Cyrus Mangum

22 Jun 1856 - 5 Dec 1927

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Cyrus Mangum

22 Jun 1856 - 5 Dec 1927
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JOHN MANGUM AND MARY ANN ADAIR Copied from 'John Mangum - American Revolutionary War Soldier - and Descendents' By Delta Ivie Mangum Hale. Typed by Mona Martin Rogers John, the son of John Mangum and Rebecca Canida Knowles, was born 10 June 1817 in Springfield, St. Clair County, Alabama. He married

Life Information

Cyrus Mangum

Born:
Died:

Georgetown Cemetery

about 3 miles south of Cannonville on Kodacrome Way (a few hundred yards to the west)
Cannonville, Garfield, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father; Mother; Their children, He Saved Soles, In His Will Is Our Peace, Married Sep 14, 1935; sealed Sept 27, 1952, Wife of Seth Johnson Peace Perfect Peace A Loving Wife, A Mother Dear, A friend to all, Lies Buried Here, Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta G Johnson, married June 29, 1956; children Clara S, A. True, Marilyn K., Richard W., Joyce F, A Devoted Husband and a Loving Father a True Latter Day Saint, Beloved Father

Headstone Description

Father - Joseph Edward
Mother - Susan J
Children: Joseph E, Alfred D, Karma J, US ARMY WORLD WAR II, says and Baby, Children: Saundra, Ronald Lee, Sheila, Nila, Sue Ellen, Children: Billy, Sherman, Gwen, Deane, David, Dimion, Karen, Rebecca, Mother
Father, Sealed Sept 27, 1952
Children: Larry W - Ladona - Myrna L - Alma D - Ramona J - Joseph D, Son of Adelbert & Mary J Heaps, Children of Nephi & Zina Johnson, Children of Irving A & Daisie C Johnson, Utah
Cpl 12 Infantry
World War II BSM-PH, Married Irving A Johnson Sept 5, 1923, A loving wife & mother...
A friend to all..., Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta C. Johnson, Wife: Shana
Daughter: Kori Lee, Sealed June 28, 1939, US ARMY
WORLD WAR II, DEAN: US ARMY WORLD WAR II, UTAH CPL 1050 BASE UNIT AAF
WORLD WAR II, PFC US ARMY
WORLD WAR I, Children: Clara S - A True - Marilyn K - Richard W - Joyce F, Wife of Cyrus Mangum, Daugh of Marion..., Son of R. W. & Clara E Pinney, Magleby Mortuary, Husband of Sarah A Dutton, Daughter of Richard C & Susanah D. Pinney
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JOHN MANGUM AND

Contributor: Ron Haymore Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

JOHN MANGUM AND MARY ANN ADAIR Copied from "John Mangum - American Revolutionary War Soldier - and Descendents" By Delta Ivie Mangum Hale. Typed by Mona Martin Rogers John, the son of John Mangum and Rebecca Canida Knowles, was born 10 June 1817 in Springfield, St. Clair County, Alabama. He married Mary Ann Adair, the daughter of Thomas Jefferson Adair and Rebecca Brown. She was born 5 July 1822 at Pickins County, Alabama and died May 1892 in Georgetown, Kane County, Utah. John died 23 May 1885 in Alpine, Apache County, Arizona. It is difficult to follow the movements of this family from the time of John's birth until the time we find them in Itawamba County, Mississippi. John's father died at Fulton, Itawamba County, Mississippi in 1843. John and Mary Ann were married in January 1841 in Itawamba County, Mississippi. Their first two children were born here, and the third was born in Chickasaw County, Mississippi. John and Mary Ann became converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Chickasaw County in 1845, through the missionary efforts in Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived in Nauvoo as the Saints were preparing to leave their homes and travel to the unknown West. John and Mary Ann Mangum arrived in Utah on 18 October 1852, with the Jacob Bigler Company. They were with the Saints when they left Nauvoo and of course endured the trials and hardships incident to that trek to Utah. However, they with many others remained in the Pottawattomie section of Iowa from 1846 to 1852, and then journeyed to Utah to make their home with the Latter-Day Saints. Pottawattomie County, Iowa was a temporary gathering place for the Saints waiting an opportunity to travel westward to the Rocky Mountains. The settlement was name Mount Pisgah and at one time numbered more than 2,000 inhabitants. They kept busy in their fields or tending their little flocks and herds on the hillsides. In 1852 President Brigham Young issued a call for the last of the members of the Church at Mount Pispah to make the journey to the Rocky Mountains, at which time they abandoned their possessions and moved westward to the Great Basin. Nothing now remained of the little settlement except a little cemetery on the summit of a rounded knoll where approximately 200 of the Saints were laid to rest. In 1888 a number of the descendents of these worthy people contributed the means and purchased the little cemetery, erecting a monument to honor their dead. (Noah Rogers, Denvon's great great grandpa's name is on this monument). The names of two of John and Mary Ann's children are on this monument, William Perry and Laney Ann Mangum. The name of John's sister, Gemima Mangum Adair, also appears. John Wesley Mangum, their sixth child, was a little baby when they left Mount Pisgah to make that long wearisome journey across the plains. John Mangum was baptized on 10 November 1845 in Mississippi He was ordained a Seventy 28 May 1854 by Joseph Young and was in the 21st Quorum of Seventies He was given a Patriarchal Blessing on 20 January 1876 at Kanab, Utah John and his family with several other families were called to Washington, Utah to help settle the area and raise cotton John was put in charge of farming operations at Pipe Springs, a section of land across the line into Arizona. It was said that he seemed to be the right man in the right place He had a very patient and kind disposition and was very industrious They cleared the land and planted ten acres of wheat They also planted beans, corn, and potatoes. John was also in charge of ten young Indian hunters who were being taught to farm. Mary Ann helped pull a handcart across the plains She was adept at caring for the sick and relieved much suffering in the camps President Young gave her a special blessing and set her apart as a nurse and midwife She helped bring hundreds of babies into the world. A short time after they reached the Valley, they were sent on to Nephi, Juab County to help in the settlement of the area around Washington, Utah. This area is also known as Utah's Dixie. He told the presiding authorities that this was a good place to raise cotton Consequently, in the spring of 1857 President Young called 36 families under the direction of Samuel Jefferson Adair to settle this country John and William Mangum and their families were part of this group Their sister, Gemima, was also skilled in the cording, spinning, and weaving of cotton into cloth Mary Ann made clothes for her family from the cloth she corded, spun, and wove Brigham Young, seeing her integrity, gave her twelve head of sheep ready to be shorn She had them sheared, then she washed, corded, spun, and wove this wool into cloth from which she made warm clothing and stockings for her family. After awhile President Young had a factory built to manufacture the cotton into cloth. These same Mangum families were called in 1876 to help settle the town of Kanab, Kane County, Utah. In 1879 they were called to help settle the towns of St. Johns and Nutrioso in Apache County, Arizona. The St. Johns Ward was organized in the spring of 1880, and Mary Ann Mangum was made first counselor in the first Relief Society. Her daughter, Lucinda Mangum Richey, was made president. John Mangum died at Alpine, Arizona a short distance from the town of Nutrioso After his death, Mary Ann came back to Utah with Cyrus and Eunity Alexander Mangum and others of the Mangum family. Mary Ann lived with them until her death which occurred m the spring of 1892. She is buried in the little Georgetown cemetery, an abandoned town about five miles south of Cannonville, Kane County, Utah. John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair had fourteen children: 1. William Perry, born in October 1841 at Itawamba County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt. Pisgah, Iowa. Rebecca Frances, born on 10 October 1843 at Itawamba County Mississippi and died 13 April 1928 in Duncan, Greenlee County, Arizona; 3. Laney Ann born in 1845 at Chickasaw County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt Pisgah, Iowa as a child; 4. Martha Elizabeth, born in 1847 in Pottawattomie County Iowa; 5. Joseph Eslen, born on 12 December 1850 in Bonou, Pottawattomie County, Iowa; 6. John Wesley, born on 31 May 1852 at Bonou, Iowa; 7. Lucinda, born on 8 July 14 at Nephi, Juab County, Utah; 8. Cyrus and 9. Harvey were twins born on 29 June 16 at Nephi, Utah. Harvey died on 13 March 1862 in Washington, Utah as a child, 10 Mary Abigail, born on 2 June 1858 at Nephi, Utah; 11. Amy Caroline, born on 13 February 1860 at Washington, Utah; 12. Julia, born in 1861 at Washington County, Utah and died in 1861 in Washington as an infant; 13. David Newton, born on 13 October 1862 at Santa Clara, Washington County, Utah; and 14. Sarah Ellen, born on 17 November 1864 at Washington, Utah.

Story and Notes - Cyrus Mangum

Contributor: Ron Haymore Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Cyrus Mangum by daughters Elizabeth Ann and EffieMay Mangum Cyrus was the son of John and Mary Ann Adair Mangum, being born 29 June1856 at Nephi, Utah Cyrus was very young when his parents moved to Dixie to help in thesettlement of this part of Utah. At the time Cyrus was married to UnityAlexander, his parents were living at Adairville, a small settlementsouth of Pahreah. The Mangum farm at Adairville is still being farmed.Cyrus and Alexander moved to Kanab during the year following theirmarriage and their first child was born there in March 1877. Others ofthe Mangum families also moved to Kanab including Cyrus's father, JohnMangum and a brother, John Wesley. They helped build the old rock fortfor protection from the Indians. Sometime during the next two yearsCyrus moved to Pahreah where on May 6 1879 their second child, Cyrus, wasborn. In the fall of 1879, Cyrus along with his parents, John and MaryAnn, his father's brothers, John Wesley, Joseph Eslen, Deavid Newtonandother families were called to Arizona to ehlp settle St. Johns andNutrioso in Apache County. They lived in St. Johns until the spring of1881, then moved to what is now Nutrioso and helped in the settling ofthis little town. Cyrus later moved back to Utah and their fifth childwas born at Pahreah on April 23, 1887. They continued to live at Pahreahwhere they farmed and added to their herd of cattle. This was a veryproductive place with the small sections of land all cultivated andplanted into orchards, vinyards, gardens and alfalfa. The watermelonsgrew so large one could hardly lift them. They also grew grapes,mulberries and currants of all kinds. They had another child born thereon March 24, 1889 and while he was a baby, the family moved to Thurber,Wayne Co where Cyrus's brother, Joseph Eslen lived. He worked at a sawmill while living at Thurber and was stricken with a stroke and for sometime was unable to work. Gradually he regained his health and moved backto Georgetown to farm. The family went back to Pahreah for a time andhad a child born there in Nov 1895. By the time this child was oldenough to start school, they had moved to Cannonville. Cyrus hadobtained a herd of fine cattle, including about sixty milk cows. Eachyear when school closed for the summer, the cattle were gathered from thewinter range and then driven to East Fork mountain, south from what isnow Bryce Canyon National Park. Here the family spent the summer,milking those cows and making the milk into lovely large round cheese.Cyrus continued to spend their summers on the mountain until 1911. Theylived the gospel. Chapter 17, p395 - Elizabeth Ann Mangum by her sister Effie May MangumGraff Elizabeth was the daughter of Cyrus Mangum Lizzie was blessed with the gift of caring for the sick, the same as ourgrandmother, Mary Ann Adair Mangum. I have heard Lizzie say that whenshe was a little girl, if ever she was around where Grandma was takingcare of someone who was ill, she would be right there watching everymove.

JOHN MANGUM AND

Contributor: vcorn49 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

JOHN MANGUM AND MARY ANN ADAIR Copied from "John Mangum - American Revolutionary War Soldier - and Descendents" By Delta Ivie Mangum Hale. Typed by Mona Martin Rogers John, the son of John Mangum and Rebecca Canida Knowles, was born 10 June 1817 in Springfield, St. Clair County, Alabama. He married Mary Ann Adair, the daughter of Thomas Jefferson Adair and Rebecca Brown. She was born 5 July 1822 at Pickins County, Alabama and died May 1892 in Georgetown, Kane County, Utah. John died 23 May 1885 in Alpine, Apache County, Arizona. It is difficult to follow the movements of this family from the time of John's birth until the time we find them in Itawamba County, Mississippi. John's father died at Fulton, Itawamba County, Mississippi in 1843. John and Mary Ann were married in January 1841 in Itawamba County, Mississippi. Their first two children were born here, and the third was born in Chickasaw County, Mississippi. John and Mary Ann became converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Chickasaw County in 1845, through the missionary efforts in Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived in Nauvoo as the Saints were preparing to leave their homes and travel to the unknown West. John and Mary Ann Mangum arrived in Utah on 18 October 1852, with the Jacob Bigler Company. They were with the Saints when they left Nauvoo and of course endured the trials and hardships incident to that trek to Utah. However, they with many others remained in the Pottawattomie section of Iowa from 1846 to 1852, and then journeyed to Utah to make their home with the Latter-Day Saints. Pottawattomie County, Iowa was a temporary gathering place for the Saints waiting an opportunity to travel westward to the Rocky Mountains. The settlement was name Mount Pisgah and at one time numbered more than 2,000 inhabitants. They kept busy in their fields or tending their little flocks and herds on the hillsides. In 1852 President Brigham Young issued a call for the last of the members of the Church at Mount Pispah to make the journey to the Rocky Mountains, at which time they abandoned their possessions and moved westward to the Great Basin. Nothing now remained of the little settlement except a little cemetery on the summit of a rounded knoll where approximately 200 of the Saints were laid to rest. In 1888 a number of the descendents of these worthy people contributed the means and purchased the little cemetery, erecting a monument to honor their dead. (Noah Rogers, Denvon's great great grandpa's name is on this monument). The names of two of John and Mary Ann's children are on this monument, William Perry and Laney Ann Mangum. The name of John's sister, Gemima Mangum Adair, also appears. John Wesley Mangum, their sixth child, was a little baby when they left Mount Pisgah to make that long wearisome journey across the plains. John Mangum was baptized on 10 November 1845 in Mississippi He was ordained a Seventy 28 May 1854 by Joseph Young and was in the 21st Quorum of Seventies He was given a Patriarchal Blessing on 20 January 1876 at Kanab, Utah John and his family with several other families were called to Washington, Utah to help settle the area and raise cotton John was put in charge of farming operations at Pipe Springs, a section of land across the line into Arizona. It was said that he seemed to be the right man in the right place He had a very patient and kind disposition and was very industrious They cleared the land and planted ten acres of wheat They also planted beans, corn, and potatoes. John was also in charge of ten young Indian hunters who were being taught to farm. Mary Ann helped pull a handcart across the plains She was adept at caring for the sick and relieved much suffering in the camps President Young gave her a special blessing and set her apart as a nurse and midwife She helped bring hundreds of babies into the world. A short time after they reached the Valley, they were sent on to Nephi, Juab County to help in the settlement of the area around Washington, Utah. This area is also known as Utah's Dixie. He told the presiding authorities that this was a good place to raise cotton Consequently, in the spring of 1857 President Young called 36 families under the direction of Samuel Jefferson Adair to settle this country John and William Mangum and their families were part of this group Their sister, Gemima, was also skilled in the cording, spinning, and weaving of cotton into cloth Mary Ann made clothes for her family from the cloth she corded, spun, and wove Brigham Young, seeing her integrity, gave her twelve head of sheep ready to be shorn She had them sheared, then she washed, corded, spun, and wove this wool into cloth from which she made warm clothing and stockings for her family. After awhile President Young had a factory built to manufacture the cotton into cloth. These same Mangum families were called in 1876 to help settle the town of Kanab, Kane County, Utah. In 1879 they were called to help settle the towns of St. Johns and Nutrioso in Apache County, Arizona. The St. Johns Ward was organized in the spring of 1880, and Mary Ann Mangum was made first counselor in the first Relief Society. Her daughter, Lucinda Mangum Richey, was made president. John Mangum died at Alpine, Arizona a short distance from the town of Nutrioso After his death, Mary Ann came back to Utah with Cyrus and Eunity Alexander Mangum and others of the Mangum family. Mary Ann lived with them until her death which occurred m the spring of 1892. She is buried in the little Georgetown cemetery, an abandoned town about five miles south of Cannonville, Kane County, Utah. John Mangum and Mary Ann Adair had fourteen children: 1. William Perry, born in October 1841 at Itawamba County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt. Pisgah, Iowa. Rebecca Frances, born on 10 October 1843 at Itawamba County Mississippi and died 13 April 1928 in Duncan, Greenlee County, Arizona; 3. Laney Ann born in 1845 at Chickasaw County, Mississippi and died between 1846 and 1852 in Mt Pisgah, Iowa as a child; 4. Martha Elizabeth, born in 1847 in Pottawattomie County Iowa; 5. Joseph Eslen, born on 12 December 1850 in Bonou, Pottawattomie County, Iowa; 6. John Wesley, born on 31 May 1852 at Bonou, Iowa; 7. Lucinda, born on 8 July 14 at Nephi, Juab County, Utah; 8. Cyrus and 9. Harvey were twins born on 29 June 16 at Nephi, Utah. Harvey died on 13 March 1862 in Washington, Utah as a child, 10 Mary Abigail, born on 2 June 1858 at Nephi, Utah; 11. Amy Caroline, born on 13 February 1860 at Washington, Utah; 12. Julia, born in 1861 at Washington County, Utah and died in 1861 in Washington as an infant; 13. David Newton, born on 13 October 1862 at Santa Clara, Washington County, Utah; and 14. Sarah Ellen, born on 17 November 1864 at Washington, Utah.

Story and Notes - Cyrus Mangum

Contributor: vcorn49 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 month ago

Cyrus Mangum by daughters Elizabeth Ann and EffieMay Mangum Cyrus was the son of John and Mary Ann Adair Mangum, being born 29 June1856 at Nephi, Utah Cyrus was very young when his parents moved to Dixie to help in thesettlement of this part of Utah. At the time Cyrus was married to UnityAlexander, his parents were living at Adairville, a small settlementsouth of Pahreah. The Mangum farm at Adairville is still being farmed.Cyrus and Alexander moved to Kanab during the year following theirmarriage and their first child was born there in March 1877. Others ofthe Mangum families also moved to Kanab including Cyrus's father, JohnMangum and a brother, John Wesley. They helped build the old rock fortfor protection from the Indians. Sometime during the next two yearsCyrus moved to Pahreah where on May 6 1879 their second child, Cyrus, wasborn. In the fall of 1879, Cyrus along with his parents, John and MaryAnn, his father's brothers, John Wesley, Joseph Eslen, Deavid Newtonandother families were called to Arizona to ehlp settle St. Johns andNutrioso in Apache County. They lived in St. Johns until the spring of1881, then moved to what is now Nutrioso and helped in the settling ofthis little town. Cyrus later moved back to Utah and their fifth childwas born at Pahreah on April 23, 1887. They continued to live at Pahreahwhere they farmed and added to their herd of cattle. This was a veryproductive place with the small sections of land all cultivated andplanted into orchards, vinyards, gardens and alfalfa. The watermelonsgrew so large one could hardly lift them. They also grew grapes,mulberries and currants of all kinds. They had another child born thereon March 24, 1889 and while he was a baby, the family moved to Thurber,Wayne Co where Cyrus's brother, Joseph Eslen lived. He worked at a sawmill while living at Thurber and was stricken with a stroke and for sometime was unable to work. Gradually he regained his health and moved backto Georgetown to farm. The family went back to Pahreah for a time andhad a child born there in Nov 1895. By the time this child was oldenough to start school, they had moved to Cannonville. Cyrus hadobtained a herd of fine cattle, including about sixty milk cows. Eachyear when school closed for the summer, the cattle were gathered from thewinter range and then driven to East Fork mountain, south from what isnow Bryce Canyon National Park. Here the family spent the summer,milking those cows and making the milk into lovely large round cheese.Cyrus continued to spend their summers on the mountain until 1911. Theylived the gospel. Chapter 17, p395 - Elizabeth Ann Mangum by her sister Effie May MangumGraff Elizabeth was the daughter of Cyrus Mangum Lizzie was blessed with the gift of caring for the sick, the same as ourgrandmother, Mary Ann Adair Mangum. I have heard Lizzie say that whenshe was a little girl, if ever she was around where Grandma was takingcare of someone who was ill, she would be right there watching everymove.

Life timeline of Cyrus Mangum

Cyrus Mangum was born on 22 Jun 1856
Cyrus Mangum was 6 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Cyrus Mangum was 24 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Cyrus Mangum was 29 years old when Louis Pasteur successfully tests his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. Louis Pasteur was a French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the "father of microbiology".
Cyrus Mangum was 35 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Cyrus Mangum was 49 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Cyrus Mangum was 58 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Cyrus Mangum died on 5 Dec 1927 at the age of 71
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Cyrus Mangum (22 Jun 1856 - 5 Dec 1927), BillionGraves Record 4092898 Cannonville, Garfield, Utah, United States

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