones Both far away and near. The mischief in his shinning eyes Still twinkle like a star No need has he now for his hat of blue, Grandpa has crossed the bar. The little hat is waiting still In the same special place as before With gentle hands he placed it there As he quietly passed through the door. JUST REMINISCING In fancy I see the hands of time Turn back within their flight, To those tender moments of yesteryear, When young hearts were gay and light In early May when first we met Mid Sundays joyful song The sun light on Irving's golden hair These precious memories linger on Time goes by and later When we took our hand in hand In Gods Holy Temple for all eternity We were sealed under his great plan Then Irving brings me to Cannonville In September of twenty three I gaze in awe at what I see I look down upon this beautiful scene With its touch of human race Comes the awareness of Gods creative hand This truly is the place We took up the art of homemaking As mother and as pa Who could possibly guess in fifty years? We would harvest such a marvelous crop Our family in pieces as time moves on We learn about r and all Six sturdy and healthy boys Who respond to our beck & call To complete this circle of gods family plan He sends us five lovely daughters Lively and happy each busy day Learning things that young ladies ott to Life’s journey is not always kind We had our share of sorrows But we tried to forget unpleasant things And look forward to the better tomorrow As the children grow up and one by one Prepare to fly from the nest We miss them yes but must realize It’s truly all for the best Minus two are married and have families of their own They are all so busy as their mother and pa Fulfilling their duties in their time on earth And helping to harvest it all While fancy fades Reality brings us together With loving hearts they still come at our call Regardless of time or the weather All of those who have been added Our grandchildren and great We welcome each with rejoicing Our score is seventy-eight Within the circle of our love Through the years to seventy three Each have taken their rightful place, On the branch of our family tree Daisie Johnson 5 Sept. 1973 Our Golden Wedding Anniversary.

Memorial / Obituary / Personal History

Contributor: GlacierSiren Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

SKETCHES FROM MY LIFE STORY BY DAISIE LAVETTA CAMPBELL JOHNSON This little story begins with the first day of my life. Twenty first of October 21, 1904 in the town of Escalante, Garfield County, Utah. A brisk autumn wind accompanied by snow flurry sent the dry leafs scurrying softly across the yard, gently for only a moment up to the door, as if they realized that the event that was materializing in the little cottage. As my father restlessly paced the floor of the new living room, dimly lighted by the flicker of the fire in the fireplace. As he patiently waited with a prayer in his heart that all would be well with mother and babe, and as with all expected fathers, many thoughts no doubt ran through his mind. Would it be another boy? The last two have been boys or a little girl this time. At last his patience was rewarded about 2:00 am I, Daisie Lavetta was ushered into the loving arms of my fond parents. John Richard and Avery Jeanette Deuel Campbell by our dear aunt Mary Alice Church, one of the villages mid wives. I have been told that before we leave our heavenly home we are given a choice of whose home we wish to enter here on earth. And I am truly thankful for wisdom in my dearly beloved parents; to me they are so wonderful. How great would be our earthly life if all my decision were made as wisely. I was the fifth child in a family of ten children. Never do I remember during the years hearing my parents say you children go on to church, instead they always said come on children let us go to church. Nor do I remember any tea, coffee or intoxicating drinks or playing cards in our home. We always had our family prayers also home evening that was called home night, before I go on with my story. I should relate a little incident of my earliest recollection, which is of a large brown tent stretched firmly on the hard bare ground as a shelter from the weather. Our bedrolls were spread down at night and rolled up in the morning to make room for breakfast cooked over a campfire outside the tent. It was a beautiful day in the spring of 1906 my father, mother and my 10 year old brother Larvin were busy my older sister, also Orlan and Arzy age 6 and 4. Both with there own interest and didn’t have time to listen to a little girl age 2 ½, asked for a drink of water. Milo was just a baby. Maybe I was like most kids that age just wanted attention. One thing I knew was where I could get a nice drink of water. In my memory now I see the cool spring water with the shinning pebbles as it made its way down the canyon toward the new cabin that was under construction. Later father changed the silo to bring the water nearer to the cabin. Before starting to build while deciding on a perfect location, we took our time to plant a few early seeds so crops could be growing while he hauled logs to a field to build a summer home for his family. We had camped previously near an old deserted sawmill where there was wood available at the edge of the timber, one mile from the cabin site with the water clear and cool, bubbling up from the springs not far from camp. There are many times we children had washed our hands or lay on our stomachs and drank from the clear water. I trudged along up the road toward the spring. The sun grew hotter and the sand in the wagon tracks oozed between my bare toes. Quite often I sat to rest and play in the sand, which we’d do sometimes. But before I had time to reach my destination, I had been missed at the cabin site. And the next thing I knew father had me in his arms and was telling me how glad he was to have found me before I reached the timbers. The day before while chopping logs he had seen a huge black bear. A few weeks later Larvin had seen a bear while bringing home the milk cows. And years later while reminiscing father told me that it was not just a bear story. My parents were both humorous and fun loving people. Father told us many interesting stories. Some of which were fictitious fairytales of course. We could almost always tell when he was telling a fairytale by the mischief shining in his eyes. Beings I was born soon after my family arrived in Escalante, Larvin or my brother Arzy was born two years previously. Father said they were driving along down the mountain in the surrey with the fringe on top drawn by two beautiful black mares nearing the ranch. In the distance down the road we saw a huge bird on a large rock by the side of the road. Holding in its mouth an object that resembled a bundle as the stark carries. As we neared this rock by the side of the road an eagle replaced its bundle on the rock and flew among the trees, as its treasure was safe. The black mares reared with excitement, as if they realized that something wonderful was happening. Father said he secured the bundle and laid it safely in mother arms. Mother beamed as she looked down into a pair of dark brown eyes, which of course were mine. So if anyone tells you that only storks bring babies don’t you believe it, in this place it was neither. We lived in Escalante in the winter where we children went to school. With the long wonderful days of summer seems longer then than now we went barefoot, but on Sunday be had to wear shoes. We loved to go to Widtsoe to Sunday school and primary 4 miles away. We had to get up early in order to be on time for Sunday School. Which was 10:00 am. Of course we had no other way but to go in the surrey with the fringe on top, the black mares and the surrey were real. I remember them well. We were a music loving family; later on in years some of the children played musical instruments. But we all learned to sing. We children were taught to sing at an early age. With my parents, Sunday school, Primary and other activities. We progressed very well. I remember my first appearance in public at about six years of age. Nola was four and I don’t remember the occasion, but the program was held in an old two story church house where the new stake center now stands in Escalante. I remember standing upon a table up in front while mother stood behind us for moral support I suppose. We sang “two little children,” I wondered if we sang loud enough to drum out the sound of our knees knocking together, we were so scared. Mother and father always sang in the church choir and other public appearance of different nature. I had not been feeling well, mother and father went to church and left Veota to care for me, mother had tucked me into bed with a bag of hot salt on my aching ear before they left for church. When I awoke and discovered I had been left home alone, I was truly upset. When Veota wasn’t looking I slipped out the back door and ran as fast I could down to the church. As I ran through the wind by the time I arrived at the chapel my ear was aching again but all I was interested in was getting to the top of the high step and to my mother. It seemed ages before I reached the top, a long time for a four-year-old. I was glad I was tall enough to reach the doorknob. As I entered everyone looked to see what the frugality could be. Still crying with tears streaming down my face running up the aisle with my nose running just as fast. Before I got very far, my mother had me in her comforting arms hurriedly moving back toward the door. By this time my sister had missed me and met mother at the foot of the steps. Mother was very brave in hiding her embarrassment as she went back to help sing the closing song. We still lived in the little blue cottage where I was born during the time we resided in the humble abode of my birth. My sister Nola was born 17th of Sept. 1906. Also my brother Milo 8th of Sept 1908 where we had in the fall of 1910. After returning home from the sweet water ranch near Widtsoe, we as usual spent the summer father placed his family in a large frame house a few miles south of Escalante on Uncle Campbell’s farm for reasons unknown to me. It was a large house with a lovely fireplace on the east side of the living room and a stairway leading up to the bedrooms where we children slept. Christmas as in most homes was and still is the most joyous occasion, but this one stands out more in my childhood memory mother had told us that a new baby was to arrive soon. And that Santa just might bring it on Christmas Eve. After the tree was trimmed and the usual prayers were said mother didn’t seem to be in a usual hurry to get us up the stairs as we sat by the fireplace where the bedtime Christmas stories about baby Jesus were told. She had barely finished when in the distant we heard the jingle of sleigh bells, which of course we were all so eager to hear. Closer and closer they came, then whoa, whoa dasher, whoa dancer was heard in a loud male voice. In seconds the door was thrown open and there stood Santa Claus with a large pack on his back. Just one look and up the stairs Nola and I scrambled. But before we reached the top father had us in his arms descending the stairs regardless of our resistance. Our father’s protective arms calmed our fears as we watched with wide-eyed wonderment as Santa place the presents under the tree and filled the stocking hung along the mantel peace with goodies. As he disappeared out the door, I could not contain my curiosity any longer and I ask why he didn’t come down the chimney. They explained that it was a cold night we had to have such a large fire he might get burned. They didn’t explain about the new baby that night but I wondered. And had to be satisfied and hustled up the stairs to dreamland. I often wondered why my older brother Larvin wasn’t home to see Santa Claus, and later when we ask him he said, “oh, I was at the mutual dance in town” I’m sure he was, but I couldn’t understand why a dance could be more important than seeing Santa clause. Christmas morning as dreams of sugarplums faded and we opened our eyes to morning light I see my father now with his back to the fire his hands behind his back smiling as we dashed down the stairs. The rattle of pans in the kitchen where Veota helped mother fix breakfast when descending the stairs I couldn’t let the other kids be first to reach the bottom, so I quickly climbed upon and slid down the banister and was first in my fathers arms. I looked around for my mother with great expectations I moved to her bedroom door and she was not there, neither was the little new baby. When I came back to the fire, mother had come in from the kitchen and was helping the smaller children dress. I looked at the packages under the tree, also the stockings; none of them looked large enough to conceal a baby. Mother must have read the fresh new look in my eyes, and explained that the new baby was not here yet but they were expecting it to arrive within the next few days. We were content with that, and busied ourselves opening our Christmas packages what joy, Nola and I each had a china doll. Dolls were not made as durable then as today. Our parents explained that we had to be very careful and not drop them or they would break. Curiosity got the best of me, and a few days later, I hit my doll hand with the hammer. And I cried broken heartily when the little hand shattered. Oranges were very hard to come by in those days and for each of us to get an orange was really something wonderful. My grief over the broken doll was somewhat eased as the morning of the 29th of December arrived and also our new baby brother. When Milo heard him cry he said “ chicken, quack, quack” Milo was only two and had never heard a baby before. We were all so happy to have a new baby in the home. I could hardly wait to hold him and when Mary Alice laid him in my arms I thought my heart would burst with pride. The snow was quite deep and the older children went to town to school in a sleigh. Spring and back to the ranch for the summer hooray. There are many happy eventful memories in my childhood. Some not so happy. I recalled that in the autumn of 1912 father decided to take us down to winder for the winter. It later became Widtsoe. With a family of eight to care for, mother was busy as usual, but not to busy for church activities. The bishop ask her to be primary president. She of course accepted. I was now seven and allowed to go to primary. All activities were held in the same building and also school. When school was dismissed early on Friday for primary, the older children babysat. Thanksgiving holiday was excitement in the air. As usual there had to be a children ’s dance. Sister Liza Meacham played the organ and a priesthood member played the violin my mother Avery Jeanette at most presided and always entered in the fun. Sometime a boy was brave enough to ask a girl to dance. But most always girls ask the boy. And when a boy named Leonard Thompson me to dance, I became ill, and went to my mother and pleaded with her to take me home. I had such a headache, I could not think just right, so I just had to suffer on until the party was over. The reason father came to winder is that he got the contract carrying the U.S. mail. He traveled to Escalante and back and Larvin went to Antimony and back, most always by team and buggy by sleigh or horseback. When either at the ranch or in town, friends or relatives stopped by our home either going to or from Escalante by buggy or wagon was the transportation. They usually made it to our place by night. One friend I remember Orrin barker called me his girlfriend usually when I saw him coming in I ran and hid. One evening mother was busy fixing supper when Orin came in, I was at least I thought safely hidden under the kitchen table covered by a large table cloth that hung almost to the floor. Mother had just sat a large pitcher of milk on the table when Orin rushed under the table after me upsetting table, milk and all. Luckily we milked our own cows and had plenty of milk on hand. He felt rather embarrassed and gave mother a handful of change to help make up for the damage. Of course I received some of it. That winter we children had the measles. In February my brother Orlan had rheumatic fever and was bedfast until spring. But aside from all of the troubles and illness another great event was taking place, a new addition to our family. On May 2nd 1913, a baby brother had arrived. I think mother had expected a girl and planned on naming her may so changed it to Mavin. Father and mother acted as switchboard operators for that vicinity. There stood a large telephone pole in front of our house. One day some folks stopped while we kids were playing. The boys were climbing the pole. The folks said they would give me fifty cents if I could climb to the top. I did and I got my fifty cents. I felt like a millionaire. The summer the first car came to our valley, this was a great event. Every one flocked around to see it. A shiny new Model T Ford. The driver told us for as many as could to climb in and would take up for a ride around town. When it came time for us to ride I was almost home. My brother Larvin was faster on foot than I, he grabbed me and climbed into the back seat with me on his lap regardless of all protests. I wasn’t so afraid then. A large part of the summer I lived at Aunt Ysutta and uncle ferry church’s farm down at the Henderson valley the north end of john’s valley. They had no children of their own. Sometimes they made trips to salt Lake City and brought back for me little gifts. One I remember so well was a little red riding hood, also red and white drinking cups. And also red carrot called beads. The cups and beads I still have in my possessions. We lived in winter two years or I should say two winters, the ranch in summer. By these time fathers mail contract ended after the crops were harvested, he took his family back to Escalante. The 21st of October I was eight and this was the first really great event of my life. We had no heated fonts for baptism the children of proper age were taken down to Uncle John’s fishpond at the north east of town. I walked down in to the water with mud squishing up between my toes, the fish darting in every which direction. I loved all things of nature, and was not afraid. I loved the water; we children went swimming in father’s irrigation ditch at the ranch every summer. I was baptized a member of the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints, 12th of august 1913 by Wilford word and confirmed by Danny Wilcox. My father build a nice new home in Escalante, one half block south of the chapel, where we resided in winter and where we went to school in the fall of 1919, until be moved to Widtsoe. We lived in this home in Escalante. My brother Larvin had typhoid fever. And was bedfast about six months. He was so ill and wasn’t expected to live at times. Through the power of the priesthood and our prayers and faith he was healed. When the terrible flu epidemic came in 1918 we escaped it, also my older sister Veota was married to Raul Rothrock in 1915. Something in Escalante in 1919. When they went to Seattle Washington they had 3 children. These were happy events for years. In those days girls didn’t graduate from primary until age 14, which was church regulations. When I graduated and entered mutual, I now must mention another very special event, which took place in the summer of 1917. We were as usual at the ranch at Sweetwater canyon. Father told us that mother was not well, and he must take her to Escalante. He said Nola and I must go to take care of her. They left the three older boys; Larvin, Orlan and Arzy to take care for themselves and 2 small brothers Milo and Cloyd. We took little Mavin with us. We had been there only a few days, then one morning when I came down stairs mother called to me from the bedroom. She said “come here and see what crawled in bed with me last night. Oh what a happy surprise, a tiny new baby. I was so happy I could hardly control my emotions when she told me it was a baby sister. We hadn’t had a baby in the family for four years. To us was such a long time, and then after having three brothers in a row to get a baby sister was such joy. I was twelve and Nola was ten between the two of us we cared for mother and the baby and Mavin. When the baby was a few days old, father returned to the ranch to see about the boys and finish his farming. Aunt Mary Alice shirts came in and gave mother and baby special care. When harvesting the summer crops, father always set aside a tenth of everything for tithing and always the best. As I said before father was fun loving and humorous one day he said, “I guess the baby will have to go for tithing she is the tenth. Such a chorus of “no, no, no” and a lot of tears were shed. Father and mother laughed so hard, that we soon knew that he was teasing us and we still kept our baby sister, Katie Maxine. Born 6th July 1917. In October 1919 we started school in Widtsoe which had grown and name changed from winter to Widtsoe after the Apostle John A. Widtsoe. At fifteen I felt quite grown up and could go to the town’s activities. I am so thankful for the watchful and protecting care and guidance of my loving parents. They were always there when we needed them. Soon after my 15th birthday I was ask to be primary teacher, later Sunday School teacher and it was here in Sunday School that Irving and I met. Here is where our life stories connect and go on from there together. Our engagement: I shall always remember when Irving asked me to be his wife. We went horseback riding, which we often did even though the skies looked like rain it was a calm and beautiful day when we were together. We had ridden a few miles up the road towards Pine Lake where the stately pines swaying slightly in the breeze, just enjoying the scenery and each other’s company then the rain came. There was not much shelter for the horses, but we found the shelter of a large pine tree. And set together with Irving’s raincoat over our shoulders and watched the rain. Among other things we talked about, our ambitions and the things we wanted to accomplish. I said I planned on going back to school and finish high school. Which would be two more years and Irving said, “I wonder what I’m going to do during that time. He was seven years my senior. He had already accomplished so much. Two years in the service of his country two years on an LDS mission and many others and I just only a teenager and the end of my sophomore year but when he ask me to marry him everything else was forgotten. I could hardly believe my ears. I was so in love with him and of course my answer was yes. How long we sat there under the tree or how long it rained I don’t remember but we finally discovered that evening was neigh, and the rained had ceased, it had been such a beautiful day. Each day I thank god for beauty and the rosy light of morning and the glorious sunlight. At evening take joy in the magical sunset and enjoy tranquility of the twilight. While here let me live where Jesus lived, and walk with me and when I leave this earth so I can walk with him.

Life timeline of Daisie L Johnson (Campbell)

Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) was born on 21 Oct 1904
Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) was 10 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) was 25 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) was 26 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) was 40 years old when World War II: The Allied invasion of Normandy—codenamed Operation Overlord—begins with the execution of Operation Neptune (commonly referred to as D-Day), the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy in France. The Allied soldiers quickly break through the Atlantic Wall and push inland in the largest amphibious military operation in history. The Allies of World War II, called the United Nations from the 1 January 1942 declaration, were the countries that together opposed the Axis powers during the Second World War (1939–1945). The Allies promoted the alliance as a means to control German, Japanese and Italian aggression.
Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) was 48 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) was 60 years old when Thirty-five hundred United States Marines are the first American land combat forces committed during the Vietnam War. The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.
Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) was 68 years old when Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers leave South Vietnam. The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and the government of South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese army was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; the South Vietnamese army was supported by the United States, South Korea, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some US perspectives. The majority of Americans believe the war was unjustified. The war would last roughly 19 years and would also form the Laotian Civil War as well as the Cambodian Civil War, which also saw all three countries become communist states in 1975.
Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) died on 25 Nov 1989 at the age of 85
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Daisie L Johnson (Campbell) (21 Oct 1904 - 25 Nov 1989), BillionGraves Record 4092491 Cannonville, Garfield, Utah, United States

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