Clarence A. Frost

1891 - 1965

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Clarence A. Frost

1891 - 1965
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In the year 1904 my father (William Allen Frost) was moving from Arizona to Shiprock, New Mexico. We had 15 head of cows, six horses, and two wagons with all our earthly belongings. My two older brothers, Clarence and Heber, ages 13 and 11, were driving the loose stock while Father drove the trail w

Life Information

Clarence A. Frost

Born:
Died:

Monticello City Cemetery

Monticello Cemetery Rd
Monticello, San Juan, Utah
United States
Transcriber

8diggin

April 5, 2015
Photographer

8diggin

April 5, 2015

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Clarence A. Frost is buried in the Monticello City Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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A Faith Promoting Experience by Wilford Frost to My Great Grandchildren

Contributor: 8diggin Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

In the year 1904 my father (William Allen Frost) was moving from Arizona to Shiprock, New Mexico. We had 15 head of cows, six horses, and two wagons with all our earthly belongings. My two older brothers, Clarence and Heber, ages 13 and 11, were driving the loose stock while Father drove the trail wagons with four head of horses. This was slow traveling, as we had to let the stock rest and eat quite often. We would make 12 to 15 miles a day. The Indians didn't like our using their feed and water without paying for it. All went well until we were out in the middle of the reservation between Gallup and Shiprock, New Mexico. The stock was turned loose to graze as usual with one saddle pony tied to the wagons to wrangle on in the morning. Next morning my older brother went out to gather the stock. He was unable to find a single animal but found Moccasin tracks driving all the animals directly away from camp. He hurried back to camp to tell Father what had happened to the stock. A prayer was offered before Father jumped on the pony and took off in pursuit of the stock and the Indians. Early history is full of such attacks on lone travelers, but first they usually did away with the people to save trouble. You can imagine our feeling, stranded there 50 miles from the nearest town. Time dragged on. Noon came and still no sign of Father. We had about given up hope that he would ever return. My stepmother (Sibyl Harris Frost) was a very religious woman and continued to pray for Father's safe return. Along mid afternoon we could see Father coming with part of the stock. He had to pay a big price in cattle to save his own life and get the Indians to release the work horses so we could continue our journey. What rejoicing to see Father still alive and able to continue our journey! Now to you grandchildren and great grandchildren, I want to bear my testimony of the power of prayer and the Lord looks after his people. Now the descendants of those three small boys are over 100 and still growing. Think if those Indians had decided to do away with us and take all, it would be a different story.

Clarence and Seraphine Frost

Contributor: 8diggin Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Clarence Alford Frost was born in Snowflake, Arizona to William Allen and Amelia Anderson Frost on January 14, 1891. He is the brother of Maud Frost Ramsay. The family moved to Woodruff when the children were young. Later, after his mother's death, his father remarried, they went to New Mexico, and finally settled in Monticello, Utah. One winter Clarence returned to Snowflake to attend school at the Academy and at the first entertainment he met Seraphine and walked her home from the dance. Seraphine was born in Snowflake, Arizona on August 19, 1891 to Silas D. and Ellen J. Larson Smith. Her grandfather, Jesse N. Smith, was the stake president, and her other grandfather, Mons Larson, crossed the plains in a handcart company and had moved to Snowflake from Santaquin, Utah when called by the church. In 1879 he returned to Utah for his second wife and was with the group called to settle San Juan County, Utah through the "Hole in the Rock". By the time spring came Clarence and Seraphine had decided to get married in the fall, and Clarence returned to Monticello to earn a wedding stake. They met again in Salt Lake City and were married in the Temple on October 4, 1911. After spending about a week in the city they took the train to Thompson, Utah and traveled from there to Monticello in his horse drawn buggy. It took several days to make the trip and it was the first time Seraphine had been away from Arizona and her relatives and family. She had met Clarence's stepmother briefly, but did not know another soul in her new home town except Clarence, her husband. The country was beautiful and the marriage a happy one, but she did get so homesick. Her children remember the many stories about Snowflake and the good times in Arizona. In the fall of 1912 they were expecting their first baby so decided to make the trip to Snowflake and be with her parents for the great event. They thought they had plenty of time for the trip and had been on the road traveling in a wagon for nine days when they stopped for the night at an Indian Trading Post called Chinaman Springs. The kind trader gave them a bed inside and made a trip into Gallop, New Mexico for the doctor. Their baby girl arrived safely on November 8, 1912 and was named Willamelia for her Frost grandparents, Will and Amelia. After a few days Seraphine and the baby took the train from Gallop and were met in Holbrook by her father and taken on to Snowflake where Clarence joined her later to spend the winter. They had four children when Clarence was called on a mission to California and was to leave in January 1920. At the time he had enough wheat stored to finance the mission, but before time to leave disaster struck. The building burned down and all the grain and other valuable things such as wedding presents, furniture and tools were destroyed and a few days later one of their choice team of horses died. It was a very discouraging time, but Seraphine encouraged Clarence to go and then took her little family to Hunter, Utah to live with her parents for 2 1/2 years while he was gone. There her last child, a boy, was born in August 1920. The children each had all the common diseases including scarlet fever, and Clarence was also very sick in the mission field for two or three months, but they did all survive and returned to Monticello after his release from the mission. As the farm had been mortgaged and the taxes were delinquent, it took about ten years to pay the debts. Most of this time Clarence worked for Charles Redd at the Old LaSal Ranch as foreman and Seraphine cooked for the ranch hands, washed their clothes and ironed, made butter and all of the other hard work to provide for the family so that his waages could be used to pay the debts. The two older children attended school in Salt Lake and California, as there was only a one-room school at LaSal. They moved back to Monticello in the spring of 1929 and during the next 20 years had many happy experiences with the children getting married and the little grandchildren coming along. There were also some sad times. Clarence lost part of his right hand in an accident while sawing lumber on the Blue Mountain. He was a farmer and also operated a flour mill at one time and owned a beautiful guest ranch on the mountain. He was also county assessor of San Juan County, Utah. They had five children: Willamelia Barton, C. Alford Frost, Kent S. Frost, Pearl Lewis, and Melvin J. Frost. Clarence and Seraphine moved to Mesa, Arizona about 1955. They filled two stake missions of two years each, two six-month missions to California, and two missions to the Southwest Indian mission. The first was a regular two-year mission and the last one lasted for three years as Clarence was First Counselor to President Fred Turley and Seraphine was First Counselor to Sister Turley in the Relief Society.

Seraphine Smith Frost - History

Contributor: 8diggin Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

~-------------------------------------------------------------------~ SERAPHINE SMITH FROST Sister Frost is the oldest member of Mesa 11th Ward and has owned her home on Udall street since 1955 or 56. She was born in Snowflake, AZ on August 19, 1891 to Silas D. and Ellen J. Larson Smith. Her grandfather, Jesse N. Smith, was the stake president, and her other grandfather, Mons Larson, crossed the plains in a handcart company and had moved to Snow- flake from Santaquinn, Utah when called by the church , In 1879 he returned to Utah for his second wife and was with the group called to settle San Juan County, Utah who built the famous road through the "Hole in the Rock". They crossed the Colorado river on Jan 26, 1880. Her husband, Clarence Alford Frost, was also born in Snowflake to William Allen and Amelia Anderson Frost on January 14, 1891 but the family moved to Woodruff when the children were young. Later, after his mother's death, they went to New Mexico, and finally settled in Monticello, Utah. One winter he returned to Snowflake to attend school at the Academy and at the first entertainment he met Seraphine and walked her home from the dance. By the time spring came they had decided to get married in the fall and he returned to Monticello to earn a wedding stake. They met again in Salt Lake City and were married in the Temple on October 4, 1911. After spending about a week in the city they took the train to Thompson, Utah and from there to Monticello in his horse drawn buggy. It took several days to make the trip and it was the first time she had been away from Arizona and her relatives and family where she had been very secure and happy. She was a good student and popular in her crowd and was a beautiful young woman. She had met her husband's step mother briefly but did not know another soul in her new home town except Clarence, her husband. The country was beautiful and the marriage a happy one but she did get so homesick. Her children remember the many stories about Snowflake and the good times in Arizona. In the fall of 1912 they were expecting their first baby so decided to make the trip to Snowflake and be with her parents for the great event. They thought they had plenty of time for the trip and had been on the road traveling in a wagon for nine days when they stopped for the night at an Indian Trading Post called Chinaman Springs. The kind trader gave them a bed inside and made a trip into Gallop, New Mexico for the doctor. Their baby girl arrived safely on November 8, 1912 and was named Willamelia for her Frost grandparents, Will and Amelia. After a few days Seraphine and the baby took the train from Gallop and were met in Holbrook by her father and taken on to Snowflake where her husband joined her later to spend the winter. They had four children when her husband was called on a mission to California and was to leave in January 1920. At the time he had enough wheat stored to finance the mission but before time to leave disaster struck. The building burned down and all the grain and other valuable things such as wedding presents, furniture and tools were destroyed and a few days later one of their choice team of horses died. It was a very discouraging. time but Seraphine encouraged her husband to go and then took her little family to Hunter, Utah to live with her parents. They had moved from Arizona to a small farm just out of Salt Lake City. The family traveled by mail car and train and there she lived for the 2 and a half years he was gone. There her last child, a boy, was born in August 1920. The children each had all of the common diseases including scarlet fever and Clarence was also very sick in the mission field for two or three months but they did all survive and returned to Monticello after his release from the mission. As the farm had been mortgaged and the taxes were delinquent, it took about ten years to pay the debts. Most of this time Clarence worked for Charles Redd at the Old LaSal Ranch as foreman and Seraphine cooked for the ranch hands, washed their clothes and ironed, made butter and all of the other hard work to provide for the family so that his wages could be used to pay the debts. The two older children attended school in Salt Lake and California as there was only a one room school at LaSal. They moved back to Monticello in the spring of 1929 and during the next 20 years had many happy experiences with the children getting married and the little grandchildren coming along. There were also some sad times. Clarence lost part of his right hand in an accident while sawing lumber on the Blue Mountain. He was a farmer and also operated a flour mill at one time and owned a beautiful guest ranch on the mountain. He was also county assessor of San Juan County, Utah. Sister Frost has always been active in the church and has a strong testimony. She and Clarence filled two stake missions of two years each, two six month missions to California, and two missions to the Southwest Indian mission. The first was a regular two year mission and the last one lasted for three years as Clarence was lst counselor to Pres. Fred Turley and Seraphine was 1st counselor to Sister Turley in the Relief Society. After Clarence's death in 1965 Sister Frost was an ordinance worker in the Mesa Temple for five years. She i8 now 96 years old and is a visiting teacher in the Mesa 11th Ward Relief Society. She is the mother of five children Willamelia Barton, C Alford Frost, Kent S Frost, Pearl Lewis, and Melvin J Frost. There are 26 living grand children, 114 great grand, and 79 great great grand children. We salute you, Sister Frost!

Life timeline of Clarence A. Frost

1891
Clarence A. Frost was born in 1891
Clarence A. Frost was 12 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Clarence A. Frost was 21 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Clarence A. Frost was 38 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
Clarence A. Frost was 48 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Clarence A. Frost was 54 years old when World War II: Combat ends in the Pacific Theater: The Japanese Instrument of Surrender is signed by Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and accepted aboard the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. The Pacific War, sometimes called the Asia-Pacific War, was the theater of World War II that was fought in the Pacific and Asia. It was fought over a vast area that included the Pacific Ocean and islands, the South West Pacific, South-East Asia, and in China.
Clarence A. Frost was 64 years old when Disneyland Hotel opens to the public in Anaheim, California. The Disneyland Hotel is a resort hotel located at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, owned by the Walt Disney Company and operated through its Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division. Opened on October 5, 1955, as a motor inn owned and operated by Jack Wrather under an agreement with Walt Disney, the hotel was the first to officially bear the Disney name. Under Wrather's ownership, the hotel underwent several expansions and renovations over the years before being acquired by Disney in 1988. The hotel was downsized to its present capacity in 1999 as part of the Disneyland Resort expansion.
Clarence A. Frost died in 1965 at the age of 74
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Grave record for Clarence A. Frost (1891 - 1965), BillionGraves Record 13419729 Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States

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