D. M. Burbank

3 Dec 1814 - 13 Jan 1894

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D. M. Burbank

3 Dec 1814 - 13 Jan 1894
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Daniel Mark Burbank, Jr., was born 10 June 1846 at Farmington, Van Buren, Iowa; married (1) Sarah Adeline Lindsay, 20 April 1867 at the Salt Lake Endowment House. (She was born 6 November 1851 at Pottawattamie County, Iowa; daughter of Edwin Reuben and Tabitha (Cragun) Lindsay.) He married (2) Mary
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Life Information

D. M. Burbank

Born:
Died:

Brigham City Cemetery

300 East 300 South
Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah
United States

Epitaph

A honest upright man
Transcriber

Laralee

May 2, 2012
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GraveScavenger

April 8, 2012

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Daniel Mark Burbank Jr.

Contributor: Laralee Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Daniel Mark Burbank, Jr., was born 10 June 1846 at Farmington, Van Buren, Iowa; married (1) Sarah Adeline Lindsay, 20 April 1867 at the Salt Lake Endowment House. (She was born 6 November 1851 at Pottawattamie County, Iowa; daughter of Edwin Reuben and Tabitha (Cragun) Lindsay.) He married (2) Mary Jane Lindsay , 2 January, 1853 at the Salt Lake Endowment House. (She was born 7 August, 1853, Centerville, Davis County, Utah, a younger sister of his first wife. His parents, due to increasing mob violence against the Saints in Illinois, decided to leave the States and find a home where best they could. We started west into the wilderness amidst rain, snow, and much high water and most excess exposure for men, women and children; leaving our farms, orchards, homes and Temple. Many of our people were poor and destitute of the comforts of life; yet we must go on or be killed; so trusting in God, we arrived at Farmington, Iowa. Daniel Mark Burbank, Jr., was born at this place 10 June 1846, in a rude frontier home with scarcely the necessities of life. In the fall of the year his parents moved on to a place called Old Agency where they could spend the Winter. In the spring they moved on to the Bluffs, called Hannerville. It was in route to the Bluffs that tragedy struck. One morning the team started up suddenly throwing my older brother, Joseph Smith Burbank, out of the wagon and underneath the wagon wheels and he was run over and killed. He was named after the Prophet Joseph Smith whom his father dearly loved. He was buried along the Platte River. He was six years old when his parents started west with the Saints for Salt Lake. His father was made a Captain of ten wagons on this trip. As they were crossing the plains in the alkali desert of Wyoming Cholera broke out among the Company. His mother was among the first to die of the plague. She was placed in a shallow grave, wrapped in a quilt for a coffin and covered over. Sage brush was burned over the grave to stop coyotes from digging up the body. Sarah Zurviah Southworth reports the incident thus; We were traveling along the Platte River when Cholera broke out. Our Captain's wife, Abigail Burbank, died 20 July 1852, near Sweet Water, Nebraska, on the Platte River and was buried with out a coffin, along with many others of the company who died with the disease. A young lady and I were the only ones not afraid to wash and dress her for burial. Her underclothing and night gown were used and then we sewed her up in a sheet and quilt. This was all that could be done for the burial. This left my father with four small children, Mary Lydia, eight; Daniel M. Jr., six; Abigail, four; and Laura, two years. Soon after this Sarah Zurviah Southworth, rode in the wagon and took care of the children. While on the plains near the South Pass, his father married Sarah Z. Southworth, 10 September, 1852. Captain Walker of another Company married them. They sounded a bugle and called the camp together to witness the marriage. We used cedar torch lights for candles, it was on the Green River. It was here we all had scarlet fever, but our new mother nursed us back to health. One day my father saw a lone buffalo with his spyglasses and rode out on the prairie to shoot it for meat for the camp. Soon he was surrounded by about one hundred Indians and we feared for his life, but the Indians brought him back to camp and gave him back to us for flour, sugar, ect. After many trials and privations we arrived in the Great Salt Lake City, 7 October, 1852, and was sent to Springville, in Utah County. The Indians were very bad that winter. In April of 1853 we moved to Grant's Fort (Grantsville) in Tooele County. The settlers had started a Fort and my father helped finish it. They brought in logs from the Oquirrah's and built them a cabin inside the Fort. My father fought in the Utah War in 1856 - 1857 and lived here until June 1863 and then moved to Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah. When Daniel Mark, Jr., was a very young man he again crossed the plains to assist others who were coming to Utah and arrived back in 1863. In Brigham City he met and married Sarah Adeline Lindsay. They travelled by horse and buggy to Salt Lake City to be married in the Endowment House. His first home was in Brigham City. He built most of the furniture that was in it. On the 2nd of January, 1871 he married his second wife, Mary Jane Lindsay, a younger sister of his first wife. This was at the Salt Lake Endowment House. About the year 1874-5 he moved to Deweyville, Utah just north of Brigham City and lived there about twelve years. When the United States Government began hunting and persecuting those who had entered into plural marriage, he took his first wife and moved to Bear Lake County, Idaho and settled at what was later called Bennington. After the persecution had quieted down, his second wife and family were moved to Bennington. His home was built upon a hill near a spring of cold clear water. The town was built below him about two miles. Later he bought a lot in town and built a home there. He was at one time a body guard of President Brigham Young. He did a great deal of missionary work among the Indians and learned their language and could speak as fluently as they themselves. He was well acquainted with Brother Walker, the Indian. When living in Brigham City, he served as policeman for some time. He served in many capacities in the Church, especially Sunday School and as Ward Teacher. His last days were spent doing Temple work for his departed ancestors. He had the courage to accept any calling that came to him and do it well. He lost his second wife, Mary Jane, 5 January, 1918, Bennington, Idaho, and she was buried there 8 January, 1918; his first wife died soon after, 16 November, 1919, at the same place and also was buried there. He died 12 February, 1931, Bennington, Bear Lake, Idaho and was buried there 15 February, 1931. He lived to be nearly 85 years old. Following is a history of Sarah Adeline and Mary Jane (Lindsay) Burbank. Both these sisters married Daniel Mark Burbank, Jr., and this added history enhances the life of all. Thanks to Mavin Sparks, a grandson, here is a poem as well as the history. Grandfather's House How do you write the story Of a house upon the hill? A house that has disappeared And the land is silent and still. Whence came the logs that made its wall? Of mountain fir and pine, Chopped with axe, shaped with adz And hewn to the line. Did they come from Red Canyon Or Maple Canyon's wall? We have lost their story; Gone, and beyond recall. All that's left of this house is a memory fond and dear. Of all the love, struggle and strife; Happiness, hope and fear. But still we have the heritage of this builder's told, Passed down through the family He raised on this virgin soil. by Mavin Sparks. The village of Bennington, Idaho was settled in about 1864 - 5 by a group of Mormons called by President Young and he named it for his native home of Bennington, Vermont. He planned that it would be the central town on the east side of Bear Lake Valley but it has never worked out that way. Bishop Moore was the first Bishop of this Ward and the Priesthood groups from Twin Creeks, now Georgetown, Idaho came to attend their functions here at Bennington. Grandfather Burbank, Daniel Mark Burbank, Jr., came to Bennington in 1886 and built a one room house on a plot of ground just north of the mouth of Red Canyon about three miles east of Bennington. With him came his wife, Sarah Adeline, and eight children; there were nine children in the family at that time but the oldest one was married by this time. With a family of this size, it was rather hard to find a place for all of them to sleep in a one room house. There was a big bed in each corner of the room and a trundle bed under each one of the big ones. Each bed had a curtain of bleach; a light cotton material around it and these curtains had to be washed each week. There was a spring just above the house that has a spout or trough in the stream and their culinary water was taken from this. This was probably quite an asset at that time to have water so close that you could just step out the door and get a bucket full at any time you wanted it; practically as good as having running water piped into the house. Four or five years later, they built another room addition onto the west end of the original house and this served as a kitchen and the boys also used it for a bedroom. The first room was used as bedroom for the parents and the girls. Grandfather probably moved his other family, Mary Jane (Lindsay) Burbank, up to Bear Lake from Deweyville, Utah; and settled them on a plot of ground about a mile and a half west of this cabin. This place is about half way between Red Canyon and Bennington. Before moving this family to Bennington, they became ill. When Grandfather got word about it, he strapped on his snowshoes, (it being the dead of winter) and walked over the mountains to Deweyville, Utah. He told of staying at nights under pine trees by a big fire.Grandmother was worried that he would freeze to death and had no way of knowing whether he ever made it or not for a long time. After the time that the twins were born, Grandfather was seated by the cook stove in the kitchen. He was just rolling a cigarette when the midwife, Hannah McGowen, yelled out to him; "Come quick and help, there's another one " Grandpa vowed that if he could have twin sons, he would never smoke again. So far as is known, he kept that vow. The family used to have a big long table with benches made of log slabs with pole legs. Each child had a special place to sit at this table. Dave had to sit on one end because he was left-handed and it wouldn't interfere with the others so much. Grandpa and Great- grandfather made most of furniture. They built cupboards, beds, and so on. There were a lot of water snakes that stayed around the little stream that ran from their spring and these snakes would crawl onto the doorstep and would often crawl up on a shelf in the kitchen where Grandma kept her home made soap. If you were not careful when you reached for a bar of soap, you might get hold of a snake. To get clay for plastering the cracks between the logs or chinking as it was called, they had to go to Soda Springs, Idaho; a trip of 27 miles with a team and wagon. It required one day to go down there, then a day to load up and come back to a little spring just north of where the Bear Lake, Caribou County line is now, then on home the next day. This clay was used for white wash for the inside walls also. This was merely a thin mixture of the clay and water brushed onto the walls and it would flake and rub off very easily and get into the food and onto the clothing. Also Grandpa would make at least one or two trips to Soda Springs for the famous soda water that is there. They would take fruit juices and mix it with it and put it in quart fruit jars. This made a drink just like our soda pop of today. The children used to pick service berries and dry them for fruit in the winter. There used to be two big bushes or trees of this berry near the east end of the house but they didn't have as good a flavor as the berries that grew in the mouth of the canyon. Also they had a patch of strawberries and raspberries which they had to pick. Usually one of the older girls would go to Deweyville and spend the summer with their sister Abbie (Abigail), the one that was married at the time the family moved here. They would put up fruit and dry it; then in the fall, Grandpa would drive down with a wagon and bring the fruit back. Both going and coming, at the hill between Mink Creek and Preston, everyone would have to walk and some one carry a rock to block the wheels of the wagon when the horses stopped to rest. This was a very steep grade and was hard on the horses. Usually they would camp at the bend of Mink Creek just below this hill. A garden was raised, using water from the spring by the house and from a duck pond in back of the house where a flock of ducks were kept. The cows were pastured up in Red Canyon during the summer. Sometimes they would climb half way up the mountain that rises above the house and the children would have to go after them. Part of the winters were spent getting out logs for firewood. One time while Grandpa was working in the canyon getting out wood, he reached to hook the tug of one of the horses when the horse jerked and caught the end of one of his fingers in the single-tree hook. It took the end of his finger right off and he tore his underwear off to wrap his hand until he got home.On December 7, 1896, one of the boys, Joseph Burbank, was killed when a gun that he was cleaning accidently fired and shot him in the head. Olive was home at the time and tried to do what she could but there was nothing that could be done. She sent one of the twins down through the snow to ask Aunt Mandy (Amanda Hawkins) to come up to help her. The Lindsay's, with whom Mandy Hawkins stayed, lived about half a mile from Grandfather's house. Someone came into Church at Bennington to tell Grandpa and Grandma of the accident. Bennington was a ward of the Bear Lake Stake at that time and the members would have to go to Paris, Idaho, a trip of about twenty miles, to go to Conference. Grandfather's family would go in the lumber wagon, cutting across the valley and fording Bear River below Bennington. It would take all day to go these meetings and back. They used to buy sweet crackers, a cracker similar to a graham cracker only thicker and a can of sardines or some cheese for their lunch while there. Every year or two Grandfather would go over to Crow Creek to a salt spring and get big blocks of rock salt for his stock. For table use, they bought a sack of coarse salt that is usually used for sheep and ground it fine in a coffee-grinder. Grandmother used to put this coarse salt in an earthen bowl, melt it in water, then use this water for making bread and other cooking uses. She used to have to make hot soda biscuits for Grandpa for every meal. She would never let the children make the biscuits because they couldn't make them good enough. Grandmother took in washings some of the time to help make a living for the family. She would go to Montpelier, five miles south of Bennington, gather up the big bundles of clothes, bring them home to wash them, then deliver them for fifty cents a batch. In the summer she would drive the big lumber wagon this distance; in the winter she would use a kind of toboggan behind the team. This toboggan was made by putting a box on the front bob of the sleigh. Often the snow would be over the fences and sometimes it would freeze a crust so hard on it that a horse could walk on it without breaking through. Henry Hoff, a butcher, was one of her customers. She would have to wash the blood out of his big aprons and then starch them so stiff that the apron would stand alone. Grandfather and John Dunn had a dancing school where they would teach the young people to dance. Grandfather played the drums, cymbals, and called the dances while John Dunn played the violin. If the young people didn't do the steps right, John Dunn would be right alongside them, doing the steps to show them how and still play his fiddle. Grandmother was married when she was just a little past fourteen years old; and when she was sixteen, her mother died, leaving two little babies for her to take care of in addition to her own little baby. When Grandfather was courting Grandmother, he came for her one night to go to a dance. Her father said that she couldn't go because her dress was still in the loom. They were weaving a new dress for her and it was not finished and she did not have a dress to wear to a dance. The old house on the hill was torn down in 1920-1 and used for firewood the home that was built on a lot on the north end of Bennington. Dave gave this lot to his mother when he went to Canada to live. The youngest child of Daniel and Sarah owns this house now and lives there. Dorothy Lyona (Bur

Daniel Mark Burbank

Contributor: Laralee Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Following is the life story of Daniel Mark Burbank, the pioneer written by himself in a brown leather covered book of some age, and now held by his son Brigham Southworth Burbank. (Born 3 Dec 1814 Delphi County, New York State; I was the son of Daniel and Margaret (Pynchon) Burbank converted to Mormonism by the Prophet Joseph Smith, Spring of 1841; Baptized 11 April 1841 by William Smith, brother of the Prophet Joseph Smith in the Mississippi River, at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. (William was excommunicated from the church soon after) Ordained an Elder 8 April 1842, and a Seventy, 8 October 1844, by Brigham Young and George A Smith, Received his Endowments 6 Jan 1846 in the Nauvoo Illinois Temple. Ordained a High Priest by Brigham Young at Winter Quarters in 1847 and ordained a Bishop in which he served until 1852, at which time he crossed the Plains to Utah Territory. Ordained a Patriarch 19 April 1883 by Wilford Woodruff. Present at this Conference was President George Q. Cannon, Wilford Woodruff, Lorenzo Snow, and Franklin D. Richards, all members of the Twelve. He died 13 Jan 1894 at Brigham City,. Utah and buried 15 January 1894, Brigham City Cemetery; Services were held in the Brigham City Tabernacle to an overflowing crowd. Apostle Lorenzo Snow and others spoke at his funeral.) In the year 1833, late in the fall I left my trade and came down the Ohio River to Shawnestown and then out to see my two sisters at McLeansbors, whom married the Maulding brothers. I stayed there until in the spring of 1834 when I left and went to my sister's place Eveline Kellogg, Living in the town of Naples, then Morgan County now Scott County Illinois. Here also my youngest brother Augustus lived. At the town of Naples, I lived with my sister Eveline and her husband Orlando Kellogg, being chosen as the guardian of my youngest brother, Augustus Ripley. I entered into service on the farm with him for sometime, then went on a steam boat as a barkeeper at $10.00 per month. Later as stoareman until late in the summer I left this employee and went for myself at $50.00 per month as Pilot and continued in this business for some time operating mostly on the Illinois River. On the 31st of December 1835 I was married to Lydia Vanblaricon, (she was born 10 Dec 1816 in Switzerland County, Indiana) who lived one mile south east of Naples at which town we lived after marriage. I continued to pilot on the Illinois River seeing my wife twice a week.. My wages now were from $100.00 to $150.00 dollars a month, yet some transient trips I got as high as $100.00 dollars In 1836 my wife had small pox and lost her first child and came very near losing her life. On January 12, 1838, Augustus Ripley was born and on September 18, 1838 Lydia died leaving me with the small baby, which my sister Margaret took to raise but it pined its life away and died soon after its mother on 28 September 1838 at age of 8 Months and 16 days. I sold my possessions and continued piloting the river until August 3, 1839, at which time I again was married. Her name was Abigail Blodgett a widow of Mr. King. We were married at Naples and lived at this place until in the spring of 1841 and then moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, being about ninety miles west on the Mississippi river, on its eastern bank. We lived at a place called Nauvoo House, in the north west part of the city, three blocks from the temple, until the fall of 1844 we moved north west three miles on a farm. These were very hard times in Nauvoo for the Saints to live while building the Temple. Our labors were great, for we had to labor days and guard the temple at night. There were many attempts made to burn the Temple, sometimes by false brothern seeking to kill the prophet Joseph Smith also kidnap him and run him into Missouri, and there hand burn or otherwise destroy him. Many times we had to turn out and take him away for a time and then bring him back when times were better. At one time while the Prophet was at Pawpaw Grove on Rock river on a visit, the mob sheriff and posse took him and much maltreated him. Brother Hirum Smith sent out Colonel Charles Kitch, and Colonel Steven Markum and others, each with a party of horseman, one to head towards the Illinois River others by land in other directions while some thirty others went by water on board the steamboat "Maid of Iowa." This steamboat was commanded by Dan Dunun; Captain John Taylor; Sergeant John Venhisen; Second Sergeant George Langley; Stearman, Thomas Briley; pilot and First Sergeant Daniel Mark Burbank. We started down the Mississippi river then turned up the Illinois River. We soon found that there was a boat that had been manned out of St. Louis to receive Joseph the Prophet, and the mob at Ottawa, La Salle County which is on the west side of the river at the mouth of the Fox River; in conjunction would run him into St. Louis then back into the country and there destroy him at their own pleasure. The enemy boat had an armed force and two swivels on board. Her name was Chicago Bell, a very large and strongly built boat, with some hundred men well armed. When we got this news we crowded all steam ahead for the Bell was some four miles ahead at the town of E______ located on the west bank. We had to stop to buy some bricks and mound up the back wall of the furnace but this was soon done and we again were under crowding our little boat day and night until one morning about three o'clock we came in sight of the town Rekin, Taxwell County located on the east bank of the river Illinois. When about one and one half miles of this place we saw a boat leaving the wharf running out across the river west for a small island shoal, which was the main passage channel. She rounded into the right into the this channel and caught fast and could not back off. On nearing her we found it to be the Bell. We stopped and hailed her through a speaking trumpet from the pilot stand and ask if she would let us pass. She wanted to know what boat we were. We told her and she then answered that she would not let us pass. They then swung the Bell around with stern into the willows and made it fast. We then ask if they would not ease off her line and let us pass, but they swore they would not. At this time her deck was black with men. Then the most wonderful thing happened. The spirit of God whispered to me, the pilot whom was at the wheel, and commanded me to go around the Bell through the bush channel west of the island. So I rang the bell at once, and sang out through the lower speaking trumpet to the engineer, to put on the steam. We went through the woods until we reached the main channel above the Bell and we went until day break in the morning we were at the town of Peoria. Here we received news from our Brothern that went by land. So we went on to Peay, La Salle County a town on the west side of the river at the mouth of the canal. Here we got word again that our brothern by land had retaken Joseph Smith the Prophet, and they were on their march for Nauvoo, and ordered us to return to Quency, Adam Co. and there wait for further orders. So back we went passing the Bell again at Diamond Island, at a place known as the Buckhorn Woodyard, the Bell was lying to a wooding. On to Quincy we went and from there ordered back to Nauvoo. On our arrival we found that Joseph Smith, the Prophet, was undergoing his trial and when he saw -us he called to us to wait, that he wanted to see us. In a little while he and Brother Hiram came into our mist and they blessed us in the name of the Lord and we again went to our homes. Then for a while we lived in peace, until the time Joseph gave himself up to go to Carthage, Hancock, County, Illinois, being charged with treason against the government. This was a chame (shame) and a great injustice for he was always loyal and true to the faith. They only wanted to destroy him and this was the design of the whole and entire government, and then after the government had promised them protection, and while Joseph and Hiram were in jail, the mob shot them both to death on 27th of June - 1844. Not long after, the mobs commenced burning our homes, killing our stock all through the country, so that the people at Nauvoo had to turn out and help gather in the poor Saints. Many of them had only the clothes they were left. All of their property had been burned and destroyed, some lost their lives. Irode for some time under Colonel S. Markum on Bear River, Green plains, and also at Carthage and Warsaw, and in touring the country we saw much destruction of houses, animals and crops. In this we got no redress from the government or the president of the United States. So in the year 1846, we had to leave the United States and find a home where best we could. We started into the wilderness, west of Nauvoo amidst -rain and much high water and most excess exposure for men, women and children; leaving our farms, orchards, homes and Temple, got nothing for all our labors from the government. Many of our people were very poor and destitute for the comforts of life, yet we must go on or be killed, so trusting in God we prayed often and after a while came to Farmington Iowa. Here I stopped and labored for goods and remnant for my family. At this place my son Daniel was born June 10, 1846. In the fall I started on west again until I came to a place called Old Agency, where we spent the winter, then on again to the Bluffs to a place called Hanerville. Here I lived on Indian Creek and was Bishop for some time and then moved north sixty miles, taking charge of the church affairs until the year of 1852, we started for Salt Lake City. We traveled across the plains on our way to the Salt Lake, my wife Abigail died, leaving me with four children, three girls and one boy. Such was the sorrows and hardships endured by our people. but we prayed often and after many trials and hardships- the tord ruling and over ruling for our good and safety in all things both spiritual and temporal as our circumstances stood in need-- we came to Salt Lake. Ilanded with my family in the City of Great Salt Lake on the 7th of October 1852. I again was married to Sarah Southworth, but we were married on the plains at South pass, prior to our arrival in Salt Lake. We moved south into Utah County at the town of Springville. Here I built a home and wintered there. then in the spring of 1853, in April I moved to Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah Territory. Here lived ten years, until June 1863, we moved to Brigham City, Boxelder County, Utah Territory. And here my great grandfather lived until death took him from all his labors, and his rest is sweet. He died January 12 1894, at thirteen minutes past 12 o'clock Saturday morning at the age 79 years. Funeral services were held in the Stake Tabernacle in Brigham City, Monday January 14 1894. Remarks were made by Apostle Lorenzo Snow, Stake president Rudger Clawson, Counselor Charles Kelly, Bishop A. A. Jensen, and W. L. Watkins. There was present 4 sons, 7 daughters, 24 grandchildren and between 7 & 8 hundred people. (He was a River boat captain, then pilot of the Maid of Iowa. He was a carpenter while building the Nauvoo Temple. Helped guard the Temple at night from vandalizing mobs. At the request of the Prophet Joseph Smith he went to St. Louis to study obstetrics. Driven out of Nauvoo by the mobs during the fall of 1846 and arrived at Winter Quarters in 1847. His life was greatly influenced by the Prophet Joseph Smith, through the restored Gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.)

Daniel Marcus Burbank Life History

Contributor: Laralee Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Source: This life history was found among family history papers given to me, Jacki Selman Johnson, by my grandmother Lila Burbank Madsen, granddaughter of Daniel Marcus Burbank. I was born in Manchester County, New York, Dec. 3, 1814, the son of Daniel and Margaret Pynchon Burbank. My parents had three sons, Lester, Augustus, and myself, and sisters were Margaret, Aveline, Sophia, Louisa and Mary Anne. Eight of us children. When I was about five years of age, our family, with two other families started West (1819). The Men built a flat bottomed boat along the Monogahala River at a place called Olegan Point- it being one of the forks of the Ohio River. We came down the river on this boat to Cincinnatti, Ohio, and resided there until the Spring of 1820, at which time my father and family and one of the other families again boated down the Ohio River, until we came to a place called Shawncetown, Illinois, Gallatin County, situated on the West bank of the Ohio River. From this place we traveled West into Hamilton County, Illinois, four miles west of McLeansboro; this being the county seat. Here we lived for some time, and where my two older sisters married two brothers. Sophia to Ernie Kaulding and Loiusa to William Maulding. From this place the rest of us moved to Swining Point, Illinois in Morgan county and from there into Exerter, Illinois, Scott County.

The Daniel Mark Burbank History follows:

Contributor: Laralee Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

DANIEL MARK BURBANK (13 December 1814-13 January 1894 [79]) Daniel Mark Burbank was our first Burbank Mormon pioneer ancestor. He was born in Dethy, Western New York, to Major Daniel Burbank (War of 1812) and Margaret Pynchon on December 13, 1814. After Daniel Mark’s father served in the war of 1812, he and his family lived in the western part of New York State. (We do not know where “Dethy” is.) Their last child born in New York was Daniel Mark. D. M. writes in his Record Book: “When I was about five years old my father started West with two other families. They built a flat boat on the Allegheny River at a place called Olean Point. It being one of the forks of the Ohio River. They came on down the river to Cincinnati, Ohio. There they stayed until the spring of the year 1820 when two of them started again on down the river [Ohio] and landed at a placed called Shawneetown, Illinois, on the West side of the Ohio. From this place they traveled West into Hamilton County, Illinois, four miles west of McLeansboro—this being the county seat of Hamilton. Here we lived for some time. When two of my oldest sisters, Sophia and Lisa, married two brothers: Sophia to Ennis Maulding and Lisa to William Maulding. From this point we moved to Swimming Point in Morgan County, Illinois. From this town West to the town of Exeter in the same county [Morgan County]. Here we lived for some time. “When in the year 1826 July 14 my mother Margaret [51] died leaving me only 12 years old and one brother yet younger, Augustus. My sisters Aveline and Margaret then kept house for my father. My sister Margaret, the youngest of the two, married Adam Conrad. They lived in the town of Exeter and my father moved on mile south on a farm at this place. Aveline married one Orlando Kellogg and about this time my father married a widow woman by the names of Adams; she having four girls and two boys. He then brung them home and my sisters moved to another house on the farm. Her [Aveline’s] husband [Orlando Kellogg], being a Captain of a steamboat then running on the Illinois River, my youngest brother went to live with her. We lived on this place till in 1828 when we moved across to the Illinois River at a town of Meredosia. Here my father bought land that lay along the River. We made improvements till in the year 1830 when I started with my youngest sister Mary Ann by water for Cincinnati, Ohio, to where my oldest brother, Lester, lived, to learn the trade of carpenter. “My father was at home, he being quite feeble having lost the use of his right hand by a felon and brutal cure of his wife and doctor. They sought to destroy him and to take away his means made all preparations one morning to cut off his hand. When I asked him if he was against having it done, he being very poor in health and confined to his bed, said my son I don’t know what is best. I replied, don’t father have it cut off. The doctor told me to shut my mouth and the old woman clinching me by the hair of the head and ordered me out of the doors. I then said father they shant cut off your hand. I then ceased my little fowling piece and drove the doctor and the woman out of the house. When my father covered his face with the sheet and wept. I then sent for my brother-in-law [Adam Conrad]. He came and took my father home to his house. There he was nursed. His hand got well, but withered down till it was nothing but skin and bone. Here he stayed for some time till after me and my sister had left thee. He came on to Cincinnati. There spent the summer with his son, Lester. “When in the fall of 1832 he went back to his home farm. His wife married again to another man by the name of Brown. His property was all used up. He landed in the night. In the morning went up to his house and found that Brown had left. His wife urged him to take breakfast. This he refused, but took a cup of coffee, went back to the Hotel was taking to vomiting. Lived 3 or 4 days and died on 27 of October 1832. It was said by the neighbors and doctors that this woman had poisoned him to death. His body was taken to the town of Exeter and buried by the side of my mother West of this town on a high rolling ridge. “Then in the year of 1833 late in the fall I left my trade and came on down the River Ohio to Shawneetown, then out to my two sisters. There I stayed till in the spring of 1834. Then I left and went home to my sister Aveline’s where my youngest brother Augustus lived in the town of Naples, then Morgan County but now Scott County, Illinois.” Daniel Burbank’s oldest son, Asa, graduated from William’s College in 1797. He went to college until he became a medical doctor. The father left Asa $80.00 to purchase a horse, saddle, and bridle so he would have the accepted mode of travel of the doctor of that time. He was a surgeon and well-loved by his patients. Daniel Mark Burbank, through which our blood line runs, kept a little leather-covered record book where we got the records of his father and family. The record book is located in the Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. “In the town of Naples I lived with my sister Aveline for some time and her husband Orlando Kellogg being chosen as guardian for my youngest brother. I entered into serving with him on the farm for a while, then went on a steamboat as bar keeper for Kellogg at $10 a month; then as steersman till late in the summer. Then I left him and went for myself at $50 per month. So in the business I continued as Pilot for some time, mostly on the Illinois River. “When I married Lydia VanBlaricom one mile south, south East of Naples. In this town I then moved and then continued to follow Piloting the River—seeing my family twice a week. The wages from $100 to $125 per month. I got some transient trips that got as high as $100 per day [week?] “So in 1836 my wife had the small pox and lost her child and came very near losing her life. In 1838 [January 12] Augustus was born and September 18, 1838, my wife, Lydia, died leaving me with a small child which my sister, Margaret, took. He soon pinned away and died September 25, 1838, but 8 months 16 days old. [He died ten days after Lydia died.] I sold all out and continued Piloting the River till August 3 in 1839 at Naples was married again to Abigail [Blodgett] King then a widow. We lived at the place til in the spring of 1841. We went to Nauvoo being about 90 miles West on the Mississippi River and on the Eastern Bank, and in April 11, 1841, was baptized in the Mississippi by William Smith at the place called the Nauvoo House. In the north part of the city, three blocks from the temple I lived till the fall of 1845.” Following is Daniel Mark Burbank’s conversion t Mormonism as told by him to his son, Brigham Southworth Burbank: “In the spring of 1841, Daniel Mark Burbank, captain of a river boat, was traveling North on the Mississippi River and had gone past Nauvoo, Illinois, when he was informed that the brick lining of the furnace had deteriorated to such an extent that the fire had to be put out. Daniel ark decided that they would drift back down the river to Nauvoo as they had a wharf there where the repairs could be made. After he had given instructions for the repair, he asked one of the men on the wharf if he knew Joseph Smith, and the man replied that he did; and as he was going in that direction he would escort him there. When they arrived the escort knocked on the door and Emma answered. She asked what they wanted. Daniel Mark said they wanted to see Brother Smith. So he came to the door and while standing at the door, his escort informed the Prophet that Brother Burbank had asked to see him to find out for himself if the Mormons were the rascles some people were saying they were. My father said he looked him in the eye and they seemed to pierce his very soul. He slowly looked down to his feet and Daniel Mark said it seemed that the fluid of his body seemed to flow out of his body. Brother Smith slowly raised his eyes and looking at Daniel Mark made the following statement: ‘Brother Burbank, I can see that you are thirsty for the want of water. Meet me down on the banks of the Mississippi River and you will be baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints!’ Brother Smith then asked Daniel Mark into the house and they talked for a great length of time Brother Smith told him of his experience in the Grove and Daniel Mark Burbank was converted that day. Daniel Mark went forth from the prophet with great joy in his heart and converted his wife, and they returned to Nauvoo. On 11 April 1841 they were baptized in the Mississippi River by William Smith, brother of the Prophet Joseph Smith. They lived in the north part of the city of Nauvoo, three blocks from the Temple until the fall of 1845 when they moved northeast three miles to a farm.” Baptisms for the Dead: Baptisms for the dead was revealed to the Prophet August 15, 1840. January 19, 1841, the Prophet informs the Saints that the baptisms for the dead in the Mississippi River, etc. would not be acceptable. Conference October 2-5, 1841: The Prophet tells the Saints to stop doing baptisms for the dead until they can do them in the House of the Lord. (D&C 124.) November 8, 1841, the wooden baptismal font was dedicated in the Nauvoo Temple and put to use. The stone baptismal font was finished in 1846. D. M. Burbank oversaw the following baptisms for the dead in 1841. The baptisms were recorded in the Nauvoo Baptismal Records of the Dead. Baptisms for the dead were recorded when they started using the wooden font at the Nauvoo Temple, November 1841. We assume this is when his relatives were baptized. His first wife: Lydia VanBlaricom Burbank His father and mother: Daniel and Margaret Burbank Three brothers and five sisters. (Some were baptized 11 August 1844.) Other ancestors. Caring for the Sick: “When Emma, the Prophet’s wife, was given up to die by the Doctor, Joseph called Daniel Mark Burbank to come and see her. Brother Burbank said, ‘I believe I can cure her.’ She said he went to the store and got medicine and stayed two nights and days and cured her. Then the Prophet told Brother Burbank to gather all his books together. The knowledge that Daniel Mark Burbank had was received in a hospital in St. Louis. The Prophet said that it was his mission on earth to attend the sick.” (Sarah Zurviah Southworth Burbank.) Nauvoo Legion: Daniel Mark Burbank was a Third Sergeant, 1st Cohort, 4th Regiment, 2nd Company in Church records dated September 5, 1843. When the city of Nauvoo was incorporated in 1840, it was also authorized to create a military body or militia that came to be known as the Nauvoo Legion. Perhaps influence by genuine disgust with the way the Latter-day Saints had been treated in Missouri, the Illinois legislature acted liberally. The person in charge of the Nauvoo Legion was Lieutenant General Joseph Smith. The following is from the Record Book of Daniel Mark Burbank: “Whilst living in Nauvoo, times was very hard for the Saints to live whilst building the temple. Our labors was great for we had to labor days and guard nights. There was many attempts made to burn the Temple, some times by false brethren seeking to kill the Prophet Joseph Smith—kidnap him and run him into Missouri and there hang, burn or otherwise destroy him. So many times we had to turn out and take the Prophet away and fetch him home again.” Quote from his wife, Sarah Southworth Burbank: “My husband, D. M. Burbank, used to guard his [the Prophet’s] house and took him out in the country and hid him away from the mob. He dressed himself in his mother’s old dress and bonnet and took her cane and basket, bent over and walked passed the mob and got away. My husband guarded the Prophet just before he was taken to Carthage where he was put in jail.” The Maid of Iowa on the Prophet’s Assignment: The mobs were trying to capture the Prophet on the rivers and take him to Missouri. Daniel M. Burbank was first pilot on The Maid of Iowa. Daniel Mark related the following account to his son, Brigham S. Burbank: “When we came upon the ‘Chicago Bell’ at Pekin, Illinois, the mob had expected our coming so they swung the stem of the steamship into the river channel which completely blocked our passage up the river. The men had all blackened their faces and were waving their hands and cursing and swore that they would see us in hell before they would let us pass! Then Daniel Mark Burbank, the Pilot, said he offered a silent prayer while standing at the wheel and asked the Lord to please let him know what to do. He heard a voice behind him say in a clear voice: ‘Full speed ahead and go around the island channel.’ This channel had never been used as a passageway as it was grown-up with willows. When he heard the voice, he turned around quickly to see who was speaking but could see no one in sight and he knew that the Lord had directed. He yelled down the speaking tube to put on the steam and he piloted the boat thru this channel without any apparent damage to the ‘Maid.’” (See History of the Church 5:481-484 entitled “Daniel Mark Burbank’s Account of the Maid of Iowa Expedition for the Prophet’s Relief.”) The above account explains why Daniel Mark did not honor Captain Dan Jones’ command to “Stop the Maid. Stop the Maid or you will smash the boat to pieces.” He knew the Lord had directed his course and he pursued it. Daniel Mark continues: “For a while we lived in peace until about the time that Joseph gave himself up to go to Carthage [27 June 1844], being charged with treason against Government. This was only a sham, for he was always true and loyal. They only wanted to destroy him and this was the desire of the whole and entire Government, and then after that Governor Ford promised him protection by their own men and while in prison they shot him and Bro. Hyrum. “Then not long they commenced burning our houses, killing our stock all thru the country, so that the people at Nauvoo had to turn out and help gather in the poor Saints, many of them had only the clothes on their backs. All had been burned and destroyed and some lost their lives. I rode for some time under Col. Steven Markham on Bear River, Green plains and also at Carthage and Warsaw. In our scouring the country, we saw much destruction of houses, animals and grain. In this we got no redress from the Governor or the President of the United States. “So in 1846, we had to leave the States and find a home where best we could, se we started into the wilderness west leaving our farms, houses, orchards and Temple and got nothing for all our labors. Many were very poor and destitute for the comforts of life, yet we must go or be killed, yes utterly destroyed. “So trusting in God we prayed along till we got into the Valley of the Great Salt Lake—the Lord ruling and over-ruling for our good and safety in all things both in spiritual and temporal as our circumstances stood in need of.” “After leaving Nauvoo I came to Farmington, Iowa. Here I stopped and labored awhile for food and raiment for my family. At this place [Farmington, Iowa] my son Daniel was born, 10 June 1846, and in the fall I started on West again until I came to a place called Old Agency [Florence, Nebraska]. We wintered here, then on to the Bluffs or a placed called Kanesville.” On page 32 of Daniel Mark’s Record Book it is entered: “Joseph Smith Burbank, died 6 July 1848.” They must have been near Kanesville when he was run over, because they first arrived in this area in the spring of 1847. Also written in Daniel Burbank, III’s history: “The team started up suddenly throwing my older brother, Joseph Smith Burbank, out of the wagon and under the wagon wheels and he was run over and killed. He was named after the Prophet Joseph Smith whom my father loved.” “Here I lived on Indian Creek and was Bishop for some time, then moved north 60 miles, taking charge of the Church affairs.” During 1846-1852 there were more than 70 settlements in Iowa. Bishops were ordained to preside over the temporal affairs of the Church in the different branches. They were to care for the needy, widows, and orphans. They were to be the fathers of the branches. Orson Hyde, in instructing the bishops of their calling, had this to say: “There will be many calls on you for assistance and aid, because you are the men appointed to receive the tithing, and from it to administer to the wants of the poor. It is desirable that the honest and virtuous poor should receive succor from the Church; but such persons as waste their time in bed in the morning when they should be up and at work if they are healthy, have no claim on you for support. That family who are guilty of profanity or suffer the name of their house, have no claim on the tithing for support. Parents who have boys and girls large enough to earn their living, yet instead of working, idle away their time, have no claim on you for aid…. Let your disbursements prove that the Church does not tolerate idleness in any shape or form, neither crime, nor immorality.” (Frontier Guardian, [semi-monthly organ of the LDS Church at Kanesville, Iowa, edited by Orson Hyde], August 8, 1849.) Kanesville, Iowa, December 1847: The Quorum of the Twelve wanted to announce to the Saints the reestablishment of the First Presidency. It remained only to place the matter before a meeting of the general membership. A large meetinghouse was commissioned to be completed as soon as possible. About 200 men were called to assist in construction. (Possibly Daniel Mark Burbank was one of them since he was a Bishop on Indian Creek.) Within three weeks of hard winter labor, it was completed. Built with logs cut three miles away and carted to the site, the Kanesville Log Tabernacle, as it came to be called, was impressively large—60 feet west to east and 40 feet north to south. The walls were eight logs high, and the log roof was covered with willow straw and dirt. The tabernacle was capable of containing 1,000 seated. It stood near Indian Creek, four miles from Council Point. The First Presidency was sustained December 27, 1847: President Brigham Young, First Counselor Heber C. Kimball, and Second Counselor Willard Richards. Kanesville was on Indian Creek and Mosquito Creek. This town was designed to be a fitting-out place, a layover town where those too poor, tired, discouraged, or unprepared could delay their journey, plant and sow crops, procure teams and outfits, and make other necessary preparations. In the winter and spring of 1852 Daniel Mark was busy in making and repairing wagons for the poor Saints to cross the plains. The John B. Walker Company departed 26-30 June 1852 and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley 2-7 October 1852. About 258 individuals were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post in Kanesville. Daniel Mark was called to be Captain of ten wagons [50 Saints] in the Walker Company. “When on the plains my wife Abigail died leaving me with 4 children, one boy and three girls.” Sarah Z. Southworth, who later became Daniel Mark’s third wife writes of this incident: “Then we went along the Platte River where we had Cholera [from the water.] Five died in our camp. Our captain, Daniel M. Burbank’s wife Abigail died with Cholera 20 July 1852 near Sweetwater, Nebraska on the Platte River, at 41 years, 3 months, and 25 days old, and was buried without a coffin by the Platte River along with others. We had to go on in the morning never to see their graves again. The night that Abby was buried the wolves were howling. It was awful to hear the dirt thrown on their bodies. A young lady and I were the only ones to wash and dress her with what we could find, her underclothing and night-gown. We sewed her up in a sheet and quilt. That was all that could be done for her burial. All the women in the camp were afraid to prepare the body, for fear they would catch the cholera from her. This young girl and I were not afraid to take care of the body. We were only 16-years old but brave in that case.” From Sarah Zurviah Southworth Burbank: “We started in June and were four months on our journey before we reached Salt Lake Valley. About two months after Abby died I married Daniel Mark Burbank on the plains [September 10, 1852]. Captain Walker of another company that camped by us married us one evening. The bugle called the called the cams and they came together to witness our marriage. We had cedar torch lights instead of candles. It was by Green River in September. There I mothered four children that were sick with scarlet fever. My husband and I had great trouble with sickness the rest of the way. We also had a number of oxen die and had to stop to get cows instead of oxen. A hundred Indians took Daniel M. Burbank a prisoner. We thought he would be killed but the chief gave him up to us if we would give them flour, sugar, and coffee. We rejoiced when we saw the Captain alive. He had gone to hunt a buffalo that he had spied through a spy glass. He had killed the buffalos before when hunting for a camping place. “The poor cows furnished us with milk or we would have suffered for a drink as the water was so bad for hundreds of miles. We had to grind parched corn in coffee mills to eat with our milk to save our flour. We would eat it in milk at night.” At this time his oldest child was about eight years old and his youngest was two years old. His third wife, Sarah Zurviah Southworth, was born 10 February 1835, Bastard, Leads Col, Ontario, Canada. She was 17 years, 7 months old when she married Daniel M. Burbank, and he was 37 years 9 months and 7 days old, or 20 years her senior, and they raised a family of 13 children of their own, plus four from Abby. She died 27 Ma 1927, Deweyville, Utah, and was buried at Brigham City, Utah. (Age 92 years, 3 months, 17 days.) He received his endowment in the temple at Nauvoo, January 16, 1846, and on the 17th of the same month was sealed to Lydia VanBlaricom (deceased) and Abigail Blodgett by Heber C. Kimball. Brigham Young being present. Sarah Zurviah Southworth was sealed to him in the Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Utah, by Heber C. Kimball, July 16th, 1864. Daniel Mark continues: “On 7 October 1852 I landed with my family in the City of Great Salt Lake, then moved south into Utah County at a place called Springville, Utah. At Springville I built a house and wintered there. Times were very hard and the Indians were restless because we were settling in their hunting grounds. So in the spring of 1853 in April I moved my family to [Grant’s Fort] Grantsville, Tooele, Utah Territory.” He helped finish building the Fort. They brought in logs from the Oquirrh Mountains and built a log cabin inside for protection from the Piutes. There were intermittent raids by the Indians on the settlers’ cows and horses. The Saints had another situation in the year 1857. Johnston’s Army was coming to Utah. The U.S. government was coming to stop the “Mormon Rebellion.” The story is well known how the Church recalled its members who abandoned their settlements to come home to the Salt Lake Valley to protect themselves. It was determined that the Army would never enter the Salt Lake Valley. Daniel Mark Burbank joined Major Warren Snow’s Command of Cavalry and was appointed a Chaplain and Commissarian of the command. It was a very hard winter for him. (October 23-December 2, 1857.)His report of the experience is recorded in Journal History 2 December 1857, 4-7, Church History Library, SLC, Utah. Following is how he ended his report: “Sir [Brother Woodruff]: I wish to make a statement touching our fare and what we received while out on this campaign. We got five plugs of tobacco in all, some coffee, tea, sugar, flour, and a little beef. Then what was it that we did not get? No blankets, no overshirts, no socks, mittens or gloves, and none of the dried fruit that Pres. Young sent to the command; none of the many overshirts made by the different wards. No salt to salt our dying beef with. “With this I will close, hoping that in the future we will see such times no more. “Your brother in Christ, Daniel M. Burbank “Chaplain and Commissary: Major Snow’s Command.” After the campaign he returned to his wife and family in Grantsville, and in the month of June 1863, after ten years in Grantsville, they moved to Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah Territory. His father-in-law Chester Southworth and family resided there. He followed his trade of carpenter. He helped build the Brigham City Tabernacle, furniture, many homes and other buildings in Box Elder County. He was very active in Church affairs. He was baptized 11 April 1841 in the Mississippi River by William Smith, brother of the Prophet Joseph. Ordained an Elder 8 April 1842 by Brigham Young. Ordained a Seventy 8 October 1844 by Brigham Young (8th Quorum of Seventy). He was ordained a High Priest at Winter Quarters in 1847, and a Bishop on Indian Creek by Kanesville, Iowa. He was ordained a Patriarch 29 April 1883 by Apostle Wilford Woodruff. Daniel Mark Burbank died 13 January 1894 at 13 minutes past 12 o’clock, Saturday morning, aged 79 years, 1 month, 10 days. Funeral services were held in the stake tabernacle in Brigham City, Monday 15 January 1894. Remarks were made by Apostle Lorenzo Snow, Stake President Rudger Clawson, Counselor Charles Kelley, Bishops A. A. Jensen and W. L. Watkins. There were present 4 sons, 7 daughters, 24 grandchildren and between 700 and 800 attended. Buried in the Brigham City Cemetery.

BURBANK FAMILY HISTORY FOLLOWS:

Contributor: Laralee Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

BURBANK FAMILY HISTORY 14 February 2018 Note: At the time of the first English Settlements in New England, the New Year began on March 25th (Annunciation of Ladies Day), and a date written as “10th day of the second month” referred to 10 April, and not February from 1671 to 1686, the New Year began on March 1st and in the next year, 1667, it began on January 1st as at the present, but the change was not made in England until many years later. During these periods a form of designating the years was employed consisting of a double date 1649/1650 (1649 old style, 1650 new style.) The first time this form was used by the General Court of Connecticut was on 20 March 1649/50. (Handbook of Genealogy, by Henry R. Stiles, 52.) Note: In early colonial times Clergymen, graduates of colleges, members of the General Court, and planters of good families, were called, “Gentlemen” and addressed as Mr. Those without these advantages, including those of respectable character, and who owned lands, and the better class of laborers and tenants were called “Yeomen” and addressed as “Goodman” and the wife as “Goodwife,” or sometimes “Goody.” (Lyman Beecher’s Autiobiography, Vol. 1, 11.) 1.JOHN BURBANK SR. (1551-1581) ELIZABETH WILSON (1542-1590) JOHN BURBANK SR. was born about 1551, in Greystoke Manor, Cumberland, England, to unknown parents. He married Elizabeth Wilson, 31 October 1563, Cumberland, England. John Burbank died 3 January 1581, Greystoke Manor, Cumberland, England, age 30. Greystoke Castle Where John Burbank lived and died. ELIZABETH WILSON was born about 1542, of Greystoke, Cumberland, England, to unknown parents. She married John Burbank, 31 October 1563, Cumberland England. Elizabeth Wilson died about 1590, of Greystoke, Cumberland, England, age 48. Greystoke, Cumberland, England, Painting Child of John Burbank and Elizabeth Wilson: 1.JOHN BURBANK was born 21 September 1571, in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, to John Burbank Sr. (1551-1581) and Elizabeth Wilson (1542-1590.) He married (1) *Anne Gordon; (2) Abigail Unknown, about 1600. Arrived America 1635. John Burbank Sr. died about 1671 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England. + 2.JOHN BURBANK (1571-1671) ANN GORDON (1576-1676) JOHN BURBANK was born 21 September 1571, in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, to John Burbank Sr. (1551-1581) and Elizabeth Wilson (1542-1590.) He married (1) *Anne Gordon; (2) Abigail Unknown, about 1600. John Burbank Sr. died about 1671 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, age 90. ANNE GORDON was born about 1576 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England to unknown parents. She married John Burbank. Anne Gordon died about 1676 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, age 100. Child of John Burbank and Ann Gordon: 1.JOHN BURBANK was born about 1602, of England, to John Burbank (1571-1671) and Ann Gordon (1576-1676.) He married (1) *(Joan) Ann Jordan in about 1639. Ann Jordan died in about 1642, at Rowley, Massachusetts; married (2) Jemima Unknown in about 1643. Jemima died at Rowley, Massachusetts, on 24 March 1693. John Burbank died 3 April 1683, in Rowley, Massachusetts, at age 81. + 3. JOHN BURBANK (1602-1683) ANN JORDAN (1610-1642) JOHN BURBANK was born about 1602, of England, to John Burbank Sr. (1571-1671) and Ann Gordon (1576-1676.) He married (1) *(Joan) Ann Jordan in about 1639. Ann Jordan died in about 1642, at Rowley, Massachusetts; married (2) Jemima in about 1643. Jemima died at Rowley, Massachusetts, on 24 March 1693. John Burbank died 3 April 1683, at Rowley, Massachusetts, age 72. John Burbank (Borebancke) the Immigrant: The name Joseph Burbank has been a stumbling block to all those descendants who have traced their ancestry back to John, the Immigrant, because none of the Immigrant lists had a John Burbank. Here is the key to the problem. (New England Historical Genealogical Register, Vol. 94; pp. 393-4, by William B. Dibble): John (Immigrant) and Ann Burbank -- a suggested identity: In 1635 the ship Abigail, Robert Hackwell, master, sailed from London, England to Boston, Mass. Among the passengers as given in Hotten's list of immigrants to America were George Hadborne, 43 years, his wife Anne, and two children (Rebecca Ann), and Joseph Borebancke, 24 years and Joane Jorden, 16 years, servants of Geo. Hadborne. Drake's Founders of New England gives these names as Joseph Borebanck and Jorden -- the same as Hotten, but Bank's Planters of the Commonwealth, published about seventy years later than Hotten and Drake, presents the names as Joseph Borebank and Joan Jordan. Among others listed for the same trip of the Abigail were (Hotten's List ) Jo. West, Jo. Fox, Jo. Freeman, John Rookeman, 45 years, Jo. Rookerman, 9 years. (All these appearing in the index as JOHN. Drake has them listed as Jo. with one exception, John Freeman, Savage and Banks called them JOHN.) Another family listed by Hotten for the same voyage of the Abigail was that of Christopher Foster, 32 years; Frances, 25 years, and children Rebecca, 5 years; Nathaniel, 2 years, and Jo. 1 year. Hotten indexes Jo. as John but Banks calls him Joseph. This Foster family settled at Lynn, Mass., and in a few years moved to Southampton, Long Island, where the young Jo. was known as John: a name which was carried down for several generations (History of Southampton) and agrees with the Foster Family Bible, now owned by a descendant in Michigan. Other boats sailing from London the same year show the same discrepancies in the names of several passengers listed as Jo, a fact which shows that the listing clerk at London was not particular how he wrote the name John, usually spelling it Jo. The contributor has not found any but who was later called John. Considering the discrepancies in the printed lists and indexes of Hotten, Drake and Banks, it is suggested that the Joseph Borabancke and Joan Jorden, servants to George Hepburn, were John Burbank and wife Ann (Joan shortened to Ann) Jordan, who were at Rowley in 1638 or 1639. Their surnames had various spellings but finally settled down to Burbank and Jordan. Coming as servants to Geo. Hepburn, who settled in Charlestown, they worked out their passage as was the custom. This usually took about four years, which accounts for the time between their passage and their settling at Rowley, Mass. - having been married in the meantime. John Burbank and wife Ann had a son John Burbank, Jr., who married Susannah Merrill, daughter of Nathaniel and Susannah (Wilterton) Merrill. Nathaniel Merrill died and his widow married Stephen Jordan of Newbury -which adjoins Rowley, Mass. It has been suggested that Stephen Jordan was a relation of Ann (Jordan) Burbank and that John Burbank, Jr., when visiting Stephen Jordan, met his stepdaughter, Susannah Merrill, and married her. We do not know why John Burbank and Ann Jordan wanted to come to the New World. Was he working as an apprentice to George Hepburn? What about Joan Jordan? Was she related to George Hepburn some way through the marriage of one of his sisters to a Jordan? Maybe John and Ann were in love and did not want to be separated when one of them decided to come to the New World. John Burbank History Continues: John Burbank (about age 24) in 1635, was an immigrant on the ship Abigail from London, England, to Boston, Bay Colony, 15 years after the Mayflower. His age was given in 1635 as 24 years which would place his birth about 1611 give or take a year on either side. It is presumed he was born in London, England, as this is a stronghold for the Burbank name. It is also presumed that he married (Joan) Ann Jordan about 1639, in Rowley, Massachusetts, probably around the time he joined the Rogers Company that settled in Rowley, Massachusetts. From1635 to 1638 John Burbank probably lived with George Hepburn at Charlestown to work out his passage as a servant. Gage's History of Rowley says: “On the arrival of Rev. Ezekiel Rogers, with about twenty families in December 1638, the towns of Salem, Charlestown, Boston, Medford, Watertown, Roxbury, Lynn, Dorchester, together with Cambridge, Ipswich, Newbury, Weymouth, Hingham, Concord, Dedham, and Braintree were all taken up.” They (Rogers Company) spent the winter in Salem and improved the time in looking for a place for a plantation. Mr. Rogers was a man of great note in England for his piety, zeal and ability. He and his people had concluded to take a place between Ipswich and Newbury; and these towns having granted some farms on this tracts. Mr. Rogers' Company purchased them at a price of 800 pounds. This place was at first called Mr. Rogers Plantation -- afterwards, Rowley; so called from Rowley, Yorkshire, England, where he and some of his people had lived. During his wanderings among the Colonies, Mr. Rogers added forty more families to his Company; so that with the 18 families who came from England with him, the Company numbered 58 families when they settled at Rowley in the spring or summer of 1639. (In the list of 40 families joining Mr. Rogers is Goodman Burbank, so called because the title of Mr. was a title of quite high rank in Colonial days, and John Burbank had not received his Freeman papers until after he arrived at Rowley, 16 May1640; having worked out his passage to America with George Hepburn. John Burbank settled in Rowley, Massachusetts, where he was made a freeman in 1640 and was recorded as a proprietor of the town in 1640. There is no record of where he came from. He held various offices, was chosen one of the overseers of Rowley for 1661-1662. He left an estate of £180 after he had given 60 pounds to his son John Jr. and land to his daughter Julia. He left quite a detailed will. John Burbank left a will on 5 April 1681 at Rowley. His estate was probated at Rowley on 10 April 1681. He died in 1682, at about age 68. On the night of Mr. Rogers' third marriage, July 16, 1651, his dwelling house with all his goods, library, and Church records were consumed by fire. The Church records, no doubt, contained much valuable historical and genealogical matter. Probably, all records of John Burbank, as to whence he came, and when, were destroyed. The families worked together in common for about five years. The land was surveyed in 1643, and each freeman or family was granted one and a half acres. The ones who contributed towards the 800-pound fund were allotted more land, so, John Burbank, very likely, did not have much money, as he was given only an acre and half of land -- the seventh lot on Bradford St., part of it lying on the west side and part of it on the east side of the street, bounded on the south side by Thomas Sumner's house lot. All lots on this street went to the brook, so, the owners could get water without going off their own land. In 1672, he owned some fresh meadow on Plum Island -- the land is described as, 1-0-0, which probably means one acre, and this may have been allotted him 1643, and that would make him a half acre in the house lot on Bradford street, where he built his home. Others have acre lots of "fresh meadow" on Plum Island, and these lots, or many of them, were bought by Father Jewett, and among those sold was the lot of John Burbanke, Sr. Quarterly Court 1672, Essex Co. John Burbank of Rowley and Annie Cooper depose regarding Thomas Sumner, a resident of Rowley. In several instances it is impossible to distinguish between John Burbank, Sr., and John Burbank, Jr., but most of the court records, of which there are a plenty, belong to John, Jr. It appears by the court record that John, Jr., could write his name, while John, Sr., signed his will with a mark. Rather unusual. Generally, the immigrant could write, while many of the second and third generations could not. The immigrant left an estate of £180, after he had given £60 too his son, John, Jr., and land to his daughter, Lydia. The Last Will and Testament of John Burbank of Rowley in the county of Essex in New England is as follows: I being att this day aged & Decriped in body thought having Mercy of Perfect Memory & understanding, Knowing how fraile my Life is and not Knowing the Day of my Desolutions, that my House may be so far sett in Order & trouble as much as in me lieth, prevented after my departure therefore appoynt this to be my Last will. My soule I committ into the hands of him that gave it and my body to be interred by decent buriall in hope of a blessed Ressureection through the Lord Jesus Christ. As to my outward estate I dispose of it in Manner following: To my beloved wife Gemima I give half my dwelling house & half my Lands throughout to be at her dispose during her naturall life. Also I give her all my household stuff bedding utensils & necessary things in the house for her natural life and what of them she hath not occasion to Dispose off or her comfortable Maintenance & livelyhood after her decease to my son Caleb, also I give her one Cow and the keeping of her Winter & Summer, also convenient fire wood shall yearly be provided for her during her Naturall Life by my Executor. Also I give her the third part of the fruit of the orchard yearly, also I give her the keeping of a pig or swine yearly during her life. To my son John Burbank I give the sum of forty shillings in Cattle to be paid within one year after my Decease if he come and Receive it in Rowley the reason I now give him no more is because I have given him what I thought was sufficient according to my ability in Cattle and Household stuff & Village Land, all I judge to be worth about three score pounds which when I gave it him it was accepted by him as his full portion and that in presence of Capt. Brocklebank and his wife before whom he gave it under his hand that he would Desire no more of what I have Left. To his son Timothy my grandchild who lieth with Capt. Saltonstall after he cometh to the age of twenty-one years I give a beast of about three pounds price. To my Daughter Lydia having given her Merrimack Land or my Land at Bradford and other necessaries I hereby Confirm it to her Husband and her and their Children. Also I give her Ten pounds to be Paid in Rowley within one year after my Wife her decease in cattle. To my son Caleb I give the half of my Dwelling and Barn and the other half of all my Lands & Meadows that is to say Land s Divided or not Divided, or Layd out within the bounds of Rowley and the other half given to his Mother for Life to be to him & his Heirs after her Decease and all my Moveables not given my Wife. My will is that my son Caleb Burbank be my sole Executor and that he pay all Debts and Legacys given in my Will as an Explaination of what I have given my wife. My will is that my Executor provide all comfortable necessaries for my beloved wife During her Natural Life both for Health and sickness according as my overseers shall think & Judge convenient. If my son or those that survive him provide not according to her need and expectation my will is, and that which I desire that my loving friends Daniel Wicam & Nehemiah Jewett be my overseers to see that my will be performed and especially that my wife be well provided for. For as she may need and he thus providing according to her need then the Lands given her to be free to my son Caleb as the other Lands given him. Signed Sealed and Declared to be his Last Will and Testament the fifth Day of April Anno Domini: 1681. his mark X John Burbank In presence of Witness: Nehemiah Jewett Danl. Wickam Att Court at Ipswich 10th of April 1683 from website http://users.ev1.net/~hmltn/burbank/burbank.htm John Burbank died 3 April 1683, in Rowley, Massachusetts, at age 81. JOAN or ANN JORDAN was born about 1610, in England, to unknown parents. John Burbank, the immigrant to America, was born about 1602 in England. His future wife Joan or Ann Jordan, was also born in England, about 1610. They are both listed as coming on the ship, Abigail in 1635 as servants to George Hadborne. John and Ann married about 1639, in Rowley. They settled in Rowley, Massachusetts, and had two children: John Burbank (b. 1639/40) and Timothy (b. 1641). Ann died in 1642/43, age 24. John married Jemima Unknown about 1643 probably in Rowley, Massachusetts, and had Lydia, Caleb and Mary. John Burbank died 3 April 1683 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts. John Burbank and wife Ann had a son John Burbank, who married Susannah Merrill, daughter of Nataniel and Susannah Merrill. Nathaniel Merrill died and his widow married Stephen Jordan of Newbury. It has been suggested that Stephen Jordan was a relation of Ann (Jordan) Burbank, John's mother, and that John Burbank, when visiting Stephen Jordan in the adjoining town of Newbury, met the stepdaughter of Stephen Jordan, Sussanah Merrill, and married her. Children of John Burbank and Ann Jordan: 1.JOHN BURBANK was born about 1640, to John Burbank (1602-1683) and Ann Jordan (1610-1642.) He married Susannah Merrill, 15 October 1663. John Burbank died 1 June 1709, at Suffield, Massachusetts, age 69. 2.Timothy Burbank, b. 18 May 1641, Rowley; d. 14 July 1660, Rowley, age 19, unmarried. He was a carpenter by trade. Children of John Burbank and Jemima (___) Burbank, all born at Rowley were: 1.Lydia Burbank, b. 7 April 1644; md. Abraham Foster, 1657. 2.Caleb Burbank, b. 19 May 1646; md. Marth Smith, 6 May 1669; d. before 25 March 1690. 3.Timothy Burbank, b. 24 Jan 1677; d. abt. 1703, prob. Unmd. 4.Martha Burbank, b. 22 Feb 1679-80; md. Daniel Gage, 9 Mar 1697-8. 5.Eleazer Burbank, b. 14 Mar 1681-2; md. Lydia Kimball, 14 Feb 1759; d. 14 Feb 1759. (Descendants: Luther Burbank, California, originated many new varieties of fruit, flowers, and vegetables; George Burbank Sedgley, author and compiler of Burbank genealogy, 1928.) 6.Ebenezer Burbank, B. 28 June 1687; Md. Widow Walker Hardy, 19 Apr 1711; d. Nov or Dec 1760. 7.Mary Burbank, b. 16 May 1655; buried at Rowley, 12 July 1660. (Source: John Burbank of Rowley, Massachusetts, and some of His Descendants, by: N. P. Maling.) (Source: Genealogy of the Burbank Families, by George Burbank Sedgeley, 1928.) + 3. JOHN BURBANK II (1640-1709) SUSANNAH MERRILL (1638-1690) (16th Century Man) JOHN BURBANK was born about 1640, in Rowley, Massachusetts, to John Burbank (1602-1683) and (Joan) Ann Jordan (1610-1642) the immigrants. He married (1) *Susannah Merrill, 15 October 1663, at Newbury, Massachusetts. Susannah died at Suffield, on 10 October 1690. He married (2) Sarah Hart Scone, 15 July 1692, at Springfield, Massachusetts. Sarah died at Suffield, on 19 August 1692. He married (3) Mehitable Saunders, 9 January 1693, at Springfield. Mehitable died at Suffield, on 24 February 1728, at about age 67. John Burbank died 1 June 1709, at Suffield, Massachusetts, age 69. He lived in Newbury, Rowley, and Haverhill, Massachusetts, then moved to Suffield, Connecticut in 1680. Nothing is recorded of his early youth in Rowley except this court record: 1659—John Burbank fined for excessive drinking (this may have been either John Jr., at the age of 20, or his father, John Sr., at the age of 59.) John Burbank was made a freeman in Boston, Massachusetts, on 13 May 1640. Four years after his marriage and one year after the birth of his first child, Mary, in a case in court of a least dated June 3, 1667: “Whereas John Burbank Jr., of Rowley, had taken half of the farm of Phillip Neilson of Rowley, lying near Merrimacke River next to the Newbury line, which was let to said Burbank by assignment of John Willcot of Newbury. Burbank having suffered great damage because the house and barn were not finished as they should be, and likewise in falling short both of land and meadow of what was expected. Philip Neilson was to let said Burbank live the present year upon the farm rent free, and to have the improvement of the farm, and Burbank was to acquit said Neilson of all debts paying for future time a yearly rental.” After he settled in Suffield, he participated in the land grants at Suffield, in 1674 but was delayed from taking up the land by King Philip’s War. Around the year 1668, he moved to Haverhill, which was farther west on the Merrimacke River. Here the last three of his children, all sons, were born: Timothy, John III, and Ebenezer. From Connecticut records 1674, John Burbank was granted fifty acres of land in Suffield. He was a large landholder, and much employed by Major Pynchon in building and clearing land in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when the town was organized, but never held office. His name is found in Major Pynchon’s account book oftener than any Suffield man. He must have been a man of business. (Major Daniel Burbank, a descendant of this John Burbank, married Margaret Pynchon, a descendant of Major Pynchon.) His sons John III and Ebenezer were afterwards prominent men in town matters. His homestead was at the north end of Feather Street. His name appears several times in the Suffield records much earlier than 1680. In fact he was granted 50 acres in 1674, but he did not live there for any length of time until 1680. John’s son Timothy did not go with his father to Suffield, Connecticut, in 1680. He was then 12 years old and must have taken an apprenticeship with Capt. Saltonstall if Ipswich, Massachusetts. He became a sea captain. When Suffield was laid out it was part of Maj. Pynchon’s plantation in Massachusetts, but when the Connecticut line was formed, it was located about seven miles inside Connecticut, and about six more miles to Springfield. John was very actively engaged in work for Major Pynchon. It appears from all records that he was energetic, well-to-do, a prominent citizen, and large land holder. He had three wives having two daughters and three sons. In the last years of his life, John began to lose his mental facilities similar to the ailment that struct his brother Caleb at a younger age. John Burbank died 1 June 1709, at Suffield, Massachusetts, age 69. •2. John2 Burbank ( John1 (1)), was born at Rowley, Mass., in 1640 or 1642; died June 1, 1709; married, first, at Newbury, Mass., Oct.15, 1663, Susannah, daughter Nathaniel and Susannah (Jordon) Merrill (she died Oct. 10, 1690 at Suffield, Conn.); married, second, at Springfield, Mass., July 15, 1692, Sarah, widow of John Scone of Westfield, Mass., and daughter of Elisha Hart (she died, Aug. 19, 1692); married, third, at Springfield, Mass., Jan. 1693-4, widow Mehitable Sanders (she died Feb. 24, 1727-8). He lived in Newbury, Rowley, and Haverhill, Mass., and moved to Suffield, Conn, in 1680. His anme appears several times in the Suffield records much earlier than 1680, but he did not live there for any length of time until 1680. After he settled in Suffield it appears from all records that he was energetic, well-to-do, a prominent citizen, and large land holder. The last year or two of his life his mind went wrong --- the same with his half-brother, Caleb, only at a younger age. The records in Massachusetts, together with the fact that his oldest son, Timothy, was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, shows that for some reason he was not as prosperous the first half of his life. From Essex County Quarterly Court Records and Files: Mention is made in a case in court of a lease dated June 3, 1667, whereas John Burbanke, Jr., of Rowley, had taken half of the farm of Philip Nellson of Rowley, lying near Merrimacke river next to Newbury line, which was let to said Burbanke by assignment of John Willcot of newbury. Burbanke having suffered great damage for not finishing the house and barn as it should be finished and likewise in falling short both of land and meadow of what was expected. Philip Nellson was to let said Burbanke live the present year upon the farm, rent free, and to have the improvement of the farm, and Burbanke was to acquit said Nellson of all debts paying for future time a yearly rental. Sept. 1677. John Borbank is mentioned with other citizens as against the demand of Mr. Shepard for fifty pounds per annum. July 16, 1772. John Burbanke, aged about thirty years, made a deposition in regard to some land that it was required he should appraise. Nov. 1673. John Burbanke as a witness in court at Salem. His autograph is in the original. (In this case it is easy to distinguish between him and his father by his signature.) June 1674. Testimony of John Burbank in court in regard to a controversy. Vol. 5: p. 331. Receipt given to John Burbanke of Haverhill by John Godfrey of Salem dated April 2, 1674. (This case seems to be over a cow.) April 1679. John Burbanke with others testifies in a case at court. (His autograph appears in the original.) 1659. John Burbank fined for excesive drinking. (This may have been either John, Jr., at the age of about 20, or his father, John, Sr., at the age of 59.) John Burbank was admonished by the court for going into a neighbor's house in the night after fire when the family were abed. (There were matches at that period, and it seems the habit was to go to a neighbor's house when the fire went out and borrow live coals. It is impossible to tell for sure which John was after the fire.) At another time he called in the neighbors to see how bad his barn leaked; this was probably in connection with the court case about the rented farm. (The writer accords the testimony in the witch trial of Margaret Scott of Rowley to John3, son of Caleb2 Burbank, although there is a remote possibility that it belongs to the subject of this sketch.) From Connecticut records: "John Burbank was granted 50 acres of land in Suffield in 1674. He was a large landholder, and much employed by Mayor Pynchon in bulding, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when town was organized, but never held office. His name is found in Mayor Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and he must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterwards prominent men in town matters. His homestaed was at the north end of Feather street. His oldest son, Timothy, who was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, did not go to Suffield, Conn., with his father. John of Suffield was the ancestor of one branch, and his half-brother, Caleb, the ancestor of the other branch --- the two branches of the family from the Rowley immigrant. The attention of the reader is called to James C. Burbank, of St. Paul, Minn., a descendant through his som Timothy. Children by first wife: i Mary3, baptized "in our Church" June 24, 1666; lived in Haverhill and Rowley, Mass., until 1680 then moved with her parents to Suffield, Conn. (then Mass.). The following mention is made of her in Burt's History of Springfield, Mass., Vol. 2, page 606: Probably married first, Dec. 2, 1685, Lazarus Miller; married, second, about 1702, William McCraney; married, third, Feb. 11, 1734, James Sexton. Children by first husband: 1 Obediah Miller. 2 John Miller. 3 Noah Miller. 4 Nathaniel Miller. 5 Martha Miller. 6 Martha Miller. 7 Mary Miller. Children by second husband: 8 Ruth McCraney. 9 Rachel McCraney. 10 Benjamin McCraney. 11 Timothy McCraney. 4 ii Timothy3, b. May 30, 1668. 5 iii John3, b. Aug. 1670. 6 iv Ebenezer3, b. Mar. 4, 1673-4. Child by third wife: v Susanna3, b. at Suffield, Conn., Nov. 23, 1695; d. at Westfield, Mass., Dec. 19, 1752; m. 1726, Ebenezer Philips. •Sketch from Sheldon's History of Suffield Posted 03 Jan 2010 by Debra Burbank "John Burbank, son of John of Rowley, married Susannah Merrill, October 15, 1663, and lived at Haverhill. He removed his wife and several children to Suffield, about 1680. His wife died October 10, 1690. Married second and third wife; the last bore him a daughter " Susannah." He was a large land-holder, and much employed by Major Pynchon in building, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when the Town was organized, but never held an office. His name is found in Major Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and be must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterward prominent men in Town matters. His homestead was at the north end of Feather street. He died June 1, 1709." ----Sheldon, Hezekiah Spencer. History of Suffield, in the Colony and Province of the Massachusetts Bay, New England. Springfield, Massachusetts: Clark W. Bryan Company 1879. page 30. (Excerpt from the Sedgley book •2. John2 Burbank ( John1 (1)), was born at Rowley, Mass., in 1640 or 1642; died June 1, 1709; married, first, at Newbury, Mass., Oct.15, 1663, Susannah, daughter Nathaniel and Susannah (Jordon) Merrill (she died Oct. 10, 1690 at Suffield, Conn.); married, John Burbank II (1641 - 1709) Posted 28 Apr 2017 by Dyharma Source: https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Burbank-5 Biography John Burbank, born in 1640 in Rowley, Massachusetts, was the son of John Burbank the immigrant and his first wife Anne Jordan. In Dewey's John Burbank of Suffield, Conn. and Some of His Descendants, he describes John Burbank being made a freeman in Boston, Mass. on 13 May 1640 where he lived at Newbury, Haverhill, and Rowley, Mass. then details his three marriages. [1] The details of becoming a freeman may be accredited to his father if his birthdate is truly 1641. John Burbank is listed in both the 1677 and 1681 Massachusetts Early Census Index. First living in Essex County, Mass. then living in Massachusetts Colony having been made a freeman 11 May. [2] Marriages He married first at Newbury, Massachusetts on 15 Oct 1663, Susannah Merrill[3][4][5], daughter of Nathaniel and Susannah (Jordan) Merrill. After being allotted fifty acres of land on 17 July 1674, the family moved to Suffield, Connecticut in 1680. John and Susannah had a daughter Mary b. 24 June 1666 and three sons: Timothy b. 30 May 1668 in Haverhill, Massachusetts, John b. August 1670, and Ebenezer b. 4 March 1673/4. On 15 July 1692 in Springfield, Massachusetts, John married second, Sarah (Hart) Scone who was the the widow of John Scone of Westfield. Sarah had married former husband John Scone in 1675. [6][5] Sarah, died soon after on 19 August 1692. She was the daughter of Edmund Hart. [7][8][9] On 9 January 1693 in Springfield, Massachusetts, John married third, Mehitable (Barlett) Sanders who was the widow of George Sanders of Windsor. John and Mehitable had one daughter, Susanna Burbank b. 23 November 1965. Death In the last years of his life, John began to lose his mental facilities similar to the ailment that struct his brother Caleb at a younger age. He died on 1 June 1709 and is buried in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut. Sources 1.↑ Louis Marinus Dewey, esq. John Burbank of Suffield, Conn. and Some of His Descendants Henry Fitz-Gilbert. editor. The New England historical and Genealogical Register, New England Historic Genealogical Society, (Boston: The Society, 1907), vol 61, p 139-142. https://archive.org/stream/newenglandhistor61wate#page/139/mode/1up 2.↑ Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Massachusetts Census, 1790-1890. Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes. Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1790-1890 ([database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. :accessed 13 Sept 2016). 3.↑ Clemens, William Montgomery. American Marriage Records Before 1699. Pompton Lakes, NJ, USA: Biblio Co., 1926. 4.↑ Town and City Clerks of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Vital and Town Records. Provo, UT: Holbrook Research Institute (Jay and Delene Holbrook). 5.↑ 5.0 5.1 Torry, Clarence A. New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004. 6.↑ Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. Massachusetts, Marriages, 1633-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. (Original data: With some noted exceptions all marriage records in this collection can be found at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, and may be available through Family History Centers throughout the United States. See table below for information listed.) 7.↑ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, Volumes 1-3; Boston: New England Historical and Genealogical Society, 1996-2011. 2:868. 8.↑ New England Historical Genealogical Register, 61:139. 9.↑ Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. See also: •Suffield Historical Society, Family history of John Burbank http://www.suffieldhistoricalsociety.org/families/burbank.htm •Barbour Collection Connecticut Vital Records, 1674-1850 Connecticut State •George Burbank Sedgley, Genealogy of The Burbank Family and The Families of Bray, Wellcome, Sedgley (Sedgeley) and Welch Knowlton and McLeary Company 1928. •Godfrey Memorial Library, comp., American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999), Ancestry.com, Record for John Burbank. •American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) about John Burbank Volume 22 pg. 77 •Richard Coleman Witters. Ancestral Roots and Descendants of Charles Robert Looney and LaVanchie Margaret Cool and the Families of Ackley, Bradford, Burbank, Cool, Crow, Dwight, Fitch, Flint, Goodwin, Granger, Hoar, Kuhl, Looney, Mason, Partridge, Peck, Wark, and Whiting (Xlibris Corporation, Aug 17, 2009) 113-133. •John R. Burbank, Various correspondence (1/10/2000) •Benjamin P. Mighill and George B. Blodgette, The Early Records of the Town of Town of Rowley, Massachuetts, 1639-1672, Volume one of the printed records of the town; printed Rowley, Mass. 1894. •Robert Hayden Alcorn, The Biography of a Town, Suffield-Connecticut 1670-1970, pages 317-323, Three Hundredth Anniversary Committee of The Town of Suffield. •Biographical Sketched of the Graduate of Yale College with Annals of College History •Dean, History of Scituate, page 256. Hist. and General Register, xix, 40: Conn. Puritan Settlers •A Brief History of The First Church of Christ, Congregational •Captain Abraham Burbank "Probate Records" dated 1768, Hartford, Connecticut, file number 925. •Franklin Bowditch Dexter, M.A., Biographical Sketches of the Graduate of Yale College with Annals of the College History, Volume II, pp. 517-518 New York, Henry Holt & Co. 1896. •Frederick W. Bailey, Editor Early Connecticut Marriages As Found On Ancient Church Records Prior to 1800, p. 47, Bureau of American Ancestry. •Public records of the Colony of Connecticut 1636-1776. •Vital Records of Granville, Massachusetts to year 1850, p. 185, published by New England Historical Genealogical Society, Boston 1914. •Church Baptismal records from the First Church of Christ, Congregational United Church Christ," photo copied by Richard C. Witters. •Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Prepared for publication by Elizabeth P. Bentley, Genealogical Publishing Co. Baltimore, 1985. •Headstone Incriptions," Suffield, Hartford County, Connecticut 1660-1937 •second, at Springfield, Mass., July 15, 1692, Sarah, widow of John Scone of Westfield, Mass., and daughter of Elisha Hart (she died, Aug. 19, 1692); married, third, at Springfield, Mass., Jan. 1693-4, widow Mehitable Sanders (she died Feb. 24, 1727-8). He lived in Newbury, Rowley, and Haverhill, Mass., and moved to Suffield, Conn, in 1680. His anme appears several times in the Suffield records much earlier than 1680, but he did not live there for any length of time until 1680. After he settled in Suffield it appears from all records that he was energetic, well-to-do, a prominent citizen, and large land holder. The last year or two of his life his mind went wrong --- the same with his half-brother, Caleb, only at a younger age. The records in Massachusetts, together with the fact that his oldest son, Timothy, was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, shows that for some reason he was not as prosperous the first half of his life. From Essex County Quarterly Court Records and Files: Mention is made in a case in court of a lease dated June 3, 1667, whereas John Burbanke, Jr., of Rowley, had taken half of the farm of Philip Nellson of Rowley, lying near Merrimacke river next to Newbury line, which was let to said Burbanke by assignment of John Willcot of newbury. Burbanke having suffered great damage for not finishing the house and barn as it should be finished and likewise in falling short both of land and meadow of what was expected. Philip Nellson was to let said Burbanke live the present year upon the farm, rent free, and to have the improvement of the farm, and Burbanke was to acquit said Nellson of all debts paying for future time a yearly rental. Sept. 1677. John Borbank is mentioned with other citizens as against the demand of Mr. Shepard for fifty pounds per annum. July 16, 1772. John Burbanke, aged about thirty years, made a deposition in regard to some land that it was required he should appraise. Nov. 1673. John Burbanke as a witness in court at Salem. His autograph is in the original. (In this case it is easy to distinguish between him and his father by his signature.) June 1674. Testimony of John Burbank in court in regard to a controversy. Vol. 5: p. 331. Receipt given to John Burbanke of Haverhill by John Godfrey of Salem dated April 2, 1674. (This case seems to be over a cow.) April 1679. John Burbanke with others testifies in a case at court. (His autograph appears in the original.) 1659. John Burbank fined for excesive drinking. (This may have been either John, Jr., at the age of about 20, or his father, John, Sr., at the age of 59.) John Burbank was admonished by the court for going into a neighbor's house in the night after fire when the family were abed. (There were matches at that period, and it seems the habit was to go to a neighbor's house when the fire went out and borrow live coals. It is impossible to tell for sure which John was after the fire.) At another time he called in the neighbors to see how bad his barn leaked; this was probably in connection with the court case about the rented farm. (The writer accords the testimony in the witch trial of Margaret Scott of Rowley to John3, son of Caleb2 Burbank, although there is a remote possibility that it belongs to the subject of this sketch.) From Connecticut records: "John Burbank was granted 50 acres of land in Suffield in 1674. He was a large landholder, and much employed by Mayor Pynchon in bulding, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when town was organized, but never held office. His name is found in Mayor Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and he must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterwards prominent men in town matters. His homestaed was at the north end of Feather street. His oldest son, Timothy, who was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, did not go to Suffield, Conn., with his father. John of Suffield was the ancestor of one branch, and his half-brother, Caleb, the ancestor of the other branch --- the two branches of the family from the Rowley immigrant. The attention of the reader is called to James C. Burbank, of St. Paul, Minn., a descendant through his som Timothy. Feather St. 1684 Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut Early settlers at Suffield who were assigned lots on Feather Street from 1671-1684 from the Documentary History of Suffield by H. S. Sheldon Linked to John and Susannah Merrill Burbank Children by first wife: i Mary3, baptized "in our Church" June 24, 1666; lived in Haverhill and Rowley, Mass., until 1680 then moved with her parents to Suffield, Conn. (then Mass.). The following mention is made of her in Burt's History of Springfield, Mass., Vol. 2, page 606: Probably married first, Dec. 2, 1685, Lazarus Miller; married, second, about 1702, William McCraney; married, third, Feb. 11, 1734, James Sexton. Children by first husband: 1 Obediah Miller. 2 John Miller. 3 Noah Miller. 4 Nathaniel Miller. 5 Martha Miller. 6 Martha Miller. 7 Mary Miller. Children by second husband: 8 Ruth McCraney. 9 Rachel McCraney. 10 Benjamin McCraney. 11 Timothy McCraney. 4 ii Timothy3, b. May 30, 1668. 5 iii John3, b. Aug. 1670. 6 iv Ebenezer3, b. Mar. 4, 1673-4. Child by third wife: v Susanna3, b. at Suffield, Conn., Nov. 23, 1695; d. at Westfield, Mass., Dec. 19, 1752; m. 1726, Ebenezer Philips. •Sketch from Sheldon's History of Suffield Posted 03 Jan 2010 by Debra Burbank "John Burbank, son of John of Rowley, married Susannah Merrill, October 15, 1663, and lived at Haverhill. He removed his wife and several children to Suffield, about 1680. His wife died October 10, 1690. Married second and third wife; the last bore him a daughter " Susannah." He was a large land-holder, and much employed by Major Pynchon in building, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when the Town was organized, but never held an office. His name is found in Major Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and be must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterward prominent men in Town matters. His homestead was at the north end of Feather street. He died June 1, 1709." ----Sheldon, Hezekiah Spencer. History of Suffield, in the Colony and Province of the Massachusetts Bay, New England. Springfield, Massachusetts: Clark W. Bryan Company 1879. page 30. susannahmerrill john burbank mountain road Suffield Hartford County Connecticut, USA old center cemetery SUSANNAH MERRILL was baptized 12 December 1638, in Lawford, Essex, England. Her parents were Nathaniel Merrill Jr. (1601-1655) and Susannah Wolterton (1610-1673.) She married John Burbank, 15 October 1663, Newbury, Massachusetts. Susanna Merrill died 10 October 1690, at Suffield, Connecticut at about age 50. Some newly found records show that Nathaniel Merrill's daughter, Susanna, was not baptized until December 12, 1638, in Lawford, Essex, Co., England. This tells us that Nathaniel had not left for America with his family until late December 1638 or early 1639. In 1638 the English Government started restricting its citizens from freely immigrating to the new continent with its abundance of land for all, something unknown in England. The fact that brother John arranged for a home site of four acres in Newbury for his unnamed "brother" would indicate that the brother was not there by 23 July 1638 but was arranging to come. Ship records, the Hector, show that Nathaniel and John did arrive in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1635. Nathaniel must have returned to England to get his wife and his four children and returned in 1638-39. This is when Susannah Merrill must have immigrated as an infant. Susannah Merrill passed away 10 October 1690, in Suffield, Connecticut, at about age 50. Posted 13 Aug 2011 by mrsoul_29 Children of Nathaniel1 and Susanna Merrill, the last five of whom were born in Newbury: Nathaniel2, b. prob. 1633/4; d. 1 Jan. 1682/3. John2, b. about 1635; d. 18 July, 1712. Abraham2, b. 1636 or 1637; d. 28 Nov. 1722. Susanna2, b. 1640; d. 10 Oct. 1690, in Suffield, Conn.; lived in Bradford (now Haverhill), Mass., in 1667, in Haverhill from 1668 to 1674, then in Suffield; m. 15 Oct. 1663, in Newbury, John Burbank, son of John and Ann Burbank of Rowley, Mass.; he m. (2) Sarah , who d. 19 Aug. 1691, and (3) Mehitable; he d.1 June, 1709. Children: Mary, bap. 24 June, 1666, in Rowley. (Burbank), Timothy, bap. 30 May, 1668, in Haverhill; mentioned in the will of his grandfather,John Burbank, in 1681, as living with Capt. Saltonstall, John, b. Aug. 1670, in Haverhilll; d. 25 Mar. 1729; m. 21 Dec. 1699, Mary Granger, Ebenezer, b. 21 Mar. 1673/4, in Haverhill; lived in Suffield; m. 9 Oct. 1698 (or 1699), Rebecca Pritchard (widow). Daniel2, b. 20 Aug. 1642; d. 27 June, 1717. Abel2, b. 20 Feb. 1643/4; d. 28 Oct. 1689. * Children of John Burbank and Susannah Merrill: 1.Mary Burbank was baptized at Rowley, on 24 June 1666; md. (1) Lazarus Miller, 2 Dec 1685; md. (2) William McCraney, 1702; (3) James Sexton, 11 Feb 1734; d. 16 Dec. 1640. 2.TIMOTHY BURBANK was born 30 May 1668, at Haverhill, Massachusetts, to John Burbank (1640-1709) and Susannah Merrill (1638-1690.) He settled in Boston, Massachusetts and married Rebecca Darling, July 3, 1695, at Salem, Massachusetts. Timothy Burbank died in 1706, at about age 38. 3.John Burbank III was born at Haverhill, in August 1670; md. Mary Granger, 21 Dec 1699; died at Suffield, 25 March 1729. 4.Ebenezer Burbank was born at Haverhill, on 4 March 1674; md. Widow Rebecca Pritchard, 9 Oct 1699. (Source: John Burbank of Rowley, Massachusetts, and some of His Descendants, by: N. P. Maling.) (Source: “A Merrill Family History,” http://family.rootsweb.ancestry.com) + 4. TIMOTHY BURBANK (1668-1706) REBECCA DARLING (1673-1712) (MARINER) TIMOTHY BURBANK was born 30 May 1668, at Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts, to John Burbank (1638-1709) and Susannah Merrill (1628-1690.) He was the second child and the first son of John & Susannah (Merrill) Burbank, and was named for his Uncle Timothy Burbank, who died in 1660 at the age of 19 years. When he was 12 years old his father moved to Suffield, Conn., but left Timothy with Capt. Nathaniel Saltonstall of Haverhill, Mass., graduate of Harvard. Timothy must have apprenticed himself to Capt. Salstonstall to become a Mariner. His grandfather’s will (John Burbank) dated 5 April 1681 reads: “To his son Timothy my grandchild who lieth with Capt. Saltonstall after he cometh to the age of twenty-one years I give about three pounds price.” Timothy had an Aunt Lydia (Burbank) Foster living in Ipswich and one of her boys, Isaac Foster, was his age. He also had Aunts and Uncles of his mother, Susannah (Merrill) Burbank; their children were his first cousins living close by in Newbury, Massachusetts. There is only one item regarding his early life dated 1691: “Timothy Burbank took Jane Toppan to Newbury to help tend her brother, Samuel, who is there taken ill of the smallpox.” This was probably one of his girlfriends before he met and married Rebecca Darling. Note that he named his second child; a daughter, Jane. He was sailing out of Salem when he met his wife, Rebecca Darling, and married her, 3 July 1695, at Salem. He had a daughter, named after his wife Rebecca, and she was born somewhere in the vicinity of Salem, but her birthplace or date is unknown. He was sailing out of Salem at first, but about 1698 out of Boston, as his last four children were born there; Jane, Timothy Jr., John, and Samuel. From the Virginia Magazine, Vol 26, we find in the record of the receiver of the Virginia duties for York River district, dated 3 July 1704, the Swallow of Boston, mastered by Capt. Timothy Burbank, was bound for Boston, and that it was a ship of 25 tons. These ships were called Brigantines. List of Ships Entering in Upper District James River from 25th March to 16th July 1702 SWALLOW OF NEW ENGLAND Sloop, built I696, 25 Tons NEW ENGLAND Timothy Burbank, Master John Fawster, Nath'll Hlnksman, Jos. Souter, List of Ships that have been Cleared In Rappahanock River from 25th March to 24th June 1704 SWALLOW OF BOSTON Sloop, built New England I696, 25 Tons Timothy Burbank, Master Wm. Burroughs, Jno. Foster, Owners Nothing is found regarding Timothy's death--no date, no place. After the birth of his last child, Samuel, 16 Oct 1706, no further record is found regarding him. There is strong evidence, however, that he died shortly after the birth of this child as the Boston records give the marriage of his widow to Thomas Smith, of the Reserve, 22 Feb. 1709. His death was not listed in the Boston Vital Records--so it can be only supposed that he was lost at sea. None of his sons became mariners. Timothy Burbank probably died in about 1706 at sea, at about age 38. None of his sons became mariners. REBECCA DARLING was born about 1673, of Salem, Massachusetts, to George Darling (1615-1693) and Katherine More (1637-1693.) She married (1) *Timothy Burbank, 3 July 1695, in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts. Timothy Burbank was probably drowned at sea in about 1706, at age 38 (Rebecca was about 33.) Rebecca married (2) Thomas Smith, 22 Feb 1709, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. Rebecca Darling died about 1712, in Massachusetts, age 39. Children of Timothy Burbank and Rebecca Darling: 1.Rebecca Burbank, born between 1696-98, probably Salem, Mass.; married Nathan Webber by the Reverend Samuel Miles, Presbyterian at Boston, Mass., 20 Oct. 1713. 2.Jane Burbank, born 24 March 1699, Boston, Suffolk, Mass.; married John Smallage 12 August 1720, by Reverend Joseph Sewall, Presbyterian, Boston, Mass. 3.Timothy Burbank, born 12 October, 1703, Boston, Mass.; married in 1728 at the age of twenty-five, Mercy, daughter of Samuel & Mercy (Dunham) Kempton. He was a tailor and settled in Plymouth, Mass. He died 13 Oct 1793, age 90. 4.John Burbank, born 19 January 1705, Boston, Mass.; Elizabeth Tower, 28 June, 1728; d. 30 September, 1791. 5.SAMUEL BURBANK, born 16 October 1706, Boston, Massachusetts, to Timothy Burbank (1668-1709) and Rebecca Darling (1673-1712.) His father drowned at sea when he was a baby. He married (1) *Mary Reed daughter of Thomas & Abigail (Bacon) Reed, 10 March 1730, Sudbury, Massachusetts. He married (2) Mrs. Hannah Emerson. He lived in Sudbury, Massachusetts, where all of his twelve children were born, and in his old age was living at Holliston, Massachusetts, where his will was probated 6 September 1781. (Source: John Burbank of Rowley, Massachusetts, and some of His Descendants, by: N. P. Maling.) + 5. SAMUEL BURBANK (1706-1781) MARY REED (1709-1750) (PATRIOT) SAMUEL BURBANK was born 16 October 1706, in Boston, Massachusetts, to Timothy Burbank (1668-1709) and Rebecca Darling (1673-1712.) He married (1) *Mary Reed, 10 March 1729, Sudbury, Massachusetts. He married (2) Mrs. Hannah Emerson. He lived in Sudbury, Massachusetts, where all of his twelve children were born, and in his old age was living at Holliston, Massachusetts, where his will was probated 6 September 1781. None of Capt. Timothy's three sons became mariners -- Samuel was a baby when his father was lost at sea, and he was brought up by his stepfather, Thomas Smith. Samuel Burbank is known by his descendants as the father of the Revolutionary Soldier boys. His four boys; Ebenezer, Samuel, Daniel and John saw much service in this War. Sudbury is only about seven miles south of Concord and Lexington -- the hot spot of the war. His son Samuel played a very important part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. 1781. William Todd, a son of William, died while privateering. Solomon Lowell, David Poor, Silas Dole, Moses Boynton, and James Phillips, were in the army. Samuel Burbank, on his return from the army, died of the small-pox in the pest-house. Private, served as guard under Sergeant Breck, Hopkinton Massachusetts Militia, April, 1776 ; Private, Captain Samuel Burbank's Company of Massachusetts Militia, for service in Rhode Island, January, 1778; Private, Captain Perry's Company, Colonel Cyprian Howe's Regiment Massachusetts Militia, Rhode Island service, August, 1778; Private, Captain McFarland's Company, same regiment, Rhode Island service, September, 1780. Walker, William Augustus Samuel Burbank’s will, probated 6 September 1781, follows: In the name of God, Amen: The seventh day of February 1778, I Samuel Burbank of Holliston, county of Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay, in New England: Yeoman: Calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that I must die, recommending my soul into the hands of God that gate it, and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in a decent Christian burial at the discretion of my Executor. And as to the worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give, demise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form by this my last will and testament. I give and bequeath unto Hannah, my wife, the use of one-half of my dwelling house, meaning the westerly part of the same from the center of the chimney and the cellar under the same house; and also the use of the oven in the easterly part of said house and of the well for water; together with all privileges she may need in using and improving the westerly part of said house meaning to bequeath the same during the present Hannah's natural life only. I also give and bequeath to the present Hannah ail my household furniture for her own use and disposal forever together with her fire wood and provisions for her comfortable support as I shall hereafter order in this my last will and testament. 1. I give to my son Eben(ezer), five shillings which together with what he has received making his full postion in my estate. 2. I give to my son Samuel, five shillings which together with what he has received making his full portion in my estate. 3.I give to my son Daniel, five shillings. 4.I give to my daughter, Mary Morse, five shillings, which together with what she has received makes her full portion in my estate. 5. I give to my daughter, Rebecca Bishop, five shillings, which together with what she has received makes her full portion in my estate. 6.I give to my daughter, Rachell Dix, five shillings. 7.I give to my daughter Lydia Sheffield, five shillings, which together with what she has received makes her full portion. 8.I give to my son, John Burbank, his heirs and assigns forever; all my lands and buildings in Holliston aforesaid, together with my armour, my wearing apparel, and all my personal estate; except my household furniture already bequeathed, reserving the use of the westerly half of my dwelling house to my wife Hannah during her life--he the said John Burbank, paying on demand the several legacies within mentioned: together with my funeral charges, and charges that may arise by executing this my will and testament. And also that he supply my wife, Hannah. during her widowhood with every of the necessaries of life, as she may require for her comfortable support, and so much firewood as she may require brought to her door; cut fit for her use, and carried into her room if requested, and he my said son John to receive my credits and pay my just debts. I do constitute and appoint my son Samuel Burbank within named, sole executor of this my last will and testament, ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. Signed, Sealed and Declared by the said Samuel Burbank, to be his last will and Testament. in presence of us: John Hemenway Eunice Burbank John Stone Samuel Burbank Seal Samuel Burbank’s will was probated 6 September 1781, age 75. MARY REED was born, 1 May 1709, in Sudbury Middlesex, Massachusetts, to Thomas Reed (1678-1755) and Abigail Bacon (1685-before 1755.) She married Samuel Burbank, 10 March 1729/30, in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts. They had 12 children. Mary Reed died about 1750, in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, at about age 41. Children of Samuel Burbank and Mary Reed: 1.Samuel Burbank, b. 28 Dec 1730, Sudbury; d. 2 Mar 1731. Child. 2. Ebenezer Burbank, b. 5 May 1733, Sudbury; md. Sarah Homans, 22 Dec 1752. 3. Samuel Burbank, b. 24 June 1734, Sudbury; md. Eunice Kendall, 22 Apr 1773; d. 1808, Vermont. (From pension application on file at Washington, D.C. Eunice Morse applied for pension 17 Feb 1838, on the service of Samuel Burbank who enlisted about 19 Apr 1775 and arrived in Lexington during the battle. He was appointed Lieutenant. Was in the Battle of Bunker Hill and when Capt. Leland gave out on the eve of battle (want of courage), Samuel took command and led in the battle until a Captain was attached.) This must not be our Samuel Burbank: Samuel Burbank, on his return from the army, died of the small-pox in the pest house (hospital.) 4. LIEUT. DANIEL BURBANK was born 4 April 1736, in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay, British America, to Samuel Burbank (1706-1781) and Mary Reed (1709-1750.) He married Mary Marks (1740-1808) 19 May 1764 in Warren, Worchester, Massachusetts. He died 27 September 1802 in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, at 66 years of age. They had nine children. 5. John Burbank, b. 8 Apr 1737, Sudbury; md. Mary Verney, int. 6 Feb 1773; d. 19 Jul 1818. He served in the Revolutionary War. He had four sons all born in Holliston, Massachusetts. In his father’s will he was given the farm at Holliston and the care of his mother until her death. 6.Abigail Burbank, b. 19 Sep 1738, Sudbury; d. 13 Nov 1738. Child. 7.Josiah (Joseph) Burbank, b. 17 Mar 1739/40, Sudbury; d. 1740. Child. 8.Mary Burbank, b. 11 Apr 1741, Sudbury; md. William Morse, 8 Dec 1763. 9.Abigail Burbank, b. 12 Aug 1742; md. (1) Reuben Underwood, 20 May 1762; (2) John Steadman 1765; d. 13 Sept 1822. 10.Rebecca Burbank, b. 20 June 1745; md. Zebulon Bishop, 26 Apr 1769. 11.Rachel Burbank, b. 16 Nov 1747; md. Timothy Dix, 13 Aug 1769; d. 1793. 12.Lydia Burbank, b. 9 May 1749; md. (1) Daniel Sheffield, 1 Mar 1772. (2) Elisha Marsh, 1792. + 6. LIEUTENANT DANIEL BURBANK (1736-1802, age 66) MARY MARKS (1740-1808, age 68) (From the Ancestors & Descendants of Lt. Daniel & Mary (Marks) Burbank) LIEUTENANT DANIEL BURBANK was born 4 April, 1736, Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, to Samuel Burbank (1706-1781) and Mary Reed (1709-1750.) Marriage int., 19 Mar 1764, Warren, Massachusetts, Mary, daughter of Hezekiah and Judith (Hayward) Marks. (She was born 18 July 1740, Warren, Mass.; died 25 February 1808, age 68 years, Williamstown, Massachusetts.) They had five sons and four daughters. Daniel Burbank died 27 September 1802, in Williamstown, Massachusetts, at age 66. Revolutionary War: Lieut. Daniel Burbank lived and died in Williamstown, Massachusetts. When the Revolutionary War broke out he gained for himself the title of Lieutenant. He entered service in 1776 and was discharged in 1777. He gave a long life of service, especially in protecting and building up the community of Williamstown, Massachusetts. History: Many of the inhabitants of Sudbury took up land in Western (now Warren) Massachusetts, and it is known that Daniel's Reed relatives, thru his mother Mary (Reed) Burbank, were of Warren. He went there as a young man and fell in love with the beautiful Mary Marks. Her grandfather is listed in the History of N. Brookfield, page 680: “Joseph Marks, of Springfield, where he had a grant of land located on the west side of the river, dated 2 February, 1685; was a soldier in Captain Bull's company, which was sent to Albany and Schenectady in November 1689, to protect the settlers there against the French and Indians. In a skirmish Joseph Marks was taken prisoner to Canada. He escaped and returned about March 1692, and soon after came to Brookfield, where he received a grant of 60 acres and later 180 acres. His was one of the fortified homes necessary in the Indian Wars of that time. Mark's Garrison stood near the south west end of Wickaboag pond on a knoll below the junction of the waters of the pond with the Quaboag River.” It is related that one day Mary, wife of Joseph Marks, being left alone, discovered hostile Indians in the neighborhood of the garrison waiting for a favorable opportunity to attack the settlement. She immediately put on her husband's wig, hat, great coat; and taking his gun, went to the top of the fortification, and marched backwards and forwards vociferating, like a vigilant sentinel, all's well! all's well! This led the Indians to believe that they could not take the place by surprise, and fearing an open and protracted assault, they retreated. This was the Grandmother of Mary (Marks) Burbank. History of Berkshire Co. Massachusetts: Thomas Dunton was from Western, now Warren, Massachusetts. So far as can be known, his was the first family to settle directly on the bank of the Hoosac River. For a number of years, Dunton owned house lot 13 and sold to prominent parties the outlots drawn in succession by this house lot. For example, he sold Daniel Burbank, also of Western, the second division fifty-acre lot 56, October 1763. (After he bought this land he went back to Warren and married his wife Mary Marks, and brought her back to West Hoosac, [now Williamstown, Mass.,] and built a framed house of one room.) He soon doubled this farm, buying the adjoining fifty-acre lot 57 half a mile from South Williamstown on the road to New Ashford. Daniel Burbank was a Lieutenant in the military company of South Williamstown and fought in the Battle of Bennington, Vermont, and his oldest son, Samuel, at the instance of his mother while the Bennington battle was going forward, put his ear to the ground, and heard successive discharges of cannon. His neighbors crowded around him on his return, wanted to know if he felt afraid during the battle; and he answered, "After they had fired once, and we had fired once, I was no more afraid on the battlefield than I am on the potato field!" He fought in several other engagements during the Revolutionary War. Burbank's lots were level and fertile and heavily wooded. The Ashford brook crossed these lots not far from their eastern end but a little before its junction with the Hancock brook, and the road to the South crossed them diagonally just about their middle. He had at first but one neighbor, and that was Isaac Stratton, living then in a log house on lot 53, just north of the Hancock brook. Burbank's own axe was the first to make clearings on his lots 56 and 57, and his own plow was the first that ever stirred the rich soil there. He added several parcels of 25 acre plots during his life. Both Burbank and his wife were original members of the one church and their place of meeting was more than five miles from their home. The roads were rough, and over Stone Hill it was very steep both ways, but it is altogether likely that they were in their pew in the new meetinghouse, after 1768, most of the Sundays of the year; and he was certainly often at the church meetings on week days. History of Berkshire County, page 250, also gives: Soon after the incorporation of New Ashford, just south of Williamstown, into a district, 17 December 1782, it was voted that we will build a house of public worship -- and they chose Samuel Hand, Daniel Burbank, and Gideon Wheeler, Esq., a committee to pitch a stake where said house will stand. The significance of this past proceeding is that the men chosen to pitch this stake were from adjoining towns. Burbank was very active in community affairs and was a very religious and respected citizen. He owned land in Marcellus, Onadaga County, New York. He probably got it thru his Revolutionary services, but he never settled on it as we will find thru his will -- he gave it to his sons Daniel and John. His long life of service ended 27 September 1802, aged 66 years, at Williamstown, Massachusetts, where he is buried. His wife survived him a little over five years; however, in that time she never applied for a Government pension on the services of her husband. During her widowhood, she lived on the old farm at Williamstown with her oldest son, Samuel and two youngest daughters, Rachel and Lydia, all three never marrying. She died 25 February 1808, aged 67 years, at Williamstown, and is buried there. The will of Lieutenant Daniel Burbank is as follows, which was allowed 4 January 1803, and recorded in Book 11, page 242: In the name of God. Amen. I Daniel Burbank of Williamstown, in the County of Berkshire and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Gentlemen, being weak in body but sound in mind and memory blessed by almighty God therefor, taking into consideration the mortality of man, do make and ordain this my last will and testament. First I give and bequeath my soul to God who gave, and my body to the earth in hope of a joyful resurrection through Jesus Christ my Savior, and the estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me, I give and bequeath in the manner following, viz: 1st. I will that all my lawful debts together with my funeral charges be punctually paid to my executor to be hereafter named. 2nd. To my beloved wife Mary Burbank I give and bequeath one-third part of all my estate both real and personal not herein disposed of during her natural life. 3rd. I give and bequeath to my eldest son Samuel Burbank the residue of all my sd. estate not otherwise disposed of by this will and testament. 4th. I give to my son Daniel Burbank, one-hundred acres of land lying in the Township of Marcellus in the County of Onadaga in the State of New York to be taken from off the east part of my land lying in that Township and -- 5th. I give to my son John Burbank all the residue of my land lying in the sd. Township of Marcellus. 6th. To my son Asa Burbank in consideration of his having received an education I give only the sum of ($80.00) eighty dollars for the purpose of purchasing a horse, saddle and bridle. 7th. I give to my daughter Mary Baker the sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars, including the sum of ($110.00) one hundred and ten dollars which she has already received to be paid within one year after my decease by my executor. 8th. I give to my daughter Sarah the like sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars, to be paid by my said executor within two years after my decease. 9th. I give to my daughter Rachel the like sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars to be paid as aforesaid within three years after my decease. 10th. To my daughter Lydia I give the like sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars to be paid as and when she shall arrive at the age of twenty-one and she is to be supported by my son Samuel until of lawful age. Lastly I nominate and appoint my son Samuel Burbank, sole executor to this my last will and testament. Signed Sealed published pronounced and declared by the said Daniel Burbank as his last will and testament this 23rd. day of September in the year of our Lord 1802. In the presence of us: Wm Young Wm. Towner Daniel Burbank Ara Roberts Daniel Burbank (SEAL) Lieut. Daniel Burbank Small Biography: Revolutionary War Lieut. Daniel Burbank was born in Sudbury, Massachusetts, April 4, 1736, to Samuel Burbank (1706-1781) and Mary Reed (1709-1750), and died September 27 1801, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. He lived and died in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. He had five sons and four daughters. His mother, Judith Hayward, had “Mayflower” blood in her veins through George Hayward, Ann White, Resolved White, William White, Mayflower immigrants in 1620. When the Revolutionary War broke out he gained for himself the title of Lieutenant. He entered service in 1776 and was discharged in 1777. He gave a long life of service, especially in protecting and building up the community of Williamstown, Massachusetts. Daniel Burbank died 27 September 1802, aged 66 years, in Williamstown, Massachusetts. They had been married 38 years. Williamstown, Bershire, Massachusetts MARY MARKS was born 18 July 1740 in Warren, Worchester, Massachusetts, to Hezekiah Marks (1704-1788) and Judith Hayward (1701-1786.) She was married to Lieutenant Daniel Burbank, 19 May 1764, in Warren, Worchester, Massachusetts, at age 23. Daniel Burbank was in Williamstown, Massachusetts, and bought the second division fifty-acre lot 56, October 1763. After he bought this land he went back to Warren and married his wife Mary Marks, and brought her back to West Hoosac, (now Williamstown, Mass.,) and built a framed house of one room.) He soon doubled this farm, buying the adjoining fifty-acre lot 57 half a mile from South. Both John Burbank and his wife, Mark Marks, were original members of the one church and their place of meeting was more than five miles from their home. The roads were rough, and over Stone Hill it was very steep both ways, but it is altogether likely that they were in their pew in the new meetinghouse, after 1768, most of the Sundays of the year; and he was certainly often at the church meetings on week days. History of Berkshire County, page 250, also gives: “Soon after the incorporation of New Ashford, just south of Williamstown, into a district, 17 December 1782, it was voted that we will build a house of public worship -- and they chose Samuel Hand, Daniel Burbank, and Gideon Wheeler, Esq., a committee to pitch a stake where said house will stand.’ The significance of this past proceeding is that the men chosen to pitch this stake were from adjoining towns. Burbank was very active in community affairs and was a very religious and respected citizen. John Burbank’s life of service ended 27 September 1802, aged 66 years, at Williamstown, Massachusetts, where he is buried. His wife, Mary Marks, survived him a little over five years; however, in that time she never applied for a Government pension on the services of her husband. During her widowhood, she lived on the old farm at Williamstown with her oldest son, Samuel and two youngest daughters, Rachel and Lydia, all three never marrying. Mary Marks passed away 25 February 1808, aged 67 years, at Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, at the age of 67. Children of Daniel Burbank and Mary Marks: 1.Samuel Burbank, b. 1 Feb 1766; d. 2 Sep 1844. Unmarried. Samuel born 1 February, 1766; died 2 September 1844 Williamstown Massachusetts. He grew to manhood on the farm at Williamstown, and probably received as good an education as was available at that time. He never married and upon the death of his father, at the age of 36, he was willed the farm at Williamstown. His sisters Rachel and Lydia, also never married and lived on the farm with their mother. Samuel was to care for his mother until her death according to the will. He died of old age 2 September 1844, Williamstown, Massachusetts aged 78 1/2 years. He did not leave a will but administration was taken out on his estate and Ebenezer Foster was appointed administrator, 5 November 1844. 2.Mary Burbank, b. 30 Jan 1768; md. Ira Baker, 1786; d. aft 1844. 3.Major Daniel Burbank, b. 7 May 1770, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, to Daniel Burbank (1736-1802) and Mary Marks (1740-1808.) He married (1) *Margaret Pynchon, 21 Mar 1793, in Williamstown. Married (2) Mary Adams. Died (coffee poisoned by wife, Mary Adams) 27 Oct 1832, Meredosia, Morgan, Illinois. Buried in Exeter, Scott, Illinois, by his first wife, Margaret Pynchon. 4.Asa Burbank, b. 28 Sep 1772; md. Laura Hubbel 1806; d. 4 Aug 1829. (Doctor.) 5.Reuben Burbank, b. 29 Mar 1775; d. 14 Sep 1777. Child. (2 years +.) 6.Sarah Burbank, b. 18 Jan 1777; md. Oliver Root; d. 1855. 7.John Burbank, b. 6 July 1779; md. Mary Kent; d. before 1809. 8.Rachel Burbank, b. 11 July 1782; d. 17 Sep 1843 (died of consumption.) Unmarried. 9.Lydia Burbank, b. 24 Oct 1786, d. 1829. Unmarried. + 7. MAJOR DANIEL BURBANK (1770-1832) MARGARET PYNCHON (1775-1826) MAJOR DANIEL BURBANK was born, 7 May 1770, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, to Lieutenant Daniel Burbank (1736-1802) and Mary Marks (1740-1808.) He married Margaret Pynchon, 21 May 1793, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. Daniel served in the War of 1812 as a Major at Niagara, New York. Daniel is a descendant of Mayflower passengers William and Susanna Fuller White. in Meredosia, Illinois. His body was taken from the town of Exeter, and he was buried by the side of his first wife Margaret (Pynchon) Burbank, West of the Town on a high rolling Hill. He was 68 years old. Daniel Burbank died 17 Ocober 1832 (poisoned by his second wife,) at Meredosia, Illinois, age 62. His body was taken from the town of Exeter, and he was buried by the side of his first wife Margaret BURBANK FAMILY HISTORY 14 February 2018 Note: At the time of the first English Settlements in New England, the New Year began on March 25th (Annunciation of Ladies Day), and a date written as “10th day of the second month” referred to 10 April, and not February from 1671 to 1686, the New Year began on March 1st and in the next year, 1667, it began on January 1st as at the present, but the change was not made in England until many years later. During these periods a form of designating the years was employed consisting of a double date 1649/1650 (1649 old style, 1650 new style.) The first time this form was used by the General Court of Connecticut was on 20 March 1649/50. (Handbook of Genealogy, by Henry R. Stiles, 52.) Note: In early colonial times Clergymen, graduates of colleges, members of the General Court, and planters of good families, were called, “Gentlemen” and addressed as Mr. Those without these advantages, including those of respectable character, and who owned lands, and the better class of laborers and tenants were called “Yeomen” and addressed as “Goodman” and the wife as “Goodwife,” or sometimes “Goody.” (Lyman Beecher’s Autiobiography, Vol. 1, 11.) 1.JOHN BURBANK SR. (1551-1581) ELIZABETH WILSON (1542-1590) JOHN BURBANK SR. was born about 1551, in Greystoke Manor, Cumberland, England, to unknown parents. He married Elizabeth Wilson, 31 October 1563, Cumberland, England. John Burbank died 3 January 1581, Greystoke Manor, Cumberland, England, age 30. Greystoke Castle Where John Burbank lived and died. ELIZABETH WILSON was born about 1542, of Greystoke, Cumberland, England, to unknown parents. She married John Burbank, 31 October 1563, Cumberland England. Elizabeth Wilson died about 1590, of Greystoke, Cumberland, England, age 48. Greystoke, Cumberland, England, Painting Child of John Burbank and Elizabeth Wilson: 1.JOHN BURBANK was born 21 September 1571, in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, to John Burbank Sr. (1551-1581) and Elizabeth Wilson (1542-1590.) He married (1) *Anne Gordon; (2) Abigail Unknown, about 1600. Arrived America 1635. John Burbank Sr. died about 1671 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England. + 2.JOHN BURBANK (1571-1671) ANN GORDON (1576-1676) JOHN BURBANK was born 21 September 1571, in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, to John Burbank Sr. (1551-1581) and Elizabeth Wilson (1542-1590.) He married (1) *Anne Gordon; (2) Abigail Unknown, about 1600. John Burbank Sr. died about 1671 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, age 90. ANNE GORDON was born about 1576 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England to unknown parents. She married John Burbank. Anne Gordon died about 1676 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, age 100. Child of John Burbank and Ann Gordon: 1.JOHN BURBANK was born about 1602, of England, to John Burbank (1571-1671) and Ann Gordon (1576-1676.) He married (1) *(Joan) Ann Jordan in about 1639. Ann Jordan died in about 1642, at Rowley, Massachusetts; married (2) Jemima Unknown in about 1643. Jemima died at Rowley, Massachusetts, on 24 March 1693. John Burbank died 3 April 1683, in Rowley, Massachusetts, at age 81. + 3. JOHN BURBANK (1602-1683) ANN JORDAN (1610-1642) JOHN BURBANK was born about 1602, of England, to John Burbank Sr. (1571-1671) and Ann Gordon (1576-1676.) He married (1) *(Joan) Ann Jordan in about 1639. Ann Jordan died in about 1642, at Rowley, Massachusetts; married (2) Jemima in about 1643. Jemima died at Rowley, Massachusetts, on 24 March 1693. John Burbank died 3 April 1683, at Rowley, Massachusetts, age 72. John Burbank (Borebancke) the Immigrant: The name Joseph Burbank has been a stumbling block to all those descendants who have traced their ancestry back to John, the Immigrant, because none of the Immigrant lists had a John Burbank. Here is the key to the problem. (New England Historical Genealogical Register, Vol. 94; pp. 393-4, by William B. Dibble): John (Immigrant) and Ann Burbank -- a suggested identity: In 1635 the ship Abigail, Robert Hackwell, master, sailed from London, England to Boston, Mass. Among the passengers as given in Hotten's list of immigrants to America were George Hadborne, 43 years, his wife Anne, and two children (Rebecca Ann), and Joseph Borebancke, 24 years and Joane Jorden, 16 years, servants of Geo. Hadborne. Drake's Founders of New England gives these names as Joseph Borebanck and Jorden -- the same as Hotten, but Bank's Planters of the Commonwealth, published about seventy years later than Hotten and Drake, presents the names as Joseph Borebank and Joan Jordan. Among others listed for the same trip of the Abigail were (Hotten's List ) Jo. West, Jo. Fox, Jo. Freeman, John Rookeman, 45 years, Jo. Rookerman, 9 years. (All these appearing in the index as JOHN. Drake has them listed as Jo. with one exception, John Freeman, Savage and Banks called them JOHN.) Another family listed by Hotten for the same voyage of the Abigail was that of Christopher Foster, 32 years; Frances, 25 years, and children Rebecca, 5 years; Nathaniel, 2 years, and Jo. 1 year. Hotten indexes Jo. as John but Banks calls him Joseph. This Foster family settled at Lynn, Mass., and in a few years moved to Southampton, Long Island, where the young Jo. was known as John: a name which was carried down for several generations (History of Southampton) and agrees with the Foster Family Bible, now owned by a descendant in Michigan. Other boats sailing from London the same year show the same discrepancies in the names of several passengers listed as Jo, a fact which shows that the listing clerk at London was not particular how he wrote the name John, usually spelling it Jo. The contributor has not found any but who was later called John. Considering the discrepancies in the printed lists and indexes of Hotten, Drake and Banks, it is suggested that the Joseph Borabancke and Joan Jorden, servants to George Hepburn, were John Burbank and wife Ann (Joan shortened to Ann) Jordan, who were at Rowley in 1638 or 1639. Their surnames had various spellings but finally settled down to Burbank and Jordan. Coming as servants to Geo. Hepburn, who settled in Charlestown, they worked out their passage as was the custom. This usually took about four years, which accounts for the time between their passage and their settling at Rowley, Mass. - having been married in the meantime. John Burbank and wife Ann had a son John Burbank, Jr., who married Susannah Merrill, daughter of Nathaniel and Susannah (Wilterton) Merrill. Nathaniel Merrill died and his widow married Stephen Jordan of Newbury -which adjoins Rowley, Mass. It has been suggested that Stephen Jordan was a relation of Ann (Jordan) Burbank and that John Burbank, Jr., when visiting Stephen Jordan, met his stepdaughter, Susannah Merrill, and married her. We do not know why John Burbank and Ann Jordan wanted to come to the New World. Was he working as an apprentice to George Hepburn? What about Joan Jordan? Was she related to George Hepburn some way through the marriage of one of his sisters to a Jordan? Maybe John and Ann were in love and did not want to be separated when one of them decided to come to the New World. John Burbank History Continues: John Burbank (about age 24) in 1635, was an immigrant on the ship Abigail from London, England, to Boston, Bay Colony, 15 years after the Mayflower. His age was given in 1635 as 24 years which would place his birth about 1611 give or take a year on either side. It is presumed he was born in London, England, as this is a stronghold for the Burbank name. It is also presumed that he married (Joan) Ann Jordan about 1639, in Rowley, Massachusetts, probably around the time he joined the Rogers Company that settled in Rowley, Massachusetts. From1635 to 1638 John Burbank probably lived with George Hepburn at Charlestown to work out his passage as a servant. Gage's History of Rowley says: “On the arrival of Rev. Ezekiel Rogers, with about twenty families in December 1638, the towns of Salem, Charlestown, Boston, Medford, Watertown, Roxbury, Lynn, Dorchester, together with Cambridge, Ipswich, Newbury, Weymouth, Hingham, Concord, Dedham, and Braintree were all taken up.” They (Rogers Company) spent the winter in Salem and improved the time in looking for a place for a plantation. Mr. Rogers was a man of great note in England for his piety, zeal and ability. He and his people had concluded to take a place between Ipswich and Newbury; and these towns having granted some farms on this tracts. Mr. Rogers' Company purchased them at a price of 800 pounds. This place was at first called Mr. Rogers Plantation -- afterwards, Rowley; so called from Rowley, Yorkshire, England, where he and some of his people had lived. During his wanderings among the Colonies, Mr. Rogers added forty more families to his Company; so that with the 18 families who came from England with him, the Company numbered 58 families when they settled at Rowley in the spring or summer of 1639. (In the list of 40 families joining Mr. Rogers is Goodman Burbank, so called because the title of Mr. was a title of quite high rank in Colonial days, and John Burbank had not received his Freeman papers until after he arrived at Rowley, 16 May1640; having worked out his passage to America with George Hepburn. John Burbank settled in Rowley, Massachusetts, where he was made a freeman in 1640 and was recorded as a proprietor of the town in 1640. There is no record of where he came from. He held various offices, was chosen one of the overseers of Rowley for 1661-1662. He left an estate of £180 after he had given 60 pounds to his son John Jr. and land to his daughter Julia. He left quite a detailed will. John Burbank left a will on 5 April 1681 at Rowley. His estate was probated at Rowley on 10 April 1681. He died in 1682, at about age 68. On the night of Mr. Rogers' third marriage, July 16, 1651, his dwelling house with all his goods, library, and Church records were consumed by fire. The Church records, no doubt, contained much valuable historical and genealogical matter. Probably, all records of John Burbank, as to whence he came, and when, were destroyed. The families worked together in common for about five years. The land was surveyed in 1643, and each freeman or family was granted one and a half acres. The ones who contributed towards the 800-pound fund were allotted more land, so, John Burbank, very likely, did not have much money, as he was given only an acre and half of land -- the seventh lot on Bradford St., part of it lying on the west side and part of it on the east side of the street, bounded on the south side by Thomas Sumner's house lot. All lots on this street went to the brook, so, the owners could get water without going off their own land. In 1672, he owned some fresh meadow on Plum Island -- the land is described as, 1-0-0, which probably means one acre, and this may have been allotted him 1643, and that would make him a half acre in the house lot on Bradford street, where he built his home. Others have acre lots of "fresh meadow" on Plum Island, and these lots, or many of them, were bought by Father Jewett, and among those sold was the lot of John Burbanke, Sr. Quarterly Court 1672, Essex Co. John Burbank of Rowley and Annie Cooper depose regarding Thomas Sumner, a resident of Rowley. In several instances it is impossible to distinguish between John Burbank, Sr., and John Burbank, Jr., but most of the court records, of which there are a plenty, belong to John, Jr. It appears by the court record that John, Jr., could write his name, while John, Sr., signed his will with a mark. Rather unusual. Generally, the immigrant could write, while many of the second and third generations could not. The immigrant left an estate of £180, after he had given £60 too his son, John, Jr., and land to his daughter, Lydia. The Last Will and Testament of John Burbank of Rowley in the county of Essex in New England is as follows: I being att this day aged & Decriped in body thought having Mercy of Perfect Memory & understanding, Knowing how fraile my Life is and not Knowing the Day of my Desolutions, that my House may be so far sett in Order & trouble as much as in me lieth, prevented after my departure therefore appoynt this to be my Last will. My soule I committ into the hands of him that gave it and my body to be interred by decent buriall in hope of a blessed Ressureection through the Lord Jesus Christ. As to my outward estate I dispose of it in Manner following: To my beloved wife Gemima I give half my dwelling house & half my Lands throughout to be at her dispose during her naturall life. Also I give her all my household stuff bedding utensils & necessary things in the house for her natural life and what of them she hath not occasion to Dispose off or her comfortable Maintenance & livelyhood after her decease to my son Caleb, also I give her one Cow and the keeping of her Winter & Summer, also convenient fire wood shall yearly be provided for her during her Naturall Life by my Executor. Also I give her the third part of the fruit of the orchard yearly, also I give her the keeping of a pig or swine yearly during her life. To my son John Burbank I give the sum of forty shillings in Cattle to be paid within one year after my Decease if he come and Receive it in Rowley the reason I now give him no more is because I have given him what I thought was sufficient according to my ability in Cattle and Household stuff & Village Land, all I judge to be worth about three score pounds which when I gave it him it was accepted by him as his full portion and that in presence of Capt. Brocklebank and his wife before whom he gave it under his hand that he would Desire no more of what I have Left. To his son Timothy my grandchild who lieth with Capt. Saltonstall after he cometh to the age of twenty-one years I give a beast of about three pounds price. To my Daughter Lydia having given her Merrimack Land or my Land at Bradford and other necessaries I hereby Confirm it to her Husband and her and their Children. Also I give her Ten pounds to be Paid in Rowley within one year after my Wife her decease in cattle. To my son Caleb I give the half of my Dwelling and Barn and the other half of all my Lands & Meadows that is to say Land s Divided or not Divided, or Layd out within the bounds of Rowley and the other half given to his Mother for Life to be to him & his Heirs after her Decease and all my Moveables not given my Wife. My will is that my son Caleb Burbank be my sole Executor and that he pay all Debts and Legacys given in my Will as an Explaination of what I have given my wife. My will is that my Executor provide all comfortable necessaries for my beloved wife During her Natural Life both for Health and sickness according as my overseers shall think & Judge convenient. If my son or those that survive him provide not according to her need and expectation my will is, and that which I desire that my loving friends Daniel Wicam & Nehemiah Jewett be my overseers to see that my will be performed and especially that my wife be well provided for. For as she may need and he thus providing according to her need then the Lands given her to be free to my son Caleb as the other Lands given him. Signed Sealed and Declared to be his Last Will and Testament the fifth Day of April Anno Domini: 1681. his mark X John Burbank In presence of Witness: Nehemiah Jewett Danl. Wickam Att Court at Ipswich 10th of April 1683 from website http://users.ev1.net/~hmltn/burbank/burbank.htm John Burbank died 3 April 1683, in Rowley, Massachusetts, at age 81. JOAN or ANN JORDAN was born about 1610, in England, to unknown parents. John Burbank, the immigrant to America, was born about 1602 in England. His future wife Joan or Ann Jordan, was also born in England, about 1610. They are both listed as coming on the ship, Abigail in 1635 as servants to George Hadborne. John and Ann married about 1639, in Rowley. They settled in Rowley, Massachusetts, and had two children: John Burbank (b. 1639/40) and Timothy (b. 1641). Ann died in 1642/43, age 24. John married Jemima Unknown about 1643 probably in Rowley, Massachusetts, and had Lydia, Caleb and Mary. John Burbank died 3 April 1683 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts. John Burbank and wife Ann had a son John Burbank, who married Susannah Merrill, daughter of Nataniel and Susannah Merrill. Nathaniel Merrill died and his widow married Stephen Jordan of Newbury. It has been suggested that Stephen Jordan was a relation of Ann (Jordan) Burbank, John's mother, and that John Burbank, when visiting Stephen Jordan in the adjoining town of Newbury, met the stepdaughter of Stephen Jordan, Sussanah Merrill, and married her. Children of John Burbank and Ann Jordan: 1.JOHN BURBANK was born about 1640, to John Burbank (1602-1683) and Ann Jordan (1610-1642.) He married Susannah Merrill, 15 October 1663. John Burbank died 1 June 1709, at Suffield, Massachusetts, age 69. 2.Timothy Burbank, b. 18 May 1641, Rowley; d. 14 July 1660, Rowley, age 19, unmarried. He was a carpenter by trade. Children of John Burbank and Jemima (___) Burbank, all born at Rowley were: 1.Lydia Burbank, b. 7 April 1644; md. Abraham Foster, 1657. 2.Caleb Burbank, b. 19 May 1646; md. Marth Smith, 6 May 1669; d. before 25 March 1690. 3.Timothy Burbank, b. 24 Jan 1677; d. abt. 1703, prob. Unmd. 4.Martha Burbank, b. 22 Feb 1679-80; md. Daniel Gage, 9 Mar 1697-8. 5.Eleazer Burbank, b. 14 Mar 1681-2; md. Lydia Kimball, 14 Feb 1759; d. 14 Feb 1759. (Descendants: Luther Burbank, California, originated many new varieties of fruit, flowers, and vegetables; George Burbank Sedgley, author and compiler of Burbank genealogy, 1928.) 6.Ebenezer Burbank, B. 28 June 1687; Md. Widow Walker Hardy, 19 Apr 1711; d. Nov or Dec 1760. 7.Mary Burbank, b. 16 May 1655; buried at Rowley, 12 July 1660. (Source: John Burbank of Rowley, Massachusetts, and some of His Descendants, by: N. P. Maling.) (Source: Genealogy of the Burbank Families, by George Burbank Sedgeley, 1928.) + 3. JOHN BURBANK II (1640-1709) SUSANNAH MERRILL (1638-1690) (16th Century Man) JOHN BURBANK was born about 1640, in Rowley, Massachusetts, to John Burbank (1602-1683) and (Joan) Ann Jordan (1610-1642) the immigrants. He married (1) *Susannah Merrill, 15 October 1663, at Newbury, Massachusetts. Susannah died at Suffield, on 10 October 1690. He married (2) Sarah Hart Scone, 15 July 1692, at Springfield, Massachusetts. Sarah died at Suffield, on 19 August 1692. He married (3) Mehitable Saunders, 9 January 1693, at Springfield. Mehitable died at Suffield, on 24 February 1728, at about age 67. John Burbank died 1 June 1709, at Suffield, Massachusetts, age 69. He lived in Newbury, Rowley, and Haverhill, Massachusetts, then moved to Suffield, Connecticut in 1680. Nothing is recorded of his early youth in Rowley except this court record: 1659—John Burbank fined for excessive drinking (this may have been either John Jr., at the age of 20, or his father, John Sr., at the age of 59.) John Burbank was made a freeman in Boston, Massachusetts, on 13 May 1640. Four years after his marriage and one year after the birth of his first child, Mary, in a case in court of a least dated June 3, 1667: “Whereas John Burbank Jr., of Rowley, had taken half of the farm of Phillip Neilson of Rowley, lying near Merrimacke River next to the Newbury line, which was let to said Burbank by assignment of John Willcot of Newbury. Burbank having suffered great damage because the house and barn were not finished as they should be, and likewise in falling short both of land and meadow of what was expected. Philip Neilson was to let said Burbank live the present year upon the farm rent free, and to have the improvement of the farm, and Burbank was to acquit said Neilson of all debts paying for future time a yearly rental.” After he settled in Suffield, he participated in the land grants at Suffield, in 1674 but was delayed from taking up the land by King Philip’s War. Around the year 1668, he moved to Haverhill, which was farther west on the Merrimacke River. Here the last three of his children, all sons, were born: Timothy, John III, and Ebenezer. From Connecticut records 1674, John Burbank was granted fifty acres of land in Suffield. He was a large landholder, and much employed by Major Pynchon in building and clearing land in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when the town was organized, but never held office. His name is found in Major Pynchon’s account book oftener than any Suffield man. He must have been a man of business. (Major Daniel Burbank, a descendant of this John Burbank, married Margaret Pynchon, a descendant of Major Pynchon.) His sons John III and Ebenezer were afterwards prominent men in town matters. His homestead was at the north end of Feather Street. His name appears several times in the Suffield records much earlier than 1680. In fact he was granted 50 acres in 1674, but he did not live there for any length of time until 1680. John’s son Timothy did not go with his father to Suffield, Connecticut, in 1680. He was then 12 years old and must have taken an apprenticeship with Capt. Saltonstall if Ipswich, Massachusetts. He became a sea captain. When Suffield was laid out it was part of Maj. Pynchon’s plantation in Massachusetts, but when the Connecticut line was formed, it was located about seven miles inside Connecticut, and about six more miles to Springfield. John was very actively engaged in work for Major Pynchon. It appears from all records that he was energetic, well-to-do, a prominent citizen, and large land holder. He had three wives having two daughters and three sons. In the last years of his life, John began to lose his mental facilities similar to the ailment that struct his brother Caleb at a younger age. John Burbank died 1 June 1709, at Suffield, Massachusetts, age 69. •2. John2 Burbank ( John1 (1)), was born at Rowley, Mass., in 1640 or 1642; died June 1, 1709; married, first, at Newbury, Mass., Oct.15, 1663, Susannah, daughter Nathaniel and Susannah (Jordon) Merrill (she died Oct. 10, 1690 at Suffield, Conn.); married, second, at Springfield, Mass., July 15, 1692, Sarah, widow of John Scone of Westfield, Mass., and daughter of Elisha Hart (she died, Aug. 19, 1692); married, third, at Springfield, Mass., Jan. 1693-4, widow Mehitable Sanders (she died Feb. 24, 1727-8). He lived in Newbury, Rowley, and Haverhill, Mass., and moved to Suffield, Conn, in 1680. His anme appears several times in the Suffield records much earlier than 1680, but he did not live there for any length of time until 1680. After he settled in Suffield it appears from all records that he was energetic, well-to-do, a prominent citizen, and large land holder. The last year or two of his life his mind went wrong --- the same with his half-brother, Caleb, only at a younger age. The records in Massachusetts, together with the fact that his oldest son, Timothy, was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, shows that for some reason he was not as prosperous the first half of his life. From Essex County Quarterly Court Records and Files: Mention is made in a case in court of a lease dated June 3, 1667, whereas John Burbanke, Jr., of Rowley, had taken half of the farm of Philip Nellson of Rowley, lying near Merrimacke river next to Newbury line, which was let to said Burbanke by assignment of John Willcot of newbury. Burbanke having suffered great damage for not finishing the house and barn as it should be finished and likewise in falling short both of land and meadow of what was expected. Philip Nellson was to let said Burbanke live the present year upon the farm, rent free, and to have the improvement of the farm, and Burbanke was to acquit said Nellson of all debts paying for future time a yearly rental. Sept. 1677. John Borbank is mentioned with other citizens as against the demand of Mr. Shepard for fifty pounds per annum. July 16, 1772. John Burbanke, aged about thirty years, made a deposition in regard to some land that it was required he should appraise. Nov. 1673. John Burbanke as a witness in court at Salem. His autograph is in the original. (In this case it is easy to distinguish between him and his father by his signature.) June 1674. Testimony of John Burbank in court in regard to a controversy. Vol. 5: p. 331. Receipt given to John Burbanke of Haverhill by John Godfrey of Salem dated April 2, 1674. (This case seems to be over a cow.) April 1679. John Burbanke with others testifies in a case at court. (His autograph appears in the original.) 1659. John Burbank fined for excesive drinking. (This may have been either John, Jr., at the age of about 20, or his father, John, Sr., at the age of 59.) John Burbank was admonished by the court for going into a neighbor's house in the night after fire when the family were abed. (There were matches at that period, and it seems the habit was to go to a neighbor's house when the fire went out and borrow live coals. It is impossible to tell for sure which John was after the fire.) At another time he called in the neighbors to see how bad his barn leaked; this was probably in connection with the court case about the rented farm. (The writer accords the testimony in the witch trial of Margaret Scott of Rowley to John3, son of Caleb2 Burbank, although there is a remote possibility that it belongs to the subject of this sketch.) From Connecticut records: "John Burbank was granted 50 acres of land in Suffield in 1674. He was a large landholder, and much employed by Mayor Pynchon in bulding, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when town was organized, but never held office. His name is found in Mayor Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and he must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterwards prominent men in town matters. His homestaed was at the north end of Feather street. His oldest son, Timothy, who was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, did not go to Suffield, Conn., with his father. John of Suffield was the ancestor of one branch, and his half-brother, Caleb, the ancestor of the other branch --- the two branches of the family from the Rowley immigrant. The attention of the reader is called to James C. Burbank, of St. Paul, Minn., a descendant through his som Timothy. Children by first wife: i Mary3, baptized "in our Church" June 24, 1666; lived in Haverhill and Rowley, Mass., until 1680 then moved with her parents to Suffield, Conn. (then Mass.). The following mention is made of her in Burt's History of Springfield, Mass., Vol. 2, page 606: Probably married first, Dec. 2, 1685, Lazarus Miller; married, second, about 1702, William McCraney; married, third, Feb. 11, 1734, James Sexton. Children by first husband: 1 Obediah Miller. 2 John Miller. 3 Noah Miller. 4 Nathaniel Miller. 5 Martha Miller. 6 Martha Miller. 7 Mary Miller. Children by second husband: 8 Ruth McCraney. 9 Rachel McCraney. 10 Benjamin McCraney. 11 Timothy McCraney. 4 ii Timothy3, b. May 30, 1668. 5 iii John3, b. Aug. 1670. 6 iv Ebenezer3, b. Mar. 4, 1673-4. Child by third wife: v Susanna3, b. at Suffield, Conn., Nov. 23, 1695; d. at Westfield, Mass., Dec. 19, 1752; m. 1726, Ebenezer Philips. •Sketch from Sheldon's History of Suffield Posted 03 Jan 2010 by Debra Burbank "John Burbank, son of John of Rowley, married Susannah Merrill, October 15, 1663, and lived at Haverhill. He removed his wife and several children to Suffield, about 1680. His wife died October 10, 1690. Married second and third wife; the last bore him a daughter " Susannah." He was a large land-holder, and much employed by Major Pynchon in building, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when the Town was organized, but never held an office. His name is found in Major Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and be must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterward prominent men in Town matters. His homestead was at the north end of Feather street. He died June 1, 1709." ----Sheldon, Hezekiah Spencer. History of Suffield, in the Colony and Province of the Massachusetts Bay, New England. Springfield, Massachusetts: Clark W. Bryan Company 1879. page 30. (Excerpt from the Sedgley book •2. John2 Burbank ( John1 (1)), was born at Rowley, Mass., in 1640 or 1642; died June 1, 1709; married, first, at Newbury, Mass., Oct.15, 1663, Susannah, daughter Nathaniel and Susannah (Jordon) Merrill (she died Oct. 10, 1690 at Suffield, Conn.); married, John Burbank II (1641 - 1709) Posted 28 Apr 2017 by Dyharma Source: https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Burbank-5 Biography John Burbank, born in 1640 in Rowley, Massachusetts, was the son of John Burbank the immigrant and his first wife Anne Jordan. In Dewey's John Burbank of Suffield, Conn. and Some of His Descendants, he describes John Burbank being made a freeman in Boston, Mass. on 13 May 1640 where he lived at Newbury, Haverhill, and Rowley, Mass. then details his three marriages. [1] The details of becoming a freeman may be accredited to his father if his birthdate is truly 1641. John Burbank is listed in both the 1677 and 1681 Massachusetts Early Census Index. First living in Essex County, Mass. then living in Massachusetts Colony having been made a freeman 11 May. [2] Marriages He married first at Newbury, Massachusetts on 15 Oct 1663, Susannah Merrill[3][4][5], daughter of Nathaniel and Susannah (Jordan) Merrill. After being allotted fifty acres of land on 17 July 1674, the family moved to Suffield, Connecticut in 1680. John and Susannah had a daughter Mary b. 24 June 1666 and three sons: Timothy b. 30 May 1668 in Haverhill, Massachusetts, John b. August 1670, and Ebenezer b. 4 March 1673/4. On 15 July 1692 in Springfield, Massachusetts, John married second, Sarah (Hart) Scone who was the the widow of John Scone of Westfield. Sarah had married former husband John Scone in 1675. [6][5] Sarah, died soon after on 19 August 1692. She was the daughter of Edmund Hart. [7][8][9] On 9 January 1693 in Springfield, Massachusetts, John married third, Mehitable (Barlett) Sanders who was the widow of George Sanders of Windsor. John and Mehitable had one daughter, Susanna Burbank b. 23 November 1965. Death In the last years of his life, John began to lose his mental facilities similar to the ailment that struct his brother Caleb at a younger age. He died on 1 June 1709 and is buried in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut. Sources 1.↑ Louis Marinus Dewey, esq. John Burbank of Suffield, Conn. and Some of His Descendants Henry Fitz-Gilbert. editor. The New England historical and Genealogical Register, New England Historic Genealogical Society, (Boston: The Society, 1907), vol 61, p 139-142. https://archive.org/stream/newenglandhistor61wate#page/139/mode/1up 2.↑ Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Massachusetts Census, 1790-1890. Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes. Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1790-1890 ([database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. :accessed 13 Sept 2016). 3.↑ Clemens, William Montgomery. American Marriage Records Before 1699. Pompton Lakes, NJ, USA: Biblio Co., 1926. 4.↑ Town and City Clerks of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Vital and Town Records. Provo, UT: Holbrook Research Institute (Jay and Delene Holbrook). 5.↑ 5.0 5.1 Torry, Clarence A. New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004. 6.↑ Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. Massachusetts, Marriages, 1633-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. (Original data: With some noted exceptions all marriage records in this collection can be found at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, and may be available through Family History Centers throughout the United States. See table below for information listed.) 7.↑ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, Volumes 1-3; Boston: New England Historical and Genealogical Society, 1996-2011. 2:868. 8.↑ New England Historical Genealogical Register, 61:139. 9.↑ Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. See also: •Suffield Historical Society, Family history of John Burbank http://www.suffieldhistoricalsociety.org/families/burbank.htm •Barbour Collection Connecticut Vital Records, 1674-1850 Connecticut State •George Burbank Sedgley, Genealogy of The Burbank Family and The Families of Bray, Wellcome, Sedgley (Sedgeley) and Welch Knowlton and McLeary Company 1928. •Godfrey Memorial Library, comp., American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999), Ancestry.com, Record for John Burbank. •American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) about John Burbank Volume 22 pg. 77 •Richard Coleman Witters. Ancestral Roots and Descendants of Charles Robert Looney and LaVanchie Margaret Cool and the Families of Ackley, Bradford, Burbank, Cool, Crow, Dwight, Fitch, Flint, Goodwin, Granger, Hoar, Kuhl, Looney, Mason, Partridge, Peck, Wark, and Whiting (Xlibris Corporation, Aug 17, 2009) 113-133. •John R. Burbank, Various correspondence (1/10/2000) •Benjamin P. Mighill and George B. Blodgette, The Early Records of the Town of Town of Rowley, Massachuetts, 1639-1672, Volume one of the printed records of the town; printed Rowley, Mass. 1894. •Robert Hayden Alcorn, The Biography of a Town, Suffield-Connecticut 1670-1970, pages 317-323, Three Hundredth Anniversary Committee of The Town of Suffield. •Biographical Sketched of the Graduate of Yale College with Annals of College History •Dean, History of Scituate, page 256. Hist. and General Register, xix, 40: Conn. Puritan Settlers •A Brief History of The First Church of Christ, Congregational •Captain Abraham Burbank "Probate Records" dated 1768, Hartford, Connecticut, file number 925. •Franklin Bowditch Dexter, M.A., Biographical Sketches of the Graduate of Yale College with Annals of the College History, Volume II, pp. 517-518 New York, Henry Holt & Co. 1896. •Frederick W. Bailey, Editor Early Connecticut Marriages As Found On Ancient Church Records Prior to 1800, p. 47, Bureau of American Ancestry. •Public records of the Colony of Connecticut 1636-1776. •Vital Records of Granville, Massachusetts to year 1850, p. 185, published by New England Historical Genealogical Society, Boston 1914. •Church Baptismal records from the First Church of Christ, Congregational United Church Christ," photo copied by Richard C. Witters. •Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Prepared for publication by Elizabeth P. Bentley, Genealogical Publishing Co. Baltimore, 1985. •Headstone Incriptions," Suffield, Hartford County, Connecticut 1660-1937 •second, at Springfield, Mass., July 15, 1692, Sarah, widow of John Scone of Westfield, Mass., and daughter of Elisha Hart (she died, Aug. 19, 1692); married, third, at Springfield, Mass., Jan. 1693-4, widow Mehitable Sanders (she died Feb. 24, 1727-8). He lived in Newbury, Rowley, and Haverhill, Mass., and moved to Suffield, Conn, in 1680. His anme appears several times in the Suffield records much earlier than 1680, but he did not live there for any length of time until 1680. After he settled in Suffield it appears from all records that he was energetic, well-to-do, a prominent citizen, and large land holder. The last year or two of his life his mind went wrong --- the same with his half-brother, Caleb, only at a younger age. The records in Massachusetts, together with the fact that his oldest son, Timothy, was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, shows that for some reason he was not as prosperous the first half of his life. From Essex County Quarterly Court Records and Files: Mention is made in a case in court of a lease dated June 3, 1667, whereas John Burbanke, Jr., of Rowley, had taken half of the farm of Philip Nellson of Rowley, lying near Merrimacke river next to Newbury line, which was let to said Burbanke by assignment of John Willcot of newbury. Burbanke having suffered great damage for not finishing the house and barn as it should be finished and likewise in falling short both of land and meadow of what was expected. Philip Nellson was to let said Burbanke live the present year upon the farm, rent free, and to have the improvement of the farm, and Burbanke was to acquit said Nellson of all debts paying for future time a yearly rental. Sept. 1677. John Borbank is mentioned with other citizens as against the demand of Mr. Shepard for fifty pounds per annum. July 16, 1772. John Burbanke, aged about thirty years, made a deposition in regard to some land that it was required he should appraise. Nov. 1673. John Burbanke as a witness in court at Salem. His autograph is in the original. (In this case it is easy to distinguish between him and his father by his signature.) June 1674. Testimony of John Burbank in court in regard to a controversy. Vol. 5: p. 331. Receipt given to John Burbanke of Haverhill by John Godfrey of Salem dated April 2, 1674. (This case seems to be over a cow.) April 1679. John Burbanke with others testifies in a case at court. (His autograph appears in the original.) 1659. John Burbank fined for excesive drinking. (This may have been either John, Jr., at the age of about 20, or his father, John, Sr., at the age of 59.) John Burbank was admonished by the court for going into a neighbor's house in the night after fire when the family were abed. (There were matches at that period, and it seems the habit was to go to a neighbor's house when the fire went out and borrow live coals. It is impossible to tell for sure which John was after the fire.) At another time he called in the neighbors to see how bad his barn leaked; this was probably in connection with the court case about the rented farm. (The writer accords the testimony in the witch trial of Margaret Scott of Rowley to John3, son of Caleb2 Burbank, although there is a remote possibility that it belongs to the subject of this sketch.) From Connecticut records: "John Burbank was granted 50 acres of land in Suffield in 1674. He was a large landholder, and much employed by Mayor Pynchon in bulding, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when town was organized, but never held office. His name is found in Mayor Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and he must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterwards prominent men in town matters. His homestaed was at the north end of Feather street. His oldest son, Timothy, who was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, did not go to Suffield, Conn., with his father. John of Suffield was the ancestor of one branch, and his half-brother, Caleb, the ancestor of the other branch --- the two branches of the family from the Rowley immigrant. The attention of the reader is called to James C. Burbank, of St. Paul, Minn., a descendant through his som Timothy. Feather St. 1684 Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut Early settlers at Suffield who were assigned lots on Feather Street from 1671-1684 from the Documentary History of Suffield by H. S. Sheldon Linked to John and Susannah Merrill Burbank Children by first wife: i Mary3, baptized "in our Church" June 24, 1666; lived in Haverhill and Rowley, Mass., until 1680 then moved with her parents to Suffield, Conn. (then Mass.). The following mention is made of her in Burt's History of Springfield, Mass., Vol. 2, page 606: Probably married first, Dec. 2, 1685, Lazarus Miller; married, second, about 1702, William McCraney; married, third, Feb. 11, 1734, James Sexton. Children by first husband: 1 Obediah Miller. 2 John Miller. 3 Noah Miller. 4 Nathaniel Miller. 5 Martha Miller. 6 Martha Miller. 7 Mary Miller. Children by second husband: 8 Ruth McCraney. 9 Rachel McCraney. 10 Benjamin McCraney. 11 Timothy McCraney. 4 ii Timothy3, b. May 30, 1668. 5 iii John3, b. Aug. 1670. 6 iv Ebenezer3, b. Mar. 4, 1673-4. Child by third wife: v Susanna3, b. at Suffield, Conn., Nov. 23, 1695; d. at Westfield, Mass., Dec. 19, 1752; m. 1726, Ebenezer Philips. •Sketch from Sheldon's History of Suffield Posted 03 Jan 2010 by Debra Burbank "John Burbank, son of John of Rowley, married Susannah Merrill, October 15, 1663, and lived at Haverhill. He removed his wife and several children to Suffield, about 1680. His wife died October 10, 1690. Married second and third wife; the last bore him a daughter " Susannah." He was a large land-holder, and much employed by Major Pynchon in building, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when the Town was organized, but never held an office. His name is found in Major Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and be must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterward prominent men in Town matters. His homestead was at the north end of Feather street. He died June 1, 1709." ----Sheldon, Hezekiah Spencer. History of Suffield, in the Colony and Province of the Massachusetts Bay, New England. Springfield, Massachusetts: Clark W. Bryan Company 1879. page 30. susannahmerrill john burbank mountain road Suffield Hartford County Connecticut, USA old center cemetery SUSANNAH MERRILL was baptized 12 December 1638, in Lawford, Essex, England. Her parents were Nathaniel Merrill Jr. (1601-1655) and Susannah Wolterton (1610-1673.) She married John Burbank, 15 October 1663, Newbury, Massachusetts. Susanna Merrill died 10 October 1690, at Suffield, Connecticut at about age 50. Some newly found records show that Nathaniel Merrill's daughter, Susanna, was not baptized until December 12, 1638, in Lawford, Essex, Co., England. This tells us that Nathaniel had not left for America with his family until late December 1638 or early 1639. In 1638 the English Government started restricting its citizens from freely immigrating to the new continent with its abundance of land for all, something unknown in England. The fact that brother John arranged for a home site of four acres in Newbury for his unnamed "brother" would indicate that the brother was not there by 23 July 1638 but was arranging to come. Ship records, the Hector, show that Nathaniel and John did arrive in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1635. Nathaniel must have returned to England to get his wife and his four children and returned in 1638-39. This is when Susannah Merrill must have immigrated as an infant. Susannah Merrill passed away 10 October 1690, in Suffield, Connecticut, at about age 50. Posted 13 Aug 2011 by mrsoul_29 Children of Nathaniel1 and Susanna Merrill, the last five of whom were born in Newbury: Nathaniel2, b. prob. 1633/4; d. 1 Jan. 1682/3. John2, b. about 1635; d. 18 July, 1712. Abraham2, b. 1636 or 1637; d. 28 Nov. 1722. Susanna2, b. 1640; d. 10 Oct. 1690, in Suffield, Conn.; lived in Bradford (now Haverhill), Mass., in 1667, in Haverhill from 1668 to 1674, then in Suffield; m. 15 Oct. 1663, in Newbury, John Burbank, son of John and Ann Burbank of Rowley, Mass.; he m. (2) Sarah , who d. 19 Aug. 1691, and (3) Mehitable; he d.1 June, 1709. Children: Mary, bap. 24 June, 1666, in Rowley. (Burbank), Timothy, bap. 30 May, 1668, in Haverhill; mentioned in the will of his grandfather,John Burbank, in 1681, as living with Capt. Saltonstall, John, b. Aug. 1670, in Haverhilll; d. 25 Mar. 1729; m. 21 Dec. 1699, Mary Granger, Ebenezer, b. 21 Mar. 1673/4, in Haverhill; lived in Suffield; m. 9 Oct. 1698 (or 1699), Rebecca Pritchard (widow). Daniel2, b. 20 Aug. 1642; d. 27 June, 1717. Abel2, b. 20 Feb. 1643/4; d. 28 Oct. 1689. * Children of John Burbank and Susannah Merrill: 1.Mary Burbank was baptized at Rowley, on 24 June 1666; md. (1) Lazarus Miller, 2 Dec 1685; md. (2) William McCraney, 1702; (3) James Sexton, 11 Feb 1734; d. 16 Dec. 1640. 2.TIMOTHY BURBANK was born 30 May 1668, at Haverhill, Massachusetts, to John Burbank (1640-1709) and Susannah Merrill (1638-1690.) He settled in Boston, Massachusetts and married Rebecca Darling, July 3, 1695, at Salem, Massachusetts. Timothy Burbank died in 1706, at about age 38. 3.John Burbank III was born at Haverhill, in August 1670; md. Mary Granger, 21 Dec 1699; died at Suffield, 25 March 1729. 4.Ebenezer Burbank was born at Haverhill, on 4 March 1674; md. Widow Rebecca Pritchard, 9 Oct 1699. (Source: John Burbank of Rowley, Massachusetts, and some of His Descendants, by: N. P. Maling.) (Source: “A Merrill Family History,” http://family.rootsweb.ancestry.com) + 4. TIMOTHY BURBANK (1668-1706) REBECCA DARLING (1673-1712) (MARINER) TIMOTHY BURBANK was born 30 May 1668, at Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts, to John Burbank (1638-1709) and Susannah Merrill (1628-1690.) He was the second child and the first son of John & Susannah (Merrill) Burbank, and was named for his Uncle Timothy Burbank, who died in 1660 at the age of 19 years. When he was 12 years old his father moved to Suffield, Conn., but left Timothy with Capt. Nathaniel Saltonstall of Haverhill, Mass., graduate of Harvard. Timothy must have apprenticed himself to Capt. Salstonstall to become a Mariner. His grandfather’s will (John Burbank) dated 5 April 1681 reads: “To his son Timothy my grandchild who lieth with Capt. Saltonstall after he cometh to the age of twenty-one years I give about three pounds price.” Timothy had an Aunt Lydia (Burbank) Foster living in Ipswich and one of her boys, Isaac Foster, was his age. He also had Aunts and Uncles of his mother, Susannah (Merrill) Burbank; their children were his first cousins living close by in Newbury, Massachusetts. There is only one item regarding his early life dated 1691: “Timothy Burbank took Jane Toppan to Newbury to help tend her brother, Samuel, who is there taken ill of the smallpox.” This was probably one of his girlfriends before he met and married Rebecca Darling. Note that he named his second child; a daughter, Jane. He was sailing out of Salem when he met his wife, Rebecca Darling, and married her, 3 July 1695, at Salem. He had a daughter, named after his wife Rebecca, and she was born somewhere in the vicinity of Salem, but her birthplace or date is unknown. He was sailing out of Salem at first, but about 1698 out of Boston, as his last four children were born there; Jane, Timothy Jr., John, and Samuel. From the Virginia Magazine, Vol 26, we find in the record of the receiver of the Virginia duties for York River district, dated 3 July 1704, the Swallow of Boston, mastered by Capt. Timothy Burbank, was bound for Boston, and that it was a ship of 25 tons. These ships were called Brigantines. List of Ships Entering in Upper District James River from 25th March to 16th July 1702 SWALLOW OF NEW ENGLAND Sloop, built I696, 25 Tons NEW ENGLAND Timothy Burbank, Master John Fawster, Nath'll Hlnksman, Jos. Souter, List of Ships that have been Cleared In Rappahanock River from 25th March to 24th June 1704 SWALLOW OF BOSTON Sloop, built New England I696, 25 Tons Timothy Burbank, Master Wm. Burroughs, Jno. Foster, Owners Nothing is found regarding Timothy's death--no date, no place. After the birth of his last child, Samuel, 16 Oct 1706, no further record is found regarding him. There is strong evidence, however, that he died shortly after the birth of this child as the Boston records give the marriage of his widow to Thomas Smith, of the Reserve, 22 Feb. 1709. His death was not listed in the Boston Vital Records--so it can be only supposed that he was lost at sea. None of his sons became mariners. Timothy Burbank probably died in about 1706 at sea, at about age 38. None of his sons became mariners. REBECCA DARLING was born about 1673, of Salem, Massachusetts, to George Darling (1615-1693) and Katherine More (1637-1693.) She married (1) *Timothy Burbank, 3 July 1695, in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts. Timothy Burbank was probably drowned at sea in about 1706, at age 38 (Rebecca was about 33.) Rebecca married (2) Thomas Smith, 22 Feb 1709, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. Rebecca Darling died about 1712, in Massachusetts, age 39. Children of Timothy Burbank and Rebecca Darling: 1.Rebecca Burbank, born between 1696-98, probably Salem, Mass.; married Nathan Webber by the Reverend Samuel Miles, Presbyterian at Boston, Mass., 20 Oct. 1713. 2.Jane Burbank, born 24 March 1699, Boston, Suffolk, Mass.; married John Smallage 12 August 1720, by Reverend Joseph Sewall, Presbyterian, Boston, Mass. 3.Timothy Burbank, born 12 October, 1703, Boston, Mass.; married in 1728 at the age of twenty-five, Mercy, daughter of Samuel & Mercy (Dunham) Kempton. He was a tailor and settled in Plymouth, Mass. He died 13 Oct 1793, age 90. 4.John Burbank, born 19 January 1705, Boston, Mass.; Elizabeth Tower, 28 June, 1728; d. 30 September, 1791. 5.SAMUEL BURBANK, born 16 October 1706, Boston, Massachusetts, to Timothy Burbank (1668-1709) and Rebecca Darling (1673-1712.) His father drowned at sea when he was a baby. He married (1) *Mary Reed daughter of Thomas & Abigail (Bacon) Reed, 10 March 1730, Sudbury, Massachusetts. He married (2) Mrs. Hannah Emerson. He lived in Sudbury, Massachusetts, where all of his twelve children were born, and in his old age was living at Holliston, Massachusetts, where his will was probated 6 September 1781. (Source: John Burbank of Rowley, Massachusetts, and some of His Descendants, by: N. P. Maling.) + 5. SAMUEL BURBANK (1706-1781) MARY REED (1709-1750) (PATRIOT) SAMUEL BURBANK was born 16 October 1706, in Boston, Massachusetts, to Timothy Burbank (1668-1709) and Rebecca Darling (1673-1712.) He married (1) *Mary Reed, 10 March 1729, Sudbury, Massachusetts. He married (2) Mrs. Hannah Emerson. He lived in Sudbury, Massachusetts, where all of his twelve children were born, and in his old age was living at Holliston, Massachusetts, where his will was probated 6 September 1781. None of Capt. Timothy's three sons became mariners -- Samuel was a baby when his father was lost at sea, and he was brought up by his stepfather, Thomas Smith. Samuel Burbank is known by his descendants as the father of the Revolutionary Soldier boys. His four boys; Ebenezer, Samuel, Daniel and John saw much service in this War. Sudbury is only about seven miles south of Concord and Lexington -- the hot spot of the war. His son Samuel played a very important part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. 1781. William Todd, a son of William, died while privateering. Solomon Lowell, David Poor, Silas Dole, Moses Boynton, and James Phillips, were in the army. Samuel Burbank, on his return from the army, died of the small-pox in the pest-house. Private, served as guard under Sergeant Breck, Hopkinton Massachusetts Militia, April, 1776 ; Private, Captain Samuel Burbank's Company of Massachusetts Militia, for service in Rhode Island, January, 1778; Private, Captain Perry's Company, Colonel Cyprian Howe's Regiment Massachusetts Militia, Rhode Island service, August, 1778; Private, Captain McFarland's Company, same regiment, Rhode Island service, September, 1780. Walker, William Augustus Samuel Burbank’s will, probated 6 September 1781, follows: In the name of God, Amen: The seventh day of February 1778, I Samuel Burbank of Holliston, county of Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay, in New England: Yeoman: Calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that I must die, recommending my soul into the hands of God that gate it, and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in a decent Christian burial at the discretion of my Executor. And as to the worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give, demise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form by this my last will and testament. I give and bequeath unto Hannah, my wife, the use of one-half of my dwelling house, meaning the westerly part of the same from the center of the chimney and the cellar under the same house; and also the use of the oven in the easterly part of said house and of the well for water; together with all privileges she may need in using and improving the westerly part of said house meaning to bequeath the same during the present Hannah's natural life only. I also give and bequeath to the present Hannah ail my household furniture for her own use and disposal forever together with her fire wood and provisions for her comfortable support as I shall hereafter order in this my last will and testament. 1. I give to my son Eben(ezer), five shillings which together with what he has received making his full postion in my estate. 2. I give to my son Samuel, five shillings which together with what he has received making his full portion in my estate. 3.I give to my son Daniel, five shillings. 4.I give to my daughter, Mary Morse, five shillings, which together with what she has received makes her full portion in my estate. 5. I give to my daughter, Rebecca Bishop, five shillings, which together with what she has received makes her full portion in my estate. 6.I give to my daughter, Rachell Dix, five shillings. 7.I give to my daughter Lydia Sheffield, five shillings, which together with what she has received makes her full portion. 8.I give to my son, John Burbank, his heirs and assigns forever; all my lands and buildings in Holliston aforesaid, together with my armour, my wearing apparel, and all my personal estate; except my household furniture already bequeathed, reserving the use of the westerly half of my dwelling house to my wife Hannah during her life--he the said John Burbank, paying on demand the several legacies within mentioned: together with my funeral charges, and charges that may arise by executing this my will and testament. And also that he supply my wife, Hannah. during her widowhood with every of the necessaries of life, as she may require for her comfortable support, and so much firewood as she may require brought to her door; cut fit for her use, and carried into her room if requested, and he my said son John to receive my credits and pay my just debts. I do constitute and appoint my son Samuel Burbank within named, sole executor of this my last will and testament, ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. Signed, Sealed and Declared by the said Samuel Burbank, to be his last will and Testament. in presence of us: John Hemenway Eunice Burbank John Stone Samuel Burbank Seal Samuel Burbank’s will was probated 6 September 1781, age 75. MARY REED was born, 1 May 1709, in Sudbury Middlesex, Massachusetts, to Thomas Reed (1678-1755) and Abigail Bacon (1685-before 1755.) She married Samuel Burbank, 10 March 1729/30, in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts. They had 12 children. Mary Reed died about 1750, in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, at about age 41. Children of Samuel Burbank and Mary Reed: 1.Samuel Burbank, b. 28 Dec 1730, Sudbury; d. 2 Mar 1731. Child. 2. Ebenezer Burbank, b. 5 May 1733, Sudbury; md. Sarah Homans, 22 Dec 1752. 3. Samuel Burbank, b. 24 June 1734, Sudbury; md. Eunice Kendall, 22 Apr 1773; d. 1808, Vermont. (From pension application on file at Washington, D.C. Eunice Morse applied for pension 17 Feb 1838, on the service of Samuel Burbank who enlisted about 19 Apr 1775 and arrived in Lexington during the battle. He was appointed Lieutenant. Was in the Battle of Bunker Hill and when Capt. Leland gave out on the eve of battle (want of courage), Samuel took command and led in the battle until a Captain was attached.) This must not be our Samuel Burbank: Samuel Burbank, on his return from the army, died of the small-pox in the pest house (hospital.) 4. LIEUT. DANIEL BURBANK was born 4 April 1736, in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay, British America, to Samuel Burbank (1706-1781) and Mary Reed (1709-1750.) He married Mary Marks (1740-1808) 19 May 1764 in Warren, Worchester, Massachusetts. He died 27 September 1802 in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, at 66 years of age. They had nine children. 5. John Burbank, b. 8 Apr 1737, Sudbury; md. Mary Verney, int. 6 Feb 1773; d. 19 Jul 1818. He served in the Revolutionary War. He had four sons all born in Holliston, Massachusetts. In his father’s will he was given the farm at Holliston and the care of his mother until her death. 6.Abigail Burbank, b. 19 Sep 1738, Sudbury; d. 13 Nov 1738. Child. 7.Josiah (Joseph) Burbank, b. 17 Mar 1739/40, Sudbury; d. 1740. Child. 8.Mary Burbank, b. 11 Apr 1741, Sudbury; md. William Morse, 8 Dec 1763. 9.Abigail Burbank, b. 12 Aug 1742; md. (1) Reuben Underwood, 20 May 1762; (2) John Steadman 1765; d. 13 Sept 1822. 10.Rebecca Burbank, b. 20 June 1745; md. Zebulon Bishop, 26 Apr 1769. 11.Rachel Burbank, b. 16 Nov 1747; md. Timothy Dix, 13 Aug 1769; d. 1793. 12.Lydia Burbank, b. 9 May 1749; md. (1) Daniel Sheffield, 1 Mar 1772. (2) Elisha Marsh, 1792. + 6. LIEUTENANT DANIEL BURBANK (1736-1802, age 66) MARY MARKS (1740-1808, age 68) (From the Ancestors & Descendants of Lt. Daniel & Mary (Marks) Burbank) LIEUTENANT DANIEL BURBANK was born 4 April, 1736, Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, to Samuel Burbank (1706-1781) and Mary Reed (1709-1750.) Marriage int., 19 Mar 1764, Warren, Massachusetts, Mary, daughter of Hezekiah and Judith (Hayward) Marks. (She was born 18 July 1740, Warren, Mass.; died 25 February 1808, age 68 years, Williamstown, Massachusetts.) They had five sons and four daughters. Daniel Burbank died 27 September 1802, in Williamstown, Massachusetts, at age 66. Revolutionary War: Lieut. Daniel Burbank lived and died in Williamstown, Massachusetts. When the Revolutionary War broke out he gained for himself the title of Lieutenant. He entered service in 1776 and was discharged in 1777. He gave a long life of service, especially in protecting and building up the community of Williamstown, Massachusetts. History: Many of the inhabitants of Sudbury took up land in Western (now Warren) Massachusetts, and it is known that Daniel's Reed relatives, thru his mother Mary (Reed) Burbank, were of Warren. He went there as a young man and fell in love with the beautiful Mary Marks. Her grandfather is listed in the History of N. Brookfield, page 680: “Joseph Marks, of Springfield, where he had a grant of land located on the west side of the river, dated 2 February, 1685; was a soldier in Captain Bull's company, which was sent to Albany and Schenectady in November 1689, to protect the settlers there against the French and Indians. In a skirmish Joseph Marks was taken prisoner to Canada. He escaped and returned about March 1692, and soon after came to Brookfield, where he received a grant of 60 acres and later 180 acres. His was one of the fortified homes necessary in the Indian Wars of that time. Mark's Garrison stood near the south west end of Wickaboag pond on a knoll below the junction of the waters of the pond with the Quaboag River.” It is related that one day Mary, wife of Joseph Marks, being left alone, discovered hostile Indians in the neighborhood of the garrison waiting for a favorable opportunity to attack the settlement. She immediately put on her husband's wig, hat, great coat; and taking his gun, went to the top of the fortification, and marched backwards and forwards vociferating, like a vigilant sentinel, all's well! all's well! This led the Indians to believe that they could not take the place by surprise, and fearing an open and protracted assault, they retreated. This was the Grandmother of Mary (Marks) Burbank. History of Berkshire Co. Massachusetts: Thomas Dunton was from Western, now Warren, Massachusetts. So far as can be known, his was the first family to settle directly on the bank of the Hoosac River. For a number of years, Dunton owned house lot 13 and sold to prominent parties the outlots drawn in succession by this house lot. For example, he sold Daniel Burbank, also of Western, the second division fifty-acre lot 56, October 1763. (After he bought this land he went back to Warren and married his wife Mary Marks, and brought her back to West Hoosac, [now Williamstown, Mass.,] and built a framed house of one room.) He soon doubled this farm, buying the adjoining fifty-acre lot 57 half a mile from South Williamstown on the road to New Ashford. Daniel Burbank was a Lieutenant in the military company of South Williamstown and fought in the Battle of Bennington, Vermont, and his oldest son, Samuel, at the instance of his mother while the Bennington battle was going forward, put his ear to the ground, and heard successive discharges of cannon. His neighbors crowded around him on his return, wanted to know if he felt afraid during the battle; and he answered, "After they had fired once, and we had fired once, I was no more afraid on the battlefield than I am on the potato field!" He fought in several other engagements during the Revolutionary War. Burbank's lots were level and fertile and heavily wooded. The Ashford brook crossed these lots not far from their eastern end but a little before its junction with the Hancock brook, and the road to the South crossed them diagonally just about their middle. He had at first but one neighbor, and that was Isaac Stratton, living then in a log house on lot 53, just north of the Hancock brook. Burbank's own axe was the first to make clearings on his lots 56 and 57, and his own plow was the first that ever stirred the rich soil there. He added several parcels of 25 acre plots during his life. Both Burbank and his wife were original members of the one church and their place of meeting was more than five miles from their home. The roads were rough, and over Stone Hill it was very steep both ways, but it is altogether likely that they were in their pew in the new meetinghouse, after 1768, most of the Sundays of the year; and he was certainly often at the church meetings on week days. History of Berkshire County, page 250, also gives: Soon after the incorporation of New Ashford, just south of Williamstown, into a district, 17 December 1782, it was voted that we will build a house of public worship -- and they chose Samuel Hand, Daniel Burbank, and Gideon Wheeler, Esq., a committee to pitch a stake where said house will stand. The significance of this past proceeding is that the men chosen to pitch this stake were from adjoining towns. Burbank was very active in community affairs and was a very religious and respected citizen. He owned land in Marcellus, Onadaga County, New York. He probably got it thru his Revolutionary services, but he never settled on it as we will find thru his will -- he gave it to his sons Daniel and John. His long life of service ended 27 September 1802, aged 66 years, at Williamstown, Massachusetts, where he is buried. His wife survived him a little over five years; however, in that time she never applied for a Government pension on the services of her husband. During her widowhood, she lived on the old farm at Williamstown with her oldest son, Samuel and two youngest daughters, Rachel and Lydia, all three never marrying. She died 25 February 1808, aged 67 years, at Williamstown, and is buried there. The will of Lieutenant Daniel Burbank is as follows, which was allowed 4 January 1803, and recorded in Book 11, page 242: In the name of God. Amen. I Daniel Burbank of Williamstown, in the County of Berkshire and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Gentlemen, being weak in body but sound in mind and memory blessed by almighty God therefor, taking into consideration the mortality of man, do make and ordain this my last will and testament. First I give and bequeath my soul to God who gave, and my body to the earth in hope of a joyful resurrection through Jesus Christ my Savior, and the estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me, I give and bequeath in the manner following, viz: 1st. I will that all my lawful debts together with my funeral charges be punctually paid to my executor to be hereafter named. 2nd. To my beloved wife Mary Burbank I give and bequeath one-third part of all my estate both real and personal not herein disposed of during her natural life. 3rd. I give and bequeath to my eldest son Samuel Burbank the residue of all my sd. estate not otherwise disposed of by this will and testament. 4th. I give to my son Daniel Burbank, one-hundred acres of land lying in the Township of Marcellus in the County of Onadaga in the State of New York to be taken from off the east part of my land lying in that Township and -- 5th. I give to my son John Burbank all the residue of my land lying in the sd. Township of Marcellus. 6th. To my son Asa Burbank in consideration of his having received an education I give only the sum of ($80.00) eighty dollars for the purpose of purchasing a horse, saddle and bridle. 7th. I give to my daughter Mary Baker the sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars, including the sum of ($110.00) one hundred and ten dollars which she has already received to be paid within one year after my decease by my executor. 8th. I give to my daughter Sarah the like sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars, to be paid by my said executor within two years after my decease. 9th. I give to my daughter Rachel the like sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars to be paid as aforesaid within three years after my decease. 10th. To my daughter Lydia I give the like sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars to be paid as and when she shall arrive at the age of twenty-one and she is to be supported by my son Samuel until of lawful age. Lastly I nominate and appoint my son Samuel Burbank, sole executor to this my last will and testament. Signed Sealed published pronounced and declared by the said Daniel Burbank as his last will and testament this 23rd. day of September in the year of our Lord 1802. In the presence of us: Wm Young Wm. Towner Daniel Burbank Ara Roberts Daniel Burbank (SEAL) Lieut. Daniel Burbank Small Biography: Revolutionary War Lieut. Daniel Burbank was born in Sudbury, Massachusetts, April 4, 1736, to Samuel Burbank (1706-1781) and Mary Reed (1709-1750), and died September 27 1801, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. He lived and died in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. He had five sons and four daughters. His mother, Judith Hayward, had “Mayflower” blood in her veins through George Hayward, Ann White, Resolved White, William White, Mayflower immigrants in 1620. When the Revolutionary War broke out he gained for himself the title of Lieutenant. He entered service in 1776 and was discharged in 1777. He gave a long life of service, especially in protecting and building up the community of Williamstown, Massachusetts. Daniel Burbank died 27 September 1802, aged 66 years, in Williamstown, Massachusetts. They had been married 38 years. Williamstown, Bershire, Massachusetts MARY MARKS was born 18 July 1740 in Warren, Worchester, Massachusetts, to Hezekiah Marks (1704-1788) and Judith Hayward (1701-1786.) She was married to Lieutenant Daniel Burbank, 19 May 1764, in Warren, Worchester, Massachusetts, at age 23. Daniel Burbank was in Williamstown, Massachusetts, and bought the second division fifty-acre lot 56, October 1763. After he bought this land he went back to Warren and married his wife Mary Marks, and brought her back to West Hoosac, (now Williamstown, Mass.,) and built a framed house of one room.) He soon doubled this farm, buying the adjoining fifty-acre lot 57 half a mile from South. Both John Burbank and his wife, Mark Marks, were original members of the one church and their place of meeting was more than five miles from their home. The roads were rough, and over Stone Hill it was very steep both ways, but it is altogether likely that they were in their pew in the new meetinghouse, after 1768, most of the Sundays of the year; and he was certainly often at the church meetings on week days. History of Berkshire County, page 250, also gives: “Soon after the incorporation of New Ashford, just south of Williamstown, into a district, 17 December 1782, it was voted that we will build a house of public worship -- and they chose Samuel Hand, Daniel Burbank, and Gideon Wheeler, Esq., a committee to pitch a stake where said house will stand.’ The significance of this past proceeding is that the men chosen to pitch this stake were from adjoining towns. Burbank was very active in community affairs and was a very religious and respected citizen. John Burbank’s life of service ended 27 September 1802, aged 66 years, at Williamstown, Massachusetts, where he is buried. His wife, Mary Marks, survived him a little over five years; however, in that time she never applied for a Government pension on the services of her husband. During her widowhood, she lived on the old farm at Williamstown with her oldest son, Samuel and two youngest daughters, Rachel and Lydia, all three never marrying. Mary Marks passed away 25 February 1808, aged 67 years, at Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, at the age of 67. Children of Daniel Burbank and Mary Marks: 1.Samuel Burbank, b. 1 Feb 1766; d. 2 Sep 1844. Unmarried. Samuel born 1 February, 1766; died 2 September 1844 Williamstown Massachusetts. He grew to manhood on the farm at Williamstown, and probably received as good an education as was available at that time. He never married and upon the death of his father, at the age of 36, he was willed the farm at Williamstown. His sisters Rachel and Lydia, also never married and lived on the farm with their mother. Samuel was to care for his mother until her death according to the will. He died of old age 2 September 1844, Williamstown, Massachusetts aged 78 1/2 years. He did not leave a will but administration was taken out on his estate and Ebenezer Foster was appointed administrator, 5 November 1844. 2.Mary Burbank, b. 30 Jan 1768; md. Ira Baker, 1786; d. aft 1844. 3.Major Daniel Burbank, b. 7 May 1770, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, to Daniel Burbank (1736-1802) and Mary Marks (1740-1808.) He married (1) *Margaret Pynchon, 21 Mar 1793, in Williamstown. Married (2) Mary Adams. Died (coffee poisoned by wife, Mary Adams) 27 Oct 1832, Meredosia, Morgan, Illinois. Buried in Exeter, Scott, Illinois, by his first wife, Margaret Pynchon. 4.Asa Burbank, b. 28 Sep 1772; md. Laura Hubbel 1806; d. 4 Aug 1829. (Doctor.) 5.Reuben Burbank, b. 29 Mar 1775; d. 14 Sep 1777. Child. (2 years +.) 6.Sarah Burbank, b. 18 Jan 1777; md. Oliver Root; d. 1855. 7.John Burbank, b. 6 July 1779; md. Mary Kent; d. before 1809. 8.Rachel Burbank, b. 11 July 1782; d. 17 Sep 1843 (died of consumption.) Unmarried. 9.Lydia Burbank, b. 24 Oct 1786, d. 1829. Unmarried. + 7. MAJOR DANIEL BURBANK (1770-1832) MARGARET PYNCHON (1775-1826) MAJOR DANIEL BURBANK was born, 7 May 1770, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, to Lieutenant Daniel Burbank (1736-1802) and Mary Marks (1740-1808.) He married Margaret Pynchon, 21 May 1793, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. Daniel served in the War of 1812 as a Major at Niagara, New York. Daniel is a descendant of Mayflower passengers William and Susanna Fuller White. in Meredosia, Illinois. His body was taken from the town of Exeter, and he was buried by the side of his first wife Margaret (Pynchon) Burbank, West of the Town on a high rolling Hill. He was 68 years old. Daniel Burbank died 17 Ocober 1832 (poisoned by his second wife,) at Meredosia, Illinois, age 62. His body was taken from the town of Exeter, and he was buried by the side of his first wife MargaretBURBANK FAMILY HISTORY 14 February 2018 Note: At the time of the first English Settlements in New England, the New Year began on March 25th (Annunciation of Ladies Day), and a date written as “10th day of the second month” referred to 10 April, and not February from 1671 to 1686, the New Year began on March 1st and in the next year, 1667, it began on January 1st as at the present, but the change was not made in England until many years later. During these periods a form of designating the years was employed consisting of a double date 1649/1650 (1649 old style, 1650 new style.) The first time this form was used by the General Court of Connecticut was on 20 March 1649/50. (Handbook of Genealogy, by Henry R. Stiles, 52.) Note: In early colonial times Clergymen, graduates of colleges, members of the General Court, and planters of good families, were called, “Gentlemen” and addressed as Mr. Those without these advantages, including those of respectable character, and who owned lands, and the better class of laborers and tenants were called “Yeomen” and addressed as “Goodman” and the wife as “Goodwife,” or sometimes “Goody.” (Lyman Beecher’s Autiobiography, Vol. 1, 11.) 1.JOHN BURBANK SR. (1551-1581) ELIZABETH WILSON (1542-1590) JOHN BURBANK SR. was born about 1551, in Greystoke Manor, Cumberland, England, to unknown parents. He married Elizabeth Wilson, 31 October 1563, Cumberland, England. John Burbank died 3 January 1581, Greystoke Manor, Cumberland, England, age 30. Greystoke Castle Where John Burbank lived and died. ELIZABETH WILSON was born about 1542, of Greystoke, Cumberland, England, to unknown parents. She married John Burbank, 31 October 1563, Cumberland England. Elizabeth Wilson died about 1590, of Greystoke, Cumberland, England, age 48. Greystoke, Cumberland, England, Painting Child of John Burbank and Elizabeth Wilson: 1.JOHN BURBANK was born 21 September 1571, in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, to John Burbank Sr. (1551-1581) and Elizabeth Wilson (1542-1590.) He married (1) *Anne Gordon; (2) Abigail Unknown, about 1600. Arrived America 1635. John Burbank Sr. died about 1671 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England. + 2.JOHN BURBANK (1571-1671) ANN GORDON (1576-1676) JOHN BURBANK was born 21 September 1571, in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, to John Burbank Sr. (1551-1581) and Elizabeth Wilson (1542-1590.) He married (1) *Anne Gordon; (2) Abigail Unknown, about 1600. John Burbank Sr. died about 1671 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, age 90. ANNE GORDON was born about 1576 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England to unknown parents. She married John Burbank. Anne Gordon died about 1676 in Greystoke, Cumberland, England, age 100. Child of John Burbank and Ann Gordon: 1.JOHN BURBANK was born about 1602, of England, to John Burbank (1571-1671) and Ann Gordon (1576-1676.) He married (1) *(Joan) Ann Jordan in about 1639. Ann Jordan died in about 1642, at Rowley, Massachusetts; married (2) Jemima Unknown in about 1643. Jemima died at Rowley, Massachusetts, on 24 March 1693. John Burbank died 3 April 1683, in Rowley, Massachusetts, at age 81. + 3. JOHN BURBANK (1602-1683) ANN JORDAN (1610-1642) JOHN BURBANK was born about 1602, of England, to John Burbank Sr. (1571-1671) and Ann Gordon (1576-1676.) He married (1) *(Joan) Ann Jordan in about 1639. Ann Jordan died in about 1642, at Rowley, Massachusetts; married (2) Jemima in about 1643. Jemima died at Rowley, Massachusetts, on 24 March 1693. John Burbank died 3 April 1683, at Rowley, Massachusetts, age 72. John Burbank (Borebancke) the Immigrant: The name Joseph Burbank has been a stumbling block to all those descendants who have traced their ancestry back to John, the Immigrant, because none of the Immigrant lists had a John Burbank. Here is the key to the problem. (New England Historical Genealogical Register, Vol. 94; pp. 393-4, by William B. Dibble): John (Immigrant) and Ann Burbank -- a suggested identity: In 1635 the ship Abigail, Robert Hackwell, master, sailed from London, England to Boston, Mass. Among the passengers as given in Hotten's list of immigrants to America were George Hadborne, 43 years, his wife Anne, and two children (Rebecca Ann), and Joseph Borebancke, 24 years and Joane Jorden, 16 years, servants of Geo. Hadborne. Drake's Founders of New England gives these names as Joseph Borebanck and Jorden -- the same as Hotten, but Bank's Planters of the Commonwealth, published about seventy years later than Hotten and Drake, presents the names as Joseph Borebank and Joan Jordan. Among others listed for the same trip of the Abigail were (Hotten's List ) Jo. West, Jo. Fox, Jo. Freeman, John Rookeman, 45 years, Jo. Rookerman, 9 years. (All these appearing in the index as JOHN. Drake has them listed as Jo. with one exception, John Freeman, Savage and Banks called them JOHN.) Another family listed by Hotten for the same voyage of the Abigail was that of Christopher Foster, 32 years; Frances, 25 years, and children Rebecca, 5 years; Nathaniel, 2 years, and Jo. 1 year. Hotten indexes Jo. as John but Banks calls him Joseph. This Foster family settled at Lynn, Mass., and in a few years moved to Southampton, Long Island, where the young Jo. was known as John: a name which was carried down for several generations (History of Southampton) and agrees with the Foster Family Bible, now owned by a descendant in Michigan. Other boats sailing from London the same year show the same discrepancies in the names of several passengers listed as Jo, a fact which shows that the listing clerk at London was not particular how he wrote the name John, usually spelling it Jo. The contributor has not found any but who was later called John. Considering the discrepancies in the printed lists and indexes of Hotten, Drake and Banks, it is suggested that the Joseph Borabancke and Joan Jorden, servants to George Hepburn, were John Burbank and wife Ann (Joan shortened to Ann) Jordan, who were at Rowley in 1638 or 1639. Their surnames had various spellings but finally settled down to Burbank and Jordan. Coming as servants to Geo. Hepburn, who settled in Charlestown, they worked out their passage as was the custom. This usually took about four years, which accounts for the time between their passage and their settling at Rowley, Mass. - having been married in the meantime. John Burbank and wife Ann had a son John Burbank, Jr., who married Susannah Merrill, daughter of Nathaniel and Susannah (Wilterton) Merrill. Nathaniel Merrill died and his widow married Stephen Jordan of Newbury -which adjoins Rowley, Mass. It has been suggested that Stephen Jordan was a relation of Ann (Jordan) Burbank and that John Burbank, Jr., when visiting Stephen Jordan, met his stepdaughter, Susannah Merrill, and married her. We do not know why John Burbank and Ann Jordan wanted to come to the New World. Was he working as an apprentice to George Hepburn? What about Joan Jordan? Was she related to George Hepburn some way through the marriage of one of his sisters to a Jordan? Maybe John and Ann were in love and did not want to be separated when one of them decided to come to the New World. John Burbank History Continues: John Burbank (about age 24) in 1635, was an immigrant on the ship Abigail from London, England, to Boston, Bay Colony, 15 years after the Mayflower. His age was given in 1635 as 24 years which would place his birth about 1611 give or take a year on either side. It is presumed he was born in London, England, as this is a stronghold for the Burbank name. It is also presumed that he married (Joan) Ann Jordan about 1639, in Rowley, Massachusetts, probably around the time he joined the Rogers Company that settled in Rowley, Massachusetts. From1635 to 1638 John Burbank probably lived with George Hepburn at Charlestown to work out his passage as a servant. Gage's History of Rowley says: “On the arrival of Rev. Ezekiel Rogers, with about twenty families in December 1638, the towns of Salem, Charlestown, Boston, Medford, Watertown, Roxbury, Lynn, Dorchester, together with Cambridge, Ipswich, Newbury, Weymouth, Hingham, Concord, Dedham, and Braintree were all taken up.” They (Rogers Company) spent the winter in Salem and improved the time in looking for a place for a plantation. Mr. Rogers was a man of great note in England for his piety, zeal and ability. He and his people had concluded to take a place between Ipswich and Newbury; and these towns having granted some farms on this tracts. Mr. Rogers' Company purchased them at a price of 800 pounds. This place was at first called Mr. Rogers Plantation -- afterwards, Rowley; so called from Rowley, Yorkshire, England, where he and some of his people had lived. During his wanderings among the Colonies, Mr. Rogers added forty more families to his Company; so that with the 18 families who came from England with him, the Company numbered 58 families when they settled at Rowley in the spring or summer of 1639. (In the list of 40 families joining Mr. Rogers is Goodman Burbank, so called because the title of Mr. was a title of quite high rank in Colonial days, and John Burbank had not received his Freeman papers until after he arrived at Rowley, 16 May1640; having worked out his passage to America with George Hepburn. John Burbank settled in Rowley, Massachusetts, where he was made a freeman in 1640 and was recorded as a proprietor of the town in 1640. There is no record of where he came from. He held various offices, was chosen one of the overseers of Rowley for 1661-1662. He left an estate of £180 after he had given 60 pounds to his son John Jr. and land to his daughter Julia. He left quite a detailed will. John Burbank left a will on 5 April 1681 at Rowley. His estate was probated at Rowley on 10 April 1681. He died in 1682, at about age 68. On the night of Mr. Rogers' third marriage, July 16, 1651, his dwelling house with all his goods, library, and Church records were consumed by fire. The Church records, no doubt, contained much valuable historical and genealogical matter. Probably, all records of John Burbank, as to whence he came, and when, were destroyed. The families worked together in common for about five years. The land was surveyed in 1643, and each freeman or family was granted one and a half acres. The ones who contributed towards the 800-pound fund were allotted more land, so, John Burbank, very likely, did not have much money, as he was given only an acre and half of land -- the seventh lot on Bradford St., part of it lying on the west side and part of it on the east side of the street, bounded on the south side by Thomas Sumner's house lot. All lots on this street went to the brook, so, the owners could get water without going off their own land. In 1672, he owned some fresh meadow on Plum Island -- the land is described as, 1-0-0, which probably means one acre, and this may have been allotted him 1643, and that would make him a half acre in the house lot on Bradford street, where he built his home. Others have acre lots of "fresh meadow" on Plum Island, and these lots, or many of them, were bought by Father Jewett, and among those sold was the lot of John Burbanke, Sr. Quarterly Court 1672, Essex Co. John Burbank of Rowley and Annie Cooper depose regarding Thomas Sumner, a resident of Rowley. In several instances it is impossible to distinguish between John Burbank, Sr., and John Burbank, Jr., but most of the court records, of which there are a plenty, belong to John, Jr. It appears by the court record that John, Jr., could write his name, while John, Sr., signed his will with a mark. Rather unusual. Generally, the immigrant could write, while many of the second and third generations could not. The immigrant left an estate of £180, after he had given £60 too his son, John, Jr., and land to his daughter, Lydia. The Last Will and Testament of John Burbank of Rowley in the county of Essex in New England is as follows: I being att this day aged & Decriped in body thought having Mercy of Perfect Memory & understanding, Knowing how fraile my Life is and not Knowing the Day of my Desolutions, that my House may be so far sett in Order & trouble as much as in me lieth, prevented after my departure therefore appoynt this to be my Last will. My soule I committ into the hands of him that gave it and my body to be interred by decent buriall in hope of a blessed Ressureection through the Lord Jesus Christ. As to my outward estate I dispose of it in Manner following: To my beloved wife Gemima I give half my dwelling house & half my Lands throughout to be at her dispose during her naturall life. Also I give her all my household stuff bedding utensils & necessary things in the house for her natural life and what of them she hath not occasion to Dispose off or her comfortable Maintenance & livelyhood after her decease to my son Caleb, also I give her one Cow and the keeping of her Winter & Summer, also convenient fire wood shall yearly be provided for her during her Naturall Life by my Executor. Also I give her the third part of the fruit of the orchard yearly, also I give her the keeping of a pig or swine yearly during her life. To my son John Burbank I give the sum of forty shillings in Cattle to be paid within one year after my Decease if he come and Receive it in Rowley the reason I now give him no more is because I have given him what I thought was sufficient according to my ability in Cattle and Household stuff & Village Land, all I judge to be worth about three score pounds which when I gave it him it was accepted by him as his full portion and that in presence of Capt. Brocklebank and his wife before whom he gave it under his hand that he would Desire no more of what I have Left. To his son Timothy my grandchild who lieth with Capt. Saltonstall after he cometh to the age of twenty-one years I give a beast of about three pounds price. To my Daughter Lydia having given her Merrimack Land or my Land at Bradford and other necessaries I hereby Confirm it to her Husband and her and their Children. Also I give her Ten pounds to be Paid in Rowley within one year after my Wife her decease in cattle. To my son Caleb I give the half of my Dwelling and Barn and the other half of all my Lands & Meadows that is to say Land s Divided or not Divided, or Layd out within the bounds of Rowley and the other half given to his Mother for Life to be to him & his Heirs after her Decease and all my Moveables not given my Wife. My will is that my son Caleb Burbank be my sole Executor and that he pay all Debts and Legacys given in my Will as an Explaination of what I have given my wife. My will is that my Executor provide all comfortable necessaries for my beloved wife During her Natural Life both for Health and sickness according as my overseers shall think & Judge convenient. If my son or those that survive him provide not according to her need and expectation my will is, and that which I desire that my loving friends Daniel Wicam & Nehemiah Jewett be my overseers to see that my will be performed and especially that my wife be well provided for. For as she may need and he thus providing according to her need then the Lands given her to be free to my son Caleb as the other Lands given him. Signed Sealed and Declared to be his Last Will and Testament the fifth Day of April Anno Domini: 1681. his mark X John Burbank In presence of Witness: Nehemiah Jewett Danl. Wickam Att Court at Ipswich 10th of April 1683 from website http://users.ev1.net/~hmltn/burbank/burbank.htm John Burbank died 3 April 1683, in Rowley, Massachusetts, at age 81. JOAN or ANN JORDAN was born about 1610, in England, to unknown parents. John Burbank, the immigrant to America, was born about 1602 in England. His future wife Joan or Ann Jordan, was also born in England, about 1610. They are both listed as coming on the ship, Abigail in 1635 as servants to George Hadborne. John and Ann married about 1639, in Rowley. They settled in Rowley, Massachusetts, and had two children: John Burbank (b. 1639/40) and Timothy (b. 1641). Ann died in 1642/43, age 24. John married Jemima Unknown about 1643 probably in Rowley, Massachusetts, and had Lydia, Caleb and Mary. John Burbank died 3 April 1683 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts. John Burbank and wife Ann had a son John Burbank, who married Susannah Merrill, daughter of Nataniel and Susannah Merrill. Nathaniel Merrill died and his widow married Stephen Jordan of Newbury. It has been suggested that Stephen Jordan was a relation of Ann (Jordan) Burbank, John's mother, and that John Burbank, when visiting Stephen Jordan in the adjoining town of Newbury, met the stepdaughter of Stephen Jordan, Sussanah Merrill, and married her. Children of John Burbank and Ann Jordan: 1.JOHN BURBANK was born about 1640, to John Burbank (1602-1683) and Ann Jordan (1610-1642.) He married Susannah Merrill, 15 October 1663. John Burbank died 1 June 1709, at Suffield, Massachusetts, age 69. 2.Timothy Burbank, b. 18 May 1641, Rowley; d. 14 July 1660, Rowley, age 19, unmarried. He was a carpenter by trade. Children of John Burbank and Jemima (___) Burbank, all born at Rowley were: 1.Lydia Burbank, b. 7 April 1644; md. Abraham Foster, 1657. 2.Caleb Burbank, b. 19 May 1646; md. Marth Smith, 6 May 1669; d. before 25 March 1690. 3.Timothy Burbank, b. 24 Jan 1677; d. abt. 1703, prob. Unmd. 4.Martha Burbank, b. 22 Feb 1679-80; md. Daniel Gage, 9 Mar 1697-8. 5.Eleazer Burbank, b. 14 Mar 1681-2; md. Lydia Kimball, 14 Feb 1759; d. 14 Feb 1759. (Descendants: Luther Burbank, California, originated many new varieties of fruit, flowers, and vegetables; George Burbank Sedgley, author and compiler of Burbank genealogy, 1928.) 6.Ebenezer Burbank, B. 28 June 1687; Md. Widow Walker Hardy, 19 Apr 1711; d. Nov or Dec 1760. 7.Mary Burbank, b. 16 May 1655; buried at Rowley, 12 July 1660. (Source: John Burbank of Rowley, Massachusetts, and some of His Descendants, by: N. P. Maling.) (Source: Genealogy of the Burbank Families, by George Burbank Sedgeley, 1928.) + 3. JOHN BURBANK II (1640-1709) SUSANNAH MERRILL (1638-1690) (16th Century Man) JOHN BURBANK was born about 1640, in Rowley, Massachusetts, to John Burbank (1602-1683) and (Joan) Ann Jordan (1610-1642) the immigrants. He married (1) *Susannah Merrill, 15 October 1663, at Newbury, Massachusetts. Susannah died at Suffield, on 10 October 1690. He married (2) Sarah Hart Scone, 15 July 1692, at Springfield, Massachusetts. Sarah died at Suffield, on 19 August 1692. He married (3) Mehitable Saunders, 9 January 1693, at Springfield. Mehitable died at Suffield, on 24 February 1728, at about age 67. John Burbank died 1 June 1709, at Suffield, Massachusetts, age 69. He lived in Newbury, Rowley, and Haverhill, Massachusetts, then moved to Suffield, Connecticut in 1680. Nothing is recorded of his early youth in Rowley except this court record: 1659—John Burbank fined for excessive drinking (this may have been either John Jr., at the age of 20, or his father, John Sr., at the age of 59.) John Burbank was made a freeman in Boston, Massachusetts, on 13 May 1640. Four years after his marriage and one year after the birth of his first child, Mary, in a case in court of a least dated June 3, 1667: “Whereas John Burbank Jr., of Rowley, had taken half of the farm of Phillip Neilson of Rowley, lying near Merrimacke River next to the Newbury line, which was let to said Burbank by assignment of John Willcot of Newbury. Burbank having suffered great damage because the house and barn were not finished as they should be, and likewise in falling short both of land and meadow of what was expected. Philip Neilson was to let said Burbank live the present year upon the farm rent free, and to have the improvement of the farm, and Burbank was to acquit said Neilson of all debts paying for future time a yearly rental.” After he settled in Suffield, he participated in the land grants at Suffield, in 1674 but was delayed from taking up the land by King Philip’s War. Around the year 1668, he moved to Haverhill, which was farther west on the Merrimacke River. Here the last three of his children, all sons, were born: Timothy, John III, and Ebenezer. From Connecticut records 1674, John Burbank was granted fifty acres of land in Suffield. He was a large landholder, and much employed by Major Pynchon in building and clearing land in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when the town was organized, but never held office. His name is found in Major Pynchon’s account book oftener than any Suffield man. He must have been a man of business. (Major Daniel Burbank, a descendant of this John Burbank, married Margaret Pynchon, a descendant of Major Pynchon.) His sons John III and Ebenezer were afterwards prominent men in town matters. His homestead was at the north end of Feather Street. His name appears several times in the Suffield records much earlier than 1680. In fact he was granted 50 acres in 1674, but he did not live there for any length of time until 1680. John’s son Timothy did not go with his father to Suffield, Connecticut, in 1680. He was then 12 years old and must have taken an apprenticeship with Capt. Saltonstall if Ipswich, Massachusetts. He became a sea captain. When Suffield was laid out it was part of Maj. Pynchon’s plantation in Massachusetts, but when the Connecticut line was formed, it was located about seven miles inside Connecticut, and about six more miles to Springfield. John was very actively engaged in work for Major Pynchon. It appears from all records that he was energetic, well-to-do, a prominent citizen, and large land holder. He had three wives having two daughters and three sons. In the last years of his life, John began to lose his mental facilities similar to the ailment that struct his brother Caleb at a younger age. John Burbank died 1 June 1709, at Suffield, Massachusetts, age 69. •2. John2 Burbank ( John1 (1)), was born at Rowley, Mass., in 1640 or 1642; died June 1, 1709; married, first, at Newbury, Mass., Oct.15, 1663, Susannah, daughter Nathaniel and Susannah (Jordon) Merrill (she died Oct. 10, 1690 at Suffield, Conn.); married, second, at Springfield, Mass., July 15, 1692, Sarah, widow of John Scone of Westfield, Mass., and daughter of Elisha Hart (she died, Aug. 19, 1692); married, third, at Springfield, Mass., Jan. 1693-4, widow Mehitable Sanders (she died Feb. 24, 1727-8). He lived in Newbury, Rowley, and Haverhill, Mass., and moved to Suffield, Conn, in 1680. His anme appears several times in the Suffield records much earlier than 1680, but he did not live there for any length of time until 1680. After he settled in Suffield it appears from all records that he was energetic, well-to-do, a prominent citizen, and large land holder. The last year or two of his life his mind went wrong --- the same with his half-brother, Caleb, only at a younger age. The records in Massachusetts, together with the fact that his oldest son, Timothy, was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, shows that for some reason he was not as prosperous the first half of his life. From Essex County Quarterly Court Records and Files: Mention is made in a case in court of a lease dated June 3, 1667, whereas John Burbanke, Jr., of Rowley, had taken half of the farm of Philip Nellson of Rowley, lying near Merrimacke river next to Newbury line, which was let to said Burbanke by assignment of John Willcot of newbury. Burbanke having suffered great damage for not finishing the house and barn as it should be finished and likewise in falling short both of land and meadow of what was expected. Philip Nellson was to let said Burbanke live the present year upon the farm, rent free, and to have the improvement of the farm, and Burbanke was to acquit said Nellson of all debts paying for future time a yearly rental. Sept. 1677. John Borbank is mentioned with other citizens as against the demand of Mr. Shepard for fifty pounds per annum. July 16, 1772. John Burbanke, aged about thirty years, made a deposition in regard to some land that it was required he should appraise. Nov. 1673. John Burbanke as a witness in court at Salem. His autograph is in the original. (In this case it is easy to distinguish between him and his father by his signature.) June 1674. Testimony of John Burbank in court in regard to a controversy. Vol. 5: p. 331. Receipt given to John Burbanke of Haverhill by John Godfrey of Salem dated April 2, 1674. (This case seems to be over a cow.) April 1679. John Burbanke with others testifies in a case at court. (His autograph appears in the original.) 1659. John Burbank fined for excesive drinking. (This may have been either John, Jr., at the age of about 20, or his father, John, Sr., at the age of 59.) John Burbank was admonished by the court for going into a neighbor's house in the night after fire when the family were abed. (There were matches at that period, and it seems the habit was to go to a neighbor's house when the fire went out and borrow live coals. It is impossible to tell for sure which John was after the fire.) At another time he called in the neighbors to see how bad his barn leaked; this was probably in connection with the court case about the rented farm. (The writer accords the testimony in the witch trial of Margaret Scott of Rowley to John3, son of Caleb2 Burbank, although there is a remote possibility that it belongs to the subject of this sketch.) From Connecticut records: "John Burbank was granted 50 acres of land in Suffield in 1674. He was a large landholder, and much employed by Mayor Pynchon in bulding, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when town was organized, but never held office. His name is found in Mayor Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and he must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterwards prominent men in town matters. His homestaed was at the north end of Feather street. His oldest son, Timothy, who was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, did not go to Suffield, Conn., with his father. John of Suffield was the ancestor of one branch, and his half-brother, Caleb, the ancestor of the other branch --- the two branches of the family from the Rowley immigrant. The attention of the reader is called to James C. Burbank, of St. Paul, Minn., a descendant through his som Timothy. Children by first wife: i Mary3, baptized "in our Church" June 24, 1666; lived in Haverhill and Rowley, Mass., until 1680 then moved with her parents to Suffield, Conn. (then Mass.). The following mention is made of her in Burt's History of Springfield, Mass., Vol. 2, page 606: Probably married first, Dec. 2, 1685, Lazarus Miller; married, second, about 1702, William McCraney; married, third, Feb. 11, 1734, James Sexton. Children by first husband: 1 Obediah Miller. 2 John Miller. 3 Noah Miller. 4 Nathaniel Miller. 5 Martha Miller. 6 Martha Miller. 7 Mary Miller. Children by second husband: 8 Ruth McCraney. 9 Rachel McCraney. 10 Benjamin McCraney. 11 Timothy McCraney. 4 ii Timothy3, b. May 30, 1668. 5 iii John3, b. Aug. 1670. 6 iv Ebenezer3, b. Mar. 4, 1673-4. Child by third wife: v Susanna3, b. at Suffield, Conn., Nov. 23, 1695; d. at Westfield, Mass., Dec. 19, 1752; m. 1726, Ebenezer Philips. •Sketch from Sheldon's History of Suffield Posted 03 Jan 2010 by Debra Burbank "John Burbank, son of John of Rowley, married Susannah Merrill, October 15, 1663, and lived at Haverhill. He removed his wife and several children to Suffield, about 1680. His wife died October 10, 1690. Married second and third wife; the last bore him a daughter " Susannah." He was a large land-holder, and much employed by Major Pynchon in building, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when the Town was organized, but never held an office. His name is found in Major Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and be must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterward prominent men in Town matters. His homestead was at the north end of Feather street. He died June 1, 1709." ----Sheldon, Hezekiah Spencer. History of Suffield, in the Colony and Province of the Massachusetts Bay, New England. Springfield, Massachusetts: Clark W. Bryan Company 1879. page 30. (Excerpt from the Sedgley book •2. John2 Burbank ( John1 (1)), was born at Rowley, Mass., in 1640 or 1642; died June 1, 1709; married, first, at Newbury, Mass., Oct.15, 1663, Susannah, daughter Nathaniel and Susannah (Jordon) Merrill (she died Oct. 10, 1690 at Suffield, Conn.); married, John Burbank II (1641 - 1709) Posted 28 Apr 2017 by Dyharma Source: https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Burbank-5 Biography John Burbank, born in 1640 in Rowley, Massachusetts, was the son of John Burbank the immigrant and his first wife Anne Jordan. In Dewey's John Burbank of Suffield, Conn. and Some of His Descendants, he describes John Burbank being made a freeman in Boston, Mass. on 13 May 1640 where he lived at Newbury, Haverhill, and Rowley, Mass. then details his three marriages. [1] The details of becoming a freeman may be accredited to his father if his birthdate is truly 1641. John Burbank is listed in both the 1677 and 1681 Massachusetts Early Census Index. First living in Essex County, Mass. then living in Massachusetts Colony having been made a freeman 11 May. [2] Marriages He married first at Newbury, Massachusetts on 15 Oct 1663, Susannah Merrill[3][4][5], daughter of Nathaniel and Susannah (Jordan) Merrill. After being allotted fifty acres of land on 17 July 1674, the family moved to Suffield, Connecticut in 1680. John and Susannah had a daughter Mary b. 24 June 1666 and three sons: Timothy b. 30 May 1668 in Haverhill, Massachusetts, John b. August 1670, and Ebenezer b. 4 March 1673/4. On 15 July 1692 in Springfield, Massachusetts, John married second, Sarah (Hart) Scone who was the the widow of John Scone of Westfield. Sarah had married former husband John Scone in 1675. [6][5] Sarah, died soon after on 19 August 1692. She was the daughter of Edmund Hart. [7][8][9] On 9 January 1693 in Springfield, Massachusetts, John married third, Mehitable (Barlett) Sanders who was the widow of George Sanders of Windsor. John and Mehitable had one daughter, Susanna Burbank b. 23 November 1965. Death In the last years of his life, John began to lose his mental facilities similar to the ailment that struct his brother Caleb at a younger age. He died on 1 June 1709 and is buried in Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut. Sources 1.↑ Louis Marinus Dewey, esq. John Burbank of Suffield, Conn. and Some of His Descendants Henry Fitz-Gilbert. editor. The New England historical and Genealogical Register, New England Historic Genealogical Society, (Boston: The Society, 1907), vol 61, p 139-142. https://archive.org/stream/newenglandhistor61wate#page/139/mode/1up 2.↑ Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Massachusetts Census, 1790-1890. Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes. Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1790-1890 ([database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. :accessed 13 Sept 2016). 3.↑ Clemens, William Montgomery. American Marriage Records Before 1699. Pompton Lakes, NJ, USA: Biblio Co., 1926. 4.↑ Town and City Clerks of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Vital and Town Records. Provo, UT: Holbrook Research Institute (Jay and Delene Holbrook). 5.↑ 5.0 5.1 Torry, Clarence A. New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004. 6.↑ Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. Massachusetts, Marriages, 1633-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. (Original data: With some noted exceptions all marriage records in this collection can be found at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, and may be available through Family History Centers throughout the United States. See table below for information listed.) 7.↑ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, Volumes 1-3; Boston: New England Historical and Genealogical Society, 1996-2011. 2:868. 8.↑ New England Historical Genealogical Register, 61:139. 9.↑ Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. See also: •Suffield Historical Society, Family history of John Burbank http://www.suffieldhistoricalsociety.org/families/burbank.htm •Barbour Collection Connecticut Vital Records, 1674-1850 Connecticut State •George Burbank Sedgley, Genealogy of The Burbank Family and The Families of Bray, Wellcome, Sedgley (Sedgeley) and Welch Knowlton and McLeary Company 1928. •Godfrey Memorial Library, comp., American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999), Ancestry.com, Record for John Burbank. •American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) about John Burbank Volume 22 pg. 77 •Richard Coleman Witters. Ancestral Roots and Descendants of Charles Robert Looney and LaVanchie Margaret Cool and the Families of Ackley, Bradford, Burbank, Cool, Crow, Dwight, Fitch, Flint, Goodwin, Granger, Hoar, Kuhl, Looney, Mason, Partridge, Peck, Wark, and Whiting (Xlibris Corporation, Aug 17, 2009) 113-133. •John R. Burbank, Various correspondence (1/10/2000) •Benjamin P. Mighill and George B. Blodgette, The Early Records of the Town of Town of Rowley, Massachuetts, 1639-1672, Volume one of the printed records of the town; printed Rowley, Mass. 1894. •Robert Hayden Alcorn, The Biography of a Town, Suffield-Connecticut 1670-1970, pages 317-323, Three Hundredth Anniversary Committee of The Town of Suffield. •Biographical Sketched of the Graduate of Yale College with Annals of College History •Dean, History of Scituate, page 256. Hist. and General Register, xix, 40: Conn. Puritan Settlers •A Brief History of The First Church of Christ, Congregational •Captain Abraham Burbank "Probate Records" dated 1768, Hartford, Connecticut, file number 925. •Franklin Bowditch Dexter, M.A., Biographical Sketches of the Graduate of Yale College with Annals of the College History, Volume II, pp. 517-518 New York, Henry Holt & Co. 1896. •Frederick W. Bailey, Editor Early Connecticut Marriages As Found On Ancient Church Records Prior to 1800, p. 47, Bureau of American Ancestry. •Public records of the Colony of Connecticut 1636-1776. •Vital Records of Granville, Massachusetts to year 1850, p. 185, published by New England Historical Genealogical Society, Boston 1914. •Church Baptismal records from the First Church of Christ, Congregational United Church Christ," photo copied by Richard C. Witters. •Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Prepared for publication by Elizabeth P. Bentley, Genealogical Publishing Co. Baltimore, 1985. •Headstone Incriptions," Suffield, Hartford County, Connecticut 1660-1937 •second, at Springfield, Mass., July 15, 1692, Sarah, widow of John Scone of Westfield, Mass., and daughter of Elisha Hart (she died, Aug. 19, 1692); married, third, at Springfield, Mass., Jan. 1693-4, widow Mehitable Sanders (she died Feb. 24, 1727-8). He lived in Newbury, Rowley, and Haverhill, Mass., and moved to Suffield, Conn, in 1680. His anme appears several times in the Suffield records much earlier than 1680, but he did not live there for any length of time until 1680. After he settled in Suffield it appears from all records that he was energetic, well-to-do, a prominent citizen, and large land holder. The last year or two of his life his mind went wrong --- the same with his half-brother, Caleb, only at a younger age. The records in Massachusetts, together with the fact that his oldest son, Timothy, was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, shows that for some reason he was not as prosperous the first half of his life. From Essex County Quarterly Court Records and Files: Mention is made in a case in court of a lease dated June 3, 1667, whereas John Burbanke, Jr., of Rowley, had taken half of the farm of Philip Nellson of Rowley, lying near Merrimacke river next to Newbury line, which was let to said Burbanke by assignment of John Willcot of newbury. Burbanke having suffered great damage for not finishing the house and barn as it should be finished and likewise in falling short both of land and meadow of what was expected. Philip Nellson was to let said Burbanke live the present year upon the farm, rent free, and to have the improvement of the farm, and Burbanke was to acquit said Nellson of all debts paying for future time a yearly rental. Sept. 1677. John Borbank is mentioned with other citizens as against the demand of Mr. Shepard for fifty pounds per annum. July 16, 1772. John Burbanke, aged about thirty years, made a deposition in regard to some land that it was required he should appraise. Nov. 1673. John Burbanke as a witness in court at Salem. His autograph is in the original. (In this case it is easy to distinguish between him and his father by his signature.) June 1674. Testimony of John Burbank in court in regard to a controversy. Vol. 5: p. 331. Receipt given to John Burbanke of Haverhill by John Godfrey of Salem dated April 2, 1674. (This case seems to be over a cow.) April 1679. John Burbanke with others testifies in a case at court. (His autograph appears in the original.) 1659. John Burbank fined for excesive drinking. (This may have been either John, Jr., at the age of about 20, or his father, John, Sr., at the age of 59.) John Burbank was admonished by the court for going into a neighbor's house in the night after fire when the family were abed. (There were matches at that period, and it seems the habit was to go to a neighbor's house when the fire went out and borrow live coals. It is impossible to tell for sure which John was after the fire.) At another time he called in the neighbors to see how bad his barn leaked; this was probably in connection with the court case about the rented farm. (The writer accords the testimony in the witch trial of Margaret Scott of Rowley to John3, son of Caleb2 Burbank, although there is a remote possibility that it belongs to the subject of this sketch.) From Connecticut records: "John Burbank was granted 50 acres of land in Suffield in 1674. He was a large landholder, and much employed by Mayor Pynchon in bulding, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when town was organized, but never held office. His name is found in Mayor Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and he must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterwards prominent men in town matters. His homestaed was at the north end of Feather street. His oldest son, Timothy, who was brought up in the family of Capt. Saltonstall, did not go to Suffield, Conn., with his father. John of Suffield was the ancestor of one branch, and his half-brother, Caleb, the ancestor of the other branch --- the two branches of the family from the Rowley immigrant. The attention of the reader is called to James C. Burbank, of St. Paul, Minn., a descendant through his som Timothy. Feather St. 1684 Suffield, Hartford, Connecticut Early settlers at Suffield who were assigned lots on Feather Street from 1671-1684 from the Documentary History of Suffield by H. S. Sheldon Linked to John and Susannah Merrill Burbank Children by first wife: i Mary3, baptized "in our Church" June 24, 1666; lived in Haverhill and Rowley, Mass., until 1680 then moved with her parents to Suffield, Conn. (then Mass.). The following mention is made of her in Burt's History of Springfield, Mass., Vol. 2, page 606: Probably married first, Dec. 2, 1685, Lazarus Miller; married, second, about 1702, William McCraney; married, third, Feb. 11, 1734, James Sexton. Children by first husband: 1 Obediah Miller. 2 John Miller. 3 Noah Miller. 4 Nathaniel Miller. 5 Martha Miller. 6 Martha Miller. 7 Mary Miller. Children by second husband: 8 Ruth McCraney. 9 Rachel McCraney. 10 Benjamin McCraney. 11 Timothy McCraney. 4 ii Timothy3, b. May 30, 1668. 5 iii John3, b. Aug. 1670. 6 iv Ebenezer3, b. Mar. 4, 1673-4. Child by third wife: v Susanna3, b. at Suffield, Conn., Nov. 23, 1695; d. at Westfield, Mass., Dec. 19, 1752; m. 1726, Ebenezer Philips. •Sketch from Sheldon's History of Suffield Posted 03 Jan 2010 by Debra Burbank "John Burbank, son of John of Rowley, married Susannah Merrill, October 15, 1663, and lived at Haverhill. He removed his wife and several children to Suffield, about 1680. His wife died October 10, 1690. Married second and third wife; the last bore him a daughter " Susannah." He was a large land-holder, and much employed by Major Pynchon in building, and clearing lands in Suffield. He was one of the few qualified voters when the Town was organized, but never held an office. His name is found in Major Pynchon's account book oftener than any Suffield man; and be must have been a man of business. His sons, John, Jr., and Ebenezer, were afterward prominent men in Town matters. His homestead was at the north end of Feather street. He died June 1, 1709." ----Sheldon, Hezekiah Spencer. History of Suffield, in the Colony and Province of the Massachusetts Bay, New England. Springfield, Massachusetts: Clark W. Bryan Company 1879. page 30. susannahmerrill john burbank mountain road Suffield Hartford County Connecticut, USA old center cemetery SUSANNAH MERRILL was baptized 12 December 1638, in Lawford, Essex, England. Her parents were Nathaniel Merrill Jr. (1601-1655) and Susannah Wolterton (1610-1673.) She married John Burbank, 15 October 1663, Newbury, Massachusetts. Susanna Merrill died 10 October 1690, at Suffield, Connecticut at about age 50. Some newly found records show that Nathaniel Merrill's daughter, Susanna, was not baptized until December 12, 1638, in Lawford, Essex, Co., England. This tells us that Nathaniel had not left for America with his family until late December 1638 or early 1639. In 1638 the English Government started restricting its citizens from freely immigrating to the new continent with its abundance of land for all, something unknown in England. The fact that brother John arranged for a home site of four acres in Newbury for his unnamed "brother" would indicate that the brother was not there by 23 July 1638 but was arranging to come. Ship records, the Hector, show that Nathaniel and John did arrive in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1635. Nathaniel must have returned to England to get his wife and his four children and returned in 1638-39. This is when Susannah Merrill must have immigrated as an infant. Susannah Merrill passed away 10 October 1690, in Suffield, Connecticut, at about age 50. Posted 13 Aug 2011 by mrsoul_29 Children of Nathaniel1 and Susanna Merrill, the last five of whom were born in Newbury: Nathaniel2, b. prob. 1633/4; d. 1 Jan. 1682/3. John2, b. about 1635; d. 18 July, 1712. Abraham2, b. 1636 or 1637; d. 28 Nov. 1722. Susanna2, b. 1640; d. 10 Oct. 1690, in Suffield, Conn.; lived in Bradford (now Haverhill), Mass., in 1667, in Haverhill from 1668 to 1674, then in Suffield; m. 15 Oct. 1663, in Newbury, John Burbank, son of John and Ann Burbank of Rowley, Mass.; he m. (2) Sarah , who d. 19 Aug. 1691, and (3) Mehitable; he d.1 June, 1709. Children: Mary, bap. 24 June, 1666, in Rowley. (Burbank), Timothy, bap. 30 May, 1668, in Haverhill; mentioned in the will of his grandfather,John Burbank, in 1681, as living with Capt. Saltonstall, John, b. Aug. 1670, in Haverhilll; d. 25 Mar. 1729; m. 21 Dec. 1699, Mary Granger, Ebenezer, b. 21 Mar. 1673/4, in Haverhill; lived in Suffield; m. 9 Oct. 1698 (or 1699), Rebecca Pritchard (widow). Daniel2, b. 20 Aug. 1642; d. 27 June, 1717. Abel2, b. 20 Feb. 1643/4; d. 28 Oct. 1689. * Children of John Burbank and Susannah Merrill: 1.Mary Burbank was baptized at Rowley, on 24 June 1666; md. (1) Lazarus Miller, 2 Dec 1685; md. (2) William McCraney, 1702; (3) James Sexton, 11 Feb 1734; d. 16 Dec. 1640. 2.TIMOTHY BURBANK was born 30 May 1668, at Haverhill, Massachusetts, to John Burbank (1640-1709) and Susannah Merrill (1638-1690.) He settled in Boston, Massachusetts and married Rebecca Darling, July 3, 1695, at Salem, Massachusetts. Timothy Burbank died in 1706, at about age 38. 3.John Burbank III was born at Haverhill, in August 1670; md. Mary Granger, 21 Dec 1699; died at Suffield, 25 March 1729. 4.Ebenezer Burbank was born at Haverhill, on 4 March 1674; md. Widow Rebecca Pritchard, 9 Oct 1699. (Source: John Burbank of Rowley, Massachusetts, and some of His Descendants, by: N. P. Maling.) (Source: “A Merrill Family History,” http://family.rootsweb.ancestry.com) + 4. TIMOTHY BURBANK (1668-1706) REBECCA DARLING (1673-1712) (MARINER) TIMOTHY BURBANK was born 30 May 1668, at Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts, to John Burbank (1638-1709) and Susannah Merrill (1628-1690.) He was the second child and the first son of John & Susannah (Merrill) Burbank, and was named for his Uncle Timothy Burbank, who died in 1660 at the age of 19 years. When he was 12 years old his father moved to Suffield, Conn., but left Timothy with Capt. Nathaniel Saltonstall of Haverhill, Mass., graduate of Harvard. Timothy must have apprenticed himself to Capt. Salstonstall to become a Mariner. His grandfather’s will (John Burbank) dated 5 April 1681 reads: “To his son Timothy my grandchild who lieth with Capt. Saltonstall after he cometh to the age of twenty-one years I give about three pounds price.” Timothy had an Aunt Lydia (Burbank) Foster living in Ipswich and one of her boys, Isaac Foster, was his age. He also had Aunts and Uncles of his mother, Susannah (Merrill) Burbank; their children were his first cousins living close by in Newbury, Massachusetts. There is only one item regarding his early life dated 1691: “Timothy Burbank took Jane Toppan to Newbury to help tend her brother, Samuel, who is there taken ill of the smallpox.” This was probably one of his girlfriends before he met and married Rebecca Darling. Note that he named his second child; a daughter, Jane. He was sailing out of Salem when he met his wife, Rebecca Darling, and married her, 3 July 1695, at Salem. He had a daughter, named after his wife Rebecca, and she was born somewhere in the vicinity of Salem, but her birthplace or date is unknown. He was sailing out of Salem at first, but about 1698 out of Boston, as his last four children were born there; Jane, Timothy Jr., John, and Samuel. From the Virginia Magazine, Vol 26, we find in the record of the receiver of the Virginia duties for York River district, dated 3 July 1704, the Swallow of Boston, mastered by Capt. Timothy Burbank, was bound for Boston, and that it was a ship of 25 tons. These ships were called Brigantines. List of Ships Entering in Upper District James River from 25th March to 16th July 1702 SWALLOW OF NEW ENGLAND Sloop, built I696, 25 Tons NEW ENGLAND Timothy Burbank, Master John Fawster, Nath'll Hlnksman, Jos. Souter, List of Ships that have been Cleared In Rappahanock River from 25th March to 24th June 1704 SWALLOW OF BOSTON Sloop, built New England I696, 25 Tons Timothy Burbank, Master Wm. Burroughs, Jno. Foster, Owners Nothing is found regarding Timothy's death--no date, no place. After the birth of his last child, Samuel, 16 Oct 1706, no further record is found regarding him. There is strong evidence, however, that he died shortly after the birth of this child as the Boston records give the marriage of his widow to Thomas Smith, of the Reserve, 22 Feb. 1709. His death was not listed in the Boston Vital Records--so it can be only supposed that he was lost at sea. None of his sons became mariners. Timothy Burbank probably died in about 1706 at sea, at about age 38. None of his sons became mariners. REBECCA DARLING was born about 1673, of Salem, Massachusetts, to George Darling (1615-1693) and Katherine More (1637-1693.) She married (1) *Timothy Burbank, 3 July 1695, in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts. Timothy Burbank was probably drowned at sea in about 1706, at age 38 (Rebecca was about 33.) Rebecca married (2) Thomas Smith, 22 Feb 1709, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. Rebecca Darling died about 1712, in Massachusetts, age 39. Children of Timothy Burbank and Rebecca Darling: 1.Rebecca Burbank, born between 1696-98, probably Salem, Mass.; married Nathan Webber by the Reverend Samuel Miles, Presbyterian at Boston, Mass., 20 Oct. 1713. 2.Jane Burbank, born 24 March 1699, Boston, Suffolk, Mass.; married John Smallage 12 August 1720, by Reverend Joseph Sewall, Presbyterian, Boston, Mass. 3.Timothy Burbank, born 12 October, 1703, Boston, Mass.; married in 1728 at the age of twenty-five, Mercy, daughter of Samuel & Mercy (Dunham) Kempton. He was a tailor and settled in Plymouth, Mass. He died 13 Oct 1793, age 90. 4.John Burbank, born 19 January 1705, Boston, Mass.; Elizabeth Tower, 28 June, 1728; d. 30 September, 1791. 5.SAMUEL BURBANK, born 16 October 1706, Boston, Massachusetts, to Timothy Burbank (1668-1709) and Rebecca Darling (1673-1712.) His father drowned at sea when he was a baby. He married (1) *Mary Reed daughter of Thomas & Abigail (Bacon) Reed, 10 March 1730, Sudbury, Massachusetts. He married (2) Mrs. Hannah Emerson. He lived in Sudbury, Massachusetts, where all of his twelve children were born, and in his old age was living at Holliston, Massachusetts, where his will was probated 6 September 1781. (Source: John Burbank of Rowley, Massachusetts, and some of His Descendants, by: N. P. Maling.) + 5. SAMUEL BURBANK (1706-1781) MARY REED (1709-1750) (PATRIOT) SAMUEL BURBANK was born 16 October 1706, in Boston, Massachusetts, to Timothy Burbank (1668-1709) and Rebecca Darling (1673-1712.) He married (1) *Mary Reed, 10 March 1729, Sudbury, Massachusetts. He married (2) Mrs. Hannah Emerson. He lived in Sudbury, Massachusetts, where all of his twelve children were born, and in his old age was living at Holliston, Massachusetts, where his will was probated 6 September 1781. None of Capt. Timothy's three sons became mariners -- Samuel was a baby when his father was lost at sea, and he was brought up by his stepfather, Thomas Smith. Samuel Burbank is known by his descendants as the father of the Revolutionary Soldier boys. His four boys; Ebenezer, Samuel, Daniel and John saw much service in this War. Sudbury is only about seven miles south of Concord and Lexington -- the hot spot of the war. His son Samuel played a very important part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. 1781. William Todd, a son of William, died while privateering. Solomon Lowell, David Poor, Silas Dole, Moses Boynton, and James Phillips, were in the army. Samuel Burbank, on his return from the army, died of the small-pox in the pest-house. Private, served as guard under Sergeant Breck, Hopkinton Massachusetts Militia, April, 1776 ; Private, Captain Samuel Burbank's Company of Massachusetts Militia, for service in Rhode Island, January, 1778; Private, Captain Perry's Company, Colonel Cyprian Howe's Regiment Massachusetts Militia, Rhode Island service, August, 1778; Private, Captain McFarland's Company, same regiment, Rhode Island service, September, 1780. Walker, William Augustus Samuel Burbank’s will, probated 6 September 1781, follows: In the name of God, Amen: The seventh day of February 1778, I Samuel Burbank of Holliston, county of Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay, in New England: Yeoman: Calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that I must die, recommending my soul into the hands of God that gate it, and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in a decent Christian burial at the discretion of my Executor. And as to the worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give, demise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form by this my last will and testament. I give and bequeath unto Hannah, my wife, the use of one-half of my dwelling house, meaning the westerly part of the same from the center of the chimney and the cellar under the same house; and also the use of the oven in the easterly part of said house and of the well for water; together with all privileges she may need in using and improving the westerly part of said house meaning to bequeath the same during the present Hannah's natural life only. I also give and bequeath to the present Hannah ail my household furniture for her own use and disposal forever together with her fire wood and provisions for her comfortable support as I shall hereafter order in this my last will and testament. 1. I give to my son Eben(ezer), five shillings which together with what he has received making his full postion in my estate. 2. I give to my son Samuel, five shillings which together with what he has received making his full portion in my estate. 3.I give to my son Daniel, five shillings. 4.I give to my daughter, Mary Morse, five shillings, which together with what she has received makes her full portion in my estate. 5. I give to my daughter, Rebecca Bishop, five shillings, which together with what she has received makes her full portion in my estate. 6.I give to my daughter, Rachell Dix, five shillings. 7.I give to my daughter Lydia Sheffield, five shillings, which together with what she has received makes her full portion. 8.I give to my son, John Burbank, his heirs and assigns forever; all my lands and buildings in Holliston aforesaid, together with my armour, my wearing apparel, and all my personal estate; except my household furniture already bequeathed, reserving the use of the westerly half of my dwelling house to my wife Hannah during her life--he the said John Burbank, paying on demand the several legacies within mentioned: together with my funeral charges, and charges that may arise by executing this my will and testament. And also that he supply my wife, Hannah. during her widowhood with every of the necessaries of life, as she may require for her comfortable support, and so much firewood as she may require brought to her door; cut fit for her use, and carried into her room if requested, and he my said son John to receive my credits and pay my just debts. I do constitute and appoint my son Samuel Burbank within named, sole executor of this my last will and testament, ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. Signed, Sealed and Declared by the said Samuel Burbank, to be his last will and Testament. in presence of us: John Hemenway Eunice Burbank John Stone Samuel Burbank Seal Samuel Burbank’s will was probated 6 September 1781, age 75. MARY REED was born, 1 May 1709, in Sudbury Middlesex, Massachusetts, to Thomas Reed (1678-1755) and Abigail Bacon (1685-before 1755.) She married Samuel Burbank, 10 March 1729/30, in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts. They had 12 children. Mary Reed died about 1750, in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, at about age 41. Children of Samuel Burbank and Mary Reed: 1.Samuel Burbank, b. 28 Dec 1730, Sudbury; d. 2 Mar 1731. Child. 2. Ebenezer Burbank, b. 5 May 1733, Sudbury; md. Sarah Homans, 22 Dec 1752. 3. Samuel Burbank, b. 24 June 1734, Sudbury; md. Eunice Kendall, 22 Apr 1773; d. 1808, Vermont. (From pension application on file at Washington, D.C. Eunice Morse applied for pension 17 Feb 1838, on the service of Samuel Burbank who enlisted about 19 Apr 1775 and arrived in Lexington during the battle. He was appointed Lieutenant. Was in the Battle of Bunker Hill and when Capt. Leland gave out on the eve of battle (want of courage), Samuel took command and led in the battle until a Captain was attached.) This must not be our Samuel Burbank: Samuel Burbank, on his return from the army, died of the small-pox in the pest house (hospital.) 4. LIEUT. DANIEL BURBANK was born 4 April 1736, in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay, British America, to Samuel Burbank (1706-1781) and Mary Reed (1709-1750.) He married Mary Marks (1740-1808) 19 May 1764 in Warren, Worchester, Massachusetts. He died 27 September 1802 in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, at 66 years of age. They had nine children. 5. John Burbank, b. 8 Apr 1737, Sudbury; md. Mary Verney, int. 6 Feb 1773; d. 19 Jul 1818. He served in the Revolutionary War. He had four sons all born in Holliston, Massachusetts. In his father’s will he was given the farm at Holliston and the care of his mother until her death. 6.Abigail Burbank, b. 19 Sep 1738, Sudbury; d. 13 Nov 1738. Child. 7.Josiah (Joseph) Burbank, b. 17 Mar 1739/40, Sudbury; d. 1740. Child. 8.Mary Burbank, b. 11 Apr 1741, Sudbury; md. William Morse, 8 Dec 1763. 9.Abigail Burbank, b. 12 Aug 1742; md. (1) Reuben Underwood, 20 May 1762; (2) John Steadman 1765; d. 13 Sept 1822. 10.Rebecca Burbank, b. 20 June 1745; md. Zebulon Bishop, 26 Apr 1769. 11.Rachel Burbank, b. 16 Nov 1747; md. Timothy Dix, 13 Aug 1769; d. 1793. 12.Lydia Burbank, b. 9 May 1749; md. (1) Daniel Sheffield, 1 Mar 1772. (2) Elisha Marsh, 1792. + 6. LIEUTENANT DANIEL BURBANK (1736-1802, age 66) MARY MARKS (1740-1808, age 68) (From the Ancestors & Descendants of Lt. Daniel & Mary (Marks) Burbank) LIEUTENANT DANIEL BURBANK was born 4 April, 1736, Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, to Samuel Burbank (1706-1781) and Mary Reed (1709-1750.) Marriage int., 19 Mar 1764, Warren, Massachusetts, Mary, daughter of Hezekiah and Judith (Hayward) Marks. (She was born 18 July 1740, Warren, Mass.; died 25 February 1808, age 68 years, Williamstown, Massachusetts.) They had five sons and four daughters. Daniel Burbank died 27 September 1802, in Williamstown, Massachusetts, at age 66. Revolutionary War: Lieut. Daniel Burbank lived and died in Williamstown, Massachusetts. When the Revolutionary War broke out he gained for himself the title of Lieutenant. He entered service in 1776 and was discharged in 1777. He gave a long life of service, especially in protecting and building up the community of Williamstown, Massachusetts. History: Many of the inhabitants of Sudbury took up land in Western (now Warren) Massachusetts, and it is known that Daniel's Reed relatives, thru his mother Mary (Reed) Burbank, were of Warren. He went there as a young man and fell in love with the beautiful Mary Marks. Her grandfather is listed in the History of N. Brookfield, page 680: “Joseph Marks, of Springfield, where he had a grant of land located on the west side of the river, dated 2 February, 1685; was a soldier in Captain Bull's company, which was sent to Albany and Schenectady in November 1689, to protect the settlers there against the French and Indians. In a skirmish Joseph Marks was taken prisoner to Canada. He escaped and returned about March 1692, and soon after came to Brookfield, where he received a grant of 60 acres and later 180 acres. His was one of the fortified homes necessary in the Indian Wars of that time. Mark's Garrison stood near the south west end of Wickaboag pond on a knoll below the junction of the waters of the pond with the Quaboag River.” It is related that one day Mary, wife of Joseph Marks, being left alone, discovered hostile Indians in the neighborhood of the garrison waiting for a favorable opportunity to attack the settlement. She immediately put on her husband's wig, hat, great coat; and taking his gun, went to the top of the fortification, and marched backwards and forwards vociferating, like a vigilant sentinel, all's well! all's well! This led the Indians to believe that they could not take the place by surprise, and fearing an open and protracted assault, they retreated. This was the Grandmother of Mary (Marks) Burbank. History of Berkshire Co. Massachusetts: Thomas Dunton was from Western, now Warren, Massachusetts. So far as can be known, his was the first family to settle directly on the bank of the Hoosac River. For a number of years, Dunton owned house lot 13 and sold to prominent parties the outlots drawn in succession by this house lot. For example, he sold Daniel Burbank, also of Western, the second division fifty-acre lot 56, October 1763. (After he bought this land he went back to Warren and married his wife Mary Marks, and brought her back to West Hoosac, [now Williamstown, Mass.,] and built a framed house of one room.) He soon doubled this farm, buying the adjoining fifty-acre lot 57 half a mile from South Williamstown on the road to New Ashford. Daniel Burbank was a Lieutenant in the military company of South Williamstown and fought in the Battle of Bennington, Vermont, and his oldest son, Samuel, at the instance of his mother while the Bennington battle was going forward, put his ear to the ground, and heard successive discharges of cannon. His neighbors crowded around him on his return, wanted to know if he felt afraid during the battle; and he answered, "After they had fired once, and we had fired once, I was no more afraid on the battlefield than I am on the potato field!" He fought in several other engagements during the Revolutionary War. Burbank's lots were level and fertile and heavily wooded. The Ashford brook crossed these lots not far from their eastern end but a little before its junction with the Hancock brook, and the road to the South crossed them diagonally just about their middle. He had at first but one neighbor, and that was Isaac Stratton, living then in a log house on lot 53, just north of the Hancock brook. Burbank's own axe was the first to make clearings on his lots 56 and 57, and his own plow was the first that ever stirred the rich soil there. He added several parcels of 25 acre plots during his life. Both Burbank and his wife were original members of the one church and their place of meeting was more than five miles from their home. The roads were rough, and over Stone Hill it was very steep both ways, but it is altogether likely that they were in their pew in the new meetinghouse, after 1768, most of the Sundays of the year; and he was certainly often at the church meetings on week days. History of Berkshire County, page 250, also gives: Soon after the incorporation of New Ashford, just south of Williamstown, into a district, 17 December 1782, it was voted that we will build a house of public worship -- and they chose Samuel Hand, Daniel Burbank, and Gideon Wheeler, Esq., a committee to pitch a stake where said house will stand. The significance of this past proceeding is that the men chosen to pitch this stake were from adjoining towns. Burbank was very active in community affairs and was a very religious and respected citizen. He owned land in Marcellus, Onadaga County, New York. He probably got it thru his Revolutionary services, but he never settled on it as we will find thru his will -- he gave it to his sons Daniel and John. His long life of service ended 27 September 1802, aged 66 years, at Williamstown, Massachusetts, where he is buried. His wife survived him a little over five years; however, in that time she never applied for a Government pension on the services of her husband. During her widowhood, she lived on the old farm at Williamstown with her oldest son, Samuel and two youngest daughters, Rachel and Lydia, all three never marrying. She died 25 February 1808, aged 67 years, at Williamstown, and is buried there. The will of Lieutenant Daniel Burbank is as follows, which was allowed 4 January 1803, and recorded in Book 11, page 242: In the name of God. Amen. I Daniel Burbank of Williamstown, in the County of Berkshire and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Gentlemen, being weak in body but sound in mind and memory blessed by almighty God therefor, taking into consideration the mortality of man, do make and ordain this my last will and testament. First I give and bequeath my soul to God who gave, and my body to the earth in hope of a joyful resurrection through Jesus Christ my Savior, and the estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me, I give and bequeath in the manner following, viz: 1st. I will that all my lawful debts together with my funeral charges be punctually paid to my executor to be hereafter named. 2nd. To my beloved wife Mary Burbank I give and bequeath one-third part of all my estate both real and personal not herein disposed of during her natural life. 3rd. I give and bequeath to my eldest son Samuel Burbank the residue of all my sd. estate not otherwise disposed of by this will and testament. 4th. I give to my son Daniel Burbank, one-hundred acres of land lying in the Township of Marcellus in the County of Onadaga in the State of New York to be taken from off the east part of my land lying in that Township and -- 5th. I give to my son John Burbank all the residue of my land lying in the sd. Township of Marcellus. 6th. To my son Asa Burbank in consideration of his having received an education I give only the sum of ($80.00) eighty dollars for the purpose of purchasing a horse, saddle and bridle. 7th. I give to my daughter Mary Baker the sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars, including the sum of ($110.00) one hundred and ten dollars which she has already received to be paid within one year after my decease by my executor. 8th. I give to my daughter Sarah the like sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars, to be paid by my said executor within two years after my decease. 9th. I give to my daughter Rachel the like sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars to be paid as aforesaid within three years after my decease. 10th. To my daughter Lydia I give the like sum of ($300.00) three hundred dollars to be paid as and when she shall arrive at the age of twenty-one and she is to be supported by my son Samuel until of lawful age. Lastly I nominate and appoint my son Samuel Burbank, sole executor to this my last will and testament. Signed Sealed published pronounced and declared by the said Daniel Burbank as his last will and testament this 23rd. day of September in the year of our Lord 1802. In the presence of us: Wm Young Wm. Towner Daniel Burbank Ara Roberts Daniel Burbank (SEAL) Lieut. Daniel Burbank Small Biography: Revolutionary War Lieut. Daniel Burbank was born in Sudbury, Massachusetts, April 4, 1736, to Samuel Burbank (1706-1781) and Mary Reed (1709-1750), and died September 27 1801, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. He lived and died in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. He had five sons and four daughters. His mother, Judith Hayward, had “Mayflower” blood in her veins through George Hayward, Ann White, Resolved White, William White, Mayflower immigrants in 1620. When the Revolutionary War broke out he gained for himself the title of Lieutenant. He entered service in 1776 and was discharged in 1777. He gave a long life of service, especially in protecting and building up the community of Williamstown, Massachusetts. Daniel Burbank died 27 September 1802, aged 66 years, in Williamstown, Massachusetts. They had been married 38 years. Williamstown, Bershire, Massachusetts MARY MARKS was born 18 July 1740 in Warren, Worchester, Massachusetts, to Hezekiah Marks (1704-1788) and Judith Hayward (1701-1786.) She was married to Lieutenant Daniel Burbank, 19 May 1764, in Warren, Worchester, Massachusetts, at age 23. Daniel Burbank was in Williamstown, Massachusetts, and bought the second division fifty-acre lot 56, October 1763. After he bought this land he went back to Warren and married his wife Mary Marks, and brought her back to West Hoosac, (now Williamstown, Mass.,) and built a framed house of one room.) He soon doubled this farm, buying the adjoining fifty-acre lot 57 half a mile from South. Both John Burbank and his wife, Mark Marks, were original members of the one church and their place of meeting was more than five miles from their home. The roads were rough, and over Stone Hill it was very steep both ways, but it is altogether likely that they were in their pew in the new meetinghouse, after 1768, most of the Sundays of the year; and he was certainly often at the church meetings on week days. History of Berkshire County, page 250, also gives: “Soon after the incorporation of New Ashford, just south of Williamstown, into a district, 17 December 1782, it was voted that we will build a house of public worship -- and they chose Samuel Hand, Daniel Burbank, and Gideon Wheeler, Esq., a committee to pitch a stake where said house will stand.’ The significance of this past proceeding is that the men chosen to pitch this stake were from adjoining towns. Burbank was very active in community affairs and was a very religious and respected citizen. John Burbank’s life of service ended 27 September 1802, aged 66 years, at Williamstown, Massachusetts, where he is buried. His wife, Mary Marks, survived him a little over five years; however, in that time she never applied for a Government pension on the services of her husband. During her widowhood, she lived on the old farm at Williamstown with her oldest son, Samuel and two youngest daughters, Rachel and Lydia, all three never marrying. Mary Marks passed away 25 February 1808, aged 67 years, at Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, at the age of 67. Children of Daniel Burbank and Mary Marks: 1.Samuel Burbank, b. 1 Feb 1766; d. 2 Sep 1844. Unmarried. Samuel born 1 February, 1766; died 2 September 1844 Williamstown Massachusetts. He grew to manhood on the farm at Williamstown, and probably received as good an education as was available at that time. He never married and upon the death of his father, at the age of 36, he was willed the farm at Williamstown. His sisters Rachel and Lydia, also never married and lived on the farm with their mother. Samuel was to care for his mother until her death according to the will. He died of old age 2 September 1844, Williamstown, Massachusetts aged 78 1/2 years. He did not leave a will but administration was taken out on his estate and Ebenezer Foster was appointed administrator, 5 November 1844. 2.Mary Burbank, b. 30 Jan 1768; md. Ira Baker, 1786; d. aft 1844. 3.Major Daniel Burbank, b. 7 May 1770, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, to Daniel Burbank (1736-1802) and Mary Marks (1740-1808.) He married (1) *Margaret Pynchon, 21 Mar 1793, in Williamstown. Married (2) Mary Adams. Died (coffee poisoned by wife, Mary Adams) 27 Oct 1832, Meredosia, Morgan, Illinois. Buried in Exeter, Scott, Illinois, by his first wife, Margaret Pynchon. 4.Asa Burbank, b. 28 Sep 1772; md. Laura Hubbel 1806; d. 4 Aug 1829. (Doctor.) 5.Reuben Burbank, b. 29 Mar 1775; d. 14 Sep 1777. Child. (2 years +.) 6.Sarah Burbank, b. 18 Jan 1777; md. Oliver Root; d. 1855. 7.John Burbank, b. 6 July 1779; md. Mary Kent; d. before 1809. 8.Rachel Burbank, b. 11 July 1782; d. 17 Sep 1843 (died of consumption.) Unmarried. 9.Lydia Burbank, b. 24 Oct 1786, d. 1829. Unmarried. + 7. MAJOR DANIEL BURBANK (1770-1832) MARGARET PYNCHON (1775-1826) MAJOR DANIEL BURBANK was born, 7 May 1770, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts, to Lieutenant Daniel Burbank (1736-1802) and Mary Marks (1740-1808.) He married Margaret Pynchon, 21 May 1793, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. Daniel served in the War of 1812 as a Major at Niagara, New York. Daniel is a descendant of Mayflower passengers William and Susanna Fuller White. in Meredosia, Illinois. His body was taken from the town of Exeter, and he was buried by the side of his first wife Margaret (Pynchon) Burbank, West of the Town on a high rolling Hill. He was 68 years old. Daniel Burbank died 17 Ocober 1832 (poisoned by his second wife,) at Meredosia, Illinois, age 62. His body was taken from the town of Exeter, and he was buried by the side of his first wife Margaret (Pynchon) Burbank, West of the Town on a high rolling Hill. Probably right after their marriage, they settled on the 100 acres given to them by Daniel's father; the birth of their first child in 1794 proves that they were here at least by this year. On 6 September 1802, one year before his father's will was proved, he sold to his wife's brother Nathaniel Pynchon of Marcellus, New York, for the sum of $96.00, part of lot 21 in the Township of Marcellus, Onondaga, New York, containing 24 acres and 20 rods with all improvements. This was witnessed by his brother, John who had married Mary Kent of Lanesboro, Mass., and was probably living on his 100 acres at this time. I have not found who he sold the remaining land he owned in Marcellus. His first son, Asa died November 1801, and his third son, Samuel, died 27July 1800, and both are buried at Marcellus, New York. He had Lester, Sophia and Asa No. 2, when he left Marcellus, New York, traveling on the old Buffalo road to the Holland Purchase Lands which occupied the Western part of New York. In the History of the Holland Purchase, it lists him coming here in 1804 with eight other settlers, among them Zadock Whipple who was his neighbor according to the census of 1800; maybe he married one of the Pynchon girls and was a relative. He purchased land here as follows: THIS INDENTURE: Made this 28 June 1804 between WIhem Willink, Pieter Van Eeghen, Hendrick Vallenhoven and Rutger Jan Schimmelpennimck, all of the City of Amsterdam, in the republic of Batavia, by Joseph Ellicott, their Attorney to Daniel Burbank of the County of Genessee, State of New York, in consideration of the sum of $256.00 -- sell all that certain tract of land, lying and being in the County of Genessee, State of New York, being part or parcel of a certain Township, which on a map of Survey of divers Tracts or Townships; of Land made for the proprietors of Joseph Ellicott,, surveyor, is distinguished by Township No. 10, Range 2, and on a certain other map, is distinguished by Lot No. 2 in the 8th Section of Township No. 10 -- containing 128 acres. Somewhere in his early life he learned the Milling trade and may have had a mill on this land. His son Asa, No. 2, died here 27 December 1804, and is buried here at Sheldon, New York. This left him with his elder son Lester and a daughter, Sophia. While residing here he had four daughters, Loisa, Aveline, Margaret, and Mary Ann. He sold this land in Sheldon as follows: THIS INDENTURE: Made 26 January 1811, between Daniel Burbank of the County of Genessee, State of New York and Seymour Brainard of the County of Oneida, State of Ne", York. Witnesseth: That Daniel Burbank for the sum of $600.00 conveys all that certain tract of land lying and being in the Town of Sheldon, in the County of Genessee, State of New York, being Lot No. 2 in the 8th Section of Township No. 10 containing 128 acres, subject to a certain Deed of Mortgage executed by said Daniel Burbank to Joseph Ellicoti as agent of the proprietors of said land, for the sum of $256.00, bearing date of 23 June 1804. (Note: Form this it would seem that Daniel Burbank came to the Holland Purchase with but little means or money as from the above record he executed a Deed of Mortgage for the entire down payment on the land which afterward became the town of Sheldon.) This deed was signed by Daniel Burbank and note that his wife signs her name, Margaret B. Burbank. (It should have been Margaret P. Burbank - P for Pynchon.) His signature was witnessed by I. Babcock and Richard Smith. Daniel Burbank and his wife did not acknowledge they executed the deed until 15 February 1812, which was a little over one year from the date on the deed. He may have lived on the land until this time in the Town of Sheldon as we find that less than two months later his ninth child was born on 16 March 1811; so he evidently lived on the land or nearby until he acknowledged the Deed 15 February 1812. The proclamation, commencing the War of 1812, was given by President Madison and was carried thru the country by express riders and reached Fort Niagara on 26 June 1812 and was noised about as they went. Six says after this declaration reached Niagara, we find Daniel Burbank serving in this conflict as a Major in the Second Regiment, New York Militia, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Hugh W. Dobbin. He was in the service from 2 July 1812 to 9 November 1812 at Lewiston, Niagara, New York. After he served in the War of 1812, it is not found where he resided but presumably in the western part of New York State; however after much research, no deeds can be uncovered to prove that he owned land in New York State after 1812. The remainder of his life story is taken from an old leather covered record book written by his son, Daniel Mark Burbank, and the records of his other son Augustus Ripley Burbank found in the "History of Oregon" by Rev. H. K. Hines, DD. His last child born in New York was Daniel Mark Burbank, who says he was born 3 December 1814, Delphi County, State of New York, but as there is nothing like that county in New York, I am wondering if he meant the city of Bethany. When he was a baby in (1815), the father Daniel started West with two other families. They built a flat boat (cutting logs and tying them together and building shelters on top). This was on the Allegany River at a place called Olean Point, it being one of the forks of the Ohio River. They came down the river to Cincinnati, Ohio and settled on a farm near Cincinnati. Here their last child was born, Augustus Ripley Burbank, 15 April 1817. They stayed here until the spring of 1818 or 1819 when they started again on down the Ohio River and landed at a pace called Shawneetown, Illinois, where the government had a land office on the West bank of the Ohio River. They traveled West into Hamilton County, Illinois, four miles West of McLeansboro, County Seat of Hamilton. Their oldest son, Lester, remained in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was a carpenter. Here we lived for some time, when the oldest daughter, Sophia, married Ennis Maulding, 29 February 1820, McLeansboro, Illinois. Loisa married William Maulding, 11 October 1821 McLeansboro, Illinois. From this place we moved to Swimming Point in Morgan County, Illinois, and then West to the town of Exeter in the same county. Copy of a deed shows on 19 January 1826 Enoch C. March conveys to Daniel Burbank, Lots Nos. 39 and 40 in the Town of Exeter, Illinois, for the sum of $39.75. On 14th of July that year, my mother Margaret died leaving me (Daniel Mark Burbank) 12 years old and August Ripley Burbank, 9 years and 3 sisters older. My sisters Aveline and Margaret then kept house for my father, when my sister Margaret, the younger of the two, married Adam Conrad. They lived in the Town of Exeter and my father moved one mile South on a farm. At this place my sister Aveline married Orlando Kellogg, and shortly after my father married a widow woman by the name of Adams - she having 4 girls and 2 boys. He then brought them home, and my married sister Margaret Conrad moved to another house on the farm. Her husband, Adam Conrad, being a Captain of a Steamboat then running on the Illinois River. My youngest brother Augustus went to live with her. We lived on this place until 1828 when we moved again to the Illinois River near the town of Meredosia. This land belonged to the government and it seems he obtained this land by homestead or thru his services in the War of 1812. He built on the land and improved it. In the year of 1830 with my youngest sister, Mary Ann, I started by water for Cincinnati, Ohio, where my oldest brother lived to learn the trade of carpenter. This left my father alone with his acquired family. He lost the use of his right hand through the brutal care of his wife and Doctor. They sought to destroy him and take away his means. They made all preparations one morning to cut off his hand and when I asked if he was going to have it done, he being very poor in health and confined to his bed, said; "My son, I don't know what is best." I replied, Father don't have it cut off. The doctor told me to shut my mouth and the Old Woman clinched me by the hair of my head and ordered me out of the door. I said, Father, they shall not cut off your hand. So grabbing my little fowling piece, I drove the Old Woman and the Doctor out of the house. My father was about 60 years old and covered his face with a sheet and wept. I sent for my brother-in law, Adam Conrad, and he came and took my father home to his house. There he was nursed back to health, and his hand got well, but weathered down until it was nothing but skin and bone. Here he stayed until after my sister had left, and then he also came on to Cincinnati to spend some time with his son Lester. In the early fall of 1832, he went back to Meredosia and found his wife married to another man by the name of Brown, and his property all used up. The deed reads: I Daniel Burbank of the County of Morgan and the State of Illinois, for the sum of $150.00 paid to me by lsiah Ltites of the same county and state, do sell unto him 70 and 98/100 acres located by the West half of the South West quarter of Section No. 15, in Township No. 16, North of Range No. 13, West of the principal meridian, and entered by me at the land office in Springfield on the 24 September 1832, under the provisions of the act of Congress granting preemption rights to settlers of the Public Lands. Approved on the 5 April 1832 and hereby request that a patent for the above tract of land may be issued in the name of Isaiah Ltites. Signed: Daniel Burbank and witnessed the same day. This would prove that he intended to dissolve his marriage and sell the entire farm out from under her. One morning he went up to his house and found that Brown had left. (I don't know if he meant permanently). His wife urged him to take breakfast, but this he refused to do, but took a cup of coffee instead. Nothing is recorded what he said to her at this time, but after taking the coffee, he went back to the hotel at Meredosia and was taken vomiting and only lived about four days and died 17 October 1832. It was said by the neighbors and doctors that it was possible that his wife had poisoned him to death. His body was taken from the town of Exeter, and he was buried by the side of his first wife Margaret (Pynchon) Burbank, West of the Town on a high rolling ridge. He died intestate and George Camp was chosen as Administrator of the estate. There must have been many complications and I am not sure we have all the records. We do not know what happened to lsiah Ltites deed to all of his property. It was in litigation for about five years. I have copies of the two deeds. During this time the widow of Daniel married Edward Lusk. This indenture made 6 March 1837, between James Berdan, Master in Chancery in and for the County of Morgan in the State of Illinois of the first part and Erastus W. Palme of the same County and State of the second part. Witnesseth, that whereas at the several terms of the Circuit Court of said County held respectively in the months of July and October in the year of Our Lord 1836. It was ordered and decreed by the said court ii Chancery sitting in a certain cause wherein George Camp, Administrator of the estate C Daniel Burbank, deceased, was complainant and Edward Lusk and Mary his wife and others were defendants among other things that the said Master in Chancery, should make sale at public venue at the court house in Jacksonville of a certain tract of land situated in said county and described as the West half of the Southwest quarter of Section fifteen in Township No. Sixteen north, Range No. Thirteen West and that said sale be made in the acre lots and whereas said master having caused the said tract of land to be surveyed and sub divided into eight lots, each containing ten acres more or less. And having given the advertisement and notice of the time, place and terms of said sale in the manner require in by said orders and decrees did on the day hereof proceed to expose the said ten acre lot severally at public sale to the highest bidder at the court house in Jacksonville --- Lots No. 3 and 4 were sold to Edward Lusk, the highest bidder for $250.00 and $460.00 respectively or a total of $710.00. The second sale made 6 March 1837, was sold to the highest bidder, Edward Lusk, being No. 1, for $1,170.00. Lots 5, 6, 7 and 8 must have been claimed by Daniel's widow as there is no record of a sale. I do not know what happened to lot No. 21. The above was all sold as ten acre lots more or less. Jas. Berdan Master in Chancery. Major Daniel Burbank was poisoned and died 17 October 1832, in Meredosia, Illinois. His body was taken from the town of Exeter, and he was buried by the side of his first wife Margaret (Pynchon) Burbank, West of the Town on a high rolling Hill. He was 62 years old. MARGARET PYNCHON was born 4 January 1775, in Granville, Hampden, Massachusetts to George Pynchon (1739-1775) and Lois Hickcox (1745-1811.) Her father died 23 May 1775, about five months after she was born. Her mother never remarried. Margaret Pynchon died 14 July 1826, Exeter, Illinois, age 51. Margaret Pynchon was the fourth great grandchild of Major William Pynchon, immigrant in 1630, with Governor Winthrop who settled Springfield, Massachusetts. Margaret Pynchon married Daniel Burbank, 21 May 1793, in Williamstown, Berkshire, Massachusetts. She and her husband Daniel first settled in Sheldon, New York. Then about 1815 Daniel and Margaret left Sheldon on a flat boat travelling down the Ohio River. They settled near Cincinnati, Ohio, until about 1819 at which time they traveled again on the river to Shawneetown, Illinois, where the federal land office had recently been opened. Daniel and Margaret settled west of Shawneetown in Hamilton County, Illinois, for a couple of years. Their final migration was about 100 miles north to the area around the town of Exeter where Daniel purchased land on 16 January 1826. Margaret Pynchon passed away 14 July 1826, in Exeter, Scott, Illinois, and was buried there at the age of 50. Children of Major Daniel Burbank and Margaret Pynchon: 1.Asa Burbank, b. 12 Aug 1794, Marcellus, NY; d. 4 Nov 1801, at age 7. Child. 2.Lester Burbank, b. 17 May 1796, Marcellus, NY; md. Lois Sherman 1817, NY; d. 30 Jan 1854, Kentucky. 3.Samuel Burbank, b. 21 Apr 1798, d. 27 July 1800, Marcellus, NY, at age 2. Child. 4.Sophia Burbank, b. 10 Mar 1800, Marcellus, NY; md. Ennis Maulding, 1 Mar 1820, Hamilton, Ill.; d. 1839, Wayne Co., Illinois. 5.Asa Burbank, b. 14 Nov 1802, Marcellus; d. 27 Dec 1804, Marcellus, NY, at the age of 2. Child. 6.Louisa Jane Burbank, b. 12 Oct 1804, Sheldon, NY; md. William Maulding, 9 Oct 1821, Hamilton, Ill.; d. 25 Jan 1872, Ill. William Maulding Birth: Jan. 16 1802 Death: Sep. 3 1882 Son of Ambrose Maulding. Husband of Louisa Burbank Maulding. Father of Presley Maulding, Celia T. Maulding, Daniel Maulding, William C. Maulding, Mary Jane Maulding, Keeling Tyler Maulding, James A. Maulding, Margaret Sarah Maulding, Louisa Elizabeth Maulding, Walter Burbank Maulding, Evaline Maulding, and Ambrose Washington Maulding He was first a member of the Ten Mile Creek Church and later moved his membership to the Blooming Grove Church soon after it was founded in 1850. He helped to build the first frame church house (pictured) in 1867 Family links: Parents: Ambrose Maulding (1755 - 1833) Mary Purdy Maulding (1781 - 1859) Children: Celia T Maulding Daily (1822 - 1914)* Louisa Jane Burbank Maulding Birth: Oct. 10 1804 Death: Jan. 23 1879 Decendant of William and Susanah (Fuller) White who traveled to America in 1620 on the Mayflower. William's name is signed on the Mayflower Compact. Her parents were Daniel and Margaret Pynchon Burbank. She was first a member of the Ten Mile Creek Church but moved her membership to the Blooming Grove Church soon after it was founded. She is buried toward the middle of the oldest section of Blooming Grove Cemetery. She married William Maulding on Oct. 11 1821 in Hamilton County, IL. She was the Mother of Presley Maulding, Celia T. Maulding, Daniel Maulding, William C. Maulding, Mary Jane Maulding, Keeling Tyler Maulding, James A. Maulding, Margaret Sarah Maulding, Louisa Elizabeth Maulding, Walter Burbank Maulding, Evaline Maulding, and Ambrose Washington Maulding Family links: Parents: Daniel Burbank (1770 - 1832) Pressley Maulding (1824 - 1913)* Louisa Elizabeth Maulding Daily (1837 - 1874)* Spouse: Louisa Jane Burbank Maulding (1804 - 1879)* Margaret Pynchon Burbank (1775 - 1826) Children: Celia T Maulding Daily (1822 - 1914)* Pressley Maulding (1824 - 1913)* Louisa Elizabeth Maulding Daily (1837 - 1874)* Spouse: William Maulding (1802 - 1882) 7.Mary Aveline Burbank, b. 12 Dec 1806, Sheldon, NY; md. Orlando Kellogg, 27 Jan 1828, Morgan, Ill., d. 24 July 1887, Naples, Illinois. 8.DANIEL MARK BURBANK was born 3 December 1814, in Delphi, New York, (somewhere in Western New York) to Major Daniel Burbank (1770-1832) and Margaret Pynchon (1775-1826.) He married (1) Lydia VanBlaricom, 31 Dec 1835, (1816- 1838); (2) Abigail Blodgett, 3 Aug 1839, (1811-1852); (3) *Sarah Zurviah Southworth, 10 September 1852, South Pass, Fremont, Wyoming (1835-1927.) Daniel Mark Burbank died 31 Jan 1894, Brigham City, Utah, at age 79. 9.Augustus Ripley Burbank, b. 15 Apr 1817, Cincinnati, Ohio; md. Mary Ellen Eckles, 1 May 1845, Jacksonville, Ill.; d. Oct 1902, Lafayette, Oregon. His wife died about 15 Feb 1905. Only child, Evaline C. Burbank 1861-1880, drowned in the ocean, at age 19. Augustus Ripley Burbank • Birth: Apr. 15 1817 Cincinnati Hamilton County Ohio, USA Death: Oct. 7, 1902 Lafayette Yamhill County Oregon, USA Family links: Parents: Daniel Burbank (1770 - 1832) Margaret Pynchon Burbank (1775 - 1826) Spouse: Mary Ellen Eckles Burbank (1827 - 1906) Children: Evaline C Burbank (1861 - 1880)* Siblings: Sophia Burbank Maulding (1800 - 1839)* Louisa Jane Burbank Maulding (1804 - 1879)* Avalina Burbank Kellogg (1806 - 1837)* Daniel Mark Burbank (1814 - 1894)* Augustus Ripley Burbank (1817 - 1902) *Calculated relationship Burial: Masonic Cemetery Lafayette #3 Lafayette Yamhill County Oregon, USA Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?] Created by: Sheri West Record added: Jul 07, 2004 Find A Grave Memorial# 9056112 Honorable Augustus Ripley Burbank, widely known Oregon Pioneer and eminent public man and influential citizen of Lafayette, Oregon. In 1814 his parents removed to Ohio which was then a new and unsettled country, and located on a farm near Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was born. The father was a Miller and a Farmer, and was esteemed on account of his industry and enterprise. He was a distinguished Major in the War of 1812. He served in that memorial conflict with great valor. He was a worthy member of the Methodist then the Presbyterian Church, and Masonic Order, and is imbued with the principals of true goodness and greatness. From Ohio, the family removed to Illinois in 1818. His mother, Margaret Pynchon, died in 1826 and his father, Daniel Burbank, was poisoned in 1832, by his second wife. He went to school after his father died, and then worked in a mercantile business in Naples, Illinois. He married Mary Ellen Echols, 1 May 1845. In the spring of 1849 he started for the gold fields of California. He did mining in Nevada, went back to Illinois, and finally settled in Lafayette, Oregon. He did many things in Oregon. His one daughter was born here and unfortunately drowned in 1880, at the age of 19. He and his faithful wife were members of the Episcopal Church of Portland. In his will among other things he wanted a headstone for his wife and himself and his beautiful daughter, Evaline. The interested collected from selling all his property was to go to the Orphan Home. His wife’s will had $500 a year set apart to take care of the cemetery. This happened until the Great Depression and in 1961 it was full of weeds. She also wanted all the rest of her money to go to the Orphans’ Homes at Salem and Portland, Oregon. Augustus must have not understood the Church that his older brother, Daniel Mark Burbank, joined, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They must not have been in contact with each other. The following letter was sent to the Governor of Utah. I do not know if Daniel Mark ever saw the letter. Portland, December 12 1857 Daniel M. Burbank (my brother) and family, I presume are with the Mormons of Utah. On 7th May 1854 (his last letter to me), he resided in Tulla Valley, 30 miles west of Salt Lake City. His family (then) consisted of wife and five children (mother of four eldest children died on the plains in 1852.) His late wife or 1854 wife, was a Sarah Southworth, of whom I know not. His children’s names (to the former date /54) was as follows, Mary L., Daniel M., Abigail, Laura, and George. His eldest daughter (Mary L.) is near 16 years of age. Now in case of my brother’s death by war with U.S. Troops, or otherwise, I hope you will be so good as to give advice, and if possible, protection to his children. Have them sent to me in Oregon or Rev. Isaac Owen, Danhosa, California, or Dr. F. M. Lee, Louisville, Ky, or George Thorp, St. Louis, Mo. It may be that an Immigration from the Atlantic States may pass through Utah Territory next summer, if so, they could be sent with them. I feel very solicitous for these poor children especially his oldest daughter. I am a constant opposer of Mormonism. We here are fearing that the Mormons may stir up the Columbia Valley and their Indian tribes, to rage another war upon Oregon and Washington Territories. I am very truly yours, Your Excellency Governor Cummings of Utah Territory Signed: A. R. Burbank (Augustus Ripley Burbank) + 8. DANIEL MARK BURBANK (1814-1894, age 80) SARAH ZURVIAH SOUTHWORTH (1835-1927, age 92) Daniel Mark Burbank’s Journal (Stored in the Church History Library, SLC, Utah.) DANIEL MARK BURBANK was born 13 December 1814, in western, New York, to Daniel Burbank (1770-1832) and Margaret Pynchon (1775-1826.) He married (1) Lydia VanBlaricom, 31 Dec 1835, Lydia died 18 Sep 1838; (2) Abigail Blodgett, 3 Aug 1839, Abigail died of Cholera, crossing the Plains, 20 July 1852; (3) *Sarah Zurviah Southworth, 10 September 1852, South Pass, Wyoming. Sarah died 27 May 1927, Brigham City, Utah. Daniel Mark Burbank was our first Burbank Mormon pioneer ancestor. He was born in Dethy, Western New York, to Major Daniel Burbank (War of 1812) and Margaret Pynchon on December 13 1814. After Daniel Mark’s father served in the war of 1812, he and his family lived in the western part of New York State. (We do not know where “Dethy” is.) Their last child born in New York was Daniel Mark. D. M. writes in his Record Book: “When I was about five years old my father started West with two other families. They built a flat boat on the Allegheny River at a place called Olean Point. It being one of the forks of the Ohio River. They came on down the river to Cincinnati, Ohio. There they stayed until the spring of the year 1820 when two of them started again on down the river [Ohio] and landed at a placed called Shawneetown, Illinois, on the West side of the Ohio. From this place they traveled West into Hamilton County, Illinois, four miles west of McLeansboro—this being the county seat of Hamilton. Here we lived for some time. When two of my oldest sisters, Sophia and Lisa, married two brothers: Sophia to Ennis Maulding and Lisa to William Maulding. From this point we moved to Swimming Point in Morgan County, Illinois. From this town West to the town of Exeter in the same county [Morgan County]. Here we lived for some time. “When in the year 1826 July 14 my mother Margaret [51] died leaving me only 12 years old and one brother yet younger, Augustus. My sisters Aveline and Margaret then kept house for my father. My sister Margaret, the youngest of the two, married Adam Conrad. They lived in the town of Exeter and my father moved on mile south on a farm at this place. Aveline married one Orlando Kellogg and about this time my father married a widow woman by the names of Adams; she having four girls and two boys. He then brung them home and my sisters moved to another house on the farm. Her [Aveline’s] husband [Orlando Kellogg], being a Captain of a steamboat then running on the Illinois River, my youngest brother went to live with her. We lived on this place till in 1828 when we moved across to the Illinois River at a town of Meredosia. Here my father bought land that lay along the River. We made improvements till in the year 1830 when I started with my youngest sister Mary Ann by water for Cincinnati, Ohio, to where my oldest brother, Lester, lived, to learn the trade of carpenter. “My father was at home, he being quite feeble having lost the use of his right hand by a felon and brutal cure of his wife and doctor. They sought to destroy him and to take away his means made all preparations one morning to cut off his hand. When I asked him if he was against having it done, he being very poor in health and confined to his bed, said my son I don’t know what is best. I replied, don’t father have it cut off. The doctor told me to shut my mouth and the old woman clinching me by the hair of the head and ordered me out of the doors. I then said father they shant cut off your hand. I then ceased my little fowling piece and drove the doctor and the woman out of the house. When my father covered his face with the sheet and wept. I then sent for my brother-in-law [Adam Conrad]. He came and took my father home to his house. There he was nursed. His hand got well, but withered down till it was nothing but skin and bone. Here he stayed for some time till after me and my sister had left there. He came on to Cincinnati. There spent the summer with his son, Lester. “When in the fall of 1832 he went back to his home farm. His wife married again to another man by the name of Brown. His property was all used up. He landed in the night. In the morning went up to his house and found that Brown had left. His wife urged him to take breakfast. This he refused, but took a cup of coffee, went back to the Hotel was taking to vomiting. Lived 3 or 4 days and died on 27 of October 1832. It was said by the neighbors and doctors that this woman had poisoned him to death. His body was taken to the town of Exeter and buried by the side of my mother West of this town on a high rolling ridge. “Then in the year of 1833 late in the fall I left my trade and came on down the River Ohio to Shawneetown, then out to my two sisters. There I stayed till in the spring of 1834. Then I left and went home to my sister Aveline’s where my youngest brother Augustus lived in the town of Naples, then Morgan County but now Scott County, Illinois.” Daniel Mark Burbank, through which our blood line runs, kept a little leather-covered record book where we kept the records of his father and family. The record book is located in the Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. “In the town of Naples I lived with my sister Aveline for some time and her husband Orlando Kellogg being chosen as guardian for my youngest brother. I entered into serving with him on the farm for a while, then went on a steamboat as bar keeper for Kellogg at $10 a month; then as steersman till late in the summer. Then I left him and went for myself at $50 per month. So in the business I continued as Pilot for some time, mostly on the Illinois River. “When I married Lydia VanBlaricom one mile south, south East of Naples. In this town I then moved and then continued to follow Piloting the River—seeing my family twice a week. The wages from $100 to $125 per month. I got some transient trips that got as high as $100 per day [week?] “So in 1836 my wife had the small pox and lost her child and came very near losing her life. In 1838 [January 12] Augustus was born and September 18 1838, my wife, Lydia, died leaving me with a small child which my sister, Margaret, took. He soon pinned away and died September 25 1838, but 8 months 16 days old. [He died ten days after Lydia died.] I sold all out and continued Piloting the River till August 3 in 1839 at Naples was married again to Abigail [Blodgett] King then a widow. We lived at the place til in the spring of 1841. We went to Nauvoo being about 90 miles West on the Mississippi River and on the Eastern Bank, and in April 11 1841, was baptized in the Mississippi by William Smith at the place called the Nauvoo House. In the north part of the city, three blocks from the temple I lived till the fall of 1845.” Following is Daniel Mark Burbank’s conversion to Mormonism as told by him to his son, Brigham Southworth Burbank: “In the spring of 1841, Daniel Mark Burbank, captain of a river boat, was traveling North on the Mississippi River and had gone past Nauvoo, Illinois, when he was informed that the brick lining of the furnace had deteriorated to such an extent that the fire had to be put out. Daniel Mark decided that they would drift back down the river to Nauvoo as they had a wharf there where the repairs could be made. After he had given instructions for the repair, he asked one of the men on the wharf if he knew Joseph Smith, and the man replied that he did; and as he was going in that direction he would escort him there. When they arrived the escort knocked on the door and Emma answered. She asked what they wanted. Daniel Mark said they wanted to see Brother Smith. So he came to the door and while standing at the door, his escort informed the Prophet that Brother Burbank had asked to see him to find out for himself if the Mormons were the rascles some people were saying they were. My father said he looked him in the eye and they seemed to pierce his very soul. He slowly looked down to his feet and Daniel Mark said it seemed that the fluid of his body seemed to flow out of his body. Brother Smith slowly raised his eyes and looking at Daniel Mark made the following statement: ‘Brother Burbank, I can see that you are thirsty for the want of water. Meet me down on the banks of the Mississippi River and you will be baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints!’ Brother Smith then asked Daniel Mark into the house and they talked for a great length of time. Brother Smith told him of his experience in the Grove and Daniel Mark Burbank was converted that day. Daniel Mark went forth from the prophet with great joy in his heart and converted his wife, and they returned to Nauvoo. On 11 April 1841 they were baptized in the Mississippi River by William Smith, brother of the Prophet Joseph Smith. They lived in the north part of the city of Nauvoo, three blocks from the Temple until the fall of 1845 when they moved northeast three miles to a farm.” Baptisms for the Dead: Baptisms for the dead was revealed to the Prophet August 15 1840. January 19 1841, the Prophet informs the Saints that the baptisms for the dead in the Mississippi River, etc. would not be acceptable. Conference October 2-5 1841: The Prophet tells the Saints to stop doing baptisms for the dead until they can do them in the House of the Lord. (D&C 124.) November 8 1841, the wooden baptismal font was dedicated in the Nauvoo Temple and put to use. The stone baptismal font was finished in 1846. D. M. Burbank oversaw the following baptisms for the dead in 1841. The baptisms were recorded in the Nauvoo Baptismal Records of the Dead. Baptisms for the dead were recorded when they started using the wooden font at the Nauvoo Temple, November 1841. We assume this is when his relatives were baptized. His first wife: Lydia VanBlaricom Burbank His father and mother: Daniel and Margaret Burbank Three brothers and five sisters. (Some were baptized 11 August 1844.) Other ancestors. Caring for the Sick: “When Emma, the Prophet’s wife, was given up to die by the Doctor, Joseph called Daniel Mark Burbank to come and see her. Brother Burbank said, ‘I believe I can cure her.’ She said he went to the store and got medicine and stayed two nights and days and cured her. Then the Prophet told Brother Burbank to gather all his books together. The knowledge that Daniel Mark Burbank had was received in a hospital in St. Louis. The Prophet said that it was his mission on earth to attend the sick.” (Written by Sarah Zurviah Southworth Burbank.) Nauvoo Legion: Daniel Mark Burbank was a Third Sergeant, 1st Cohort, 4th Regiment, 2nd Company in Church records dated September 5 1843. When the city of Nauvoo was incorporated in 1840, it was also authorized to create a military body or militia that came to be known as the Nauvoo Legion. Perhaps influence by genuine disgust with the way the Latter-day Saints had been treated in Missouri, the Illinois legislature acted liberally. The person in charge of the Nauvoo Legion was Lieutenant General Joseph Smith. The following is from the Record Book of Daniel Mark Burbank: “Whilst living in Nauvoo, times was very hard for the Saints to live whilst building the temple. Our labors was great for we had to labor days and guard nights. There was many attempts made to burn the Temple, some times by false brethren seeking to kill the Prophet Joseph Smith—kidnap him and run him into Missouri and there hang, burn or otherwise destroy him. So many times we had to turn out and take the Prophet away and fetch him home again.” Quote from his wife, Sarah Southworth Burbank: “My husband, D. M. Burbank, used to guard his [the Prophet’s] house and took him out in the country and hid him away from the mob. He dressed himself in his mother’s old dress and bonnet and took her cane and basket, bent over and walked passed the mob and got away. My husband guarded the Prophet just before he was taken to Carthage where he was put in jail.” The Maid of Iowa on the Prophet’s Assignment: The mobs were trying to capture the Prophet on the rivers and take him to Missouri. Daniel M. Burbank was first pilot on The Maid of Iowa. Daniel Mark related the following account to his son, Brigham S. Burbank: “When we came upon the ‘Chicago Bell’ at Pekin, Illinois, the mob had expected our coming so they swung the stem of the steamship into the river channel which completely blocked our passage up the river. The men had all blackened their faces and were waving their hands and cursing and swore that they would see us in hell before they would let us pass! Then Daniel Mark Burbank, the Pilot, said he offered a silent prayer while standing at the wheel and asked the Lord to please let him know what to do. He heard a voice behind him say in a clear voice: ‘Full speed ahead and go around the island channel.’ This channel had never been used as a passageway as it was grown-up with willows. When he heard the voice, he turned around quickly to see who was speaking but could see no one in sight and he knew that the Lord had directed. He yelled down the speaking tube to put on the steam and he piloted the boat thru this channel without any apparent damage to the ‘Maid.’” (See History of the Church 5:481-484 entitled “Daniel Mark Burbank’s Account of the Maid of Iowa Expedition for the Prophet’s Relief.”) The above account explains why Daniel Mark did not honor Captain Dan Jones’ command to “Stop the Maid. Stop the Maid or you will smash the boat to pieces.” He knew the Lord had directed his course and he pursued it. Daniel Mark continues: “For a while we lived in peace until about the time that Joseph gave himself up to go to Carthage [27 June 1844], being charged with treason against Government. This was only a sham, for he was always true and loyal. They only wanted to destroy him and this was the desire of the whole and entire Government, and then after that Governor Ford promised him protection by their own men and while in prison they shot him and Bro. Hyrum. “Then not long they commenced burning our houses, killing our stock all thru the country, so that the people at Nauvoo had to turn out and help gather in the poor Saints, many of them had only the clothes on their backs. All had been burned and destroyed and some lost their lives. I rode for some time under Col. Steven Markham on Bear River, Green plains and also at Carthage and Warsaw. In our scouring the country, we saw much destruction of houses, animals and grain. In this we got no redress from the Governor or the President of the United States. “So in 1846, we had to leave the States and find a home where best we could, so we started into the wilderness west leaving our farms, houses, orchards and Temple and got nothing for all our labors. Many were very poor and destitute for the comforts of life, yet we must go or be killed, yes utterly destroyed. “So trusting in God we prayed along till we got into the Valley of the Great Salt Lake—the Lord ruling and over-ruling for our good and safety in all things both in spiritual and temporal as our circumstances stood in need of.” “After leaving Nauvoo I came to Farmington, Iowa. Here I stopped and labored awhile for food and raiment for my family. At this place [Farmington, Iowa] my son Daniel was born, 10 June 1846, and in the fall I started on West again until I came to a place called Old Agency [Florence, Nebraska]. We wintered here, then on to the Bluffs or a placed called Kanesville.” On page 32 of Daniel Mark’s Record Book it is entered: “Joseph Smith Burbank, died 6 July 1848.” They must have been near Kanesville when he was run over, because they first arrived in this area in the spring of 1847. Also written in Daniel Burbank, III’s history: “The team started up suddenly throwing my older brother, Joseph Smith Burbank, out of the wagon and under the wagon wheels and he was run over and killed. He was named after the Prophet Joseph Smith whom my father loved.” “Here I lived on Indian Creek and was Bishop for some time, then moved north 60 miles, taking charge of the Church affairs.” During 1846-1852 there were more than 70 settlements in Iowa. Bishops were ordained to preside over the temporal affairs of the Church in the different branches. They were to care for the needy, widows, and orphans. They were to be the fathers of the branches. Orson Hyde, in instructing the bishops of their calling, had this to say: “There will be many calls on you for assistance and aid, because you are the men appointed to receive the tithing, and from it to administer to the wants of the poor. It is desirable that the honest and virtuous poor should receive succor from the Church; but such persons as waste their time in bed in the morning when they should be up and at work if they are healthy, have no claim on you for support. That family who are guilty of profanity or suffer the name of their house, have no claim on the tithing for support. Parents who have boys and girls large enough to earn their living, yet instead of working, idle away their time, have no claim on you for aid…. Let your disbursements prove that the Church does not tolerate idleness in any shape or form, neither crime, nor immorality.” (Frontier Guardian, [semi-monthly organ of the LDS Church at Kanesville, Iowa, edited by Orson Hyde], August 8 1849.) Kanesville, Iowa, December 1847: The Quorum of the Twelve wanted to announce to the Saints the reestablishment of the First Presidency. It remained only to place the matter before a meeting of the general membership. A large meetinghouse was commissioned to be completed as soon as possible. About 200 men were called to assist in construction. (Possibly Daniel Mark Burbank was one of them since he was a Bishop on Indian Creek.) Within three weeks of hard winter labor, it was completed. Built with logs cut three miles away and carted to the site, the Kanesville Log Tabernacle, as it came to be called, was impressively large—60 feet west to east and 40 feet north to south. The walls were eight logs high, and the log roof was covered with willow straw and dirt. The tabernacle was capable of containing 1,000 seated. It stood near Indian Creek, four miles from Council Point. The First Presidency was sustained December 27 1847: President Brigham Young, First Counselor Heber C. Kimball, and Second Counselor Willard Richards. Kanesville was on Indian Creek and Mosquito Creek. This town was designed to be a fitting-out place, a layover town where those too poor, tired, discouraged, or unprepared could delay their journey, plant and sow crops, procure teams and outfits, and make other necessary preparations. In the winter and spring of 1852 Daniel Mark was busy in making and repairing wagons for the poor Saints to cross the plains. The John B. Walker Company departed 26-30 June 1852 and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley 2-7 October 1852. About 258 individuals were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post in Kanesville. Daniel Mark was called to be Captain of ten wagons [50 Saints] in the Walker Company. “When on the plains my wife Abigail died leaving me with 4 children, one boy and three girls.” Sarah Z. Southworth, who later became Daniel Mark’s third wife writes of this incident: “Then we went along the Platte River where we had Cholera [from the water.] Five died in our camp. Our captain, Daniel M. Burbank’s wife Abigail died with Cholera 20 July 1852 near Sweetwater, Nebraska on the Platte River, at 41 years, 3 months, and 25 days old, and was buried without a coffin by the Platte River along with others. We had to go on in the morning never to see their graves again. The night that Abby was buried the wolves were howling. It was awful to hear the dirt thrown on their bodies. A young lady and I were the only ones to wash and dress her with what we could find, her underclothing and night-gown. We sewed her up in a sheet and quilt. That was all that could be done for her burial. All the women in the camp were afraid to prepare the body, for fear they would catch the cholera from her. This young girl and I were not afraid to take care of the body. We were only 16-years old but brave in that case.” From Sarah Zurviah Southworth Burbank: “We started in June and were four months on our journey before we reached Salt Lake Valley. About two months after Abby died I married Daniel Mark Burbank on the plains [September 10 1852]. Captain Walker of another company that camped by us married us one evening. The bugle called the camps and they came together to witness our marriage. We had cedar torch lights instead of candles. It was by Green River in September. There I mothered four children that were sick with scarlet fever. My husband and I had great trouble with sickness the rest of the way. We also had a number of oxen die and had to stop to get cows instead of oxen. A hundred Indians took Daniel M. Burbank a prisoner. We thought he would be killed but the chief gave him up to us if we would give them flour, sugar, and coffee. We rejoiced when we saw the Captain alive. He had gone to hunt a buffalo that he had spied through a spy glass. He had killed the buffalos before when hunting for a camping place. “The poor cows furnished us with milk or we would have suffered for a drink as the water was so bad for hundreds of miles. We had to grind parched corn in coffee mills to eat with our milk to save our flour. We would eat it in milk at night.” At this time his oldest child was about eight years old and his youngest was two years old. His third wife, Sarah Zurviah Southworth, was born 10 February 1835, Bastard, Leads County, Ontario, Canada. She was 17 years, 7 months old when she married Daniel M. Burbank, and he was 37 years 9 months and 7 days old, or 20 years her senior, and they raised a family of 13 children of their own, plus four from Abby. She died 27 Ma 1927, Deweyville, Utah, and was buried at Brigham City, Utah. (Age 92 years, 3 months, 17 days.) He received his endowment in the temple at Nauvoo, January 16 1846, and on the 17th of the same month was sealed to Lydia VanBlaricom (deceased) and Abigail Blodgett by Heber C. Kimball. Brigham Young being present. Sarah Zurviah Southworth was sealed to him in the Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Utah, by Heber C. Kimball, July 16th 1864. Daniel Mark continues: “On 7 October 1852 I landed with my family in the City of Great Salt Lake, then moved south into Utah County at a place called Springville, Utah. At Springville I built a house and wintered there. Times were very hard and the Indians were restless because we were settling in their hunting grounds. So in the spring of 1853 in April I moved my family to [Grant’s Fort] Grantsville, Tooele, Utah Territory.” He helped finish building the Fort. They brought in logs from the Oquirrh Mountains and built a log cabin inside for protection from the Piutes. There were intermittent raids by the Indians on the settlers’ cows and horses. The Saints had another situation in the year 1857. Johnston’s Army was coming to Utah. The U.S. government was coming to stop the “Mormon Rebellion.” The story is well known how the Church recalled its members who abandoned their settlements to come home to the Salt Lake Valley to protect themselves. It was determined that the Army would never enter the Salt Lake Valley. Daniel Mark Burbank joined Major Warren Snow’s Command of Cavalry and was appointed a Chaplain and Commissarian of the command. It was a very hard winter for him. (October 23-December 2 1857.)His report of the experience is recorded in Journal History 2 December 1857, 4-7, Church History Library, SLC, Utah. Following is how he ended his report: “Sir [Brother Woodruff]: I wish to make a statement touching our fare and what we received while out on this campaign. We got five plugs of tobacco in all, some coffee, tea, sugar, flour, and a little beef. Then what was it that we did not get? No blankets, no overshirts, no socks, mittens or gloves, and none of the dried fruit that Pres. Young sent to the command; none of the many overshirts made by the different wards. No salt to salt our dying beef with. “With this I will close, hoping that in the future we will see such times no more. “Your brother in Christ, Daniel M. Burbank “Chaplain and Commissary: Major Snow’s Command.” After the campaign he returned to his wife and family in Grantsville, and in the month of June 1863, after ten years in Grantsville, they moved to Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah Territory. His father-in-law Chester Southworth and family resided there. He followed his trade of carpenter. He helped build the Brigham City Tabernacle, furniture, many homes and other buildings in Box Elder County. He was very active in Church affairs. He was baptized 11 April 1841 in the Mississippi River by William Smith, brother of the Prophet Joseph. Ordained an Elder 8 April 1842 by Brigham Young. Ordained a Seventy 8 October 1844 by Brigham Young (8th Quorum of Seventy). He was ordained a High Priest at Winter Quarters in 1847, and a Bishop on Indian Creek by Kanesville, Iowa. He was ordained a Patriarch 29 April 1883 by Apostle Wilford Woodruff. Daniel Mark Burbank died, 13 January 1894, at 13 minutes past 12 o’clock, Saturday morning, aged 79 years, 1 month, 10 days. Funeral services were held in the stake tabernacle in Brigham City, Monday 15 January 1894. Remarks were made by Apostle Lorenzo Snow, Stake President Rudger Clawson, Counselor Charles Kelley, Bishops A. A. Jensen and W. L. Watkins. There were present 4 sons, 7 daughters, 24 grandchildren and between 700 and 800 attended. Buried in the Brigham City Cemetery. SARAH ZURVIAH SOUTHWORTH was born 10 February 1835, in Bastard, Leeds, Ontario, Canada, to James Byington and Nichols. The following is written by Sarah Zurviah Southworth Burbank [with some additions] in 1924 at age 89.) Sarah Zurviah Southworth Burbank wrote: “I want to write these things that I have seen and heard for my children and grand-children to read in years to come. It will be interesting to them when I have passed away.” I will write a little sketch of my life and travels. I was born in 1835 in Upper Canada, Town of Bastard, County of Leeds [Ontario]. My parents joined the Church in Canada when I was a small child. They sold their home there and moved with the Saints to Missouri where the mob told us to go back, if we did not, they would kill us all. [They passed by Kirtland and went to Missouri.] But we went on as the Lord directed us, and traveled up to Kirtland, Ohio, where the first temple was built. [In Missouri] There the wicked mob stole our goods. As my father was a rich man, he brought a great lot of things from his lovely home, together with the Latter-Day-Saints. There we suffered great persecutions by the mob. They put the Prophet Joseph Smith in prison in chains, and tried to make him eat human flesh, but the Lord made known to him not to eat their meat. There the women and children were put in a court house while the men with their guns went to fight them, but the Lord drove them away and we were saved. We had to stay in the court house all day without food; there were so many people we had to stand up. The children crying for bread—I was one of those children. I was eight years old when I saw the Prophet Joseph Smith first. I have been in his store and bought things for my parents. We lived not far from his house on Mulholland Street. I have heard him preach; also his brother Hyrum. I have shaken hands with him in Sunday school. His second wife, Eliza Snow Smith, was my teacher. In a grove by the Prophet Joseph Smith’s house, I have seen his first wife, Emma Hale Smith, and his mother Lucy Mack Smith. The Prophet’s name was Joseph. He was the first Patriarch of the Church of the Latter-day-saints. I have seen Joseph in his regiment suit, on his black horse, Charley, drilling his soldiers—sword in hand—as they marched with drums and fifes. I, with many people, sat on the green grass watching him—his big feather flying on his hat. He looked grand. I have been in the Nauvoo Temple when it had some of the rooms finished. My parents had their endowments there. So did my husband Daniel Mark Burbank, whom I married while crossing the plains on our way to Salt Lake City. I have been in the Salt Lake Temple, Logan Temple, and in the Endowment House where my husband and I received our endowments and sealings. My father’s name was Chester Southworth. My mother’s name was Mary Byington. She was born in Canada, County of Leeds, Town of Bastard. She was born in the year 1811, and died in 1899 at the age of 87 years. My father died at the age of 82 years. He was born in New York State near Ontario Lake [should be born 7 May 1792, Mansfield, Tolland, Connecticut. His date of death should be 4 October 1874 instead of the year 1899. Sarah Burbank was very old when she wrote her life story so some of her dates are slightly wrong as to exact time.] His first wife Abigail Church died and left three children. Mother [Mary Byington Southworth] married him and raised two of the children; his sister the other one. My mother had eight children. All are dead but Joseph and myself. Their names are—the oldest Susannah, Emily, Emeline, Robert, Chester, and Laura. I had thirteen children: George, Brigham, Charles, James, John, Chester, AlAlonzo, Olive, Deseret, Sarah, Eliza and Louisa (twins), and Rose. Five were born in Grantsville, Utah and the other eight were born in Brigham City, Utah. My son Chester who is my youngest son; my oldest son George is 71, the 26 July of this year, 1924. [Note: from this we find that she was writing this history in 1924, just three years before she died at about the age of 89 years, at which time her hearing, although impaired, was as good as could be expected; her eyesight good as she read letters and wrote them until her death.] We were driven from Kirtland to Far West, Missouri, and again to Caldwell [Missouri] and from there to Montrose, Iowa, and later to Nauvoo, Illinois. [She now writes about leaving Nauvoo and going west.] In this flight we had to cross the Mississippi river in the night on a flat boat to save our lives. The people were camped by the river, some of which were without tents and many sick and some dying. We did not know where we were going but got word from Brigham Young we were going West. We then went to Mt. Pisgah and stayed there all winter. Father made shoes to get flour, bacon and groceries so we could go on again to Council Bluffs where the Saints were settled for the winter. Later we moved into a town called Kanesville. As we were going there my sister [Mary Emily was born May 1840 in Nauvoo and died October 1848] died and was buried by a lone tree by the roadside. We went on and never saw her grave again. She was eight [6] years old when she died. When we were moving to Missouri, my little brother [Robert Luther born 3 March 1838 Canton, St. Lawrence, New York and died 30 September 1838] died from an attack of croup and was buried by the roadside. We were driven by the mob and never saw his grave again. This was one of the trails my parents had to endure. While in Council Bluffs, father built a cabin of logs—the chimney of sods cut in squares of mud with grass on one side, laid up like adobes. The ground served as the floor. The door was made of slabs, the window of cloth. We lived there two years. While there we raised a little corn, a few potatoes, and a small garden. Father made shoes and boots from a little leather he had on hand and sold them to strangers for flour. We were working to go west. I worked for 50 cents a week. Bought me a gingham dress for 5 cents a yard. There was a little store there; goods were cheap. We had to work for 50 cents a week. I was spinning rolls of wool on a wheel to make yarn for clothes. I spun 20 pounds of rolls into yarn for a lady. I was not 15 years old then. Later I worked in a boarding house for a dollar a week and obtained clothes to start on the journey west. From that place we crossed the Missouri in a flat boat, one wagon at a time. The oxen were chained to the wheels. This was the manner in which they all crossed the river. In June we camped in a place called Winter Quarters where the companies were organized into companies of fifties, with a captain over each. Daniel M. Burbank was our Captain. Then we went on our journey among the Indians. At night we had to guard the oxen so they would not steal them. The bugle was sounded in the morning and all the camps were called together for prayer. The cows were yoked with the oxen and we traveled many miles before getting wood and water. On the first part of the journey when we came to a stream of water we found willows to make bridges so they could take the wagons over. When we came to a stream, we would wash our clothes and dry them on the grass, for we might not get a place again for fifty or a hundred miles. We gathered dried dung or buffalo chips to make a fire, to cook our food. We dug a hole in the ground—put a skillet in the hole with a tight lid on it—put the buffalo chips on the lid and set it on the fire. It baked the bread fine. That was the way we did our cooking until we got where there was wood again. Then we went along the Platte River where we had cholera [sick from bad water.] Five died in our camp. My youngest sister [Laura Saline born 18 June 1852 and died 4 February 1872] was born on the plains. My oldest sister gave birth to a baby as did many other women, but the company was not hindered in their march as they would move on the next morning—which made quite a hardship for the mother. Our captain, Daniel M. Burbank’s wife, Abigail, died with Cholera, 20 July 1852, near Sweetwater, Nebraska, on the Platte River, at 41 years, 3 months, and 25 days old, and was buried without a coffin by the Platte River along with others that died with this disease. We had to go on in the morning never to see their graves again. The night that Abby was buried the wolves were howling. It was awful to hear the dirt thrown on their bodies. A young lady and I were the only ones to wash and dress her with what we could find, her underclothing and night-gown. We sewed her up in a sheet and quilt. That was all that could be done for her burial. All the women in the camp were afraid to prepare the body, for fear they would catch the cholera from her. This young girl and I were not afraid to take care of the body. We were only 16-years old but brave in that case. [Sarah Southworth was then past 17.] We started in June and were four months on our journey before we reached Salt Lake Valley. About two months after Abby died I married Daniel Mark Burbank on the plains [September 10 1852]. Captain Walker of another company that camped by us married us one evening. The bugle called the called the camps and they came together to witness our marriage. We had cedar torch lights instead of candles. It was by Green River in September. There I mothered four children that were sick with scarlet fever. My husband and I had great trouble with sickness the rest of the way. [At this time his oldest child was about eight years old and his youngest was two years old.] We also had a number of oxen die and had to stop to get cows instead of oxen. A hundred Indians took Daniel M. Burbank a prisoner. We thought he would be killed but the chief gave him up to us if we would give them flour, sugar, and coffee. We rejoiced when we saw the Captain alive. He had gone to hunt a buffalo that he had spied through a spy glass. He had killed the buffalos before when hunting for a camping place. The poor cows furnished us with milk or we would have suffered for a drink as the water was so bad for hundreds of miles. We had to grind parched corn in coffee mills to eat with our milk to save our flour. We would eat it in milk at night. (We parched a sack full before we left home. I stood over a fire-place and helped mother parch it.) The oxen stampeded and ran away with the wagons toward the river. One woman was killed. I jumped out of the wagon with mother’s baby and came nearly being killed. It rained so hard that we had to sit up and hold the covers on all night. That happened many times. When fording streams, we could just see the oxen’s backs and horns and sure thought our wagons would go under, but we got out alive by the help of the Lord. Now I will tell you where I was baptized. In Nauvoo, Illinois in the Mississippi River, just below Joseph Smith’s house, when I was eight years old. Elder Lorin Farr confirmed me on the banks of the Mississippi river and Elder Chancey West baptized me. Then when we got into the valley of Springville all the camp had to be baptized. That was the order of President Brigham Young. He said this was done that all our sins might be washed away after our long tired journey to Salt Lake. When I was fifteen years of age I went to a braiding school to learn to braid straw hats. I sewed them for one dollar apiece. After I got married I made hats for all my children and for many others for years and sold them. I learned to make hats in Nauvoo and made and sold hats on the steam-boats that were on the Mississippi River. Many people were baptized in the Mississippi River for their dead relatives. My parents did it for their relatives. That was the order from the Prophet Joseph Smith. The Lord told him to have it done this way until they could build a Temple. Many did it over again in the Nauvoo Temple when a few rooms were finished. They had to hurry and get all the Saints thru the Temple for the mob said they would burn the Temple down. One night they got shavings and matches and were going to set fire to it when our guard came onto them with guns and saved it that time. Not long after that they burned it to the ground. They went into people’s houses and dragged out men, women and children and burned their houses and left them in the streets. A young man went to fight them with his gun to save his widowed mother. While he was gone they went in and killed his sick mother. He had to hide until they went away then he secured help and buried his mother. While he was gone they stole his clothes and bedding and burned his house. That was the way they did to scores of people. They drove them across the river in the night in leaky boats. This happened in the beautiful city Nauvoo. I used to go past the Temple and watch the men working on it. After the Temple was finished the Saints held meeting in it for a short time. Men worked on the Temple with nothing to eat but corn bread and bacon, then to see it burned to the ground after working so long was a trial. The mob took the Prophet and his brother, Hyrum, and killed them in Carthage jail. They said if the Prophet was killed that would put an end to Mormonism. He was an innocent Prophet that the Lord brought forth to lead His people in this last dispensation. After the Prophet’s death, the Lord made known to Brigham Young that he was to be our leader. When Brigham was speaking to the Saints his voice sounded like Joseph’s voice and he looked like Joseph, then the Saints knew he was our Prophet, Seer and Revelator. I bear my testimony that he was a Prophet of God, raised up to lead the people in these last days. When Joseph and Hyrum were brought from Carthage dead, my parents went and saw them lying in their bloody clothes in Joseph’s place. People went there by the thousands. My parents went to their funeral. It was a mock-funeral to fool the mob. Boxes were filled with sand because of threats that their bodies would be dug up. The city was in great mourning, and many cried saying, “What will we do for our great Prophet is gone.” The Lord raised up another in the person of Brigham Young. My husband, Daniel M. Burbank, used to guard the prophet’s house, and took him out in the country and hid him away from the mob. He, the prophet, dressed himself in his mother’s old dress and bonnet and took her cane and basket, bent over, and walked past the mob and got away. My husband guarded the prophet just before he was taken to Carthage where he was put in jail. Hyrum was holding the door when the mob fired the bullet through it striking him. He fell to the floor exclaiming, "I am a dead man.” Joseph was shot as he was about to leap from the window. They took him and set him up by a well. John Taylor was shot in his hip and hand. A bullet struck his watch that hung over his heart and that saved his life. The doctor took the bullet out of his wounds. Willard Richards crawled under the bed and saved his life. When Emma, the Prophet’s wife, was given up to die by the doctor, he called Daniel Mark Burbank to come and see her. Brother Burbank said, “I believe I can cure her.” She said he went to the store and got medicine and stayed two nights and days and cured her. Then the Prophet told Brother Burbank to gather all his books together and to tend the ladies in confinement. The knowledge that Daniel M. Burbank had was received in a hospital in St. Louis. The prophet said that was his mission on earth, to attend the sick. His blessing said the same. My blessing also said I came to this earth to attend the sick. I have delivered over 900 women. I have had many great testimonies in this Church, in caring for the sick. I have prayed for my parents when they were very sick and they have recovered. When I have been in confinement cases the Lord has blessed me in delivering women when they were in a very serious condition. Forty years ago [about 1884], when President Merrill was president of the Logan Temple, he gave me a great blessing while I was there with my husband having our second endowments. He commanded me to go forth and take care of the sick. I was very poorly at that time. I did not think it would be possible to do it but in three weeks I was able to take care of my daughter-in-law in confinement. Brother Merrill gave me this blessing never having seen me before and did not know that I had been practicing delivering women for years. It is evident that this blessing was inspired and he also said that I would live long on the earth and be a queen over queens in the eternal worlds and said many more great things that I cannot remember at this time. I had to be helped into the Temple but walked out without help. This has always been a strong testimony to me. I want to write these things that I have seen and heard for my children and grand-children to read in years to come. It will be interesting to them when I have passed away. I hope they will be interested and enjoy this as much as I have enjoyed writing it. Brother Burbank and I have at the present time 300 children—grandchildren—great grandchildren—and 2nd great grandchildren all combined. [The end of Sarah’s personal history.] Sarah Zurviah Southworth Burbank died, 27 May 1927, at Deweyville, Utah, and was buried, 29 May 1927, in the Brigham City Cemetery. Daniel Mark Burbank received his endowment in the temple at Nauvoo, January 16 1846, and on the 17th of the same month was sealed to Lydia VanBlaricom (deceased) and Abigail Blodgett by Heber C. Kimball. Brigham Young being present. Sarah Zurviah Southworth was sealed to him in the Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Utah, by Heber C. Kimball, July 16th 1864. Short History: Born in Bastard, Leeds, Ontario, Canada 1835; Canton, New York winter 1837-38; passed by Kirtland, Ohio to Far West, Missouri 1838; Nauvoo 1839-1846; Mt. Pisgah winter 1846; Kanesville and North 1846-1852; left Elk Horn, Nebraska to the west 1852; married South Pass, Fremont, Wyoming 10 September 1852; Springville, Utah October 1852-spring 1853; Grantsville, Utah April 1853-June 1863; Brigham City 1863 until death 1927. Her husband died when he was 79 years old so she would have been 59 in 1894. Her son Brigham’s wife, Elizabeth Pett Burbank, said that at that time Sarah’s youngest sons came to live with her so that Sarah could spend all her time as a midwife. In the last years of her life she lived around with her children. She was 92 years old when he passed away. Story from her seventh child, Sarah Burbank: Some of my fondest memories are of my parents gathering us all around the old-fashioned fireplace telling us about the Prophet Joseph Smith. Father tells what a fine looking man the prophet was as he stood on the platform in his white suit and black hat and said “I’m going like a lamb to the slaughter,” and how the prophet told the Saints to go to the Rocky Mountains, and how father was a guard to the Prophet Joseph smith during the time of the persecution of the Prophet. Also, when Father would meet the Prophet they would both roll their fists at each other and the Prophet would say, “Who is the best man?” My mother tells of her passing the Prophet’s store on her way to school. The Prophet would ask if she had enough lunch in her bucket for him too, and she would say, “I’m afraid not for the two of us.” They he would say, “How about giving me one of your curls them?” He answer would be, “You’ll have to ask Mother.” (As Grandmother was telling me these faith-promoting incidents the tears streamed from her eyes.) [Note: Margrette Marble Romer said they called her “Curly Grandma.”] My father Daniel Burbank had light brown hair. He was tall and well built, and his nickname was Burr. My mother Sarah Southworth was the same build as myself [medium build.] She had brown hair and brown eyes. Obituary: Brigham City, May 30. Impressive funeral services were held in the Third ward chapel Sunday for Mrs. Serah S. Burbank, pioneer, who died Friday at her home in Deweyville. Bishop J. Frank Bowring officiated. Three pioneer selections were given by the choir. The Misses Daisy and Sevena Madison sang “Zion, City of Our God.” Speakers were John D. Peters, J. E. Dewey, of Deweyville; Elder Rawlins, of Lewiston; President S. Norman Lee, Jesse W. Hoopes and Bishop Bowring. Wm. Jepsen gave the invocation and W. C. Horsley the benediction. David Reese dedicated the grave. Interment was in the Brigham City cemetery. (Ogden Standard Examiner, 30 May 1927.) Child of Daniel Mark Burbank and first wife, Lydia VanBlaricom: 1.Augustus Ripley Burbank. B. 12 Jan 1838, Naples, Scott, Illinois; d. 28 Sep 1838, Naples, age 8 m., 16 d. Children of Daniel Mark Burbank and second wife, Abigail Blodgett: 1.Joseph Smith Burbank, b. 13 July 1842, Nauvoo; d. 6 July 1848, near Winter Quarters (ran over by wagon.) 2.Mary Lydia Burbank, b. 30 Jan 1844, Alton, Madison, Ill. 3.Daniel Mark Burbank, Jr., b. 10 Jun 1846, Farmington, Iowa. 4.Abigail Burbank, b. 14 Aug 1848, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 5.Laura Burbank, b. 4 May 1850, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Children of Daniel Mark Burbank and third wife Sarah Zurviah Southworth: 1.George Southworth Burbank, b. 26 July 1853, Grantsville; md. Electa Gardner Black, 13 May 1913; d. 20 Nov 1933. 2.BRIGHAM SOUTHWORTH BURBANK was born 6 September 1855, in Grantsville, Tooele, Utah, to Daniel Mark Burbank (1814-1894) and Sarah Zurviah Southworth (1835-1927.) He married Mary Elizabeth Pett, 11 October 1875, in the SL Endowment House. Brigham Southworth Burbank died 30 August 1943, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, at age 88. 3.Olive Southworth Burbank, b. 28 April 1857, Grantsville; md. George Frederick Hamson, 13 Apr 1874, Grantsville; d. 15 Dec 1922. 4.Deseret Southworth Burbank, b. 23 July 1859, Grantsville; md. Charles Peter Hauck, 10 Apr 1876; d. 28 Feb 1943. 5.John Southworth Burbank, b. 10 Ma 1861, Grantsville; d. 8 July 1864. Child. 6.Charles Southworth Burbank, b. 1 Nov 1863, Brigham City; md. Phoebe Day, 9 Apr 1888; d. 12 May 1940. 7.Sarah Southworth Burbank, b. 12 July 1866, Brigham City; md. George Rolland Williams, 25 Oct 1883; d. 11 Dec 1957. 8.Loisa Southworth Burbank, twin, b. 10 Jan 1869, Brigham City; d. 8 May 1874. Child, age 5. 9.Elisa Southworth Burbank, twin, b. 10 Jan 1869, Brigham City; md. Andrew Madsen, 14 Dec 1887; d. 9 May 1954. 10.Alonza Southworth Burbank, b. 17 May 1871, Brigham City; d. 4 June 1871. Child, 2 weeks old. 11.James Southworth Burbank, b. 14 Dec 1872, Brigham City; md. Louise Serille Loveland, 1 Oct 1894; d. 15 Aug 1949. 12.Rose Southworth Burbank, b. 18 June 1875, Brigham City; d. 29 June 1876. Child, 1 year old. 13.Chester Southworth Burbank, b. 1 June 1877, Brigham City; md. Janie Day, 6 Dec 1898; d. 16 Nov 1949. + 9. BRIGHAM SOUTHWORTH BURBANK (1855-1943, age 88) MARY ELIZABETH PETT (1856-1951, age 95) Brigham Southworth Burbank & Mary Elizabeth Pett To understand the mission in life of the saints who lived in the period of history this life story covers, I (B. Glen Marble) have here the call that the Prophet Brigham Young was making. Speaking of great and good men President Young said: “Love of Christ, of family and friends, this was the corner stone upon which they built, under the manifold expressions of homes and farms, cities and states, communities and commonwealths. “Instead of hunting gold, let every man go to work at raising wheat, oats, barley, corn and vegetables, fruits in abundance, that there may be plenty in the land…. “The linking up of Utah with the outside world by steel rails was a favorite dream of Brigham Young.” (“Brigham Young,” by Sousa Young Gates.) BRIGHAM SOUTHWORTH BURBANK. Brigham S. Burbank was named after Brigham Young. He was born 6 September 1855, in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah, in a log cabin built inside Grants Fort, Grantsville. He was the second child of Daniel Mark Burbank (1814-1894) and Sarah Zurviah Southworth Burbank (1835-1927.) They had laid down all they had of worldly goods to serve their Savior by listening to the advice of the Prophets Joseph Smith and Brigham Young. His parents crossed the plains by ox teams to Utah Territory in 1852. Brigham Young advised them to go to Springville in Utah County, Utah. Because of Indian troubles, in the spring of 1853 they moved to Grant’s Fort, Grantsville. He helped to finish the Fort, and Build a long cabin inside. “When I was seven years old (1862) my parents moved from Grantsville to Brigham City where my Grandfather and Grandmother Southworth were living. My grandfather, Chester Southworth, was a leather tanner and produced some of the finest leather in Utah. “My schooling was very limited as the Burbank family was large and money scarce. We didn’t have free education then as they do now, but were required to pay a tuition fee. I attended school at brief intervals, first at the home of Mrs. Box and later in the Courthouse. The old east room where we held school and dances is still standing. An addition was put on when the county needed a larger courthouse, and the school was moved. But it was there and later at Jeppa’s barn down on South Main where we enjoyed many a dance to the music of those good old fiddlers.” “One thing in those days we were all in the same class—in fact, there was just one class. From the time I was sixteen I always worked at jobs away from home, on the railroad or in the logging camps and such. All we knew was work and plenty of it. In the days of the co-op I worked for some time in the hills near Brigham at logging, cutting and cording red pine from which the bark was removed and used by the tannery. “Then I went to freighting from Corrine, Utah, to Elko, Nevada, and from there to Eureka, California. The boss I worked for owned eight outfits and each outfit boasted eight yoke of oxen. This was quite an experience, and it was just like driving a herd of cattle. I may be tall of stature, but I couldn’t see over the deep feed box. We had to do our own cooking, and we camped out at nights. You might say it would be just like going camping nowadays, maybe so, but we walked all the way. I remember one night the rain poured down in torrents. We couldn’t sleep under the wagon because the road was a running stream of water, so the only available place left was on the hounds of the wagon (under the wagon connected to the tongue of the wagon), and these didn’t make what you would call a very comfortable bed. “It was after returning from one of these trips that I attended a meeting at the Old Bowery in Salt Lake City where Brigham Young gave his last public address. This is now a beautiful park with a fitting monument there in honor of this great colonizer and pioneer leader. “When 18 years old I drove a three-wagon train of eight yoke of oxen from Corrine, Utah, to Elko, Nevada, to Eureka, California, carrying freight supplies. I hauled timber for the first bridge built in the territory (probably meant Northern Utah) with a team of oxen. “I helped build the old narrow gauge railroad as a spiker. I worked from Perry to Logan on this railroad and again later to Franklin, Idaho. I was with the company when the Golden Spike was driven and well remember the big celebration at that time. I later helped build the railroad through American Fork Canyon. In Brigham City he met and fell in love with the beautiful Mary Elizabeth Pett. She was born in a little frontier town called Kanesville, Iowa. Mary crossed the plains to Utah Territory in her mother’s arms as a baby of a few months old. Her parents moved south during the Johnston’s Army troubles. At Big Cottonwood her mother, Mary Sheler Pett, died 18 May 1858, and her twin daughters at birth. This left Mary Sheler’s husband with two small children Henry Herbert about 7 and Mary Elizabeth two years old. Her uncle John Pett took care of the children until her father again married. “I (20) was married to Mary Elizabeth Pett (19) on October 12 1875, by Daniel H. Wells, in the Old Endowment House, in Salt Lake City. We made the trip in a covered wagon and camped in the tithing yard when we reached our destination. “We made our home in Brigham City, and I worked at Willard Canyon hauling iron ore out with ox teams and loaded it on rail cars at Willard. About two years later we moved to Deweyville, Utah, where we cleared off the sagebrush and made our home for 45 years or more. Our first home was not a mansion, but rather a modest log home, with logs hauled from the canyon. While there we also homesteaded 160 acres of land in Pocatello Valley.” He was a farmer. From this modest beginning they built up a posterity and home that could be bettered by few pioneers. The canal didn’t bring water to them until several years later so any crops grown would have had to be raised without it. They lived in Deweyville on the same farm until 1921 where the rest of the family was born; eight boys and one girl, the oldest boy being born in Brigham. He raised grain and sugar beets and some alfalfa. He planted a fine orchard that supplied fruit to his children and relatives for many years. When their oldest, Martello, was a young man, they each homesteaded 160 acres in Pocatello Valley where they dry farmed in the summer. Some of the younger boys would go out and batch it while they were plowing and drilling the grain and on the day of rest (Sunday), they rode wild steers for recreation. Many of them obtained work on the Beaver Dam and a canal bringing water t Deweyville was built. In 1921 they sold the farm and bought a home in Brigham City where they lived the rest of their lives. On 12 October 1940 they celebrated their 65th Wedding Anniversary. Grandson Brigham Glen Marble said, “I had the run of the home and the outdoor yard as if it were my home. I had two homes, loving parents at home and two loving grandparents only 200 yards away. I visited there often until my grandparents moved to Brigham City. There was a large log granary in which was kept the year’s supply of grain. Attached to it on the east was a long shed for buggies and machinery. In the rear of that was a chicken coop and run. I played in the buggies taking imaginary trips in them. Gravel had been hauled in so the yard was somewhat free from mud from the farm house to the farm outbuildings. The barn housed several large draft animals and some smaller buggy horses. There was a large stallion which was very frightening. Horses pulled the machinery and the buggies and wagons. Some were available for riding. My mother [Eva Burbank Marble] said she had a horse that she rode side-saddle to parties, etc. when she was young. “There were several milk cows, all milked by hand, and several beef cattle so that plenty of the basic foods they produced were available. “I remember the wood pile the men folks cut wood at and piled high in the large wood box by the black iron stove. There was a pump nearby for the house and animals. There were tall popular trees around the home to keep it cool. Some were planted along the road between my home and Grandpa’s. “When I was old enough I thinned a small amount of sugar beets. Enough to know that they were part of the crop rotation system that grandpa followed. “Spring and fall the fields were fertilized. Grandpa was a good farm manager. He had quite a large fruit orchard that produced excellent fruit. I sampled it as I roamed around those summer days and after school fall and spring. I picked rhubarb, gooseberries, and currants. There were peas, tomatoes, and other vegetables between the large lawn and the farm outbuildings. “Grandpa was always busy. He showed integrity, common honesty and business fair dealing. He showed love and respect for his wife and family. To me he had dignity, dependability, and benevolence. As each of his family were married he gave them seven acres of his homestead. They took along animals they had raised at home so they had a start in life. “There was one saying that he passed on to me I have kept in mind. He said, ‘Be careful when people owe you money because if you don’t collect you will lose your friends and your money.’ There was never any question about his meeting his obligations. He owed no man.” Memories of granddaughter Margrette Marble Romer: “I, Margrette Marble Romer, remember Grandma and Grandpa Burbank. As always you were welcome in their home. I remember Peach Days at Brigham City. Sometimes Mother (Evaline) would let me stay overnight. This was really a big thing. One Peach Day I won a cupie doll with feathers all around it. Very exciting. Grandma would always give you a nickel or dime from her little black coin purse and you could walk up town and buy crayon or something special, not just candy. She liked cowboy shows and if she could get you to take her, boy, that was really nice. “In later years she would come to my home in Elwood, Utah, and enjoy her great grandkids. Lola played the piano, and she wouldn’t let her quit. She would hum along even though she didn’t know the pieces. I remember Mother saying she had a beautiful alto voice and sang in the Choir at Church. “The thing I remember about Grandpa Burbank was his mustache. It was a handle bar thing, and when he drank he would then sip on each side then wipe with a napkin. This made quite a noise and was different for me. “The last year of his life I can remember Grandma Burbank not letting us pick the lower branches from the big cherry tree. She would pick a handful every day, and he would try and eat them, even when they were dried up. As I remember it was cancer of the throat, and he couldn’t eat too well. “Linda Romer was born the evening before Grandpa died, and I was unable to go to the funeral, but I had me my number two little girl. “Grandma and Grandpa took me out to Pocatello Valley one Sunday when I was about ten years old. Dad had bought a dry farm out there. We went in a Ford that had glass windows all around it. Grandpa never slowed down. He turned corners as fast as he went straight. He frightened me to death (35 miles per hour.)” Brigham Southworth Burbank died 30 August 1943, at his home in Brigham City, Utah. He was buried in Deweyville, Utah Cemetery, 2 September 1943. He was almost 88 years old. The death certificate states that Dr. W. R. Merrell attended him from May 20, 1943 to August 30, 1943, and had Chronic Myocarditis. (Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium, the middle layer of the heart wall. Myocarditis is usually caused by a viral infection.) OBITUARY: Brigham S. Burbank. BRIGHAM CITY—Brigham S. Burbank, 88 Box Elder pioneer, died at his home, 33 North Third West, Monday [Aug. 30], at 7:45 p.m. following a year’s illness. Mr. Burbank was born September 6 1855, at Grantsville, to Daniel Marcus and Sarah Zurviah Southworth Burbank. The family came to Brigham City when Mr. Burbank was seven years old. As a young man he worked in the hills as a logger; also as a spiker on early-day railroad lines. He was present at the driving of the golden spike at Promontory Station on May 6 1869 in observance of completion of the first transcontinental railroad. On 12 October 1979 [11 October 1875 is correct], Mr. Burbank married Mary Elizabeth Pett in the L.D.S. Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Following their marriage the couple made their home in Brigham City for two years, after which the family moved to Deweyville where Mr. Burbank purchase rough land and established a farm. He was an active member of the L.D.S. church and served as an elder and as a ward teacher and while in Deweyville baptized many children into the church. In 1921 he, with his wife, returned to Brigham City, where Mr. Burbank has resided. Surviving besides his widow are the following sons and daughter: Brigham M. Burbank, Mapleton, Idaho; Mrs. S. A. Marble, Tremonton; Henry L. Burbank, San Francisco, California; Augustus R. Burbank, Deweyville; Victor Burbank, Ogden; also four brothers and sisters: Elisa S. Madsen, Honeyville; Sarah S. Williams, Brigham City; James S. Burbank, Tremonton; Chester S. Burbank, Richmond; also 35 grandchildren and 46 great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be conducted Thursday at two p.m. in the Brigham City Third L.D.S. ward chapel by Bishop William H. Stayner. Friends may call at the family home Wednesday evening and Thursday until time of services. Burial will be in the Deweyville cemetery, directed by the Harold B. Felt Funeral Home. MARY ELIZABETH PETT. James Pett and Mary Sheler joined the Mormons in Kineton, England, in 1851. When they were coming to Utah via New Orleans, they stopped in Kanesville, Potawatomie County, Iowa, for a few years. There a baby daughter they named Mary Elizabeth was born to them 14 March 1856. When she was two or three months old they took her to Utah where they settled in Perry, Utah. In the spring of 1858 the United States Army was on its way to Salt Lake City. President Brigham Young called for all Church members to move south to Utah valley. James Pett, his wife Mary, son Henry, and daughter Mary Elizabeth traveled from Brigham City, Utah, to Provo, Utah. While moving south they had gone as far as South Cottonwood when Mary (35) was taken sick and died there while having twin girls (Ann and Jane) who also died on that day 17 or 18 May 1858. The father and son took their bodies back to Salt Lake City and buried them in the cemetery there. They continued on to Provo and remained there several weeks and finally President Buchanan issued an Amnesty Proclamation, and they returned home to Brigham City, Utah, in the summer of 1858. At the age of two years she and her brother, James, age seven, went to live with their uncle John Pett. They lived there four years. While Lizzie was still a child, about five, her father married Elizabeth Jane Brandon. Then Lizzie, as she was called most of her life, lived with her father and step-mother. By this time she was big enough to be a big help in raising her half-brothers and half-sisters that came into the family. When they first came to Utah the Pett’s moved to Three Miles Creek (Perry, Utah.) Her father farmed there for a short time then moved to Brigham City where he became an architect and builder. Lizzie told her grandchildren proudly of how when the roof had blown off the top of the courthouse twice that President Snow wanted her father to fix it more securely. He did that successfully without nails. Iva Lou Nebeker tells in “True Pioneer Stories” of Lizzie saying, “When I was a little girl we wore big, long full dresses to school, with material enough in one to make several of the modern frocks. I certainly prefer the modern ones. When I think of the bustle we wore, I really have to stop and laugh. We usually attended school at the home of the teacher and often played more than we worked. I remember one lady teacher who loved to have the girls comb her long tresses. On these occasions we played ‘tit-tat-toe’ on our slates. With those keen eyes of hers she usually managed to catch us--that meant holding out our hands for the ruler. “In the fall while camping out on the Bear River we children enjoyed a game of hunting duck eggs when going for the cows. My older brother always succeeded in getting the most eggs, so this time I shouted out my claim on the next nest. ‘All right,’ retorted brother Hen, ‘your nest but my eggs.’ Another happy childhood experience was when the Indians came to our placed and traded strings of white beads for some bread. We surely thought those beads were something grand and prided ourselves in wearing them. “When I grew older I worked as a weaver at the woolen mills for a number of years where my father was the mill superintendent. I joined the Sunday school choir at the age of twelve. One time we all dressed in our Sunday best and went to Three Mile Creek to meet Brigham Young and bid him welcome on one of his visits to Brigham City. I also taught classes in Sunday school for several years. “We did have a lot of fun in those early days. I met Brigham Burbank and attended the dances with him. They were held in the courthouse, and we danced to the tunes of the merry fiddler. Later we secured a team and traveled to Salt Lake City where we were married on October 12 1875, in the Endowment House by Daniel H. Wells.” In an interview by Mrs. Iva Lou Nebeker she said, “After our first son was born in Brigham City we moved to Deweyville to make our home, buying some land there. Clearing the sage brush we built a log house and commenced dry farming; a difficult task when there were only two light-work animals to help for the first few years. During this time I also had to take full responsibility of caring for the family while my husband was away part of the time. He finally succeeded in securing enough capital to obtain equipment enough to start out as a farmer. “Many times while I was alone Indians appeared at the kitchen window knowing they could frighten me and get food handed out to them. One time an Indian chased the dog around the house because it barked at him. I saw what was going on and let the dog in one jump ahead of the Indian. Mr. Indian pounded on the door and shouted loudly but had to leave in an angry mood. “Our home was always a center for relatives to meet on their way to get fruit at Brigham City or on business. The crowd was never too large that the kitchen couldn’t provide ample food or a room found for a night’s rest.” Her grandson, Glen Marble, writes: “There was never was a harsh word or a contentious feeling in that home. All seemed to be willing workers and thoughtful of each other’s needs. There seemed to be a loving understanding between Grandpa and Grandma. There was never any language that was wrong by them. I lived a few hundred yards away and was often there at meal time. I ate with the rest without question, and if I were hungry between meals I helped myself to a piece of Grandma’s good homemade bread with her butter and preserves. I played around without noticing if I were at either my home or Grandmother’s. Grandmother probably spoiled me as grandmother’s sometimes do. She was very independent with her buggy and old ‘Millie’ as the modern housewife is with her car. “She would ask the menfolk to hitch up her horse on the buggy when she wanted to go to town or church. My mother would often go along. I would sit in the compartment back of the seat and sometimes slip out and run behind. I had a few eggs to trade for some gum or sweets at the Buckwalter’s store up by the railroad in Deweyville.” Article in the Ogden Standard Examiner, Ogden, Utah, July 5, 1941 “True Pioneer Stories” Going shopping or attending her church duties in the days before the advent of the automobile Mary Elizabeth Burbank was as independent with her buggy and old “Millie” as the modern young housewife is with her car; especially if that car happens to have worn out tires, writes Iva Lou Nebeker, who submitted this sketch. “No need to worry then about a flat or running out of gas” says Mrs. Burbank with a smile. She celebrated her eighty-sixth birthday on March 14 and still greets her many friends with the cheery optimism of youth. Mrs. Burbank was born in Potawatama County and came across the plains with her parents when a baby of two or three months. They settled in Salt Lake City [then Perry, Box Elder County]. Moving south at the time of Johnston’s army her mother and twin babies died at Big Cottonwood when Mrs. Burbank was only two years old. She and her brother, Henry, lived with their uncle, John Pett, for four years. At that time her father married again and the family moved to Perry. Likes Modern Dress “My father was an architect and builder,” says Mrs. Burbank. “For the second time the roof had blown off the courthouse in Brigham City and President Snow sent for us to move there, asking my father to fix that roof more securely. This he accomplished successfully without using any nails on the job. “When I was a girl wore big, long, full dresses to school, with material enough in one to make several of the modern frocks. I certainly prefer the modern ones. When I think of the bustles we wore, I really have to stop and laugh. “We usually attended school at the home of the teacher and often played more than we worked. I remember one lady teacher who loved to have the girls comb her long tresses. On these occasions we played ‘tit-tat-toe’ on our slates. With those keen eyes of hers, she usually managed to catch. That meant holding out our hands for the ruler. “In the fall while camping out on the Bear River we children enjoyed a game of hunting duck eggs when going for the cows. My older brother always succeeded in getting the most eggs, so this time I shouted out my claim on the next nest. ‘All right,’ retorted brother Hen, “your nest, but my eggs!’ Another happy childhood experience was when the Indians came to our place and traded strings of white beads for some bread. We surely thought those beads were something grand and prided ourselves in wearing them. Working as a Weaver “When I grew older I worked as a weaver at the woolen mills for a number of years where my father was the mill superintendent. I joined the Sunday school choir at the age of twelve. One time we all dressed in our Sunday best and went to Three Mile Creek to meet Brigham Young and bid him welcome on one of his visits to Brigham City. I also taught classes in Sunday school for several years. “We did have a lot of fun and good times in those early days. I met Brigham Burbank and attended the dances with him. They were held in the courthouse and we danced to the tunes of the merry fiddler. Later we secured a team and traveled to Salt Lake City, where we were married on October 12 1875, in the Endowment house by Daniel H. Wells. “After our first son was born in Brigham City we moved to Deweyville to make our home, buying some land there. Clearing the sage brush, we built a log house and commenced dry farming: a difficult task when there were no work animals to help for the first few ears. During this time I also had to take the full responsibility of caring for the family while my husband was away part of the time. He finally succeeded in securing enough capital to obtain equipment enough to start out as a farmer. “Many times while I was alone Indians appeared at the kitchen window, knowing they could frighten me and get food handed out to them. One time an Indian chased the dog around the house because it barked at him. I saw what was going on and let the dog in one jump ahead of the Indian. Mr. Indian pounded on the door and shouted loudly but had to leave in an angry mood. “Our home was always a center for relatives to meet on their way to Brigham City to get fruit or on business. The crowd was never too large that the kitchen couldn’t provide ample food or a room found for a night’s rest.” Every Saturday Grandma Burbank baked pies and cakes and her pantry was always replenished. She had a great love for all her grandchildren and tried to treat them all alike. When her grandchildren came over she would bring out a pie or cake, and instead of cutting it herself, she would give one of them a knife and say: “Now divide it up evenly or Grandma won’t like you.” You may be sure we wanted Grandma to like us, and we would try out best to divide it evenly. Relief Society Worker Mrs. Burbank worked as first counselor in the Deweyville Relief Society for a number of years and belongs to the Daughters of Utah Pioneers. In 1921 she and her husband returned to Brigham City to make their home. They were the parents of nine children, six of whom are living: Brigham Martello Burbank, Mapleton, Idaho; James D. Burbank, Gridley, California; Henry Burbank, San Francisco; Augustus R. and Victor B. Burbank, Deweyville, Utah; and Mary Evaline Marble, Tremonton. End of Life: After her husband, Brigham Southworth Burbank, died in 1943, Mary Elizabeth lived in the old home in Brigham and a woman was hired to help her. After this woman married and moved out, they couldn’t get anyone to stay with her; so the home was sold and she was taken to a rest home in Ogden. A few years later, she fell out of bed and broke her hip from which she never recovered. Mary Elizabeth Pett Burbank (age 95) passed away 19 April 1951, in Ogden, Weber, Utah, and was buried by the side of her husband in the Deweyville, Utah Cemetery, 21April 1951. OBITUARY: Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, April 18, 1951 “Mary E. P. Burbank Dies at 95 in Brigham City” Brigham City—Mary Elizabeth Pett Burbank, 95, widow of Brigham S. Burbank, long-time Brigham City resident, died today at seven-thirty a.m. in Ogden. [April 18, 1951 from broken hip.] Mrs. Burbank was born at Kanesville, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, a daughter of James and Mary Sheler Pett. She came to Utah with her parents, members of the L.D.S. church, crossing the plains when she was two months old. The family settled in Perry, Box Elder County. She was married to Mr. Burbank on October 12 1875, in the Salt Lake L.D.S. endowment house. The couple lived in Brigham City for a short time, later moving to Deweyville, Box Elder County. Thirty years ago they came to Brigham City. Mr. Burbank died eight years ago. She was an active member of the L.D.S. church and served in the presidency and was a block teacher of her ward Relief Society. She was also an active choir member. Surviving are the following sons and daughters: Mart Burbank, Brigham City; Mrs. Eva Marble, Tremonton; Henry L. Burbank, San Francisco, California; August R. Burbank, Deweyville, and Victor Burbank, Ogden; also 34 grandchildren and 78 great-grandchildren. Services will be conducted Saturday at one p.m. in the LDS Deweyville ward chapel. Friends may call at the Harold B. Felt funeral home here tomorrow evening and Saturday morning; also at the chapel immediately prior to services. Interment will be in the Deweyville cemetery. Children of Brigham Southworth Burbank and Mary Elizabeth Pett: 1.Brigham Martello Burbank, b. 19 Aug 1876, Brigham City; md. (1) Electa Belettie Gardner, 21 Dec 1899; (2) Leona Rose Yeates 18 Jan 1954; d. 6 Feb 1974. 2.James Daniel Burbank, b. 2 Jan 1879, Deweyville; md. Lydia Ann Stokes, 25 Oct 1900; d. 1 June 1942. 3.MARY EVALINE BURBANK was born 1 August 1881, in Deweyville, Utah, to Brigham Southworth Burbank (1855-1943) and Mary Elizabeth Pett (1856-1951.) She married Silas Andrew Marble 14 September 1904, in Brigham City, Utah. They were sealed 20 April 1917, in the Logan Temple. Mary Evaline Burbank passed away 31 December 1970, Logan, Cache, Utah, after breaking her hip, age 89. 4.Henry Lyman Burbank, b. 6 Apr 1884, Deweyville; md. (1) Emily Alice Jones, 13 May 1903; (2) Ester Johnson; (3) Alice Feb, 1957; (4) Ethel, 1960; Elizabeth Housley Wood, 1962; d. 19 August 1971. 5.George Dennis Burbank, b. 13 Aug 1886, Deweyville; d. 19 Jul 1903. Child. (Died of rheumatic fever, age 6.) 6.Alvaro Burbank, b. 27 Mar 1890, Deweyville; d. 17 June 1906. (After swimming in the hot springs [Crystal Springs], caught cold which developed into pneumonia, and died, age 18.) 7.Oliver Burbank, b. 11 Sep 1892, Deweyville; d. 13 Feb 1899. Child. (Died of spinal meningitis, age 7.) 8.Augustus Ripley Burbank, b. 9 July 1895, Deweyville; md. Lettie Lish, 20 Sep 1916; d. 4 January 1985. 9.Victor Burbank, b. 21 Oct 1898, Deweyville; md. (1) Nellie Mary Cook, 10 Sep 1918; (2) Emma Matilda Ault Loveland, 6 Sep 1967; d. 5 May 1983. + SILAS ANDREW MARBLE (1883-1961, age 79) 10. MARY EVALINE BURBANK (1881-1970, age 89) This is a picture of Grandma Evaline and Grandpa Silas Marble outside of their Tremonton, Utah, home. There are more formal pictures, but this picture is how I remember them. Merle Romer (granddaughter) SILAS ANDREW MARBLE was born 17 April 1883, in the town of Nephi, Juab, Utah, to Hyrum Austin Marble and . He was named “Silas” after his Uncle Silas who was killed by the anti-Mormon mobs in Nauvoo, and Andrew from his mother’s side of the family from Denmark. His father was Hyrum Austin Marble (1841-1912) and his mother was Melinda Andersen (1852-1930.) He settled in Deweyville, Utah, where his uncle Henry Lyman Marble lived. He married Mary Evaline Burbank, 14 September 1904, Brigham City, Utah. Their family was sealed in the Logan Temple, 27 April 1917. Silas Andrew Marble died 17 March 1961, in Pleasant Grove, Utah, on their way home from a winter in Arizona, at age 79. (See his longer history with the Marble histories.) MARY EVALINE BURBANK was born 1 August 1881, in Deweyville, Utah, to Brigham Southworth Burbank (1855-1943) and Mary Elizabeth Pett (1856-1951.) She married Silas Andrew Marble, 14 September 1904, in Brigham City, Utah. They were sealed 27 April 1917. Following is her life story as written by her: My Life Story By MARY EVALINE BURBANK MARBLE I was born August 1 1881, in Deweyville, Utah. I was the third child in a family of eight boys and one girl. My father was Brigham Southworth Burbank and my mother was Mary Elizabeth Pett (called “Elizabeth”) Burbank. My father's mother, Sarah Southworth Burbank, was an experienced midwife and attended mine as well as my brothers’ births. My elder brothers were Martello and James. The younger ones were Henry; George, who died of rheumatic fever at the age of 17; Alvaro, who died at 18 of pneumonia; Oliver dying at 6 of spinal meningitis; Augustus and Victor. Alvaro had been swimming at the Hot Springs, a few miles south of the homestead, when he caught cold which developed into pneumonia. He died in three days. When George knew he was about to die the family was greatly upset. I kept going back and forth in the room. The rest of the family was crying. George said, "I can't die until you quit crying." When we were calm and quiet he died quite suddenly. Our home was built of logs and built by father himself. He brought out the logs from the mountains east of it. At three weeks of age I had the whooping cough. One day I coughed so severely that every cough was thought to be my last breath. The neighbors were thrashing. Brother Dunn of Beaver Dam, who was working there, was called to bless me. That was how I received my name. At six I walked one and one-half miles to the old rock schoolhouse. I went there until I was in the eighth grade. I was out of school a big part of the time because of so much sickness and so many babies, I guess. In the winter Dad went off getting work wherever he could. In the summer the men folks always seemed to be in the fields which left mother alone with the children, a good deal. I was frightened many times by tramps and Indians because of this. One day our dog scared an Indian's horse near the house. The horse threw him off and the Indian chased the dog around the house. Mother let the dog in the house. The Indian beat upon the window but mother waved the flatiron she had been using at him. I was frightened and hid under the table. At fifteen I joined the Ward Choir and sang with them all my young life. I sang Alto. Addie Gardner played the organ. Her half-brother George Dewey led it. Larette Loveland and Nellie Fryer were like sisters to me during these years. In my early years many of the fields were being cleared of sage brush. I remember one field Brother R. C. Fryer was clearing that we played in. The sage was piled high and in the evening it was burned. We would play run-sheep-run. This was our favorite pleasure for quite a few years. Many of the evenings we had little dances in the front rooms of the homes. We danced square dances, waltzes, polkas, and schottische. We traveled on the horses with the boys in front, to these parties. A fiddle and chording on the organ was the music. We had cooked suppers with home-made ice cream and cake in great amounts. Everyone in our string-town went to Church. I went to things on my saddle horse using a side saddle. I was baptized in the old Dewey pond by Bishop John Dewey on my ninth birthday (1 August 1890.) I was the only one baptized that day because in those days people were only baptized on their birthdays. I was confirmed on the same day by the same person. I went out to work at eighteen and worked out until I was married. I bought some of mine and my mother’s clothes, and many of those of my younger brothers. At Bothwell I cooked and did housework for Alan Roche. This was while we had hay crews. In Deweyville Rodney Fryer had a store and Post Office where I worked. About this time my brothers Henry and Jim were returning from working in Bothwell when they saw a young mare for sale. They bought it and made it a present to me. She was gentle and a good mare I called her Millie. I rode her with my sidesaddle wherever I wanted to go. She had a colt and I made a present of it to my younger brother Gus. He trained it then traded it for a work animal when he needed a team to start out farming for himself. (From Augustus Burbank.) While I was working at the R. C. Fryer Hotel I met Silas to whom I was married three years later. We went to Brigham City and was married by Oleen N. Stohl [stake president] September 14, 1904. We were sealed in the Logan Temple April 17, 1917. Father gave us seven acres of dry land next to him. I had two cows and my horse. We purchased five acres more and the water from the canal company for all of it. Si built a long one-room home big enough for two rooms. One end had carpet on it and the other linoleum on the floor. The walls were lined with adobe and white-washed. My first four children were born here. Midwives attended me in this home for these children. They were LaRain, Glen, Vadis, and Hyrum. While they were young there were many times that I walked with them or carried them to the old Deweyville Chapel to attend the meetings that I wanted them to attend. The fifth child, Lola, was born in a larger log house about one-half mile north of the first. She lived about three weeks then died of pneumonia. [She was put outside the window to keep her body cold before the funeral.] The next year we lived in Northern California and Southern Oregon. We had thought to make our home there but didn’t like living there. Si was offered a position as foreman in Deweyville of a large irrigated and dry farm across the road from where I had lived most of my life. We returned to that place and lived there until 1932. The home there was a large two story and full basement brick constructed building with plenty of room for my family. Here, during these years, my youngest daughter Margrette was born. The four oldest went through High School and attended College during these years. In 1932 Si bought a dry farm in Pocatella Valley. We lived there in the summer and for a few winters in Si’s mother's home in Deweyville. This home had been vacated by her death a few years previous. One day, in this home, I was sewing and Si was out front of the house talking to Bishop Perry who had a load of hay. I was sitting by my sewing machine and trying to sew when something told me: "You have got a fire outside, you had better go outside and look." I thought: "Oh, I'll just keep on sewing.” I started to sew and I couldn't sew--I couldn't make my feet work so I went out and there in my back kitchen was a fire, smoke, and there was a little well out there and a bucket. I put the fire out and I come back in. I had dinner all ready for Si and Bishop Perry. He invited him into dinner, and I couldn't talk. I had to go right to bed for the whole afternoon. Until 1953 I spent most of my summers at the dry farm. In winters I lived in Tremonton in a comfortable home at 165 North Second East. Parts of most winters Si and I have been in Mesa, Arizona, or California. In March of 1961 we were returning from Arizona and made a wrong turn in Pleasant Grove, Utah. When turning the big trailer around to get back to the highway we had to back up. In doing so the rear of the trailer turned so that it would hit a post, so Si go out to get the post out. While wrestling with that he fell and looked up at me, then he was gone. When she saw him in the coffin for the last time she said, "Goodbye old Pal." They had been married for fifty-seven years. Grandma Marble said her father had kissed her on the check one night right before Si died. She could feel his mustache. Also, Grandpa said he wasn’t going to make it home and didn’t call Hy to get the house warmed up. He was trying a new route Merlin had told him about. Grandma thought the horses in the field were going to trample Grandpa. Following this she lived in her Tremonton home with her children and grandchildren visiting her often. Some of them called on her nearly every day. She was able to care for most of her needs. Her two daughters lived near--Vadis within a few blocks and Margrette within a few miles. They took her about to shop, visit, or see the doctor, etc. They cleaned when that was too difficult for their mother. Lola Ravsten cleaned a lot. LaRain lived within a few blocks so called nearly every day. Hyrum kept the books and visited as often as he could. Their spouses and children gave loving attention. Glen and wife called as they could. She was always happy to see visitors and had treats and food handy. (Raisin pie or cookies, sugar cookies, chocolate chip cookies. She said they tasted better when they were hot.) She liked to have her family or others stay for a meal. (Chicken, macaroni goolosh, jello, with pie for desert.) Her home was very neat and clean. She attended Church regularly and saw that her tithing was paid. (She always had a cough and brought a pill bottle of water to Church with her. In those days the Apostles visited the stake 4 times a year for stake conference.) She was proud of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She was one to be a peacemaker. She didn't say anything that was negative about anyone. She wanted her children to live the good life that brings happiness. She referred to the compiler as her "Missionary son,” and thereby held an ideal before him that he felt that he couldn't break. She was generous in sharing her income at the settlement of the estate from her life's partner. Although the entire estate was legally hers, she divided equally to each of her children an amount of several thousands of dollars. Vickie, Mary, and Merle Romer stayed with Grandma Marble for a few years. She was so afraid to be alone. Then she decided she could do it. The first night she was up until 4 in the morning crying on the side of her bed so frightened. Grandma told me (Merle Romer) to record this vision she had. “A conduit of light went from her east bedroom towards the East Mountains. A voice from heaven said, ‘Don’t be afraid. I’m always with you.’” Grandma wasn’t afraid after that and stayed alone. Near the end of her life she fell and broke her hip. She fell going to bed on a Saturday night. LaRain checked on her Sunday morning and when she didn’t answer he went over and found her on the floor. She was taken to Tremonton Hospital and then to the Logan L.D.S. hospital and placed in the intensive care unit. Complications set in her lungs and throat. While she was in intensive care Margrette heard her say, “My baby, my baby.” It was likely she was seeing her baby, Lola, who had died as an infant. This was Margrette’s testimony. Merle Romer remembers seeing her on Christmas day. She was in intensive care and she knew me and said, “Oh, Merle, you have come so far.” She was talking about me coming from BYU where I worked, but of course I was in Elwood for Christmas. Vickie Romer stopped to see her just before she died and she was sitting up in her regular room and they had a good visit. She left us shortly after that. ADDENDUM: Grandma was a quiet person and was afraid to live alone. Vickie, Mary, and Merle stayed with her. Every Saturday night she stayed up late to watch the Super Smack Down (wrestling!) but was too afraid to open the door after dark; a delightful woman. She absolutely loved to watch Westerns. After she had a vision, she was brave enough to stay alone (see her story.) Grandma Marble fell and broke her hip at home. She was on the floor alone for overnight and into the next day. She died at the Logan Hospital December 31, 1970. She was 89 and had been a widow for about ten years. OBITUARY: Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah), 1 Jan 1971: Tremonton - Evaline Mary Burbank Marble, 89, of Tremonton, died Thursday in the Logan LDS Hospital following a short illness. Mrs. Marble was born Aug. 1 1881, in Deweyville, a daughter of Brigham S. and Mary Elizabeth Pett Burbank. She was reared and educated in Deweyville. She was married to Silas Andrew Marble on Sept. 14, 1904, in Brigham City. The marriage was solemnized in the Logan LDS Temple on April 20, 1917. He died March 17, 1961. They made their home in Deweyville until 1925 when they moved to Tremonton. She had been a Relief Society visiting teacher for 20 years and was a member of the ward choir. Surviving are three sons and two daughters, LaRain Marble, Mrs. Clarence (Vadis M.) Brough, both of Tremonton; B. Glen Marble, Brigham City; Hyrum A. Marble, Garland; Mrs. Merlin (Margrette) Romer, Elwood; 17 grandchildren; 39 great-grandchildren; one great-great-grandchild. Also surviving are four brothers, Martello B. Burbank, Henry L. Burbank, Victor Burbank, all of Brigham City; Augustus R. Burbank, Deweyville. Funeral services will be conducted Monday at 1 p.m. in the Tremonton 1st LDS Ward. Friends may call at the Rogers Mortuary in Tremonton Sunday from 7 to 9 p.m. and Monday from 11 a.m. until time of services. Burial will be in the Deweyville Cemetery. Children of Silas Andrew Marble and Mary Evaline Burbank: 1.Silas LaRain Marble, b. 10 July 1905, Deweyville; md. Maggie Rampton, 7 Oct 1926; d. 26 Feb 1995, age 89. 2.Brigham Glen Marble, b. 5 Oct 1907, Deweyville; md. Vera Winegar Marchant, 23 June 1932; d. 20 Sep 1989, age 81. 3.Vadis Mary Marble, b. 9 Dec 1911, Deweyville; md. Clarence Raymond Brough, 6 Feb 1929; d. 18 Oct 1998, age 86. 4.Hyrum Austin Marble, b. 9 Dec 1911, Deweyville; md. Phyllis Haws, 14 Feb 1935; d. 19 Nov 2004, age 93. 5.Lola “E” Marble, b. 17 Dec 1916, Deweyville, d. 7 Jan 1917, Deweyville. Child, 3 weeks old, pneumonia. 6.EMMA MARGRETTE MARBLE, b. 18 Nov 1918, Deweyville; md. 9 June 1937; d. 24 Sep 2004, age 85. +   BURBANK FAMILY GENERATIONS BIRTHDEATHNEW ENGLAND 1.John Burbank Sr. Elizabeth Wilson1551 15421581 1590 2.John Caleb Burbank Anne Gordon1571 15761671 1676 3.John Burbank Jr. (Joan) Ann Jordan1602 16101683 16421635 1635 4.John Burbank II Susannah Merrill1640 16381709 1690 1638 5.Timothy Burbank Rebecca Darling1668 16731706 1712 6.Samuel Burbank Mary Reed1706 17091781 1750 7.Lieut. Daniel Burbank Rev. War Mary Marks1736 17401802 1808 8.Maj. Daniel Burbank War of 1812 Margaret Pynchon1770 17751832 1826 p9.Daniel Mark Burbank Sarah Z. Southworth1814 18351894 1927 10.Brigham South. Burbank Mary Elizabeth Pett1855 18561943 1951 11.Silas Andrew Marble Mary Evaline Burbank1883 18811961 1970

Life timeline of D. M. Burbank

1814
D. M. Burbank was born on 3 Dec 1814
D. M. Burbank was 11 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
D. M. Burbank was 17 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
D. M. Burbank was 26 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
D. M. Burbank was 45 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
D. M. Burbank was 46 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
D. M. Burbank was 65 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
D. M. Burbank was 69 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
D. M. Burbank died on 13 Jan 1894 at the age of 79
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for D. M. Burbank (3 Dec 1814 - 13 Jan 1894), BillionGraves Record 987998 Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States

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