Charles Edward Baker

25 Oct 1892 - 1 Oct 1935

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Charles Edward Baker

25 Oct 1892 - 1 Oct 1935
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Charles Edward Baker was born 25 Nov. 1892 in Colonia, Juarez, Mexico to Alfred Baker and Luana Maria Christensen. They were living in Mexico because his father was married to two women. His first wife, Keturah, was unable to have any more children after her first who died as an infant, so she asked
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Charles Edward Baker

Born:
Died:

Riverside Thomas Cemetery

939-949 State Highway 39
Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho
United States

Epitaph

(Charles) Father (Dora LaRie) Mother (Elzie) Husband
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huntindead

July 7, 2018
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huntindead

October 9, 2012

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Charles Edward Baker

Contributor: kcapson Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Charles Edward Baker was born 25 Nov. 1892 in Colonia, Juarez, Mexico to Alfred Baker and Luana Maria Christensen. They were living in Mexico because his father was married to two women. His first wife, Keturah, was unable to have any more children after her first who died as an infant, so she asked him to take another wife to give her children to raise. Charles was the third of six children in this family. The young people enjoyed the beautiful green hills and going berrying and excavating in the hills around Chupi, especially when School would be out for the holiday, and the teachers would sponsor a Nature trip. Often on a holiday groups of young people would in the Spring, go out just to find the first flowers of Spring and also Fall. They were so fresh and profuse in September. There were no laws against shooting wild Turkeys, fishing in the lakes and streams, and even wild game in the mountains. It was easy to go a little way out from home in Chupi and bring in a deer, with no restrictions. All the L.D.S. people who went to Mexico to live loved Old Mexico. But there came a time when trouble brewed in the Government of Mexico. In 1912, Pancho villa, a man in strong opposition to the Government at that time raised up a band of Mexican Soldiers in rebellion, and the Government ordered all white settlers to leave the Country, or he would not be responsible for what happened to them. There was nothing they could but remain in their homes and remain neutral. They were ordered to leave the Country immediately, at last. The people were given a certain time to be gone. Pancho Villa's headquarters was in the little settlement of Dublin, or Casas Grandes, Chihuahua, Mexico, not far from Colonia Juarez. The people were given notice when to be gone, and were only allowed to carry a meager number of pounds of goods to take with them, including their bedding. They had to bury pictures and treasured things and some of their records in their gardens etc, hoping to find them safe when they were allowed to return, if they ever were allowed to return. This had to be done in a great hurry. Young Bill had left home to go to the United States to find work, soon after 14 years old. His Mother, Luanna Maria had a Brother in Saint David, Arizona and the family planned to go to him for the time being. Aunt Ketura thought it best to stop in Arizona where she had relatives, and not go on with the family. Charles and Milton, known now as Chuck and Tony, were quite young, but they elected to stay in Mexico to try to guard their property, and perhaps raise a crop of wheat to sell to get money to help their parents in the United States. Pancho Villa did not have anything particular against the white People, only wanted them entirely out of the way of the War. It Has frightening to have to leave their 17 and 19 year old sons behind in time of trouble, but they thought they might be able to protect their homes and property, and then they could plant wheat and harvest it and sell it for money to send to their destitute families in the States. They were a people of Faith and they knew their Heavenly Father would protect their brave sons. Mother Baker said she could not refrain from Tears when she parted with her brave boys, Milton first then Charles. As she pressed him to her, Charles spoke in her ear, "don’t cry Mother, we will all be together again, before long." She bravely smiled through her tears, and said, "I know Darling," and she put them in the hands of the Lord. The train pulled out and when they came to the Rio Grande River, it went safely across, and that was the last Train to cross over the Bridge. The Bridge was blown up soon after the train crossed. Charles and Milton stayed in Mexico for one year or thereabouts. They raised a crop of wheat and harvested it, and sent it to the United States with a friend who had also stayed and raised a crop to sell. He took the wheat, and the folks waited in St. David for the money, but it did not come, so Father Baker accepted the offer of financial help from his Brother, Henry Baker. of Minersville, Utah, to send the money for them to come to him, in Minersville, Beaver Co., Utah. This they did, gratefully. There was turmoil and harassment from the Mexicans during that year in the Colonies, by the Mexicans. The boys were shot at while at work in the fields, and at night they were disturbed by thieves, some. Charles' watch was stolen from the stand by his bed, one night, but he got it back. One time Charles was taken from the field and held for ransom, then turned loose unharmed in a few hours. They were well. known by the Mexican people in those parts, and some had been converted to the Church during the time the Mormons lived there. After that first year the boys got separated some way, and Milton decided twogo out to the United States. Sometime later Charles decided to leave also. The folks were situated in Minersville by the time Charles arrived and Bill was there, and the family was reunited. The folks were happily situated in uncle Henry's and Aunt Amy Walker Baker's lovely home in East Minersville. Aunt Ketura never lived with her husband again, yet they ware a united Family and corresponded by mail. Charles worked and sent money to Aunt Ketura to live on, every month. He still felt the responsibility even after we were married. Uncle Henry Baker had moved to Beaver City, Utah, where his children could have the advantage of School at the Murdoch Academy. Alfred and his family were comfortable in Minersville. Bill was a lively fellow--always had a girl and having a good time. He finally married a wonderful young woman from Beaver, Utah, who worked in Marshall's Store. She sold goods over the Counter and also handled the Mail in the post Office Department. She was so nice and kind to everyone, children just loved to be near her. We all loved to have her wait on us. All of Minersville loved Edna Hutchings, that was her name. Bill Baker finally married her and they had a lovely family of five children, Othello, Lee, Ray, Helen and Alfred. They were all diligent workers, like their parents and grandparents, and had good educations. Alfred and his sons leased a farm 5 miles north west of Minersville, between Minersville and Milford, after Uncle Henry and Aunt Amy moved back to their home. The Alfred Bakers worked hard and paid back the money their Uncle Henry had sent to them. Ketura had married Will Sevey in Chuichupa, 1908, and eventually moved to Panguitch, which is over the mountain south-east of Beaver County. When her babies were born her Mother would go to her: and nurse her and help her for a month or so. Once Sister Baker arranged with my parents for Alfrieta to stay with us and go to School until her Mother returned. My family is the George R. Williams and C. Dora Murdoch Williams' family. My Father was Bishop at that time in Minersville Ward. We all really enjoyed the association with this tall blond cheerful, happy go lucky young girl in our home. Later on, Alfrieta and I attended the Milford High School, traveling on a Bus from Minersville. We were the best of friends, although she was two years older than I. Her schooling had been interrupted when moving from Mexico and St. David, Arizona, We have some happy memories. The Bishopric of Minersville once approached Bro. Baker about Charles going on a Mission. Charles had always wanted to go an a Mission, but Bill was foreman of the ranch and not being religious himself, having been absent from and out of touch with the rest of his family for so many years, he persuaded his father to keep Charles on the farm. This was a disappointment to Charles E. Baker, but he is not one to hold grudges, he took it like a man that he was. He had been faithful in the Church all his life and a diligent worker. The Baker boys were very popular with the girls of Minersville. Being three of them the girls really had a good time. All ages liked those cheerful happy brothers. But long after this, Charles told me that he was surprised and disgusted with the boys and girls in Minersville when he first arrived there. They were so familiar with each other, and Charles had been raised to respect girls too much to maul their bodies and act boldly disrespectful. Bill was the one who understood familiarity, and he was very boisterous and loud around them. His laugh could be heard for blocks out of doors in town. Charles told me that when he first arrived in Minersville that the first Sunday after Church, in the afternoon, he was sitting in the front room with his Mother after Church when some boys and girls passed by with their arms twined around each other, and were Laughing and squealing as they passed the house. Charles said he cried tears that day to see the disrespect of those young people for each other, and the expression of their loose morals, because although there were Mexican members, in Mexico their young people ware not allowed to be familiar, nor to mix races in marriage. It is better for people to marry their own kind of people. Charles said he worried about Bill, but he said, "There's one thing about Bill Baker, He is HONEST!" When he says he will do something, he will do it!" The Baker Boys are all good dancers. They are very fast dancers, and loved to swing the girls almost off their feet. I think Bill was their teacher when they came to the United States. Once when I was 12 or 13 years old, just starting to dance on the dance floor, I was dancing with a nice little young man from my crowd we were both young and small, suddenly our: feet were pushed out from under us and we both fell flat on the floor, When I looked up I saw Bill Baker's face, he laughing loudly looking down at us. I felt that he had tripped us. Long after, when I knew him well, I accused him of it, but he denied it. But I always felt it was true. Charles and Milton were never uncouth, but were always in good self control, as gentlemen, I learned afterwards what a kind, tender heart Bill Baker really had and learned to appreciate him greatly, although he never turned back to the Church. as we hoped he would. I had never met Charles until the day I was 16 years old, May 18th 1917, on my Birthday, Frieta had asked my Mother's consent a few days before, if I could spend my Birthday with her, at her home in Minersville. It was alright with Mamma, so we had a lovely time at her place together. After lunch her sweet sister-in-law Edna, Bill's wife and baby Thel arrived in horse and buggy from the farm. She had came to town to get groceries from the stores in Minersville. When she was ready to leave Sister Baker asked Alfrieta and me if we would ride down with Edna and bring the horse and buggy back so Sister Baker could use it to go Relief Society Teaching tomorrow. We went with Edna, and went into the house for a few minutes. Edna was hurrying to get the already prepared evening meal on the table, because the men had come in from the field, and Charles came right into the house. Frieta squealed out, "O Charlie, it's LaRie's Birthday! She's sweet 16 and never been kissed!" I was terribly embarrassed I had never seen him before, nor even had an introduction to him. Charles laughed and said, "Has she ever been spanked?" He laughed and stepped towards me. Frieta took the baby from me. I stepped a step backward. He took another step towards me. I was in the middle of the floor, I took another step back and he slowly took a step towards me, looking straight into my eyes. I took another step back. I was praying for help. When I came to the wall at my back our eyes were looking straight at each other. I stopped and raised my doubled fists up to my shoulders and kept praying that the Lord would not let this man desecrate my sacred body. He put a hand on each of my shoulders, looking soberly into my eyes, for just an instant, then removed his hands and gave a little croaking laugh and turned away and left the room. I gratefully thanked my Father in Heaven for answering my prayer, When I went into the kitchen I told Frieta I had to be home early to help get the children ready for the Grade School Program that night. This was the last day of grade school, being the 18th of May, 1917, We went right out to the Buggy and Charles followed and would not let Frieta have the lines. He teased us awhile then let us go, I felt strangely all the way home. Frieta took me right home and it was time to get supper, I forgot to go by Frieta's and pick up the Mail. At the Program that night, there was Charles Baker down at the back by the door with a crowd of girls,. making them laugh and carry an, I hoped they would not notice me as I hurried out with the folks. I did not want to join them. When we crossed the street from the Church lot, he came to the side of the street that Frieta lived on, Papa said to me. "LaRie, did you get the mail today?" I said, "Yes, but I did not go to Bakers after we came from the farm, I'll have to stop there now." We stopped, and I knocked on the door. They called, "Come in but I stood in the door and said "I just stopped for the mail." Frieta got it for me but Charles had the paper and was reading it, standing in the middle of the floor. His Mother told him to give me the Paper, and he held it out, as I went to take it he jerked it back. I said, "Oh, never mine, I’ll get it tomorrow. The folks are waiting for me now." But as I stepped beck on the step, he reached it to me, then jerked it beck again, This was too much. I nearly got the door shut when he pushed it towards me through the crack. Then I expected sure to find the family waiting nearby, but do you know they had not waited for me -- I felt so hurt that they left me to walk home alone in the dark. I got home alright, just thought they should have waited for me. The next Sunday afternoon, after Sacrament Meeting, I heard the noise of joyous laughter and boisterous shouting, like a bunch of kids were playing In the street. I looked out the window and sure enough, there was a bunch of girls and boys, Charles Baker with a girl's hat on backwards, being chased by the owner. I really felt disgusted. These were kids from my crowd, and he belonged to two crowds older than mine. I did not go out But that was the last time I ever saw any foolishness from him again. If he was trying to impress me, I guess he must have learned that I do not like that kind of boys. I noticed after that, that he had a habit of being in the same place that I was quite often. But I paid no attention to him. I could not get over the fact that he belonged in two crowds ahead of mine. On June 12th 1917 Alfreita Baker was Married in the Salt Lake Temple to Elias Albert Moyes. Her Wedding Dance was to be June 20th in Minersville. She asked our dear mutual and bosom friend, Irma Estelle Blackburn and myself to come to her home early that evening and help her dress far her Wedding Dance. We were happy to assist. She had Irma fixing her pretty blond hair, while I put a few stitches in the satin Sash for her Wedding Dress. I was busily sewing when two large feet appeared. In front of me. I looked up and Charles Baker was bent over me whispering. He said, "Will you be my partner at the dance tonight?* I was so shocked I couldn't speak. He left, but in a few minutes he was there again, bending over me with the same question. I looked at him and said, "Why, I thought you were going with Eloise Pryor.” He said, “No, I have no partner for tonight.” I felt strange He left again. I was uneasy, wondering if Frieta would feel bad that I turned her brother down, at her Wedding Dance. Back he came the third time and asked me. I was embarrassed to go with a partner so much older than I, but I thought, it would be O K this once, so I said, blushing,(for my face burned), "Oh, I guess so." He smiled and left, and I was anything but comfortable, I saw to it that we were the last ones to walk out of that house, and the last to walk into the dance, as we all went in as a crowd. Charles politely hung up my coat, and then whirled me right onto the floor --as they had begun dancing as soon as the Bride and Groom appeared. Irma's partner had taken her right onto the floor and they were already dancing. As we began dancing I was petrified The Baker boys like fast dancing, and I love waltzing best, and slower, more graceful dancing. So, I'm afraid I did not do so well that night. But Charles was loyal, and treated me royally. Of course we walked home together, and at the gate, I went in and closed the gate behind me. He thanked me, then asked me if he could see me on Sunday Evening. I told him I thought I would be busy that night. He said, "Alright, how about the next Sunday night?" I felt that I would offend him if I told him how I really felt, having a visitor so much older than I, so I said, "Oh, I guess so--." He straightened up to his full height, and looked me in the eye, in the moonlight, and said, "I never take 'I guess so' from anyone--!" I felt that I had rights too," and we both smiled and I said, "Well, take it the way you want to." He went whistling down the street. From here, Charles' history and mine run side by side. We kept seeing each other on Sunday evenings and soon he showed up at our Ward Choir Practices on Wednesday evenings and walked home with me. I began to get used to him with his cordial mannerisms and he became quite interesting to me. He never showed those annoying antics he had exhibited when I first met him, He never paid any attention to other girls around me, but treated me as a respected grown-up, which I felt that I was. We would talk about his life in Old Mexico. He would tell me of the good times the young people would have taking days off, going Berry Picking with the grown ups and the walks they would take in a group up to the Caves and Cave dwellings, etc. He was very religious, and never broke any rules of decency whatever He would always refer to himself as that "Cotton Headed Guy," in the group. We had an outdoor bed in the back yard under the trees, with a canvass cover over the top of it. Often we would return from our walks in the evening and sit for awhile on that bed, where he always had some interesting things to tell me about Old Mexico. He made me feel like a grown up young woman, for sure. He never hesitated to tell me about the girls in Mexico whom he liked, and made them all seem sweet and interesting to me. There was Nellie, and Katie, and Addie and Annie, and Blanch and Bernice, and perhaps more whose names I can't remember. He made me want to meet them. He really loved Old Mexico. I was not foreign to a good feeling about Mexicans, my Father had several Mexicans herding sheep. they were men, of course, but they were nice and had good manners when they would stop at our home in Minersville on the way to and from the sheep herd. They never made us afraid, and we knew they were descendants of the Lamanites in the Book of Mormon. We respected them, and they were respectful. Charles was very interesting to me, but I did not count him a boy friend in the usual sense. I thought he just liked to talk and I was a good listener, and that's why he came around so often. He didn't frighten me nor embarrass me any more, and I sort of forgot the difference in our ages. Frieta had moved to Beaver and he kind of took her place, I guess. We got word at Choir that our Choir was selected to furnish the Singing for Stake Conference coming up in July, for both Saturday and Sunday. Our music Teacher in the higher grades in School in Minersville had been Bro. Will T. Morris. He had led our Choir all winter during School, but had now gone home to Parowan, Utah. Our present leader wrote him and asked if he would please came and see us through this beautiful assignment. He came, and how we practiced! It was a great joy to us students who knew him so well at School. Both Irma and I were singing in the Choir and we enjoyed singing so much! She sang beautiful Soprano, and I sang Alto. We practiced alone often, together. The Stake Conference was held in Beaver, Utah. We had many rehearsals for this, and Charles Baker attended every one. Our Conference came three days before the 24th of July. We were well prepared. Quite unknown to me, Alfrieta had asked my mother if I could spend the 24th of July with her in Beaver, beforehand. Mamma gave her consent, so I was to understand afterwards. Then suddenly on Friday, my father mentioned in my hearing that he had a business Meeting in Provo this weekend, and he asked me to take care of the Children that week-end as he had planned to take Mamma with him for the outing. He said the children would be my responsibility. He said I could take them with me to Conference, if I went with someone who had room for us. I contacted Aunt Margaret and Uncle Walt Blackner at Greenville, and asked if I could drop my two little sisters and little brother, with them over Sunday. They happily accepted, so on Saturday morning early, a Car stopped and picked us up and went around by Greenville, and the children were happy to be with their Cousins. I was to pick them up on the way home to sleep and then take them up again on Sunday Morning. Everything was working well. We got to Conference at the proper time and enjoyed singing and the speakers. We got out for lunch at noon. My Aunt Susie Murdock who lived in Beaver, and I loved very much, came to me and invited me to bring Irma, my dear friend and came to her home to dinner. I was happy to accept and she rushed away telling me she would rush home and have it on the table. Just then, Frieta's husband got to us and said we had to go out to their place to lunch, then they would come back to the afternoon meeting with us. I told him that was impossible, as I had promised to bring Irma and go to Aunt Susie's. He would not hear to it, but said he would run and catch up with her and tell. her his wife was expecting us along with her Mother to dinner, and had stayed home to have it all ready. He did what he said, and caught Aunt Susie a block away and told her. She was sorry, but excused us. I had noticed in the morning Session that Charles was absent. I thought nothing of it, only that he had been practicing with us. Sister Baker and Irma and I went with Elias, and when we got there I still felt badly about disappointing Aunt Susie, I always enjoyed going to visit her. When we got to Frieta's I lagged behind purposely and Let everyone go in ahead of me. Then I got the shock of my life! I came up the steps to the door, and just inside the door, I took one step toward the door to the front room where everyone were talking at once, it sounded like, Someone pounced on me from behind and grabbed me binding my arms down and squeezing me tightly. I screamed to the top of my voice! Then I was turned around gently, and looked into the smiling face of Charles E. Baker! I was weak as a kitten. Everyone laughed and said they got one on me that time. I was looking at Charles, I said, "I thought you did not come." Everyone were laughing and teasing me so that Charles took me outside and we walked through the orchard, and he told me that Bill said he had to stay home and put up hay, and warned him to get to bed early because they were getting up early to work in the hay! Charles said he did not argue but went to bed, he knew what he was going to do. He got up before any of them and rode a horse all the way to North Beaver, and bathed and got ready for Conference but was late so he stayed and visited with Frieta. while she got dinner. Charles sang with us in the afternoon Meeting, and the Meeting was wonderful. We were highly complimented on our Choir. The Bakers would not let me and Irma go back to Minersville with the ones we came with, they insisted they were going down after Meeting and would call around by Greenville for me to pick up the children. Now another surprise faced me: Frieta told me that she had asked my Mother a month ago if I could spend the 24th of July with her, and Mamma had said “Yes.” Now they were planning on spending a couple of Days in the Beaver Mountains at Puffer's Lake, which was a very special camping, fishing and boating Lake. It was high above Beaver, and there is beautiful scenery. I told them I could not go because my folks were away and I had the responsibility of the children. Frieta insisted on talking to Aunt Margaret and was sure that she would keep the children until we came back, it might be three days. I was heart sick. I wanted to go, but hated to be unfaithful to my responsibility. After supper we all piled in the car and Ed (Elias) took us and we called at Greenville and Aunt Margaret consented to keep the children, and said she was sure my Mother and Father would not mind, since we had come and talked it over with her. Well, I insisted on taking the children home that night with me, and we got all ready to be gone three more days extra. Frieta, Ed, Mrs. Baker, Charles, Irma, the Children and I all boarded the car next morning early to leave the children at Greenville, and go on the last day of Conference. We enjoyed Conference but I felt bad to separate with Irma after it was over. She went home with the Minersville Choir members. She is the dearest Bosom Friend I had ever had. I truly love her! Frieta and I slept together on an old fashoned Spring Cot, we used to call them. Early Monday Morning He were rudely awakened by being landed on the floor! Those teasing men had crawled under the back leaf and lifted it up gently until the whole Cot raised and tipped us out on the floor, bedding and all! I thought it quite uncouth, but they meant it for a, joke, so we picked ourselves up with the covers and ousted them out of the bedroom. Frieta was used to such antics being the only girl in the family since she was quite young, and three brothers. The men were dressed, and we were covered. We were soon loaded into a wagon with bows for a cover if it rained or blew badly, but it was a most besutiful day all the way. Oh Yes, They had planned on having Irma go as a companion for Annie Gayle, Ed’s niece, but Irma rather not, so they asked another friend of ours, Flossie Corbridge from Minersville. Annie's brother also went along, and several years later that fine young man married my good friend, Altheda, Banks. I had been in the Beaver Mountains many summers when Daddy went up with the sheep, before it got too hot, he would take us all up for a week after School was out. I loved the smell of nature and the beauties of the Mountains, trees and streams, but especially the lakes. Puffer's Lake was the most beautiful, and there were most lovely Mountain Trout, easy to catch. We got there in good time in late afternoon, but all the way up through the hills and mountains, Charles would compare the sights with the mountain scenery in his loved Mexico birthplace. It was interesting to enjoy the beautiful scenes of Nature. What a great Artist Creator was our Dear Heavenly Father, who gave us this beautiful EARTH to dwell upon! Can we ever thank Him enough! Once when Charles was very interested telling about the scenery in Old Mexico, and the Flowers, etc., I became conscious of Charles' hand resting on my opposite knee. I had been taught never to let boys have any such privileges, and never had an occasion to remove anyone's hand before. but I could not resist it now. I just quietly lifted his hand and put it on his leg. We got to Puffer's Lake in good time and made camp, and went out some in boats and Charles and I just walked a little ways around the Lake to a good place in the shade, and fished. We really had a good feast of Mountain Trout that evening. Fish never tasted so good to me before! I had enjoyed the ride up into the mountains so very much! Some Beaver boys, the Beakley Brothers were camped near us and knew Ed and his Niece. and Nephew, after supper they came over with their Banjo and Guitar, and sang the prettiest songs, of Hawaii, if we knew them we could join in, but mostly they sang alone, just those boys. Their Father used to be the Sunday School Stake chorister, and came to Minersville when I was quite young, I think he taught me to sing. One beautiful song these boys sang was my favorite. "She Sang Aloha To me." They sang it over and over for me. Later Frieta made me a Present of that Song, and I still love to play it. Charlie loved it too. Charles and I did go boating after we caught the fish in the afternoon, while supper was cooking that first afternoon. Just Charles and me alone. I never had a boy friend stick so close to me. I really enjoyed his company. The next morning he borrowed two horses from our friends of the evening before. They had good saddles, and rain coats tied behind the saddles. We rode high up in the mountains to the top of the divide, where the water runs both ways. This was quite exciting! We dismounted and looked and looked at the settlements of Marysvale, Kingston, both in Utah, on the east side of the State. There were wild flowers blooming on the Mountain, and I picked a bouquet. Charles told me he would like to take me to the mountains of Old Mexico, and he named many of the beautiful flowers that grew there. He named some I’d never heard of here in Utah. The wild Columbine, different kinds of lillies, ever so many, it made me wish I could see them. He also told of the lovely times the young people had in the mountains, naming the boys and girls names off to me. I told him he should write a Book of his life. I'm sure it would be most interesting! My estimation of him and the people of Old Mexican Colonies is very high. They were mostly very true to their standards and their religion, had fine characters, and seemed to love and revere the Lord, Jesus Christ, and the Prophet Joseph Smith. This is what I admire greatly in anyone. We wandered quite a ways from our mounts, finally a cloud came over the sky above us and we felt some rain drops, so he said we'd better start back to Camp. There were Rain Coats tied on the back of the saddles, and he untied them and went to put mine on me. In doing so, he went a tiny bit for out, and put his arms around me from behind and pressed me to him gently. This I thought was a little too much, so I pulled away from him and would not let him help me on the Horse. He apologized, but I felt a little miffed, and did not answer. I led the horse to a big rock, and got on the horse alone. I rode out ahead of him, it was a narrow trail anyway, and did not let him catch up with me all the way back to camp. I did not feel like talking, and did not know what to say anyway. We galloped as much as we could, and got to Camp by two o'clock. The rest were out fishing, or away somewhere. I was so tired from riding so for, I did not want him to help me off the horse, even,. but slipped off on the other side. I did not want him to lift me. I guess I was ignorant, but I didn’t want him to think I wanted boys to handle my body. I got into the wagon and laid on the bedding. I was so tired I was trembling from the long ride. I went to sleep and when I awoke I felt like someone was looking at me. I changed positions and looked at the wagon cover, and there in the hole at the end was Charles' smiling face. He did not speak, not knowing for sure I was awake I guess. Finally I sat up and got out of the wagon. I felt much better and was hungry, and the smell of fish made my mouth water. Charles was wonderful to me and nothing was said to embarrass me about our long ride until later, when we told them we were on the very top of the divide and how beautiful the fresh air and sunshine. We had another lovely Camp Fire Party with the Beakley boys and music and songs. We all felt like singing, laughing and talking, planning our trip home next morning. We broke Camp in'the morning and it was agreed that Charles and I should take a boat and row to the end of the Lake, where there was a lovely meadow of tall grass we could walk through to where the road would cross and the wagon would pick us up. It was great fun rowing together on the lake once more. We thoroughly enjoyed the trip. We laughed and sang and now I knew I was in the company of an honest to goodness trust-worthy Man! As we walked through that tall grass, waving in the breeze, Charles had me by the hand and talked to me as if I were his age and equal. He bared his feelings in a humble manner to let me know that he knew that I am a clean-minded virtuous young woman, said that the freedom he had taken with me was not meant in any disrespect, and that he hoped I would not think he was the kind that would take advantage of me, for he intended to live his life to meet the Savior and His Maker. He mentioned the time I removed his hand in the wagon, on the way to the Mountains, and said he had not realized it was out of place, and that if he had disrespected me in any way, he hoped I could forgive him, for it was not his intention to do it. I felt bad that I had made him think that, and asked him to overlook my precautions. He said,"0h, I'm proud of you, LaRie!" We had a very warm feeling and soon the wagon caught up with us and we were off to Beaver. I’ll always be glad for that walk. When we got into the wagon, the whole party were so light and happy, it was a pleasure to t together. Finally we got to where it looked like there were some caves up the hills a little ways. I said,"Is it too late, or could we stop and climb up there to investigate those caves?" I did want to climb that hillside. They stopped, and we started off afoot. My dear escort had me by the hand. He was the best partner! Just before the hill began to get steep, we came to some leafy bushes, on my side. Suddenly my eye caught what looked like two big rattle snakes coiled. Instantly I screamed bloody murder, as I turned to Charles, grabbed him around the neck and lifted my feet high off the ground. I had always lost my head when I saw a snake, and I sure did then. He held me close and ran a few steps then put me down. I was quite unnerved, and we all decided to go on to Beaver, so we did. I felt so embarrassed I could not speak for sometime, We arrived at Ed and Frieta's before sundown. Had a cold supper, and then Ed took us to Minersville, after stopping at Greenville, where we found that my Folks had returned from Provo, and called at Greenville and took the children home with them. I was surely glad they would be home when we got there. And they were glad to see mewhen I got home! They did not mind that I had spent the time away. Charles found many unexpected occasions to run up to our place after that. Once the Baker boys borrowed Papa's team, to work on a canal for a few days. ,Ye came to get the team when I was there, and he would always have time for me, and when he brought them back, it was in the evening and we sat on the side of the hay rack in the yard, and talked for awhile. Sunday evenings we always visited. Once, when Papa and Mamma had to go and visit the Sick in the Ward on Sunday evening, he came and stayed with me and the children until they returned. Finally he took the Piano Bench and began going up and down on the keys. He seemed to be going over something in his mind. The children were curious, and alert. He told them he would like to tell them a story on the Piano. Somewhere in his memory he had stored a great piece of literature in Verse. "Down by The Rio-Grande! " Repeating the famous Poem while he demonstrated Action on the Piano Keys, up and down the full length of the Piano. He did not know Music, but the cords he would strike, just before he would run the full length of the Piano, up and then down, were so impressive and thrilling the children were fascinated and I was amazed. Indeed it was very entertaining! I laughed and laughed to observe his talent for entertainment. When the folks came home he asked me to sit on the lawn with him for a while. I had never sat an the lawn with a boy before, and I did not know what to do, when he stretched out full length and put his head in my lap. All I could do with my hands was put my arms behind me and lean back on my hands. I got very tired. It did not last long, for it was getting late, and he soon got up and went home. He never seemed frivolous and loud to me any more. He treated me as a responsible young lady. I felt very self-concious, and said, "I must go in, now," So he went whistling down the street. I was completely at ease with him and enjoyed his company. He rated now equally with my, as I felt, perfect Father and Uncle Heber Williams, my two ideals! Not long after this the war in Europe was fast becoming a World War! Our United States boys were being conscripted to go in Military Training. My heart hurt to think of it. Charles always said, "I will not be drafted. If it begins to look like we will have to go, I'1l enlist!" My heart sunk! I prayed that he would not go to war and be killed. I could not bear the thought! I asked him what Service he would enlist in. He said he and his brother, Milton, had thought of the Navy. I was terrified to think of life without him. Late in July, sitting in the moonlight we were very silent, just happy to be there together, when I felt a strong Premonition. It seemed I heard the sounds of a bugle sounding in the distance, and the tramp of feet. I told him, and he said, "Yes, when it comes, Tony and I and some others from here are going to take the train to Salt Lake and Enlist, before we are drafted." Then he took me in his arms and kissed me for the first time. I did not resist that time, it seemed our parting was too close. I guess I loved him, but had not realized it. It was hard to part that night, and when he left, I went to bed and dreamed a Dream. I thought I was floating in the air, high up, just gradually floating downward to earth. Now, I seemed to drift to the side, and someone touched me and sort of guided me till my feet felt solid ground. I looked, and beheld that it was Charles E. Baker. Then, I woke up and found that I was in my own bed. I pondered over that very much, but did not speak of it for a long time, to anyone. Now, a great world War was upon us. It was the FIRST WORLD WAR! Early in August some of the town bays received Draft Notices. The Minersville boys decided to go to Salt Lake and volunteer. I was at School and when I went home for Lunch, Lottie always ran to the Post Office and brought the mail at noon. She handed me a note from Charles Baker. He wrote, "LaRie, Please stay home this afternoon. I must see you." Signed, "Chas. E. Baker:” I stayed to see him. He came at 1:30 P.M. He looked very serious. He said he would like to talk to me alone, first. Mamma said, "Certainly, Charlie, LaRie, go into the Parlor." He closed the door and took me in his arms, and we sat together on the couch. He said, they had to leave that night for Salt Lake to be registered to enlist in the Military Service of our Country. My heart sank! He said, "LaRie, I want you to go with me. We can be married in the Temple before I go to war." He wanted my consent to ask my Mother. Papa was away with the sheep; I could not answer. I was weeping and clinging to him. We wept in each other's arms. I told him I was only 16, and felt I was too young to Marry, that I would be waiting for him when he returned." I told him not to ask Mamma, for she would only say the same thing. I went to Milford with the Baker Family where the boys took the Train to Salt Lake. It seemed it was pulling my heart right out of me, when he bearded that train. All the next day I felt only part conscious. I could not talk about my sorrow. Two days later, when Lottie brought the Mail, she handed me a note. It was signed, "Chas. E. Baker." I read it and shouted for JOY! It said, "It was a mistake, our numbers were not up after all, so we did not enlist! I returned this morning. Would like to see you TONIGHT!" I thought my heart would jump out of my body! This was near the last of August. That night when he came I was so very happy! We hugged and kissed each other, walked, and sat out under the trees at the head of our lovely garden. I thought of my dream, and wondered if the Lord planned us together. The next day was Saturday. and we always washed on Saturday so I could be home to help. We had a hand Washer, back and forth, back and forth I would push it. As I ran the washer, I got thinking perhaps I had been too ready to show my feelings for Charles. He might think I was an easy touch. I was persecuted all day with this thought. I would not want him to think that of me. He came up that night. I was glad to see him, but had vowed I would not be easy. We walked that evening, and sat out under the trees, and talked and just enjoyed being together. At last we walked to the house and he took me in his arms, I pulled away, he tried to kiss me, and I told him "No." He said,"What is the matter LaRie, I thought you loved me!" I said, "I must not let you kiss me.” He stood looking at me, then took his hat off his head and threw it down on the ground and began pacing up and down. I knew I had insulted him and hurt him badly. He went doggedly around our dirt cellar three times then came and took me by the shoulders and said he surely thought I understood he was sincere. He did not try to love me any more that night, and I felt very miserable, but just could not make myself relent. The next day was Sunday, and we both sang in the Choir and he did come up that night, Although I did not dare to expect him. When he came to the door, Mamma sent me to the door to let him in. He came in and I took his hat into the bedroom and put it on the Dresser. As I went to put it down, I pressed it to my breast. Then I knew I was truly in love, and that I would never love another like I loved him. After our walk that night, he offered to kiss me and I put my arms around him and held him tightly. He said, "May I see you Friday night?" I said, "Oh, Yes!" The next Sunday night when he went to leave me, he said, "May I see you this Friday night again?" I pulled him closer and said, "Could you came Wednesday night also?" He hugged me and said, “I’ll be here." It was September by now. On the 18th of September we had had our usual walk and it was sprinkling rain a little so we climbed into the White Topped Buggy and sat in the front seat, looking out to the South. That night my love was almost overflowing. I loved him every minute. He just seemed to bask in my love. His beautiful blue eyes and curly blond hair seemed to belong to me. He spoke the most beautiful words of love I ever heard or read in any story book, to me. I was in 7th Heaven!! We both knew our joy would be interrupted too soon. Everywhere we went we went together, except to School, and to his work. One Wednesday night, he had come and it was a windy, sort of stormy night in November. We had a short walk and then enjoyed visiting with the family. All the kids loved Charlie Baker. At last they all went to bed and we sat up by the coal heater in the dining room. We sat side by side for awhile, then he said, “do you take your hair down and brush it before you go to bed?" I said, “Yes, I like to do that." He began taking the pins out and got the brush and brushed it and brushed it. Then he tried putting it up with my hair pins and combs. I laughed and laughed at the way he fixed it. At last we sat down and he said, he had better go pretty soon. Just then Papa opened the middle door to the parlor, and said,"LaRie, it's late you better go to bed and let this young man get same sleep before it's time to go to work." I just looked at him, and he got a little cross, and looking at Charles, he said something like this, "I don't appreciate you keeping my daughter up so late, Charley." We just kept mum, and he backed into the Front Room and closed the Door. Mamma told me next morning, Daddy said to her, "LaRie, the little stinker, just defied me." Charles said, "What would you have done if your 'Father had thrown me out and told me never to come back?” I said, "I'm afraid I would have gone with you." He hugged me tight and said "Oh, Thank you." He left and we never pestered them again like that. I felt like I was actually part of him. We enjoyed each other's company until December, when their numbers were really due. Another note arrived from Charles, who asked if I could miss School to go to the Train with them in Milford that afternoon. He came for me and we went. My Grandmother lived in Milford, her sweet unmarried daughter, Lottie, and sons Uncle Joe and Uncle Orrice Murdock. I wanted them to meet my dear Boy-friend, so we went to see them, and ate Supper with them. Aunt Lottie told us she would meet us at the Train to see them off. After Supper, we went to Fergusson's where his Parents were waiting for the Train. But before we arrived there, we walked on the Milford streets and talked, and tried to enjoy being together for the last time until after the War. I could not hold up, but cried and cried. It was my first great personal sorrow. I thought I could not stand it. He soothed me and told me that if anything happened that he could not return, he hoped I would go to the Temple and be sealed to him. I could not bear the thought of not seeing him again in this life! Finally, it was time to meet at the Train, so He went there, His folks and many of the families of the Minersville boys' folks were collected there also. On our way back to the Depot Charles told me to please dry my tears before we get to the Depot for he had told his Mother, he did not want any tears when he left, I did my best, and hid my sorrow. When he said good bye to his parents his brother was crying, and he said "Now, Mother, you know I love you. You have done this before, you can do it again.” He referred to the time she had to leave her two dear boys in Old Mexico, in time of War. She smiled through her tears, and kissed him, and he was off. He grabbed my hand and took me to the door of the Traln, he held onto the hand rail of the steps, and his other hand held mine. When the Train started, we walked faster, and faster together, then he had to let go of me, and swing himself up onto the steps of the Train, .I thought my heart would break. Just then my dear Aumt Lottie stepped swiftly up to me. I had not moved since he left me. She took me in her arms and said, "He will came back LaRie." I kept that thought in mind and controled myself. I went home with Bakers that night, to Minersville. I never lost faith that he would return to me. All the next day I felt only partly conscious. I could not talk about my sorrow. Two days later, at noon. Lottie brought the mail, as she always called at the Post Office for our mail. She handed me a note. I opened it, and it was signed by “Chas. E. Baker. " I read it and shouted out in sheer JOY!" The note said, "It was a MISTAKE. Our numbers were not up after all! I'll see you this evening." Words cannot express my JOY! We enjoyed each other's company three evenings a week until Dec. 13th, 1917, when their Numbers were really up to be called. Again we went to the Train, as before and I did my best to hold up, not to cry, but it was too much so soon again. We went north to the Railroad tracks and walked back to the Depot. Again, he asked me not to cry at the train, but it was all so real all over again, I tried hard though. It was a repeat of the first time they left. His dear Mother was wonderful! She comforted us both. We ran beside the train as it pulled out, as before and he finally let go of my hand and swung himself up onto the steps, and held onto my hand until it really put on steam and he was gone into the darkness. I could not move. I felt someone put their arms around me from behind, and when I looked, expecting my dear Aunt Lottie, it was an older girl I had known when I was 14 years old and visiting friends in Buckhorn, over in the Parowan area three years ago, She was Myrtle Edwards. She was motherly and gentle, and led me back in the dark to the Depot, where the Baker's were waiting for me. Everyone was so tender and kind to me. All our hearts were aching. I did have faith that he would return to me and the words Aunt Lottie had said to me echoed in my ears, That night I stayed all night with Grandma and Aunt Lottie and went back to Minersville on the Stage next Morning. There was a stage full of those who had let their loved ones go on that train the night before. We gave each other courage. Charles was fortunate to be assigned to a Ship guarding New York harbor. Milton was assigned, as a Seaman carrying soldiers across to France, and back again. They had both signed up as Seamen, but they got separated. Milton's ship went back and forth to France carrying Soldiers. When he would be on this side and had Liberty, he would try to contact Charles so they could arrange to meet quite often. This was a great Privilege for those brothers. They were separated first in California in the Rooky Camps. At first I just got Post Cards in the Mail from Charles, It made me self-conscious knowing anyone knew the news I got from Charles, but soon nice private letters replaced the Cards. He said he had to wait until he got paid to buy some Stationery. Strange we did not think to send writing materials with them. When the brothers met on Liberty, they said they would never go with rowdy crowds of Sailors. They looked up Libraries, Museums and the Mormon Church activities. Once when Edna Huldiway was in New York an a Mission, the boys knew her well, they arranged to take her and her companion out to Coney Island to spend the afternoon. They said they tried every Ride and entertainment, even the New Giant Racer, which was so fast and scary as if it would pitch them head long from the seat which they were fastened to. It sounded so scary to me, that I never put myself through the ordeal. The Ferris Wheel was my favorite always out here. Charles had lots of experiences guarding foreign ships who came into the New York Harbor, One frightening experience I will relate. He was guarding a Chinese Ship in New York Harbor. It was loaded with Chinese. In war time the Chinese were not allowed to land in the United States, Charles was the head officer, and they had had no trouble keeping the Chinese from going ashore, up to this time. The Sailors had four hours on and four hours off duty and Charles had finished his four hours on, and had just gone up to the top deckland was sitting on the bridge writing a letter to me. He was Head Officer, and said he had two hours more bff duty now. Suddenly, the Officer under him came bounding up the stairs, calling, "Bake, came down here on the double! They're going to force their way off the Ship, and they far outnumber us!!!” Charles jumped up and was down those stairs in a flash--never touching the steps, with a Prayer in his heart for HELP FROM HEAVEN! “I hit the deck and gave the ORDER TO SETTLE DOWN." They settled down, and I said, with power like I had never used before, "Not A MAN OF YOU ARE GOING OFF THIS SHIP!" He said he knew that someone besides those few little human seamen Sailors stood there by him! He felt tremendous POWER, and the sailors bore testimony of it also! Why, those Chinese were armed with knives ordinarily, and could have killed the small group of Sailors who were guarding them on that Ship! He said he had many hair-raising experiences that have happened to our Soldiers and Sailors who keep the Commandments of the Lord. He keeps His Promises! Charles E. Baker had a great-Testimony, he was no stranger to the Lord, Charles had been trying to get a Furlough for August. It was now June 1918. He thought he was going to get it, and wrote that if I was breaking any of the Lord's Commandments, for me to stop short right now, because he wanted to marry me for time and All Eternity! He had sent me a beautiful little Tiffany Diamond Ring in April, and following that my Parents received a special sacred Letter from him, asking for my hand in marriage for Eternity. I felt very self-conscious but certainly desired it with all my heart. I did not get to see the letter, but they told me about it. I had so much to look forward to! The very day that he was to arrive the first week in August, a shocking letter came from him saying we would have to postpone the long looked for Furlough. The Government had called for Volunteers to go away and guard the China Waters. He said, “I am terribly disappointed, but you know me!!" He never shirked a duty. This made me sick inside I could not even tell Mama what his letter said. I kept it to myself and silently prayed all the day long, that nothing would be allowed to take his dear life. This was the day he would have arrived home, August 7th, 1918. My heart ached and I just could not bring myself to feel good about it. My Aunt Sadie Carter, Daddy's Sister nae sick and my Mother had to go to her home to take care of her. I did not feel like talking about it, so did not tell my Mother. She was gone all day, and in the afternoon, Irma came and we took a walk up towards the east Canyon, and then around to the south side of town. We stopped at Aunt Sadie's home as I could help Mamma home with our sweet one year old baby Reva. When we arrived at Aunt Sadie's Aunt Leah Williams was also there with her sweet baby girl, and mamma was busy in the bedroom with Aunt Sadie. I gladly picked up my baby sister, Reva, and stood her on the table to help her stand alone, as she had not yet done so. My Mother had told me that the Dr. had been there and just left. We had come in the screen door, in the front room, and left the door open. Suddenly we heard that screen door open, and someone walk across the floor, and stop about in the doorway into the Kitchen, where we were. I was holding Reva to get her to try to stand alone, saying "Lonie, lonie, Reva" and trying to let go of her. When I heard those footsteps stop, I thoughtlessly turned around and looked at that Middle door. I could not believe my eyes! There framed in that middle doorway stood Charlie Baker! I had never seen him in his Navy Blues--his Sailor Suit, and I simply could not hold onto my senses. I had the thought that the Devil had put an apparition before me, for he must be now sailing to the China Waters!! I actually lost consciousness. As I swayed towards the floor, I could hear a baby crying hard but I did not remember I'd had hold of my darling baby sister who could not stand alone. The crys got farther and further away, then I did not hear anything, then from a distance, I heard the crying getting closer and closer, and then I saw before my eyes, the face of my beloved, Charles E. Baker looking down at me. I was out only an instant..., but long enough for Irma to rush across that floor and pick the baby up. And they told me that as I slowly swayed and fell, Charles crossed that floor and caught me before I hit the floor with my head. I still could not believe it was real! He held me to him, and I said his name. When it was over, Aunt Leah said to me, "LaRie, that was the most moving thing I have ever seen, on a stage or in any kind of a show or entertainment!! It was so nice that he was there to walk home with us, and we had a most wonderful week getting ready to go to Salt Lake to the Great Salt Lake Temple to be married and sealed for all Eternity! He said the very day he mailed that letter the decision came out that that group would not go to the China Waters, and he was able to arrive in Minersville on the vary day he had planned to in the first place. lie had sent another letter telling me, but it did not arrive for a couple of days. We were to be married in the Salt Lake Temple August 14, 1918. A Happy Day!! When we parted that night we thanked the Lord gratefully that He had brought us together again, and that the decision to not leave for the China Waters, was made. There was not time for a letter to arrive letting me know he would come home as planned, as his Furlough was dated to begin the very day they released him from the commitment. We hurried up our preparations for our Marriage. We were married August 14th, 1918 in the Beautiful Salt Lake Temple. We stayed for four or five days in Salt Lake, seeing the sights and visiting Harmen Relatives. I was so proud of my Sailor Boy! Those days they were not allowed to remove their Uniforms when appearing in public, at least in War time. I was very happy, but knew we would have to be separated until after the War was over. But we both had faith he would return safely, which he did. He was home 20 days. It took 5 days each way traveling on the train. There was no Air travel then. I was only 17 years old then, and it was a little embarrassing when we went to the Court House in Beaver to get our rarriage Liscense, my sweet Mother had to sign for me. I was under age. The only thing I regret is that my dear Father, George R, Williams who was Bishop of Minersville, and could have given me a Recommend to the Temple for Marriage, but he being a Sheep man, he was away with the Sheep, and I had to get it from his first Counselor, Bro. Heber Gillins. Papa always teased me and said I ran away and got married. Dr. McGreger, of Beaver, was Stake President who signed our Recommends. He had 20 days home. It took five days both ways to travel by train each way. There was no Air Travel in those Days. I had to give him up again, but I felt after that wonderful day in the Sacred Salt Lake Temple that when he returned from the War, at last, that we would never be separated again! He had many testimonies of the Blessings of the Lord while in the Service. He continued to write me every day, and I did the same. Sometimes while on the Ship he could not mail his letters until he got Liberty, but they would come in Packs and I would have a feast, reading them. I felt that I had been blessed with the best and most wonderful man in the whole world! The Armistice was signed the 11th of November 1918, but he was not mustered out until near the end of January. He arrived home the 29th of Jan. 1919. Happy Day!! At this time both of our parents' were considering making a change in their plans for the future. My father wanted to sell out and go to Blackfoot, Idaho. He had a brotherer and cousins there who were prosperous farmers, and they encourased him to make the move. Charles' folks found that people were moving back into Old Mexico at this time, and had been even earlier, so they were in favor of going home to their property in that beautiful Chihuahua, Mexico. We had to make a decision which way to go. I was so thankful to be able to go with Charles, wherever he went, that I did not talk any other way. The Baker’s wanted him to go with them, and yet they felt that I was so young to leave my family. I told them all I wanted was to never be separated from my husband again as long as I live. Charles finally decided to go to Idaho. So the two wonderful Baker parents and their youngest son, Alfred, Jr, 15 years old, went alone. The married children decided not to leave the good old U.S.A. When all was packed up and loaded into the freight Car on the Railroad, Charles and Ronald Carter, my cousin, rode with the stock in the Stock car to look after them. We, the family, followed two days later. I soon became a Farmer's Wife, and that Farmer was a great worker. He took well with all our folks in Idaho, and with all who knew him. He was a devoted, appreciative husband. He praised everything I did. He made a fuss over everything I did. I was so in love and HAPPY! I simply adored him. We first lived in Aunt Mary Williams' house. She moved all her precious things out of her parlor putting them in the basement and gave us that room to live in. My father and Charles worked her farm for her that summer. That fall we moved into two rooms of Uncle Johnny’s farm home a quarter of a mile west of Aunt Mary's. Here on December 22nd, 1919 our first child , a daughter, was born--Reva Baker. Charles farmed for Aunt Mary the next summer. We were in Thomas Ward, Blackfoot Stake and lived ten miles west of Blackfoot, Idaho. Charles taught a class of young people in Sunday School. In the fall of 1920 we moved to Swan Berg's farm west of the railroad siding Liberty, five miles farther west from Blackfoot. It was also west of the American Falls Canal. We farmed there on shares for three years during which time our second child was born November 21st, 1921--LuAna Baker. The last year we had to let a beautiful crop--ten acres of potatoes--freeze in the ground because the price dropped so low it did not pay to dig them. So Charles quit the farm and took the job of Ditch Rider for the American Falls Canal Company. He had thirty two miles of Main Canal and two Iaterals to ride and often getting off his horse to measure out water to the Farmers every day. It was a full day's riding horseback, for $7:.00 a month. This strenuous horse-back riding all day long every day brought on Arthritis Sciatica in his back and leg. After several years, ha studied health and during the winter once he took a 23 day Fast under the direction of Bernarrr McFadden's Program of Health. It did help him greatly, for he got right over all the pain, and the Program said to break the fast on Milk. We now know this was wrong, that he should have used Vegetables and juices to break his long fast. He was better for a short while, then the Sciatica came back. I'm sur the constant riding horse back, bouncing for 8-10 hours every day on horse back packed his blood doun in his legs and ankles, and also perhaps was responsible for the ruptured Appendicitis which later caused his untimely death. We bought land from the Government, through the “Carey Act", where the ditch rider's house was built under the American Falls Canal and east Lateral. We raised Alfalfa Seed, and Alfalfa Hay, after first raising a crop of Wheat. He had a water Wheel built in front of the huge Check, to raise the water out over the high ground we broke up. We had head-gates right out of the Canals for the low ground and garden. We had a large garden near the house where we raised vegetables and raspberries, and a beautiful large garden of colorful flowers in front of the house. We had luscious lawns and being below the high bank of the Canal, we could sleep outdoors from Spring until fate fall, on the lawn, under the trees. We often got up and took a swim in the Lateral before breakfast every morning. Before I go on, I must tell about the wonderful trip we had as a family to Old Mexico after the Water Run was over in September and October of 1934. Charles used to say, "If it’s the last thing I ever do, I must take my family to Old Mexico, the land of my Birth. If Old Glory waved over that Country, that's where we would make our home.” He was determined to get out of debt before we went and it seemed so long, he finally suggested in early Spring of 1928 that we send the money to his Parents and have them come to Idaho to visit us. We did that, and they got ready and left their home but decided to stop all along the way and visit their friends and relatives. That proved to be unwise, in that they took the whole Spring and Summer traveling wherever they had relatives , and they did not arrive in Idaho until quite late in the Fall, October sometime. By the time they got up to Minersville, Beaver County, Utah, it was cool weather and Mother Baker took a bad cold which resulted in a bad case of pleurisy. She was Bedfast in Minersville for sometime, and still weak when she arrived in Idaho. We were very disappointed, knowing what hard winters we have in Idaho. She soon fell ill, although we had some very lovely visits with them before her Pleurisy got the best of her. We enjoyed so much the Company of both Mother and Father Baker. They are wonderful people, so firm in the Faith and appreciative of their lovely trip. All our neighbors enjoyed visiting them also, and we had very lovely evenings invited out as well as in our home. But in November Snows set in and by December Mother Baker had a bad case of Pleura--Pneumonia. We were so frightened. We had the Dr. and did everything we could for her, but she did not respond. She was very ill by Dec 20th. We grieved that they had arrived so late In the year when we had hoped they would come in the Summer, when things looked so lovely in the growing seasons of the year. She did not rally, and on Dec. 22nd, it was our daughter Reva's Birthday, she went in to visit her dear Grandmother, and told her. The dear loving Grandmother answered her sweetly. She never complained about anything, just showed loving appreciation for being able to have the pleasure of seeing her loved ones once again. We had the Elders to give her Blessings and had the Dr., but it seemed she could not recover. She talked confidentially to her dear husband, Father Baker that evening, and he seemed depressed afterwards. We got the Dr. again in the morning and he said her lungs were.completely full of fluid, and he was sorry---. She expressed her great love for all of us and thanked Charlie for sending the money so that she could see all of her dear relatives on the say to Idaho, and how she had enjoyed all of our association, and thanked the Lord for her life and her great love for the Gospel and the Savior. She passed quietly away the next day which was the 23rd of December 1928. She lay acorpse in our house on Christmas day. It was a sweet, sad Christmas for us all, but especially dear Father Baker and my Dear Charles. We bought a Lot in the Thomas-Riverside Cemetery and buried her for away from her beloved home in Old Mexico. Bill was the only one of the family who came to the Funeral. He was a strength and a support to Charles. He stayed a few days then Father Baker went back with him, as he was anxious to go home to Mexico, where his eldest daughter and youngest son, Alfred, lived. Charles still wanted to make the trip to Old Mexico, now since his dear lonely Father was there, so we saved money for a couple of years or mmore, and in August 1934 we set out for the long planned trip to Charles's native land. It was a beautiful and interesting trip, of two months. But, we never saw dear Father Baker alive again. He took sick and died 6th of May before we could leave the Ditch job that was our livelihood. But we had a lovely time. And we could well understand why Charles always said, "If Old Glory waved over Old Mexico, I would go there to live.” He was happy to be able to take his Family to the land of his Birth, and we loved it and understood him. Life down there was still more primitive than in the U.S.A, and Charlie encouraged his Brother Alfred to sell out and move his family to the United States, this was made known to his neighbors, and they resented Charles a little for his advice. But Charles knew his children would have a better chance in the United States, for further education and to get ahead here. It was so nice for the girls and me to meet the fine members of the Church in those settlements. Charles had told me so much about them, I did not even feel strange to them. I really loved the Saints down there, and they were wonderful to me. On our way home we visited all of the Temples! My, that was a glorious experience! There was the Mesa, St. George, Manti, and Salt Lake, and Logan Temples. We had carried our recommends with us all the way. Our daughters were given the privilege of being Baptized for the Dead, 150 times each while we were going through the Mamti Temple. LuAna had been troubled with one or two painful boils on our trip to Mexico and we noticed that she never mentioned then again, when we mentioned it after we returned home she realised she had not noticed the irritation at all since she was Baptized in the Manti Temple for the Dead. She was healed. Charles E. Baker was a true Latter Day Saint. He loved the Lord and His True Gospel above everything else in the world. He was a Sunday School Teacher, and a faithful Home Teacher, and kept all the Lord’s Commandments. He carried his Pocket Doctrine & Covenants with him on his job, and would read it while the water was filling the Head Gate, so he could measure it, then ride on to the next one. At home he would read from the Book of Mormon, or the Bible before going to bed. We had a good team of horses, a horse and buggy to travel with for many years, before we could afford to buy our Ford Car. But to make the trip to Mexico, we bought a good used DeSota Six. We had a fine herd of Milk Cows, and about fifty head of Sheep on the little 40 Acre Form next to the Canal. We were very happy to return home after our lovely trip to Mexico and during the years we were also preparing for when we could afford to buy a piece of land up nearer the settlement, where we could be closer to Church and not have to have Charlie away fram home day after day, riding ditch. So we saw the chance to buy 40 Acres of good land right joining the Canal up near Rockford, Idaho near the School the Girls went to School at. We borrowed on his Government Insurance and paid Cash for it and the Water for it. Then He bought the lumber and hauled it onto the ground, all ready for him to begin building a new house. The house that was there was very old and too small. We drew the House Plans ourselves and would study them in the evenings often. as we got new ideas for it. It was such a happy time to anticipate when we could live there near the School and the Church, and he would be working on his own farm and grounds all the time. It was to be very soon, we hoped that after this Summer, we could leave the Ditch Riding for good. It was the last few days of the irrigating time when the Water would be turned out of the Canal for the Winter. I was getting dinner ready for Charlie and Papa, who had been working for us that day, and Charles was due to return from his ride. As I passed the Buffet, where the Plans for our Home lay, I stopped and looked at it and wondered if it was really the way we wanted it, or if there should be a smell change. As I was thinking about it, a strange feeling came over me and I got a definite impression that caused me to feel weak all through my body. The Thought went through my mind suddenly very impressively: "These Plans will never be realized!" Oh, the thought made me feel sick! Just then the men came into the house. I went into Charlie's Arms, and began to cry. He asked what the matter was? I sobbed out the words that had come to me with such force. They both laughed and scolded me for entertaining such a thought. But I was really worried about it. Just a few days later, the 20th of September, 1935, my Darling awoke in pain. He told us he had had a strange dream. He said he saw what looked to be the entrails of a chicken or something. He said it was an object oblong shaped kind of round, it was torn wide open and looked very bad. I was very frightened but did not let him know I was worried, but I was, He went out to the chores., but soon came in and lay down on the floor in writhing pain. I ran to the telephone and called Mr. Heal, his Boss on the Canal, in Aberdeen. Before he could get to the phone Charles was up from the floor, and took the Phone from me. He told Mr. Near that he was distressed with pain but that he would go on his ride, but if Mr. Near happened to be coming up this way today, he might need someone to take his place. I then took the Phone and told Mr. Neal it was serious, that he had lain down on the floor with pain. I felt he should not go on the ride today. Mr. Neal talked to Charles again, and said,"well if you feel like riding start up the Canal, and I'll bring a man to take your place when I catch up with you." I begged him not to go, but to let me take him to Town to the Dr. in the car. But he would not listen. He did not feel like eating breakfast, so rode off. Mr. Near stopped by at 10:30 and asked about him. I told him I had been telephoning along the line up the Canal, and each place told me he had just passed there. I never was able to catch up with him. Mr. Neal went an expecting to overtake him. But he never did. Charles rode to the end of his line and started back on the opposite side of the Canal, riding and measuring out the Water. Noon came and I had not heard from him. At 2:00 P.M. I called the Pumping Plant up the canal a ways, and found that he was there lying down a very sick man. I talked to him an the Phone. I felt he should go to the Dr. but he was always prejudiced against Medical Drs. He finally made it home, and I gave him an enema to try to relieve the pain. I took the phone down to call the Dr. and he objected, but I got the Dr. on the phone and told him of Charles’ condition. He thought he should come out, but Charles called in from the bed and said, "No, I don't want a Dr." The Dr. heard him so he told me to put Ice packs an every 20 Minutes, and let him know how he is in the Morning. In the morning he was no better, but still would not consent to have the Dr. I had the Elders come and bless him, but the 2nd night he recognized some kind of a change, and he said I'd better call the Dr. now. I was so afraid it was too late. The Dr. Came right out, and announced it Appendicitis. I took him right in to the Hospital, and the Drs. found it had ruptured already. They showed me the Appendix. It looked just like what Charles had seen in his dream, large swollen oblong diseased Appendix. It was green, gangrene had set in, He had Peritonitis! Right in the midst of the operation his ears went dark, and he was not breathing. His tongue had slipped into his throat. They had to work to make him breath. He suffered terribly for 9 ½ days, and passed away on the Ist of October 1935. I know now, that I should not have listened to a sick man! I should have taken him to the Dr. immediately. My faith and his also was so strong I did not realize how treacherous sickness can be. So many prayers were said for him, and we had the Elders every night. One night the Priesthood of the Stake were holding meeting, and they Prayed for him. I was sure he would be healed. The blessings were so powerful, but He was worthy to go on to a more fertile field of labor in the Spirit World, evidently. He had always longed to go on a mission to preach the Gospel. He was prepared. But I also wondered if my own faith had been strong enough. I loved him so much, I could hardly stand the sorrow. I could not account for his sudden passing until I attended the funeral of President Nicholas G. Smith, a member of the Temple Presidency. Elder Harold B. Lee spoke in that funeral, and mentioned the scripture, (D. & C. 42:48.) "And again, it shall come to pass that he that hath faith in Me to be healed, and is not appointed unto death, shall be healed. I have read the Book of Mormon and D. & C. many times, and never got that great message before. It just had to be that way, that he was needed over there, and was appointed unto death of the body. But I know that he is not DEAD! He is serving His beloved Savior and His Father in Heaven. We can assist by going to the Temple and doing work for the Dead. I had that Privilege, as a Temple Ordinance Worker in The Salt Lake Temple for eleven years, during the time I was working for 30 years there in the Lord's House. It was great consolation to me. And I do look forward to joining: him some happy day when we meet to part no more. I'm trying to live for it while holding my hand with his right hand, he pointed feebly with his left hand in the corner of the top of the room, as if someone were there. My Darling held my hand and finally breathed a weary sign (sic) and passed on through the Veil, Oct. Ist 1935. I'm so thankful for His life. We were very happy, we four. He adored us three. He often stood by the girl's bed while they were asleep at night and lovingly touched them on the cheeks and I heard him breath, *Kids, Oh Kids." I wonder what he was thinking. Words cannot express how we missed him. He had one of the largest Funerals the Thomas Ward ever held. There was not standing room. He was so well known and liked in his work with the public. Everyone who knew him came, and there were many, many beautiful Flowers. The American Legion Band came out and gave the 19 Gun Salute of "Taps" at the grave side. He was honored as a Sailor in the United States Navy. He loved the Stars and Stripes, and they gave me the large Flag that draped his dear Casket. Bill Baker stayed until I was resettled after our move from the Ditch Riding Home. The Bakers in milford were very loyal and thoughtful and kind to us. One member of the family made the trip up to Blackfoot once a month while we were there, and they did the same after School was out and we moved to Salt Lake. Sweet Edna would spend the 24th of July with us, watching the big parade and going to the Great Salt Lake for a swim. And the Boys would come one at a time each month for nearly two years and drive us drive un around to see the sights, etc. They did not forget us. We loved them, and appreciated their thoughtfulness. One of the Speakers at the funeral was our Stake President, Bro. Elmer Williams. I asked him to speak, he knew us quite well. He gave a wonderful tribute to Charles and at the end of his talk, he said, “To know Charlie was to love him. He was an honest to God, MAN.” He was so right! We were completely out of debt when he left us;, our plans and hopes for our form at Rockford, Idaho, near Thomas, were all shattered. I left the renter on the place., I had offers to sell it, but somehow, I could not bring myself to do it. It seemed like I needed to keep it for Charles' return. Yet I knew he would not return. Our daughters were wonderful companions to me. They were very attentive and I could trust them in every way. We soon made friends who are still true blue, and we feel we did right to come to Salt Lake. We worked in Genealogy together, and they each took their endowments while in their teens, so we could go together through the Temple. They later each married in the Salt Lake Temple and we all three did all we could gathering Genealogy. Our love and testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel grew by leaps and bounds. We are so thankful for the true Church of Jesus Christ upon the Earth. We know it is TRUE! We love the Lord with all our Hearts! We expect to meet our Daddy when we are permitted to go over there, with JOY! The song that expresses my feelings is “I Come To The Garden Alone." Our sorrow was beyond words. It seemed so unreal that we were alone here in Salt Lake City. We had a few relatives, but no one could take our Daddy's place. I came to Salt Lake at the prayerful advice of my Bishop and one of our Stake High Council Members. You see, I married before I had finished School at the Murdock Academy, at Beaver. So I needed to matriculate my education. (I) Studlied some Correspondence Courses and my lessons were graded at B.Y.U. by mail, from Bladkfoot, High School Study Hall, as I could not concentrate at home. I lived in the past continually, so I was given permission to study at the Blackfoot High School, where my daughters attended School. I made the grade, and was accepted at the L.D.S. Business College in June 1936. The girls finished High School at West High, in Salt Lake at the same time, and at one time we were all three enrolled at L.D.S. B.C. for five weeks. Then Reva was chosen by Bro. Bennett, Secretary of the Genealogical Society, to train as a Youth Researcher. She accepted and became the first youth Researcher ever hired by the Genealogical Society. This opened the field of Research for Genealogically minded young people. Reva was very capable and is highly recogized in this field throughout her stake and Ward as well. LuAna elected to go to the B.Y.U. and work her way through School there. She did well, working hard, and enjoyed one year at the University, then a wonderful returned Missionary joined the Sunday Night Missionary and Young People's Study Class of the Book of Mormon, etc. LuAna and he each felt they had known each other somewhere before. They checked where each had been and could not find the answer, unless it was in the Spirit World. They went together all winter and were Married in the Salt Lake Temple 7 April 1941. They are the Parents of 8 living children. Reva was married to Alien Wesley Holt 17 Dec. 1942, also in the Salt Lake Temple. By this time I was out of School, where I went for 21 Months, and got work in the Office of the Salt Lake Temple, where the year after I was set Apart a Temple Ordinance Worker for 11 years . I had been a widow for almost 14 years, and after the second world War, I married for Time, Elzie E. Bigelow, a veteran of the second world War. He had been in Thel's Company and same Battalion, etc, and had loved that marvelous fellow. This was the drawing cord between us. He was in Attu where Thel was killed, and knew and loved him. He saw him the day before he was killed. We were married 28 Feb. 1948 for Time. He was a Seventy, and we went together on a 2 year 9 Month's mission to New Zealand. We have enjoyed working together in the Church and it was wonderful to have someone so valiant in the Priesthood as a Companion, after living so long without My Darling Eternal Husband. It is my greatest desire to live worthy to meet my beloved Charles when our time an Earth is finished. When Elzie asked me to Marry him, I talked very plainly to him, about what I felt makes a successful Marriage. It is if the couple is of the same thought and mind. I questioned him, "Who do you hold the greatest in your life?” He said, “The Lord, Jesus Christ!" Then, “What is your Politics?” He said, “Republican!” So I said, "Well, now, if I can depend upon your sincere loyalty, I guess you will do!" He has been a wonderful Companion! I thank the Lord for him in my lonely life! ********************** Addend by Reva B. Holt ************************* Charlie Baker had blue eyes and blonde wavy hair which darkened to sandy as he grew older. His skin was fair and did not tan but reddened from exposure to the weather for he was an outdoor man. He stood five feet nine and a half inches tall and weighed 160 pounds being lean and muscular. He was the shortest of his father's four sons. He loved life and was happy. He had a great sense of humor and loved to tease, especially children and cats. Our family of cats adored him. When he'd come home they'd run to meet him meowing loudly. He'd pick them up one by one and toss them high in the air onto the roof of the-house or into the trees. They'd clamour down running up to him for more. He squirted milk into their mouths while he was milking and they loved him. He loved to sing but couldn't remember all the words to songs and so made up his own. We'd hear him at work in the fields or coming alone the canal bank singing to the of of his voice making up the words and the tune as he went along. He was honest in all his dealings. I can still hear him saying, "My word is my bond." and it was. You didn't need a written, notarized contract when dealing with him. He was plain spoken and frank. When others misunderstood or took him wrong he was deeply hurt and sometimes angered because they hadn't understood his meaning. When angered, he was quickly over it and never held a grudge. He admired education and took correspondence courses during the winter. He read all he could about agricultural advancements planning to use ideas he'd learned. During the growing season while the canal was full of water, he'd ride thirty-two miles every day, even Sunday, tending to the needs of the farmers. The months the canal was empty he had to clear weeds and willows from inside the canal and along the banks and shore up the banks. After ditch, riding he worked hard developing his homestead land. Sometimes he had a hired man to help. Thel and Lee, his brother Bill's boys, came one at a time and helped some years. Lars Petersen, a crippled ex-cowboy, came other years. a built a water wheel, which Lee helped him improve, to carry water to the field on the higher ground. Like his people before him, he was a hard-working man. He was bi-lingual, speaking Spanish, which he learned as a boy from his Mexican neighbors in Chuichupa, and English, his mother tongue. He loved the Spanish language saying he could express himself better with it than English. Some words expressed his feelings better and he couldn't find English words to do as well. Immigrant Italian farmers would meat him on the canal bank and couldn't communicate with him until he tried Spanish words. Then the foreigners eyes would light up and he'd say an Italian word equivalent until they understood each other. Then he'd (Charles) learn his (the immigrant’s) story and circumstances and he and mother would befriend him (the immigrant) and his family. He liked people and was well-liked by everyone he met. When he died, Thomas High school, which we attended, dismissed anyone who wanted to attend his funeral. People filled the Church and were standing around the walls and open doorways, so many came. Many were not of our faith but (were) farmers whom he'd served for eleven years as ditch-rider. When he died he was forty-two years old. They had been married seventeen years. Mother was only thirty-four, I was fifteen and LuAna was thirteen. Numbing, chilling grief overcame me. I could not see how the sun could shine or anyone could smile or laugh. How could I survive for ten years even? But I did. Now nearly forty-eight years later, I have six children and nineteen grandchildren to swell his posterity. Thank God for the short life of Charles Edward Baker, my father.

Dora LaRie Williams Baker Bigelow by herself

Contributor: kcapson Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

My schooling began at Greenville 1st Grade then moved to Minersville for 2nd year. During the last quarter of 8th Grade we moved to the Delta Land and Water Project two miles south of Milford and I finished the year out in a little one-room school house on the "Flat" with Mrs. Webster as the teacher. This was the spring of 1915. I began High School at Milford High in the fall of 1915. I always loved school and was doing well. In the last of April and 2nd of May my two brothers, David, age 6 years and Orrice, 19 months died suddenly and with our broken hearts we could no longer be happy in our home in Milford. We moved back to Minersville where I completed my 2nd year of High School. The 1st World War broke out in April 1917 and my sweetheart left me and went into the US Navy 14 Dec. 1917. He returned on furlough 7 Aug. 1918 and we were married 14 Aug. in the Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah. He returned to his station in New York Harbor on 25th of Aug. 1918 and in Sept. I entered school at the Murdock Academy, Beaver, Utah. The terrible 'Flu' broke out that winter and my school was again interrupted. The Armistice was signed Nov. 11, 1918 and in January late, my darling husband returned home. I stopped school and we moved to Idaho in April 4th, 1919 along with my parents who had sold their farm and home at Minersville and were moving to Idaho to make their home. My eldest child, a daughter, Reva Baker, was born 22 Dec. 1919 at Thomas, Idaho. In that ward I was Secretary of the Primary from 1919 to 1921. I was also organist for the Primary those years. I had been Secy. of Religion Class in Minersville when eleven and twelve years old. A Primary Teach in Minersville Ward when twelve to fourteen years old, and teacher in Jr. Sunday School when fourteen. My second child, a daughter, LuAna Baker, was born on a farm between Rockford and Pingree, Idaho, 21 Nov. 1921. My husband was a Ward Teacher and a Sunday School Teacher of the 1st Intermediate Class in the Thomas Ward during these years which I have mentioned 1919 to 1926. We were called into the Ward Genealogical Committee together in 1926 where we enjoyed working together. We began our Books of Remembrance together at that time. In 1922 I lost a baby by miscarriage and infection closed the tubes and I never conceived again, which made me very sad. In 1929 my husband's parents visited us from Old Mexico. Mother Baker had had a severe case of pleuresy at Minersville on her way to Idaho. She came to us all taped and was still delicate in health. That month we got winter extra early and the cold wind and snow which they were not used to in Mexico gave her plural pneumonia. We did all we could for her, but it was very quick acting and filled up her lungs immediately and she passed away in our home on the third day after taking ill, 23 Dec. 1929. This was a great shock and a sorrow to all of us, especially dear Father Baker, who went back alone to his little home in Colonia Chuachupa, Chihuahua, Mexico. All of his children would loved to have him live with them, but he went back to be with his eldest daughter, Ketura B. Sevey in Mexico. 11 Jan. 1930 my own dear Mother died of spinal meningitis in Idaho Falls LDS Hospital after a short illness. This was another severe shock and deep hurt to our hearts. My dear husband and I had much in common and drew very close together, as we had always been. My husband had always wanted to take his family to visit the land of his birth, but it was a sorrow to know that we had waited until his dear parents had passed on. Father Baker had died in 1933. 16 Aug. 1934 we started on our two month and more than 1200 mile trip to Old Mexico. We visited relatives and all the Temples in the United States at that time. Logan, Salt Lake, Manti, St. George and Mesa Temples. It was a most wonderful trip. We returned home 13 Oct. 1934 with our faith renewed from the renewal of our covenants and the joy of seeing so many of our loved ones. Charlie always said he would take his family to see the land of his birth it it was the last thing he did. The next summer he worked extra long hours with his Ditch-rider job and also farming our 40 acre farm where we lived and also a 40 up the canal at Rockford where we planned to move to the next spring when he would quit the ditch and farm exclusively, now that we had both places paid for in full. But such joy was not for us in this life. Charlie took acute appendicitis which ruptured 3 days before he would submit to an operation and he passed away 9 days after the terrible operation in the Beck Hospital at Blackfoot 1 Oct. 1935. This was the hardest blow that had ever struck his family. It took much fasting and prayer to be able to understand and get hold of ourselves. Reva and LuAna were 14 and 16 years now, and after much meditation, fasting and prayer and consulting with our Bishop and wife, we moved to Salt Lake City, where the girls went on to High School and I went to the LDS Business College for 21 months. It was very hard to study or concentrate with my sorrow and regrets. I knew we should have had that operation sooner, but he would never submit to even having the Dr. come. He was so sure he would get better through his clean living and prayers and administration. But we know now that his mission was finished and we had to have the lessons it took to stand on our own feet and learn to depend upon the Lord instead of our Daddy. It was many years before I came across the scripture that told me why his powerful administrations failed to restore him to life and health again. D & C Sec. 42:48. Read verses 43 - 48 inclusive. We are sure that his Mission was finished and that the Lord will say to him, "Well done thou good and faithful servant, enter into thy rest." He was such a hard worker all his life, never giving up when things seemed almost impossible. His courage lives on and was our inspiration in our time of becoming accustomed to life in a city and the large schools we attended in Salt Lake. In March of 1938 I was called to work in the Temple Office while one of the typists was out because of illness. A Sister Elsie McKnight. On May 1st she returned but was not able to continue long. So I was called back permanently 15 May 1938. My eldest dau. was married in the Temple 17 Dec. 1942 to Allen Wesley Holt. Her sister, LuAna was married in the Temple 7 Apr. 1941 to Ariel Elmer Sorensen. For seven years I lived alone, sometimes with young girls rooming and boarding with me, but for the last two years I was alone and my continuous loneliness became almost unbearable. At this time I met and married a man for time in the St. George Temple 28 Feb. 1948. He was a Seventy and we were almost immediately called to be Stake Missionaries, Mar. 1948. We labored for 30 months in the Salt Lake Stake Mission during which time we purchased a home at 133 E. 17th South, in the Whittier Ward, Wells Stake. This was in 1950. In 1952 we received a call to go on a foreign mission to New Zealand. We enter4ed the Mission Home 13 Oct. 1952, and left Salt Lake City 20 Oct. by train to Vancouver, Canada where we embarked 23 Oct. on the Orangi for New Zealand. This was a wonderful trip for me, I had been ill most of the whole year, being able to enter the Mission Home on the appointed date through faith, fasting and prayer and receiving a healing which was very evident. The boat trip offered much time to rest and recuperate and all the wonderful fresh air and sunshine needed. We were 21 days on this voyage. We visited the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Honolulu, the Mission Home, Chapel, and Temple touring the Island in the one day that we were stopped there. Next we visited Fiji and toured that island. We landed at Auckland 13 Nov. 1952, went to the Mission Home and found the Mission Pres. visiting one of the islands of the Mission. We waited in Auckland nearly a week for him to return, when he assigned us to the Whangarei District. We labored in Whangarei for twelve months then were transferred to the Wellington District 12 Nov. 1953. Here we labored at Porirua and vicinity for 18 months. We gained permission the last week of our time to visit South Island for a few days. Crossed the channel from Wellington to Picton, stayed over night at Nelson then took overland bus to Christchurch next day. We visited our nephew, Elder Harvey W. Tanner and stayed over night. Took the Maori, a beautiful boat the third night back to Wellington, where we arrived on Sunday morning. Went to Wellington Sunday School then to our Porirua chapel service in the evening. There we said farewell to our beloved members and contacts and left our field of labor Wednesday, June 1st, 1955. Arrived in Auckland again the next morning, June 2nd. Had the weekend in Auckland and boarded the boat June 6 for home. Arrived in San Francisco 23 June and in Salt Lake City the morning of June 25th. Our family was all at the station to meet us and it was a great thrill. Our children, grandchildren and my Father and family all all my living brothers and sisters. Each of our daughters had a little new grandchild for us to see four the first time. We were asked to report to our Stake High Council about the 30th of July and a few days later were handed a written invitation to me with the High Council again in their room at the Stake Center. To our surprise they asked us to accept another Stake Mission, which we did and were set apart that night along with several other couples. I was set apart by President Teerlink. Aug. 1955. We were released from this, our second Stake Mission, this time in the Wells Stake, 6 Aug. 1957, by President John Earl Horton. I was called into the Whittier Ward Sunday School as assistant Enlistment Director the Summer of 1956 where I also acted as a substitute teacher for one year. August 1957 I was called by President Greene of the Wells Stake Presidency to attend a Genealogical Research Class held each Tuesday night at Pres. Teerlink's, under the leadership of Sister Mary Teerlink. When that was completed I was selected and set apart to be on the teaching staff of the Wells Stake Gen. Committee, and also on the Gen. Committee of the Whittier Ward. I taught a class in Basic Research Vol. 1 through 1958-1959, following Basic Research Vol. 1 with Vol. 11. Again in September 1960 I was asked to teach another class likewise. I am working every day at the Temple, as one of the Secretaries to the President's Office, and giving out the keys to the Sisters, as they go through the Temple. Monday nights I type names for the dead on the men's side for the two evening companies. I was given a typist recorders position March 1938 and except for the 31 months spent on our Mission to New Zealand, have been employed at the Temple practically ever since. It being 25 Sep. 1960 that I now close this record for the present. I wish to say that there is nothing like living within the standards of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints. I have a personal testimony of the truth and know that this is the only Church that has the fullness of the gospel and that through the instrumentality of the beloved Prophet, Joseph Smith, it was revealed again to earth in the latter days. I know that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God and that the Holy Ghost is the third member in the Godhead, who is the spirit by which power we can know these things.

Charles Edward Baker

Contributor: huntindead Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Charles Edward Baker was born 25 Nov. 1892 in Colonia, Juarez, Mexico to Alfred Baker and Luana Maria Christensen. They were living in Mexico because his father was married to two women. His first wife, Keturah, was unable to have any more children after her first who died as an infant, so she asked him to take another wife to give her children to raise. Charles was the third of six children in this family. The young people enjoyed the beautiful green hills and going berrying and excavating in the hills around Chupi, especially when School would be out for the holiday, and the teachers would sponsor a Nature trip. Often on a holiday groups of young people would in the Spring, go out just to find the first flowers of Spring and also Fall. They were so fresh and profuse in September. There were no laws against shooting wild Turkeys, fishing in the lakes and streams, and even wild game in the mountains. It was easy to go a little way out from home in Chupi and bring in a deer, with no restrictions. All the L.D.S. people who went to Mexico to live loved Old Mexico. But there came a time when trouble brewed in the Government of Mexico. In 1912, Pancho villa, a man in strong opposition to the Government at that time raised up a band of Mexican Soldiers in rebellion, and the Government ordered all white settlers to leave the Country, or he would not be responsible for what happened to them. There was nothing they could but remain in their homes and remain neutral. They were ordered to leave the Country immediately, at last. The people were given a certain time to be gone. Pancho Villa's headquarters was in the little settlement of Dublin, or Casas Grandes, Chihuahua, Mexico, not far from Colonia Juarez. The people were given notice when to be gone, and were only allowed to carry a meager number of pounds of goods to take with them, including their bedding. They had to bury pictures and treasured things and some of their records in their gardens etc, hoping to find them safe when they were allowed to return, if they ever were allowed to return. This had to be done in a great hurry. Young Bill had left home to go to the United States to find work, soon after 14 years old. His Mother, Luanna Maria had a Brother in Saint David, Arizona and the family planned to go to him for the time being. Aunt Ketura thought it best to stop in Arizona where she had relatives, and not go on with the family. Charles and Milton, known now as Chuck and Tony, were quite young, but they elected to stay in Mexico to try to guard their property, and perhaps raise a crop of wheat to sell to get money to help their parents in the United States. Pancho Villa did not have anything particular against the white People, only wanted them entirely out of the way of the War. It Has frightening to have to leave their 17 and 19 year old sons behind in time of trouble, but they thought they might be able to protect their homes and property, and then they could plant wheat and harvest it and sell it for money to send to their destitute families in the States. They were a people of Faith and they knew their Heavenly Father would protect their brave sons. Mother Baker said she could not refrain from Tears when she parted with her brave boys, Milton first then Charles. As she pressed him to her, Charles spoke in her ear, "don’t cry Mother, we will all be together again, before long." She bravely smiled through her tears, and said, "I know Darling," and she put them in the hands of the Lord. The train pulled out and when they came to the Rio Grande River, it went safely across, and that was the last Train to cross over the Bridge. The Bridge was blown up soon after the train crossed. Charles and Milton stayed in Mexico for one year or thereabouts. They raised a crop of wheat and harvested it, and sent it to the United States with a friend who had also stayed and raised a crop to sell. He took the wheat, and the folks waited in St. David for the money, but it did not come, so Father Baker accepted the offer of financial help from his Brother, Henry Baker. of Minersville, Utah, to send the money for them to come to him, in Minersville, Beaver Co., Utah. This they did, gratefully. There was turmoil and harassment from the Mexicans during that year in the Colonies, by the Mexicans. The boys were shot at while at work in the fields, and at night they were disturbed by thieves, some. Charles' watch was stolen from the stand by his bed, one night, but he got it back. One time Charles was taken from the field and held for ransom, then turned loose unharmed in a few hours. They were well. known by the Mexican people in those parts, and some had been converted to the Church during the time the Mormons lived there. After that first year the boys got separated some way, and Milton decided twogo out to the United States. Sometime later Charles decided to leave also. The folks were situated in Minersville by the time Charles arrived and Bill was there, and the family was reunited. The folks were happily situated in uncle Henry's and Aunt Amy Walker Baker's lovely home in East Minersville. Aunt Ketura never lived with her husband again, yet they ware a united Family and corresponded by mail. Charles worked and sent money to Aunt Ketura to live on, every month. He still felt the responsibility even after we were married. Uncle Henry Baker had moved to Beaver City, Utah, where his children could have the advantage of School at the Murdoch Academy. Alfred and his family were comfortable in Minersville. Bill was a lively fellow--always had a girl and having a good time. He finally married a wonderful young woman from Beaver, Utah, who worked in Marshall's Store. She sold goods over the Counter and also handled the Mail in the post Office Department. She was so nice and kind to everyone, children just loved to be near her. We all loved to have her wait on us. All of Minersville loved Edna Hutchings, that was her name. Bill Baker finally married her and they had a lovely family of five children, Othello, Lee, Ray, Helen and Alfred. They were all diligent workers, like their parents and grandparents, and had good educations. Alfred and his sons leased a farm 5 miles north west of Minersville, between Minersville and Milford, after Uncle Henry and Aunt Amy moved back to their home. The Alfred Bakers worked hard and paid back the money their Uncle Henry had sent to them. Ketura had married Will Sevey in Chuichupa, 1908, and eventually moved to Panguitch, which is over the mountain south-east of Beaver County. When her babies were born her Mother would go to her: and nurse her and help her for a month or so. Once Sister Baker arranged with my parents for Alfrieta to stay with us and go to School until her Mother returned. My family is the George R. Williams and C. Dora Murdoch Williams' family. My Father was Bishop at that time in Minersville Ward. We all really enjoyed the association with this tall blond cheerful, happy go lucky young girl in our home. Later on, Alfrieta and I attended the Milford High School, traveling on a Bus from Minersville. We were the best of friends, although she was two years older than I. Her schooling had been interrupted when moving from Mexico and St. David, Arizona, We have some happy memories. The Bishopric of Minersville once approached Bro. Baker about Charles going on a Mission. Charles had always wanted to go an a Mission, but Bill was foreman of the ranch and not being religious himself, having been absent from and out of touch with the rest of his family for so many years, he persuaded his father to keep Charles on the farm. This was a disappointment to Charles E. Baker, but he is not one to hold grudges, he took it like a man that he was. He had been faithful in the Church all his life and a diligent worker. The Baker boys were very popular with the girls of Minersville. Being three of them the girls really had a good time. All ages liked those cheerful happy brothers. But long after this, Charles told me that he was surprised and disgusted with the boys and girls in Minersville when he first arrived there. They were so familiar with each other, and Charles had been raised to respect girls too much to maul their bodies and act boldly disrespectful. Bill was the one who understood familiarity, and he was very boisterous and loud around them. His laugh could be heard for blocks out of doors in town. Charles told me that when he first arrived in Minersville that the first Sunday after Church, in the afternoon, he was sitting in the front room with his Mother after Church when some boys and girls passed by with their arms twined around each other, and were Laughing and squealing as they passed the house. Charles said he cried tears that day to see the disrespect of those young people for each other, and the expression of their loose morals, because although there were Mexican members, in Mexico their young people ware not allowed to be familiar, nor to mix races in marriage. It is better for people to marry their own kind of people. Charles said he worried about Bill, but he said, "There's one thing about Bill Baker, He is HONEST!" When he says he will do something, he will do it!" The Baker Boys are all good dancers. They are very fast dancers, and loved to swing the girls almost off their feet. I think Bill was their teacher when they came to the United States. Once when I was 12 or 13 years old, just starting to dance on the dance floor, I was dancing with a nice little young man from my crowd we were both young and small, suddenly our: feet were pushed out from under us and we both fell flat on the floor, When I looked up I saw Bill Baker's face, he laughing loudly looking down at us. I felt that he had tripped us. Long after, when I knew him well, I accused him of it, but he denied it. But I always felt it was true. Charles and Milton were never uncouth, but were always in good self control, as gentlemen, I learned afterwards what a kind, tender heart Bill Baker really had and learned to appreciate him greatly, although he never turned back to the Church. as we hoped he would. I had never met Charles until the day I was 16 years old, May 18th 1917, on my Birthday, Frieta had asked my Mother's consent a few days before, if I could spend my Birthday with her, at her home in Minersville. It was alright with Mamma, so we had a lovely time at her place together. After lunch her sweet sister-in-law Edna, Bill's wife and baby Thel arrived in horse and buggy from the farm. She had came to town to get groceries from the stores in Minersville. When she was ready to leave Sister Baker asked Alfrieta and me if we would ride down with Edna and bring the horse and buggy back so Sister Baker could use it to go Relief Society Teaching tomorrow. We went with Edna, and went into the house for a few minutes. Edna was hurrying to get the already prepared evening meal on the table, because the men had come in from the field, and Charles came right into the house. Frieta squealed out, "O Charlie, it's LaRie's Birthday! She's sweet 16 and never been kissed!" I was terribly embarrassed I had never seen him before, nor even had an introduction to him. Charles laughed and said, "Has she ever been spanked?" He laughed and stepped towards me. Frieta took the baby from me. I stepped a step backward. He took another step towards me. I was in the middle of the floor, I took another step back and he slowly took a step towards me, looking straight into my eyes. I took another step back. I was praying for help. When I came to the wall at my back our eyes were looking straight at each other. I stopped and raised my doubled fists up to my shoulders and kept praying that the Lord would not let this man desecrate my sacred body. He put a hand on each of my shoulders, looking soberly into my eyes, for just an instant, then removed his hands and gave a little croaking laugh and turned away and left the room. I gratefully thanked my Father in Heaven for answering my prayer, When I went into the kitchen I told Frieta I had to be home early to help get the children ready for the Grade School Program that night. This was the last day of grade school, being the 18th of May, 1917, We went right out to the Buggy and Charles followed and would not let Frieta have the lines. He teased us awhile then let us go, I felt strangely all the way home. Frieta took me right home and it was time to get supper, I forgot to go by Frieta's and pick up the Mail. At the Program that night, there was Charles Baker down at the back by the door with a crowd of girls,. making them laugh and carry an, I hoped they would not notice me as I hurried out with the folks. I did not want to join them. When we crossed the street from the Church lot, he came to the side of the street that Frieta lived on, Papa said to me. "LaRie, did you get the mail today?" I said, "Yes, but I did not go to Bakers after we came from the farm, I'll have to stop there now." We stopped, and I knocked on the door. They called, "Come in but I stood in the door and said "I just stopped for the mail." Frieta got it for me but Charles had the paper and was reading it, standing in the middle of the floor. His Mother told him to give me the Paper, and he held it out, as I went to take it he jerked it back. I said, "Oh, never mine, I’ll get it tomorrow. The folks are waiting for me now." But as I stepped beck on the step, he reached it to me, then jerked it beck again, This was too much. I nearly got the door shut when he pushed it towards me through the crack. Then I expected sure to find the family waiting nearby, but do you know they had not waited for me -- I felt so hurt that they left me to walk home alone in the dark. I got home alright, just thought they should have waited for me. The next Sunday afternoon, after Sacrament Meeting, I heard the noise of joyous laughter and boisterous shouting, like a bunch of kids were playing In the street. I looked out the window and sure enough, there was a bunch of girls and boys, Charles Baker with a girl's hat on backwards, being chased by the owner. I really felt disgusted. These were kids from my crowd, and he belonged to two crowds older than mine. I did not go out But that was the last time I ever saw any foolishness from him again. If he was trying to impress me, I guess he must have learned that I do not like that kind of boys. I noticed after that, that he had a habit of being in the same place that I was quite often. But I paid no attention to him. I could not get over the fact that he belonged in two crowds ahead of mine. On June 12th 1917 Alfreita Baker was Married in the Salt Lake Temple to Elias Albert Moyes. Her Wedding Dance was to be June 20th in Minersville. She asked our dear mutual and bosom friend, Irma Estelle Blackburn and myself to come to her home early that evening and help her dress far her Wedding Dance. We were happy to assist. She had Irma fixing her pretty blond hair, while I put a few stitches in the satin Sash for her Wedding Dress. I was busily sewing when two large feet appeared. In front of me. I looked up and Charles Baker was bent over me whispering. He said, "Will you be my partner at the dance tonight?* I was so shocked I couldn't speak. He left, but in a few minutes he was there again, bending over me with the same question. I looked at him and said, "Why, I thought you were going with Eloise Pryor.” He said, “No, I have no partner for tonight.” I felt strange He left again. I was uneasy, wondering if Frieta would feel bad that I turned her brother down, at her Wedding Dance. Back he came the third time and asked me. I was embarrassed to go with a partner so much older than I, but I thought, it would be O K this once, so I said, blushing,(for my face burned), "Oh, I guess so." He smiled and left, and I was anything but comfortable, I saw to it that we were the last ones to walk out of that house, and the last to walk into the dance, as we all went in as a crowd. Charles politely hung up my coat, and then whirled me right onto the floor --as they had begun dancing as soon as the Bride and Groom appeared. Irma's partner had taken her right onto the floor and they were already dancing. As we began dancing I was petrified The Baker boys like fast dancing, and I love waltzing best, and slower, more graceful dancing. So, I'm afraid I did not do so well that night. But Charles was loyal, and treated me royally. Of course we walked home together, and at the gate, I went in and closed the gate behind me. He thanked me, then asked me if he could see me on Sunday Evening. I told him I thought I would be busy that night. He said, "Alright, how about the next Sunday night?" I felt that I would offend him if I told him how I really felt, having a visitor so much older than I, so I said, "Oh, I guess so--." He straightened up to his full height, and looked me in the eye, in the moonlight, and said, "I never take 'I guess so' from anyone--!" I felt that I had rights too," and we both smiled and I said, "Well, take it the way you want to." He went whistling down the street. From here, Charles' history and mine run side by side. We kept seeing each other on Sunday evenings and soon he showed up at our Ward Choir Practices on Wednesday evenings and walked home with me. I began to get used to him with his cordial mannerisms and he became quite interesting to me. He never showed those annoying antics he had exhibited when I first met him, He never paid any attention to other girls around me, but treated me as a respected grown-up, which I felt that I was. We would talk about his life in Old Mexico. He would tell me of the good times the young people would have taking days off, going Berry Picking with the grown ups and the walks they would take in a group up to the Caves and Cave dwellings, etc. He was very religious, and never broke any rules of decency whatever He would always refer to himself as that "Cotton Headed Guy," in the group. We had an outdoor bed in the back yard under the trees, with a canvass cover over the top of it. Often we would return from our walks in the evening and sit for awhile on that bed, where he always had some interesting things to tell me about Old Mexico. He made me feel like a grown up young woman, for sure. He never hesitated to tell me about the girls in Mexico whom he liked, and made them all seem sweet and interesting to me. There was Nellie, and Katie, and Addie and Annie, and Blanch and Bernice, and perhaps more whose names I can't remember. He made me want to meet them. He really loved Old Mexico. I was not foreign to a good feeling about Mexicans, my Father had several Mexicans herding sheep. they were men, of course, but they were nice and had good manners when they would stop at our home in Minersville on the way to and from the sheep herd. They never made us afraid, and we knew they were descendants of the Lamanites in the Book of Mormon. We respected them, and they were respectful. Charles was very interesting to me, but I did not count him a boy friend in the usual sense. I thought he just liked to talk and I was a good listener, and that's why he came around so often. He didn't frighten me nor embarrass me any more, and I sort of forgot the difference in our ages. Frieta had moved to Beaver and he kind of took her place, I guess. We got word at Choir that our Choir was selected to furnish the Singing for Stake Conference coming up in July, for both Saturday and Sunday. Our music Teacher in the higher grades in School in Minersville had been Bro. Will T. Morris. He had led our Choir all winter during School, but had now gone home to Parowan, Utah. Our present leader wrote him and asked if he would please came and see us through this beautiful assignment. He came, and how we practiced! It was a great joy to us students who knew him so well at School. Both Irma and I were singing in the Choir and we enjoyed singing so much! She sang beautiful Soprano, and I sang Alto. We practiced alone often, together. The Stake Conference was held in Beaver, Utah. We had many rehearsals for this, and Charles Baker attended every one. Our Conference came three days before the 24th of July. We were well prepared. Quite unknown to me, Alfrieta had asked my mother if I could spend the 24th of July with her in Beaver, beforehand. Mamma gave her consent, so I was to understand afterwards. Then suddenly on Friday, my father mentioned in my hearing that he had a business Meeting in Provo this weekend, and he asked me to take care of the Children that week-end as he had planned to take Mamma with him for the outing. He said the children would be my responsibility. He said I could take them with me to Conference, if I went with someone who had room for us. I contacted Aunt Margaret and Uncle Walt Blackner at Greenville, and asked if I could drop my two little sisters and little brother, with them over Sunday. They happily accepted, so on Saturday morning early, a Car stopped and picked us up and went around by Greenville, and the children were happy to be with their Cousins. I was to pick them up on the way home to sleep and then take them up again on Sunday Morning. Everything was working well. We got to Conference at the proper time and enjoyed singing and the speakers. We got out for lunch at noon. My Aunt Susie Murdock who lived in Beaver, and I loved very much, came to me and invited me to bring Irma, my dear friend and came to her home to dinner. I was happy to accept and she rushed away telling me she would rush home and have it on the table. Just then, Frieta's husband got to us and said we had to go out to their place to lunch, then they would come back to the afternoon meeting with us. I told him that was impossible, as I had promised to bring Irma and go to Aunt Susie's. He would not hear to it, but said he would run and catch up with her and tell. her his wife was expecting us along with her Mother to dinner, and had stayed home to have it all ready. He did what he said, and caught Aunt Susie a block away and told her. She was sorry, but excused us. I had noticed in the morning Session that Charles was absent. I thought nothing of it, only that he had been practicing with us. Sister Baker and Irma and I went with Elias, and when we got there I still felt badly about disappointing Aunt Susie, I always enjoyed going to visit her. When we got to Frieta's I lagged behind purposely and Let everyone go in ahead of me. Then I got the shock of my life! I came up the steps to the door, and just inside the door, I took one step toward the door to the front room where everyone were talking at once, it sounded like, Someone pounced on me from behind and grabbed me binding my arms down and squeezing me tightly. I screamed to the top of my voice! Then I was turned around gently, and looked into the smiling face of Charles E. Baker! I was weak as a kitten. Everyone laughed and said they got one on me that time. I was looking at Charles, I said, "I thought you did not come." Everyone were laughing and teasing me so that Charles took me outside and we walked through the orchard, and he told me that Bill said he had to stay home and put up hay, and warned him to get to bed early because they were getting up early to work in the hay! Charles said he did not argue but went to bed, he knew what he was going to do. He got up before any of them and rode a horse all the way to North Beaver, and bathed and got ready for Conference but was late so he stayed and visited with Frieta. while she got dinner. Charles sang with us in the afternoon Meeting, and the Meeting was wonderful. We were highly complimented on our Choir. The Bakers would not let me and Irma go back to Minersville with the ones we came with, they insisted they were going down after Meeting and would call around by Greenville for me to pick up the children. Now another surprise faced me: Frieta told me that she had asked my Mother a month ago if I could spend the 24th of July with her, and Mamma had said “Yes.” Now they were planning on spending a couple of Days in the Beaver Mountains at Puffer's Lake, which was a very special camping, fishing and boating Lake. It was high above Beaver, and there is beautiful scenery. I told them I could not go because my folks were away and I had the responsibility of the children. Frieta insisted on talking to Aunt Margaret and was sure that she would keep the children until we came back, it might be three days. I was heart sick. I wanted to go, but hated to be unfaithful to my responsibility. After supper we all piled in the car and Ed (Elias) took us and we called at Greenville and Aunt Margaret consented to keep the children, and said she was sure my Mother and Father would not mind, since we had come and talked it over with her. Well, I insisted on taking the children home that night with me, and we got all ready to be gone three more days extra. Frieta, Ed, Mrs. Baker, Charles, Irma, the Children and I all boarded the car next morning early to leave the children at Greenville, and go on the last day of Conference. We enjoyed Conference but I felt bad to separate with Irma after it was over. She went home with the Minersville Choir members. She is the dearest Bosom Friend I had ever had. I truly love her! Frieta and I slept together on an old fashoned Spring Cot, we used to call them. Early Monday Morning He were rudely awakened by being landed on the floor! Those teasing men had crawled under the back leaf and lifted it up gently until the whole Cot raised and tipped us out on the floor, bedding and all! I thought it quite uncouth, but they meant it for a, joke, so we picked ourselves up with the covers and ousted them out of the bedroom. Frieta was used to such antics being the only girl in the family since she was quite young, and three brothers. The men were dressed, and we were covered. We were soon loaded into a wagon with bows for a cover if it rained or blew badly, but it was a most besutiful day all the way. Oh Yes, They had planned on having Irma go as a companion for Annie Gayle, Ed’s niece, but Irma rather not, so they asked another friend of ours, Flossie Corbridge from Minersville. Annie's brother also went along, and several years later that fine young man married my good friend, Altheda, Banks. I had been in the Beaver Mountains many summers when Daddy went up with the sheep, before it got too hot, he would take us all up for a week after School was out. I loved the smell of nature and the beauties of the Mountains, trees and streams, but especially the lakes. Puffer's Lake was the most beautiful, and there were most lovely Mountain Trout, easy to catch. We got there in good time in late afternoon, but all the way up through the hills and mountains, Charles would compare the sights with the mountain scenery in his loved Mexico birthplace. It was interesting to enjoy the beautiful scenes of Nature. What a great Artist Creator was our Dear Heavenly Father, who gave us this beautiful EARTH to dwell upon! Can we ever thank Him enough! Once when Charles was very interested telling about the scenery in Old Mexico, and the Flowers, etc., I became conscious of Charles' hand resting on my opposite knee. I had been taught never to let boys have any such privileges, and never had an occasion to remove anyone's hand before. but I could not resist it now. I just quietly lifted his hand and put it on his leg. We got to Puffer's Lake in good time and made camp, and went out some in boats and Charles and I just walked a little ways around the Lake to a good place in the shade, and fished. We really had a good feast of Mountain Trout that evening. Fish never tasted so good to me before! I had enjoyed the ride up into the mountains so very much! Some Beaver boys, the Beakley Brothers were camped near us and knew Ed and his Niece. and Nephew, after supper they came over with their Banjo and Guitar, and sang the prettiest songs, of Hawaii, if we knew them we could join in, but mostly they sang alone, just those boys. Their Father used to be the Sunday School Stake chorister, and came to Minersville when I was quite young, I think he taught me to sing. One beautiful song these boys sang was my favorite. "She Sang Aloha To me." They sang it over and over for me. Later Frieta made me a Present of that Song, and I still love to play it. Charlie loved it too. Charles and I did go boating after we caught the fish in the afternoon, while supper was cooking that first afternoon. Just Charles and me alone. I never had a boy friend stick so close to me. I really enjoyed his company. The next morning he borrowed two horses from our friends of the evening before. They had good saddles, and rain coats tied behind the saddles. We rode high up in the mountains to the top of the divide, where the water runs both ways. This was quite exciting! We dismounted and looked and looked at the settlements of Marysvale, Kingston, both in Utah, on the east side of the State. There were wild flowers blooming on the Mountain, and I picked a bouquet. Charles told me he would like to take me to the mountains of Old Mexico, and he named many of the beautiful flowers that grew there. He named some I’d never heard of here in Utah. The wild Columbine, different kinds of lillies, ever so many, it made me wish I could see them. He also told of the lovely times the young people had in the mountains, naming the boys and girls names off to me. I told him he should write a Book of his life. I'm sure it would be most interesting! My estimation of him and the people of Old Mexican Colonies is very high. They were mostly very true to their standards and their religion, had fine characters, and seemed to love and revere the Lord, Jesus Christ, and the Prophet Joseph Smith. This is what I admire greatly in anyone. We wandered quite a ways from our mounts, finally a cloud came over the sky above us and we felt some rain drops, so he said we'd better start back to Camp. There were Rain Coats tied on the back of the saddles, and he untied them and went to put mine on me. In doing so, he went a tiny bit for out, and put his arms around me from behind and pressed me to him gently. This I thought was a little too much, so I pulled away from him and would not let him help me on the Horse. He apologized, but I felt a little miffed, and did not answer. I led the horse to a big rock, and got on the horse alone. I rode out ahead of him, it was a narrow trail anyway, and did not let him catch up with me all the way back to camp. I did not feel like talking, and did not know what to say anyway. We galloped as much as we could, and got to Camp by two o'clock. The rest were out fishing, or away somewhere. I was so tired from riding so for, I did not want him to help me off the horse, even,. but slipped off on the other side. I did not want him to lift me. I guess I was ignorant, but I didn’t want him to think I wanted boys to handle my body. I got into the wagon and laid on the bedding. I was so tired I was trembling from the long ride. I went to sleep and when I awoke I felt like someone was looking at me. I changed positions and looked at the wagon cover, and there in the hole at the end was Charles' smiling face. He did not speak, not knowing for sure I was awake I guess. Finally I sat up and got out of the wagon. I felt much better and was hungry, and the smell of fish made my mouth water. Charles was wonderful to me and nothing was said to embarrass me about our long ride until later, when we told them we were on the very top of the divide and how beautiful the fresh air and sunshine. We had another lovely Camp Fire Party with the Beakley boys and music and songs. We all felt like singing, laughing and talking, planning our trip home next morning. We broke Camp in'the morning and it was agreed that Charles and I should take a boat and row to the end of the Lake, where there was a lovely meadow of tall grass we could walk through to where the road would cross and the wagon would pick us up. It was great fun rowing together on the lake once more. We thoroughly enjoyed the trip. We laughed and sang and now I knew I was in the company of an honest to goodness trust-worthy Man! As we walked through that tall grass, waving in the breeze, Charles had me by the hand and talked to me as if I were his age and equal. He bared his feelings in a humble manner to let me know that he knew that I am a clean-minded virtuous young woman, said that the freedom he had taken with me was not meant in any disrespect, and that he hoped I would not think he was the kind that would take advantage of me, for he intended to live his life to meet the Savior and His Maker. He mentioned the time I removed his hand in the wagon, on the way to the Mountains, and said he had not realized it was out of place, and that if he had disrespected me in any way, he hoped I could forgive him, for it was not his intention to do it. I felt bad that I had made him think that, and asked him to overlook my precautions. He said,"0h, I'm proud of you, LaRie!" We had a very warm feeling and soon the wagon caught up with us and we were off to Beaver. I’ll always be glad for that walk. When we got into the wagon, the whole party were so light and happy, it was a pleasure to t together. Finally we got to where it looked like there were some caves up the hills a little ways. I said,"Is it too late, or could we stop and climb up there to investigate those caves?" I did want to climb that hillside. They stopped, and we started off afoot. My dear escort had me by the hand. He was the best partner! Just before the hill began to get steep, we came to some leafy bushes, on my side. Suddenly my eye caught what looked like two big rattle snakes coiled. Instantly I screamed bloody murder, as I turned to Charles, grabbed him around the neck and lifted my feet high off the ground. I had always lost my head when I saw a snake, and I sure did then. He held me close and ran a few steps then put me down. I was quite unnerved, and we all decided to go on to Beaver, so we did. I felt so embarrassed I could not speak for sometime, We arrived at Ed and Frieta's before sundown. Had a cold supper, and then Ed took us to Minersville, after stopping at Greenville, where we found that my Folks had returned from Provo, and called at Greenville and took the children home with them. I was surely glad they would be home when we got there. And they were glad to see mewhen I got home! They did not mind that I had spent the time away. Charles found many unexpected occasions to run up to our place after that. Once the Baker boys borrowed Papa's team, to work on a canal for a few days. ,Ye came to get the team when I was there, and he would always have time for me, and when he brought them back, it was in the evening and we sat on the side of the hay rack in the yard, and talked for awhile. Sunday evenings we always visited. Once, when Papa and Mamma had to go and visit the Sick in the Ward on Sunday evening, he came and stayed with me and the children until they returned. Finally he took the Piano Bench and began going up and down on the keys. He seemed to be going over something in his mind. The children were curious, and alert. He told them he would like to tell them a story on the Piano. Somewhere in his memory he had stored a great piece of literature in Verse. "Down by The Rio-Grande! " Repeating the famous Poem while he demonstrated Action on the Piano Keys, up and down the full length of the Piano. He did not know Music, but the cords he would strike, just before he would run the full length of the Piano, up and then down, were so impressive and thrilling the children were fascinated and I was amazed. Indeed it was very entertaining! I laughed and laughed to observe his talent for entertainment. When the folks came home he asked me to sit on the lawn with him for a while. I had never sat an the lawn with a boy before, and I did not know what to do, when he stretched out full length and put his head in my lap. All I could do with my hands was put my arms behind me and lean back on my hands. I got very tired. It did not last long, for it was getting late, and he soon got up and went home. He never seemed frivolous and loud to me any more. He treated me as a responsible young lady. I felt very self-concious, and said, "I must go in, now," So he went whistling down the street. I was completely at ease with him and enjoyed his company. He rated now equally with my, as I felt, perfect Father and Uncle Heber Williams, my two ideals! Not long after this the war in Europe was fast becoming a World War! Our United States boys were being conscripted to go in Military Training. My heart hurt to think of it. Charles always said, "I will not be drafted. If it begins to look like we will have to go, I'1l enlist!" My heart sunk! I prayed that he would not go to war and be killed. I could not bear the thought! I asked him what Service he would enlist in. He said he and his brother, Milton, had thought of the Navy. I was terrified to think of life without him. Late in July, sitting in the moonlight we were very silent, just happy to be there together, when I felt a strong Premonition. It seemed I heard the sounds of a bugle sounding in the distance, and the tramp of feet. I told him, and he said, "Yes, when it comes, Tony and I and some others from here are going to take the train to Salt Lake and Enlist, before we are drafted." Then he took me in his arms and kissed me for the first time. I did not resist that time, it seemed our parting was too close. I guess I loved him, but had not realized it. It was hard to part that night, and when he left, I went to bed and dreamed a Dream. I thought I was floating in the air, high up, just gradually floating downward to earth. Now, I seemed to drift to the side, and someone touched me and sort of guided me till my feet felt solid ground. I looked, and beheld that it was Charles E. Baker. Then, I woke up and found that I was in my own bed. I pondered over that very much, but did not speak of it for a long time, to anyone. Now, a great world War was upon us. It was the FIRST WORLD WAR! Early in August some of the town bays received Draft Notices. The Minersville boys decided to go to Salt Lake and volunteer. I was at School and when I went home for Lunch, Lottie always ran to the Post Office and brought the mail at noon. She handed me a note from Charles Baker. He wrote, "LaRie, Please stay home this afternoon. I must see you." Signed, "Chas. E. Baker:” I stayed to see him. He came at 1:30 P.M. He looked very serious. He said he would like to talk to me alone, first. Mamma said, "Certainly, Charlie, LaRie, go into the Parlor." He closed the door and took me in his arms, and we sat together on the couch. He said, they had to leave that night for Salt Lake to be registered to enlist in the Military Service of our Country. My heart sank! He said, "LaRie, I want you to go with me. We can be married in the Temple before I go to war." He wanted my consent to ask my Mother. Papa was away with the sheep; I could not answer. I was weeping and clinging to him. We wept in each other's arms. I told him I was only 16, and felt I was too young to Marry, that I would be waiting for him when he returned." I told him not to ask Mamma, for she would only say the same thing. I went to Milford with the Baker Family where the boys took the Train to Salt Lake. It seemed it was pulling my heart right out of me, when he bearded that train. All the next day I felt only part conscious. I could not talk about my sorrow. Two days later, when Lottie brought the Mail, she handed me a note. It was signed, "Chas. E. Baker." I read it and shouted for JOY! It said, "It was a mistake, our numbers were not up after all, so we did not enlist! I returned this morning. Would like to see you TONIGHT!" I thought my heart would jump out of my body! This was near the last of August. That night when he came I was so very happy! We hugged and kissed each other, walked, and sat out under the trees at the head of our lovely garden. I thought of my dream, and wondered if the Lord planned us together. The next day was Saturday. and we always washed on Saturday so I could be home to help. We had a hand Washer, back and forth, back and forth I would push it. As I ran the washer, I got thinking perhaps I had been too ready to show my feelings for Charles. He might think I was an easy touch. I was persecuted all day with this thought. I would not want him to think that of me. He came up that night. I was glad to see him, but had vowed I would not be easy. We walked that evening, and sat out under the trees, and talked and just enjoyed being together. At last we walked to the house and he took me in his arms, I pulled away, he tried to kiss me, and I told him "No." He said,"What is the matter LaRie, I thought you loved me!" I said, "I must not let you kiss me.” He stood looking at me, then took his hat off his head and threw it down on the ground and began pacing up and down. I knew I had insulted him and hurt him badly. He went doggedly around our dirt cellar three times then came and took me by the shoulders and said he surely thought I understood he was sincere. He did not try to love me any more that night, and I felt very miserable, but just could not make myself relent. The next day was Sunday, and we both sang in the Choir and he did come up that night, Although I did not dare to expect him. When he came to the door, Mamma sent me to the door to let him in. He came in and I took his hat into the bedroom and put it on the Dresser. As I went to put it down, I pressed it to my breast. Then I knew I was truly in love, and that I would never love another like I loved him. After our walk that night, he offered to kiss me and I put my arms around him and held him tightly. He said, "May I see you Friday night?" I said, "Oh, Yes!" The next Sunday night when he went to leave me, he said, "May I see you this Friday night again?" I pulled him closer and said, "Could you came Wednesday night also?" He hugged me and said, “I’ll be here." It was September by now. On the 18th of September we had had our usual walk and it was sprinkling rain a little so we climbed into the White Topped Buggy and sat in the front seat, looking out to the South. That night my love was almost overflowing. I loved him every minute. He just seemed to bask in my love. His beautiful blue eyes and curly blond hair seemed to belong to me. He spoke the most beautiful words of love I ever heard or read in any story book, to me. I was in 7th Heaven!! We both knew our joy would be interrupted too soon. Everywhere we went we went together, except to School, and to his work. One Wednesday night, he had come and it was a windy, sort of stormy night in November. We had a short walk and then enjoyed visiting with the family. All the kids loved Charlie Baker. At last they all went to bed and we sat up by the coal heater in the dining room. We sat side by side for awhile, then he said, “do you take your hair down and brush it before you go to bed?" I said, “Yes, I like to do that." He began taking the pins out and got the brush and brushed it and brushed it. Then he tried putting it up with my hair pins and combs. I laughed and laughed at the way he fixed it. At last we sat down and he said, he had better go pretty soon. Just then Papa opened the middle door to the parlor, and said,"LaRie, it's late you better go to bed and let this young man get same sleep before it's time to go to work." I just looked at him, and he got a little cross, and looking at Charles, he said something like this, "I don't appreciate you keeping my daughter up so late, Charley." We just kept mum, and he backed into the Front Room and closed the Door. Mamma told me next morning, Daddy said to her, "LaRie, the little stinker, just defied me." Charles said, "What would you have done if your 'Father had thrown me out and told me never to come back?” I said, "I'm afraid I would have gone with you." He hugged me tight and said "Oh, Thank you." He left and we never pestered them again like that. I felt like I was actually part of him. We enjoyed each other's company until December, when their numbers were really due. Another note arrived from Charles, who asked if I could miss School to go to the Train with them in Milford that afternoon. He came for me and we went. My Grandmother lived in Milford, her sweet unmarried daughter, Lottie, and sons Uncle Joe and Uncle Orrice Murdock. I wanted them to meet my dear Boy-friend, so we went to see them, and ate Supper with them. Aunt Lottie told us she would meet us at the Train to see them off. After Supper, we went to Fergusson's where his Parents were waiting for the Train. But before we arrived there, we walked on the Milford streets and talked, and tried to enjoy being together for the last time until after the War. I could not hold up, but cried and cried. It was my first great personal sorrow. I thought I could not stand it. He soothed me and told me that if anything happened that he could not return, he hoped I would go to the Temple and be sealed to him. I could not bear the thought of not seeing him again in this life! Finally, it was time to meet at the Train, so He went there, His folks and many of the families of the Minersville boys' folks were collected there also. On our way back to the Depot Charles told me to please dry my tears before we get to the Depot for he had told his Mother, he did not want any tears when he left, I did my best, and hid my sorrow. When he said good bye to his parents his brother was crying, and he said "Now, Mother, you know I love you. You have done this before, you can do it again.” He referred to the time she had to leave her two dear boys in Old Mexico, in time of War. She smiled through her tears, and kissed him, and he was off. He grabbed my hand and took me to the door of the Traln, he held onto the hand rail of the steps, and his other hand held mine. When the Train started, we walked faster, and faster together, then he had to let go of me, and swing himself up onto the steps of the Train, .I thought my heart would break. Just then my dear Aumt Lottie stepped swiftly up to me. I had not moved since he left me. She took me in her arms and said, "He will came back LaRie." I kept that thought in mind and controled myself. I went home with Bakers that night, to Minersville. I never lost faith that he would return to me. All the next day I felt only partly conscious. I could not talk about my sorrow. Two days later, at noon. Lottie brought the mail, as she always called at the Post Office for our mail. She handed me a note. I opened it, and it was signed by “Chas. E. Baker. " I read it and shouted out in sheer JOY!" The note said, "It was a MISTAKE. Our numbers were not up after all! I'll see you this evening." Words cannot express my JOY! We enjoyed each other's company three evenings a week until Dec. 13th, 1917, when their Numbers were really up to be called. Again we went to the Train, as before and I did my best to hold up, not to cry, but it was too much so soon again. We went north to the Railroad tracks and walked back to the Depot. Again, he asked me not to cry at the train, but it was all so real all over again, I tried hard though. It was a repeat of the first time they left. His dear Mother was wonderful! She comforted us both. We ran beside the train as it pulled out, as before and he finally let go of my hand and swung himself up onto the steps, and held onto my hand until it really put on steam and he was gone into the darkness. I could not move. I felt someone put their arms around me from behind, and when I looked, expecting my dear Aunt Lottie, it was an older girl I had known when I was 14 years old and visiting friends in Buckhorn, over in the Parowan area three years ago, She was Myrtle Edwards. She was motherly and gentle, and led me back in the dark to the Depot, where the Baker's were waiting for me. Everyone was so tender and kind to me. All our hearts were aching. I did have faith that he would return to me and the words Aunt Lottie had said to me echoed in my ears, That night I stayed all night with Grandma and Aunt Lottie and went back to Minersville on the Stage next Morning. There was a stage full of those who had let their loved ones go on that train the night before. We gave each other courage. Charles was fortunate to be assigned to a Ship guarding New York harbor. Milton was assigned, as a Seaman carrying soldiers across to France, and back again. They had both signed up as Seamen, but they got separated. Milton's ship went back and forth to France carrying Soldiers. When he would be on this side and had Liberty, he would try to contact Charles so they could arrange to meet quite often. This was a great Privilege for those brothers. They were separated first in California in the Rooky Camps. At first I just got Post Cards in the Mail from Charles, It made me self-conscious knowing anyone knew the news I got from Charles, but soon nice private letters replaced the Cards. He said he had to wait until he got paid to buy some Stationery. Strange we did not think to send writing materials with them. When the brothers met on Liberty, they said they would never go with rowdy crowds of Sailors. They looked up Libraries, Museums and the Mormon Church activities. Once when Edna Huldiway was in New York an a Mission, the boys knew her well, they arranged to take her and her companion out to Coney Island to spend the afternoon. They said they tried every Ride and entertainment, even the New Giant Racer, which was so fast and scary as if it would pitch them head long from the seat which they were fastened to. It sounded so scary to me, that I never put myself through the ordeal. The Ferris Wheel was my favorite always out here. Charles had lots of experiences guarding foreign ships who came into the New York Harbor, One frightening experience I will relate. He was guarding a Chinese Ship in New York Harbor. It was loaded with Chinese. In war time the Chinese were not allowed to land in the United States, Charles was the head officer, and they had had no trouble keeping the Chinese from going ashore, up to this time. The Sailors had four hours on and four hours off duty and Charles had finished his four hours on, and had just gone up to the top deckland was sitting on the bridge writing a letter to me. He was Head Officer, and said he had two hours more bff duty now. Suddenly, the Officer under him came bounding up the stairs, calling, "Bake, came down here on the double! They're going to force their way off the Ship, and they far outnumber us!!!” Charles jumped up and was down those stairs in a flash--never touching the steps, with a Prayer in his heart for HELP FROM HEAVEN! “I hit the deck and gave the ORDER TO SETTLE DOWN." They settled down, and I said, with power like I had never used before, "Not A MAN OF YOU ARE GOING OFF THIS SHIP!" He said he knew that someone besides those few little human seamen Sailors stood there by him! He felt tremendous POWER, and the sailors bore testimony of it also! Why, those Chinese were armed with knives ordinarily, and could have killed the small group of Sailors who were guarding them on that Ship! He said he had many hair-raising experiences that have happened to our Soldiers and Sailors who keep the Commandments of the Lord. He keeps His Promises! Charles E. Baker had a great-Testimony, he was no stranger to the Lord, Charles had been trying to get a Furlough for August. It was now June 1918. He thought he was going to get it, and wrote that if I was breaking any of the Lord's Commandments, for me to stop short right now, because he wanted to marry me for time and All Eternity! He had sent me a beautiful little Tiffany Diamond Ring in April, and following that my Parents received a special sacred Letter from him, asking for my hand in marriage for Eternity. I felt very self-conscious but certainly desired it with all my heart. I did not get to see the letter, but they told me about it. I had so much to look forward to! The very day that he was to arrive the first week in August, a shocking letter came from him saying we would have to postpone the long looked for Furlough. The Government had called for Volunteers to go away and guard the China Waters. He said, “I am terribly disappointed, but you know me!!" He never shirked a duty. This made me sick inside I could not even tell Mama what his letter said. I kept it to myself and silently prayed all the day long, that nothing would be allowed to take his dear life. This was the day he would have arrived home, August 7th, 1918. My heart ached and I just could not bring myself to feel good about it. My Aunt Sadie Carter, Daddy's Sister nae sick and my Mother had to go to her home to take care of her. I did not feel like talking about it, so did not tell my Mother. She was gone all day, and in the afternoon, Irma came and we took a walk up towards the east Canyon, and then around to the south side of town. We stopped at Aunt Sadie's home as I could help Mamma home with our sweet one year old baby Reva. When we arrived at Aunt Sadie's Aunt Leah Williams was also there with her sweet baby girl, and mamma was busy in the bedroom with Aunt Sadie. I gladly picked up my baby sister, Reva, and stood her on the table to help her stand alone, as she had not yet done so. My Mother had told me that the Dr. had been there and just left. We had come in the screen door, in the front room, and left the door open. Suddenly we heard that screen door open, and someone walk across the floor, and stop about in the doorway into the Kitchen, where we were. I was holding Reva to get her to try to stand alone, saying "Lonie, lonie, Reva" and trying to let go of her. When I heard those footsteps stop, I thoughtlessly turned around and looked at that Middle door. I could not believe my eyes! There framed in that middle doorway stood Charlie Baker! I had never seen him in his Navy Blues--his Sailor Suit, and I simply could not hold onto my senses. I had the thought that the Devil had put an apparition before me, for he must be now sailing to the China Waters!! I actually lost consciousness. As I swayed towards the floor, I could hear a baby crying hard but I did not remember I'd had hold of my darling baby sister who could not stand alone. The crys got farther and further away, then I did not hear anything, then from a distance, I heard the crying getting closer and closer, and then I saw before my eyes, the face of my beloved, Charles E. Baker looking down at me. I was out only an instant..., but long enough for Irma to rush across that floor and pick the baby up. And they told me that as I slowly swayed and fell, Charles crossed that floor and caught me before I hit the floor with my head. I still could not believe it was real! He held me to him, and I said his name. When it was over, Aunt Leah said to me, "LaRie, that was the most moving thing I have ever seen, on a stage or in any kind of a show or entertainment!! It was so nice that he was there to walk home with us, and we had a most wonderful week getting ready to go to Salt Lake to the Great Salt Lake Temple to be married and sealed for all Eternity! He said the very day he mailed that letter the decision came out that that group would not go to the China Waters, and he was able to arrive in Minersville on the vary day he had planned to in the first place. lie had sent another letter telling me, but it did not arrive for a couple of days. We were to be married in the Salt Lake Temple August 14, 1918. A Happy Day!! When we parted that night we thanked the Lord gratefully that He had brought us together again, and that the decision to not leave for the China Waters, was made. There was not time for a letter to arrive letting me know he would come home as planned, as his Furlough was dated to begin the very day they released him from the commitment. We hurried up our preparations for our Marriage. We were married August 14th, 1918 in the Beautiful Salt Lake Temple. We stayed for four or five days in Salt Lake, seeing the sights and visiting Harmen Relatives. I was so proud of my Sailor Boy! Those days they were not allowed to remove their Uniforms when appearing in public, at least in War time. I was very happy, but knew we would have to be separated until after the War was over. But we both had faith he would return safely, which he did. He was home 20 days. It took 5 days each way traveling on the train. There was no Air travel then. I was only 17 years old then, and it was a little embarrassing when we went to the Court House in Beaver to get our rarriage Liscense, my sweet Mother had to sign for me. I was under age. The only thing I regret is that my dear Father, George R, Williams who was Bishop of Minersville, and could have given me a Recommend to the Temple for Marriage, but he being a Sheep man, he was away with the Sheep, and I had to get it from his first Counselor, Bro. Heber Gillins. Papa always teased me and said I ran away and got married. Dr. McGreger, of Beaver, was Stake President who signed our Recommends. He had 20 days home. It took five days both ways to travel by train each way. There was no Air Travel in those Days. I had to give him up again, but I felt after that wonderful day in the Sacred Salt Lake Temple that when he returned from the War, at last, that we would never be separated again! He had many testimonies of the Blessings of the Lord while in the Service. He continued to write me every day, and I did the same. Sometimes while on the Ship he could not mail his letters until he got Liberty, but they would come in Packs and I would have a feast, reading them. I felt that I had been blessed with the best and most wonderful man in the whole world! The Armistice was signed the 11th of November 1918, but he was not mustered out until near the end of January. He arrived home the 29th of Jan. 1919. Happy Day!! At this time both of our parents' were considering making a change in their plans for the future. My father wanted to sell out and go to Blackfoot, Idaho. He had a brotherer and cousins there who were prosperous farmers, and they encourased him to make the move. Charles' folks found that people were moving back into Old Mexico at this time, and had been even earlier, so they were in favor of going home to their property in that beautiful Chihuahua, Mexico. We had to make a decision which way to go. I was so thankful to be able to go with Charles, wherever he went, that I did not talk any other way. The Baker’s wanted him to go with them, and yet they felt that I was so young to leave my family. I told them all I wanted was to never be separated from my husband again as long as I live. Charles finally decided to go to Idaho. So the two wonderful Baker parents and their youngest son, Alfred, Jr, 15 years old, went alone. The married children decided not to leave the good old U.S.A. When all was packed up and loaded into the freight Car on the Railroad, Charles and Ronald Carter, my cousin, rode with the stock in the Stock car to look after them. We, the family, followed two days later. I soon became a Farmer's Wife, and that Farmer was a great worker. He took well with all our folks in Idaho, and with all who knew him. He was a devoted, appreciative husband. He praised everything I did. He made a fuss over everything I did. I was so in love and HAPPY! I simply adored him. We first lived in Aunt Mary Williams' house. She moved all her precious things out of her parlor putting them in the basement and gave us that room to live in. My father and Charles worked her farm for her that summer. That fall we moved into two rooms of Uncle Johnny’s farm home a quarter of a mile west of Aunt Mary's. Here on December 22nd, 1919 our first child , a daughter, was born--Reva Baker. Charles farmed for Aunt Mary the next summer. We were in Thomas Ward, Blackfoot Stake and lived ten miles west of Blackfoot, Idaho. Charles taught a class of young people in Sunday School. In the fall of 1920 we moved to Swan Berg's farm west of the railroad siding Liberty, five miles farther west from Blackfoot. It was also west of the American Falls Canal. We farmed there on shares for three years during which time our second child was born November 21st, 1921--LuAna Baker. The last year we had to let a beautiful crop--ten acres of potatoes--freeze in the ground because the price dropped so low it did not pay to dig them. So Charles quit the farm and took the job of Ditch Rider for the American Falls Canal Company. He had thirty two miles of Main Canal and two Iaterals to ride and often getting off his horse to measure out water to the Farmers every day. It was a full day's riding horseback, for $7:.00 a month. This strenuous horse-back riding all day long every day brought on Arthritis Sciatica in his back and leg. After several years, ha studied health and during the winter once he took a 23 day Fast under the direction of Bernarrr McFadden's Program of Health. It did help him greatly, for he got right over all the pain, and the Program said to break the fast on Milk. We now know this was wrong, that he should have used Vegetables and juices to break his long fast. He was better for a short while, then the Sciatica came back. I'm sur the constant riding horse back, bouncing for 8-10 hours every day on horse back packed his blood doun in his legs and ankles, and also perhaps was responsible for the ruptured Appendicitis which later caused his untimely death. We bought land from the Government, through the “Carey Act", where the ditch rider's house was built under the American Falls Canal and east Lateral. We raised Alfalfa Seed, and Alfalfa Hay, after first raising a crop of Wheat. He had a water Wheel built in front of the huge Check, to raise the water out over the high ground we broke up. We had head-gates right out of the Canals for the low ground and garden. We had a large garden near the house where we raised vegetables and raspberries, and a beautiful large garden of colorful flowers in front of the house. We had luscious lawns and being below the high bank of the Canal, we could sleep outdoors from Spring until fate fall, on the lawn, under the trees. We often got up and took a swim in the Lateral before breakfast every morning. Before I go on, I must tell about the wonderful trip we had as a family to Old Mexico after the Water Run was over in September and October of 1934. Charles used to say, "If it’s the last thing I ever do, I must take my family to Old Mexico, the land of my Birth. If Old Glory waved over that Country, that's where we would make our home.” He was determined to get out of debt before we went and it seemed so long, he finally suggested in early Spring of 1928 that we send the money to his Parents and have them come to Idaho to visit us. We did that, and they got ready and left their home but decided to stop all along the way and visit their friends and relatives. That proved to be unwise, in that they took the whole Spring and Summer traveling wherever they had relatives , and they did not arrive in Idaho until quite late in the Fall, October sometime. By the time they got up to Minersville, Beaver County, Utah, it was cool weather and Mother Baker took a bad cold which resulted in a bad case of pleurisy. She was Bedfast in Minersville for sometime, and still weak when she arrived in Idaho. We were very disappointed, knowing what hard winters we have in Idaho. She soon fell ill, although we had some very lovely visits with them before her Pleurisy got the best of her. We enjoyed so much the Company of both Mother and Father Baker. They are wonderful people, so firm in the Faith and appreciative of their lovely trip. All our neighbors enjoyed visiting them also, and we had very lovely evenings invited out as well as in our home. But in November Snows set in and by December Mother Baker had a bad case of Pleura--Pneumonia. We were so frightened. We had the Dr. and did everything we could for her, but she did not respond. She was very ill by Dec 20th. We grieved that they had arrived so late In the year when we had hoped they would come in the Summer, when things looked so lovely in the growing seasons of the year. She did not rally, and on Dec. 22nd, it was our daughter Reva's Birthday, she went in to visit her dear Grandmother, and told her. The dear loving Grandmother answered her sweetly. She never complained about anything, just showed loving appreciation for being able to have the pleasure of seeing her loved ones once again. We had the Elders to give her Blessings and had the Dr., but it seemed she could not recover. She talked confidentially to her dear husband, Father Baker that evening, and he seemed depressed afterwards. We got the Dr. again in the morning and he said her lungs were.completely full of fluid, and he was sorry---. She expressed her great love for all of us and thanked Charlie for sending the money so that she could see all of her dear relatives on the say to Idaho, and how she had enjoyed all of our association, and thanked the Lord for her life and her great love for the Gospel and the Savior. She passed quietly away the next day which was the 23rd of December 1928. She lay acorpse in our house on Christmas day. It was a sweet, sad Christmas for us all, but especially dear Father Baker and my Dear Charles. We bought a Lot in the Thomas-Riverside Cemetery and buried her for away from her beloved home in Old Mexico. Bill was the only one of the family who came to the Funeral. He was a strength and a support to Charles. He stayed a few days then Father Baker went back with him, as he was anxious to go home to Mexico, where his eldest daughter and youngest son, Alfred, lived. Charles still wanted to make the trip to Old Mexico, now since his dear lonely Father was there, so we saved money for a couple of years or mmore, and in August 1934 we set out for the long planned trip to Charles's native land. It was a beautiful and interesting trip, of two months. But, we never saw dear Father Baker alive again. He took sick and died 6th of May before we could leave the Ditch job that was our livelihood. But we had a lovely time. And we could well understand why Charles always said, "If Old Glory waved over Old Mexico, I would go there to live.” He was happy to be able to take his Family to the land of his Birth, and we loved it and understood him. Life down there was still more primitive than in the U.S.A, and Charlie encouraged his Brother Alfred to sell out and move his family to the United States, this was made known to his neighbors, and they resented Charles a little for his advice. But Charles knew his children would have a better chance in the United States, for further education and to get ahead here. It was so nice for the girls and me to meet the fine members of the Church in those settlements. Charles had told me so much about them, I did not even feel strange to them. I really loved the Saints down there, and they were wonderful to me. On our way home we visited all of the Temples! My, that was a glorious experience! There was the Mesa, St. George, Manti, and Salt Lake, and Logan Temples. We had carried our recommends with us all the way. Our daughters were given the privilege of being Baptized for the Dead, 150 times each while we were going through the Mamti Temple. LuAna had been troubled with one or two painful boils on our trip to Mexico and we noticed that she never mentioned then again, when we mentioned it after we returned home she realised she had not noticed the irritation at all since she was Baptized in the Manti Temple for the Dead. She was healed. Charles E. Baker was a true Latter Day Saint. He loved the Lord and His True Gospel above everything else in the world. He was a Sunday School Teacher, and a faithful Home Teacher, and kept all the Lord’s Commandments. He carried his Pocket Doctrine & Covenants with him on his job, and would read it while the water was filling the Head Gate, so he could measure it, then ride on to the next one. At home he would read from the Book of Mormon, or the Bible before going to bed. We had a good team of horses, a horse and buggy to travel with for many years, before we could afford to buy our Ford Car. But to make the trip to Mexico, we bought a good used DeSota Six. We had a fine herd of Milk Cows, and about fifty head of Sheep on the little 40 Acre Form next to the Canal. We were very happy to return home after our lovely trip to Mexico and during the years we were also preparing for when we could afford to buy a piece of land up nearer the settlement, where we could be closer to Church and not have to have Charlie away fram home day after day, riding ditch. So we saw the chance to buy 40 Acres of good land right joining the Canal up near Rockford, Idaho near the School the Girls went to School at. We borrowed on his Government Insurance and paid Cash for it and the Water for it. Then He bought the lumber and hauled it onto the ground, all ready for him to begin building a new house. The house that was there was very old and too small. We drew the House Plans ourselves and would study them in the evenings often. as we got new ideas for it. It was such a happy time to anticipate when we could live there near the School and the Church, and he would be working on his own farm and grounds all the time. It was to be very soon, we hoped that after this Summer, we could leave the Ditch Riding for good. It was the last few days of the irrigating time when the Water would be turned out of the Canal for the Winter. I was getting dinner ready for Charlie and Papa, who had been working for us that day, and Charles was due to return from his ride. As I passed the Buffet, where the Plans for our Home lay, I stopped and looked at it and wondered if it was really the way we wanted it, or if there should be a smell change. As I was thinking about it, a strange feeling came over me and I got a definite impression that caused me to feel weak all through my body. The Thought went through my mind suddenly very impressively: "These Plans will never be realized!" Oh, the thought made me feel sick! Just then the men came into the house. I went into Charlie's Arms, and began to cry. He asked what the matter was? I sobbed out the words that had come to me with such force. They both laughed and scolded me for entertaining such a thought. But I was really worried about it. Just a few days later, the 20th of September, 1935, my Darling awoke in pain. He told us he had had a strange dream. He said he saw what looked to be the entrails of a chicken or something. He said it was an object oblong shaped kind of round, it was torn wide open and looked very bad. I was very frightened but did not let him know I was worried, but I was, He went out to the chores., but soon came in and lay down on the floor in writhing pain. I ran to the telephone and called Mr. Heal, his Boss on the Canal, in Aberdeen. Before he could get to the phone Charles was up from the floor, and took the Phone from me. He told Mr. Near that he was distressed with pain but that he would go on his ride, but if Mr. Near happened to be coming up this way today, he might need someone to take his place. I then took the Phone and told Mr. Neal it was serious, that he had lain down on the floor with pain. I felt he should not go on the ride today. Mr. Neal talked to Charles again, and said,"well if you feel like riding start up the Canal, and I'll bring a man to take your place when I catch up with you." I begged him not to go, but to let me take him to Town to the Dr. in the car. But he would not listen. He did not feel like eating breakfast, so rode off. Mr. Near stopped by at 10:30 and asked about him. I told him I had been telephoning along the line up the Canal, and each place told me he had just passed there. I never was able to catch up with him. Mr. Neal went an expecting to overtake him. But he never did. Charles rode to the end of his line and started back on the opposite side of the Canal, riding and measuring out the Water. Noon came and I had not heard from him. At 2:00 P.M. I called the Pumping Plant up the canal a ways, and found that he was there lying down a very sick man. I talked to him an the Phone. I felt he should go to the Dr. but he was always prejudiced against Medical Drs. He finally made it home, and I gave him an enema to try to relieve the pain. I took the phone down to call the Dr. and he objected, but I got the Dr. on the phone and told him of Charles’ condition. He thought he should come out, but Charles called in from the bed and said, "No, I don't want a Dr." The Dr. heard him so he told me to put Ice packs an every 20 Minutes, and let him know how he is in the Morning. In the morning he was no better, but still would not consent to have the Dr. I had the Elders come and bless him, but the 2nd night he recognized some kind of a change, and he said I'd better call the Dr. now. I was so afraid it was too late. The Dr. Came right out, and announced it Appendicitis. I took him right in to the Hospital, and the Drs. found it had ruptured already. They showed me the Appendix. It looked just like what Charles had seen in his dream, large swollen oblong diseased Appendix. It was green, gangrene had set in, He had Peritonitis! Right in the midst of the operation his ears went dark, and he was not breathing. His tongue had slipped into his throat. They had to work to make him breath. He suffered terribly for 9 ½ days, and passed away on the Ist of October 1935. I know now, that I should not have listened to a sick man! I should have taken him to the Dr. immediately. My faith and his also was so strong I did not realize how treacherous sickness can be. So many prayers were said for him, and we had the Elders every night. One night the Priesthood of the Stake were holding meeting, and they Prayed for him. I was sure he would be healed. The blessings were so powerful, but He was worthy to go on to a more fertile field of labor in the Spirit World, evidently. He had always longed to go on a mission to preach the Gospel. He was prepared. But I also wondered if my own faith had been strong enough. I loved him so much, I could hardly stand the sorrow. I could not account for his sudden passing until I attended the funeral of President Nicholas G. Smith, a member of the Temple Presidency. Elder Harold B. Lee spoke in that funeral, and mentioned the scripture, (D. & C. 42:48.) "And again, it shall come to pass that he that hath faith in Me to be healed, and is not appointed unto death, shall be healed. I have read the Book of Mormon and D. & C. many times, and never got that great message before. It just had to be that way, that he was needed over there, and was appointed unto death of the body. But I know that he is not DEAD! He is serving His beloved Savior and His Father in Heaven. We can assist by going to the Temple and doing work for the Dead. I had that Privilege, as a Temple Ordinance Worker in The Salt Lake Temple for eleven years, during the time I was working for 30 years there in the Lord's House. It was great consolation to me. And I do look forward to joining: him some happy day when we meet to part no more. I'm trying to live for it while holding my hand with his right hand, he pointed feebly with his left hand in the corner of the top of the room, as if someone were there. My Darling held my hand and finally breathed a weary sign (sic) and passed on through the Veil, Oct. Ist 1935. I'm so thankful for His life. We were very happy, we four. He adored us three. He often stood by the girl's bed while they were asleep at night and lovingly touched them on the cheeks and I heard him breath, *Kids, Oh Kids." I wonder what he was thinking. Words cannot express how we missed him. He had one of the largest Funerals the Thomas Ward ever held. There was not standing room. He was so well known and liked in his work with the public. Everyone who knew him came, and there were many, many beautiful Flowers. The American Legion Band came out and gave the 19 Gun Salute of "Taps" at the grave side. He was honored as a Sailor in the United States Navy. He loved the Stars and Stripes, and they gave me the large Flag that draped his dear Casket. Bill Baker stayed until I was resettled after our move from the Ditch Riding Home. The Bakers in milford were very loyal and thoughtful and kind to us. One member of the family made the trip up to Blackfoot once a month while we were there, and they did the same after School was out and we moved to Salt Lake. Sweet Edna would spend the 24th of July with us, watching the big parade and going to the Great Salt Lake for a swim. And the Boys would come one at a time each month for nearly two years and drive us drive un around to see the sights, etc. They did not forget us. We loved them, and appreciated their thoughtfulness. One of the Speakers at the funeral was our Stake President, Bro. Elmer Williams. I asked him to speak, he knew us quite well. He gave a wonderful tribute to Charles and at the end of his talk, he said, “To know Charlie was to love him. He was an honest to God, MAN.” He was so right! We were completely out of debt when he left us;, our plans and hopes for our form at Rockford, Idaho, near Thomas, were all shattered. I left the renter on the place., I had offers to sell it, but somehow, I could not bring myself to do it. It seemed like I needed to keep it for Charles' return. Yet I knew he would not return. Our daughters were wonderful companions to me. They were very attentive and I could trust them in every way. We soon made friends who are still true blue, and we feel we did right to come to Salt Lake. We worked in Genealogy together, and they each took their endowments while in their teens, so we could go together through the Temple. They later each married in the Salt Lake Temple and we all three did all we could gathering Genealogy. Our love and testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel grew by leaps and bounds. We are so thankful for the true Church of Jesus Christ upon the Earth. We know it is TRUE! We love the Lord with all our Hearts! We expect to meet our Daddy when we are permitted to go over there, with JOY! The song that expresses my feelings is “I Come To The Garden Alone." Our sorrow was beyond words. It seemed so unreal that we were alone here in Salt Lake City. We had a few relatives, but no one could take our Daddy's place. I came to Salt Lake at the prayerful advice of my Bishop and one of our Stake High Council Members. You see, I married before I had finished School at the Murdock Academy, at Beaver. So I needed to matriculate my education. (I) Studlied some Correspondence Courses and my lessons were graded at B.Y.U. by mail, from Bladkfoot, High School Study Hall, as I could not concentrate at home. I lived in the past continually, so I was given permission to study at the Blackfoot High School, where my daughters attended School. I made the grade, and was accepted at the L.D.S. Business College in June 1936. The girls finished High School at West High, in Salt Lake at the same time, and at one time we were all three enrolled at L.D.S. B.C. for five weeks. Then Reva was chosen by Bro. Bennett, Secretary of the Genealogical Society, to train as a Youth Researcher. She accepted and became the first youth Researcher ever hired by the Genealogical Society. This opened the field of Research for Genealogically minded young people. Reva was very capable and is highly recogized in this field throughout her stake and Ward as well. LuAna elected to go to the B.Y.U. and work her way through School there. She did well, working hard, and enjoyed one year at the University, then a wonderful returned Missionary joined the Sunday Night Missionary and Young People's Study Class of the Book of Mormon, etc. LuAna and he each felt they had known each other somewhere before. They checked where each had been and could not find the answer, unless it was in the Spirit World. They went together all winter and were Married in the Salt Lake Temple 7 April 1941. They are the Parents of 8 living children. Reva was married to Alien Wesley Holt 17 Dec. 1942, also in the Salt Lake Temple. By this time I was out of School, where I went for 21 Months, and got work in the Office of the Salt Lake Temple, where the year after I was set Apart a Temple Ordinance Worker for 11 years . I had been a widow for almost 14 years, and after the second world War, I married for Time, Elzie E. Bigelow, a veteran of the second world War. He had been in Thel's Company and same Battalion, etc, and had loved that marvelous fellow. This was the drawing cord between us. He was in Attu where Thel was killed, and knew and loved him. He saw him the day before he was killed. We were married 28 Feb. 1948 for Time. He was a Seventy, and we went together on a 2 year 9 Month's mission to New Zealand. We have enjoyed working together in the Church and it was wonderful to have someone so valiant in the Priesthood as a Companion, after living so long without My Darling Eternal Husband. It is my greatest desire to live worthy to meet my beloved Charles when our time an Earth is finished. When Elzie asked me to Marry him, I talked very plainly to him, about what I felt makes a successful Marriage. It is if the couple is of the same thought and mind. I questioned him, "Who do you hold the greatest in your life?” He said, “The Lord, Jesus Christ!" Then, “What is your Politics?” He said, “Republican!” So I said, "Well, now, if I can depend upon your sincere loyalty, I guess you will do!" He has been a wonderful Companion! I thank the Lord for him in my lonely life! ********************** Addend by Reva B. Holt ************************* Charlie Baker had blue eyes and blonde wavy hair which darkened to sandy as he grew older. His skin was fair and did not tan but reddened from exposure to the weather for he was an outdoor man. He stood five feet nine and a half inches tall and weighed 160 pounds being lean and muscular. He was the shortest of his father's four sons. He loved life and was happy. He had a great sense of humor and loved to tease, especially children and cats. Our family of cats adored him. When he'd come home they'd run to meet him meowing loudly. He'd pick them up one by one and toss them high in the air onto the roof of the-house or into the trees. They'd clamour down running up to him for more. He squirted milk into their mouths while he was milking and they loved him. He loved to sing but couldn't remember all the words to songs and so made up his own. We'd hear him at work in the fields or coming alone the canal bank singing to the of of his voice making up the words and the tune as he went along. He was honest in all his dealings. I can still hear him saying, "My word is my bond." and it was. You didn't need a written, notarized contract when dealing with him. He was plain spoken and frank. When others misunderstood or took him wrong he was deeply hurt and sometimes angered because they hadn't understood his meaning. When angered, he was quickly over it and never held a grudge. He admired education and took correspondence courses during the winter. He read all he could about agricultural advancements planning to use ideas he'd learned. During the growing season while the canal was full of water, he'd ride thirty-two miles every day, even Sunday, tending to the needs of the farmers. The months the canal was empty he had to clear weeds and willows from inside the canal and along the banks and shore up the banks. After ditch, riding he worked hard developing his homestead land. Sometimes he had a hired man to help. Thel and Lee, his brother Bill's boys, came one at a time and helped some years. Lars Petersen, a crippled ex-cowboy, came other years. a built a water wheel, which Lee helped him improve, to carry water to the field on the higher ground. Like his people before him, he was a hard-working man. He was bi-lingual, speaking Spanish, which he learned as a boy from his Mexican neighbors in Chuichupa, and English, his mother tongue. He loved the Spanish language saying he could express himself better with it than English. Some words expressed his feelings better and he couldn't find English words to do as well. Immigrant Italian farmers would meat him on the canal bank and couldn't communicate with him until he tried Spanish words. Then the foreigners eyes would light up and he'd say an Italian word equivalent until they understood each other. Then he'd (Charles) learn his (the immigrant’s) story and circumstances and he and mother would befriend him (the immigrant) and his family. He liked people and was well-liked by everyone he met. When he died, Thomas High school, which we attended, dismissed anyone who wanted to attend his funeral. People filled the Church and were standing around the walls and open doorways, so many came. Many were not of our faith but (were) farmers whom he'd served for eleven years as ditch-rider. When he died he was forty-two years old. They had been married seventeen years. Mother was only thirty-four, I was fifteen and LuAna was thirteen. Numbing, chilling grief overcame me. I could not see how the sun could shine or anyone could smile or laugh. How could I survive for ten years even? But I did. Now nearly forty-eight years later, I have six children and nineteen grandchildren to swell his posterity. Thank God for the short life of Charles Edward Baker, my father.

Dora LaRie Williams Baker Bigelow by herself

Contributor: huntindead Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

My schooling began at Greenville 1st Grade then moved to Minersville for 2nd year. During the last quarter of 8th Grade we moved to the Delta Land and Water Project two miles south of Milford and I finished the year out in a little one-room school house on the "Flat" with Mrs. Webster as the teacher. This was the spring of 1915. I began High School at Milford High in the fall of 1915. I always loved school and was doing well. In the last of April and 2nd of May my two brothers, David, age 6 years and Orrice, 19 months died suddenly and with our broken hearts we could no longer be happy in our home in Milford. We moved back to Minersville where I completed my 2nd year of High School. The 1st World War broke out in April 1917 and my sweetheart left me and went into the US Navy 14 Dec. 1917. He returned on furlough 7 Aug. 1918 and we were married 14 Aug. in the Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah. He returned to his station in New York Harbor on 25th of Aug. 1918 and in Sept. I entered school at the Murdock Academy, Beaver, Utah. The terrible 'Flu' broke out that winter and my school was again interrupted. The Armistice was signed Nov. 11, 1918 and in January late, my darling husband returned home. I stopped school and we moved to Idaho in April 4th, 1919 along with my parents who had sold their farm and home at Minersville and were moving to Idaho to make their home. My eldest child, a daughter, Reva Baker, was born 22 Dec. 1919 at Thomas, Idaho. In that ward I was Secretary of the Primary from 1919 to 1921. I was also organist for the Primary those years. I had been Secy. of Religion Class in Minersville when eleven and twelve years old. A Primary Teach in Minersville Ward when twelve to fourteen years old, and teacher in Jr. Sunday School when fourteen. My second child, a daughter, LuAna Baker, was born on a farm between Rockford and Pingree, Idaho, 21 Nov. 1921. My husband was a Ward Teacher and a Sunday School Teacher of the 1st Intermediate Class in the Thomas Ward during these years which I have mentioned 1919 to 1926. We were called into the Ward Genealogical Committee together in 1926 where we enjoyed working together. We began our Books of Remembrance together at that time. In 1922 I lost a baby by miscarriage and infection closed the tubes and I never conceived again, which made me very sad. In 1929 my husband's parents visited us from Old Mexico. Mother Baker had had a severe case of pleuresy at Minersville on her way to Idaho. She came to us all taped and was still delicate in health. That month we got winter extra early and the cold wind and snow which they were not used to in Mexico gave her plural pneumonia. We did all we could for her, but it was very quick acting and filled up her lungs immediately and she passed away in our home on the third day after taking ill, 23 Dec. 1929. This was a great shock and a sorrow to all of us, especially dear Father Baker, who went back alone to his little home in Colonia Chuachupa, Chihuahua, Mexico. All of his children would loved to have him live with them, but he went back to be with his eldest daughter, Ketura B. Sevey in Mexico. 11 Jan. 1930 my own dear Mother died of spinal meningitis in Idaho Falls LDS Hospital after a short illness. This was another severe shock and deep hurt to our hearts. My dear husband and I had much in common and drew very close together, as we had always been. My husband had always wanted to take his family to visit the land of his birth, but it was a sorrow to know that we had waited until his dear parents had passed on. Father Baker had died in 1933. 16 Aug. 1934 we started on our two month and more than 1200 mile trip to Old Mexico. We visited relatives and all the Temples in the United States at that time. Logan, Salt Lake, Manti, St. George and Mesa Temples. It was a most wonderful trip. We returned home 13 Oct. 1934 with our faith renewed from the renewal of our covenants and the joy of seeing so many of our loved ones. Charlie always said he would take his family to see the land of his birth it it was the last thing he did. The next summer he worked extra long hours with his Ditch-rider job and also farming our 40 acre farm where we lived and also a 40 up the canal at Rockford where we planned to move to the next spring when he would quit the ditch and farm exclusively, now that we had both places paid for in full. But such joy was not for us in this life. Charlie took acute appendicitis which ruptured 3 days before he would submit to an operation and he passed away 9 days after the terrible operation in the Beck Hospital at Blackfoot 1 Oct. 1935. This was the hardest blow that had ever struck his family. It took much fasting and prayer to be able to understand and get hold of ourselves. Reva and LuAna were 14 and 16 years now, and after much meditation, fasting and prayer and consulting with our Bishop and wife, we moved to Salt Lake City, where the girls went on to High School and I went to the LDS Business College for 21 months. It was very hard to study or concentrate with my sorrow and regrets. I knew we should have had that operation sooner, but he would never submit to even having the Dr. come. He was so sure he would get better through his clean living and prayers and administration. But we know now that his mission was finished and we had to have the lessons it took to stand on our own feet and learn to depend upon the Lord instead of our Daddy. It was many years before I came across the scripture that told me why his powerful administrations failed to restore him to life and health again. D & C Sec. 42:48. Read verses 43 - 48 inclusive. We are sure that his Mission was finished and that the Lord will say to him, "Well done thou good and faithful servant, enter into thy rest." He was such a hard worker all his life, never giving up when things seemed almost impossible. His courage lives on and was our inspiration in our time of becoming accustomed to life in a city and the large schools we attended in Salt Lake. In March of 1938 I was called to work in the Temple Office while one of the typists was out because of illness. A Sister Elsie McKnight. On May 1st she returned but was not able to continue long. So I was called back permanently 15 May 1938. My eldest dau. was married in the Temple 17 Dec. 1942 to Allen Wesley Holt. Her sister, LuAna was married in the Temple 7 Apr. 1941 to Ariel Elmer Sorensen. For seven years I lived alone, sometimes with young girls rooming and boarding with me, but for the last two years I was alone and my continuous loneliness became almost unbearable. At this time I met and married a man for time in the St. George Temple 28 Feb. 1948. He was a Seventy and we were almost immediately called to be Stake Missionaries, Mar. 1948. We labored for 30 months in the Salt Lake Stake Mission during which time we purchased a home at 133 E. 17th South, in the Whittier Ward, Wells Stake. This was in 1950. In 1952 we received a call to go on a foreign mission to New Zealand. We enter4ed the Mission Home 13 Oct. 1952, and left Salt Lake City 20 Oct. by train to Vancouver, Canada where we embarked 23 Oct. on the Orangi for New Zealand. This was a wonderful trip for me, I had been ill most of the whole year, being able to enter the Mission Home on the appointed date through faith, fasting and prayer and receiving a healing which was very evident. The boat trip offered much time to rest and recuperate and all the wonderful fresh air and sunshine needed. We were 21 days on this voyage. We visited the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Honolulu, the Mission Home, Chapel, and Temple touring the Island in the one day that we were stopped there. Next we visited Fiji and toured that island. We landed at Auckland 13 Nov. 1952, went to the Mission Home and found the Mission Pres. visiting one of the islands of the Mission. We waited in Auckland nearly a week for him to return, when he assigned us to the Whangarei District. We labored in Whangarei for twelve months then were transferred to the Wellington District 12 Nov. 1953. Here we labored at Porirua and vicinity for 18 months. We gained permission the last week of our time to visit South Island for a few days. Crossed the channel from Wellington to Picton, stayed over night at Nelson then took overland bus to Christchurch next day. We visited our nephew, Elder Harvey W. Tanner and stayed over night. Took the Maori, a beautiful boat the third night back to Wellington, where we arrived on Sunday morning. Went to Wellington Sunday School then to our Porirua chapel service in the evening. There we said farewell to our beloved members and contacts and left our field of labor Wednesday, June 1st, 1955. Arrived in Auckland again the next morning, June 2nd. Had the weekend in Auckland and boarded the boat June 6 for home. Arrived in San Francisco 23 June and in Salt Lake City the morning of June 25th. Our family was all at the station to meet us and it was a great thrill. Our children, grandchildren and my Father and family all all my living brothers and sisters. Each of our daughters had a little new grandchild for us to see four the first time. We were asked to report to our Stake High Council about the 30th of July and a few days later were handed a written invitation to me with the High Council again in their room at the Stake Center. To our surprise they asked us to accept another Stake Mission, which we did and were set apart that night along with several other couples. I was set apart by President Teerlink. Aug. 1955. We were released from this, our second Stake Mission, this time in the Wells Stake, 6 Aug. 1957, by President John Earl Horton. I was called into the Whittier Ward Sunday School as assistant Enlistment Director the Summer of 1956 where I also acted as a substitute teacher for one year. August 1957 I was called by President Greene of the Wells Stake Presidency to attend a Genealogical Research Class held each Tuesday night at Pres. Teerlink's, under the leadership of Sister Mary Teerlink. When that was completed I was selected and set apart to be on the teaching staff of the Wells Stake Gen. Committee, and also on the Gen. Committee of the Whittier Ward. I taught a class in Basic Research Vol. 1 through 1958-1959, following Basic Research Vol. 1 with Vol. 11. Again in September 1960 I was asked to teach another class likewise. I am working every day at the Temple, as one of the Secretaries to the President's Office, and giving out the keys to the Sisters, as they go through the Temple. Monday nights I type names for the dead on the men's side for the two evening companies. I was given a typist recorders position March 1938 and except for the 31 months spent on our Mission to New Zealand, have been employed at the Temple practically ever since. It being 25 Sep. 1960 that I now close this record for the present. I wish to say that there is nothing like living within the standards of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints. I have a personal testimony of the truth and know that this is the only Church that has the fullness of the gospel and that through the instrumentality of the beloved Prophet, Joseph Smith, it was revealed again to earth in the latter days. I know that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God and that the Holy Ghost is the third member in the Godhead, who is the spirit by which power we can know these things.

Life timeline of Charles Edward Baker

Charles Edward Baker was born on 25 Oct 1892
Charles Edward Baker was 16 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Charles Edward Baker was 24 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Charles Edward Baker was 37 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
Charles Edward Baker died on 1 Oct 1935 at the age of 42
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Charles Edward Baker (25 Oct 1892 - 1 Oct 1935), BillionGraves Record 28043691 Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho, United States

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