Charles Conrad

20 Nov 1831 - 7 Feb 1910

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Charles Conrad

20 Nov 1831 - 7 Feb 1910
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Grave site information of Charles Conrad (20 Nov 1831 - 7 Feb 1910) at Provo City Cemetery in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

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Charles Conrad

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Died:

Provo City Cemetery

610 S State St
Provo, Utah, Utah
United States

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Mother- LEONA
FATHER- LEWIS
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BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH ADAMS BITELY CONRAD

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH ADAMS BITELY CONRAD Sarah Adams Bitely was the daughter of Peter Bitely and Elizabeth Maria Douglas. She was born in the State of Vermont on the 21st of February 1802. She was named after the mid-wife, Sarah Adams, who attended her mother. This woman had no children and asked that the little girl be given her name, so she was given the name of Sarah Adams Bitely. Sarah Adams Bitely married Charles Ferdinand Conrad February 8, 1830, in the town of Seneca, Ontario County, New York. Their first child, John was born in Fayette , Seneca County, New York. He died when only two months old. The second child was a girl, Elizabeth, she was born in the town of Seneca, Ontario County, New York. A little later the family moved from New York to Brownstown, Wayne County, Michigan, where Mr. Conrad took up 80 acres of land, which was located on Mud Street going into Detroit. This was all new country, thickly timbered, and full of wild animals, especially deer, and bear. There were a few panthers and these animals with their peculiar cry were feared and many stories where told about them leading the settlers into the forest with their cries because it was thought that some child was lost. The trees had to be cut and burned so as to clear the land before it could be farmed. Among the other trees in this section of the country were hardwood trees such as the hickory, oak, end ash. Mr. Conrad leased a piece of his land on the north East Corner of his property for a school house. This school was used for many years. He was a prominent leader in his community and held the of office of Justice of the Peace at Trenton, Michigan. Nine children were born to Sarah Adams Bitely and Charles F. Conrad in Brownstown, Wayne County, Michigan. They were poor, but sturdy and loved the new country in spite of the hardships of pioneering. Many times they had only potatoes and salt to eat, sometimes they even lacked the salt to eat with the potatoes. Although Mr. Conrad was interested in his community he didn’t seem to take any of the responsibilities of his family, and many times the children went to school without shoes. Elizabeth wore her father’s old shoes when she had to go out in the snow on an errand. The snow sometimes piled up in drifts of three and four feet. It was so deep that it was possible to sleigh ride over the fences. Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad’s fourth child, William caused her a great deal of worry. He loved to hunt and whenever he found his father’s rifle in the house he would take it and go out hunting. When anyone asked where he was, his father would look in the corner where his rifle always stood and missing it would say "Bill's gone hunting, the rifle’s gone." One day he shot two large bucks, they had been fighting and had locked horns so that his one shot killed them both. Sarah Adams Bitely joined the church in 1843, immediately after hearing Elder Serrine preach the gospel. She and her daughter Elizabeth were interested from the first words of Elder Serrine. They accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints gladly, joyously, without question as though it was just what they had long been waiting for, and their faith never wavered through the troubles and hardships they endured in coming west and pioneering another new country. Mr. Conrad joined the church with his wife. They desired to join the Saints in Illinois and left their home in Brownstown. They traveled as far as LaHarpe, Illinois, here they learned that the prophet Joseph Smith had been killed. This caused them to turn about and go back to Michigan. Some time later Sarah's husband left the church. In 1862 Sarah Adams Bitely came to Utah in the company of another lady who had joined the church. Before they got to Missouri they were sitting in the train when two drunken men knowing that they were Mormons began to annoy them. They marched against them when they walked up the aisle and laughed drunkenly. Sarah took her shawl pin, which was about three inches long, and fixed it so that the next time these men came walking along and fell against them this pin stuck into them. After a few stabs they went away and didn't bother them again. Sarah Adams Bitely located in Provo. Her first home was in a little log cabin, where the administration building now stands. In 1864 her sons Charlie, George, and Serrine, her brother-in-law Frederick S. Conrad, and her son-in-law James Hooks joined her in Utah. They had traveled across the plains with one wagon between them, and reached Salt Lake City in August 1864. In Oct. 1870 her daughter Elizabeth, who had married James Hooks came to Provo with her four children. They came all the way from Michigan to Salt Lake City by train. Her son Daniel Schotte Conrad went to Kansas, where he died in 1878, and William Thomas Conrad died in St. Louis. Miles Henry Conrad was killed by a shot through a window one night while he was sitting by his stove. A short time after Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad came to Utah she was sealed to George Brown, a blacksmith who lived across the road from her. Her son Charlie bought a lot on Third North and Second West, just a block north of the Woolen Mills, which was finished in 1821. The brick work was up when Elizabeth joined her mother in Provo, another story was built on in the spring of 1871. The mill race had to be built up so as to get enough power for the machinery to run by, and this caused water to seep over on Charlie's land and onto the land owned by Mrs. Dan Jones, this ruined their gardens and President Young bought this land from them. Charlie then bought property out on Eighth North and Seventh East where his wife is still living. He built a home here on this land a mile from any other residence and his mother lived there for two years with her son George. Charlie had married and was living on his father-in-law's farm down by the lake. Later he brought his wife out to his land and built a home west of his mother's about a block. When Sarah Adams Bitely began to fail in health she went to live with her daughter, Elizabeth Conrad Hooks, who was living just a short distance south, where her son and his family are still living. Sarah Adams Bitely died in her daughter's home on the 29th of December 1879. She was 77 years old at the time of her death. Biography written by Bertha Louise Hooks November 26, 1934 Provo, Utah (Great granddaughter of Sarah Adams Bitely)

Mary Elizabeth Holdaway by her Grandson Tell

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Mary Elizabeth Holdaway by Grandson, Grant Tell Muhlestein Mary Elizabeth Holdaway, born 12 Sept. 1856 to SHEDRICK HOLDAWAY and LUCINDA HAWS, was reared in a large pioneer family where work and austerity gave demands to all family members. Mary Elizabeth carried the attributes of a true pioneer throughout her life. She was frugal, but generous, and no visitor ever left her garden (after her family was raised) without taking along a bouquet of flowers, or something from the fruit and vegetable garden. She was a great lover of all kinds of plants, and learned the art of grafting so that the seedling fruits could be grafted with better varieties if they did not produce a better kind than anything in the fruit orchard. Grandfather Charles Conrad, born 12 Nov. 1831 to Charles Ferdinand Conrad and Sarah Adams Bitely, saw this Mary Elizabeth Holdaway as a child --- attractive, brown eyes, curley dark hair, and winsome smile --- and vowed that be would wait until she grew to womanhood at which time he would marry her. When this young lady reached seventeen years and ten months, they were married the 10 Nov. 1873 in the Salt Lake Endowment House. My mother, their first child, was born 21 March 1875 and, like her mother.. learning, as well, to care for their food and clothing needs. Grandfather was a self-made veterinarian and often cared for sick animals through a full night. His clients promised grains or fruits at harvest time and often this fell through, so grandmother was compelled to grow and produce most of their food needs. Grandfather had acquired considerable land in the NorthEast part of Provo. They built their home on the corner of 7th East and 8th North --- a large one-story, double-brick home with a small fruit-and vegetable cellar. This was a double-brick construction and the lumber came from the Shedrick Holdaway Lumber Mill in South Fork of Provo Canyon- --a very hard and sturdy native pine almost impossible to drive nails into or to cut with a saw once cured, as we found later when the ceilings were lowered and rooms built in the attic area. This high-ceiling home was cool both in summer and winter. Good home-produced foods seemed to keep the family in health. There was plenty of milk and cream and home-churned butter. The grains were taken to the Mill and used in their natural state. Grandmother was an excellent cook and seamstress--providing wholesome food for the family and clothing for all. The landmark for the Ccnrad hcme was a huge cottonwood tree which was planted by nature long before the white man made inroads to the West. This tree provided the Conrad home with shade and comfort in the summertime. When the home was finished, one of the first things planted near the large cottonwood tree were some black walnut seeds. One grew vigorous and tall and provided the family with much enjoyment each year. As the grandchildren came to visit grandmother, they would ask to crack nuts under the Cottonwood --- sitting on a large stone bench that surrounded it. The soil near the home was quite rocky--being the residue of streams that once came over the area. In fact, my father-in-law, Gordon Phillips, sold land and gravel from an area which he purchased from the Conrad estate just north of the Conrad home. They had seeds of select cantaloupe and watermelon brought from Kentucky. Grandmother would save seeds from the cantaloupe with the smallest centers and the most meat, and the thin-rinded melons with the best:flavor. As a child I remember the strong and pleasant odor of the melons as grandmother cut them open to serve to her guests or relatives. The sweetness and perfume of those days seems to be missing in the melons we purchase at the markets today. They kept both beef and dairy cattle and, of necessity, a herd bull--one of which was notoriously mean. On one occasion grandmother had to cross the pasture where the bull was kept and he was aroused and came at her loudly bellowing. When he got too close, she fell to the ground, lying on her back, and, as the bull charged her, she would kick him in the mouth and continue. to push herself toward the barn area where the hog pen offered some kind of retreat. She reached the pig stye at a moment when the bull had stopped to appraise this strange woman's actions, and she was able to get over the wall and fall to the ground and gratefully rningle with the hogs. When their sixth child, Angus, died at the age of eight months, grandfather brought home a buck fawn deer which grandmother breast fed until it was weaned. This fawn grew to maturity and loved grandmother, of course, but he was hard to control since few fences would hold him and he was mean with strangers --- and especially with the boys who came by and threw rocks and sticks at him. One day some boys up on the "university" property threw stones and one struck him in the head and he fell to the ground dead, thus he provided meat for the Conrad family for some time. Grandmother loved to share plants with anyone who showed an interest in them. She grew many kinds of perennials and always had colorful annuals. She was able to plant sweet peas in the late fall and give them winter protection and have them grow and blossom for Memorial Day. Often the hundreds of peony plants she grew would not quite make their blooming coincide with Memorial Day and, if they were early, she would cut the buds and put them in cold storage at the "Ice Plant. But she could usually provide her "customers" with some flowers for this occasion. Any money she received for flowers, roots, vegetables or fruit was put into a jar in the kitchen to pay her taxes in the fall. Grandmother gave her five sons, Charles, Warren, Arthur, Milton, and Lewis their "inheritance" as young men who wished to establish themselves in a new land in Canada (Taber, Alberta). She gave her daughter, Eva a like stipened so she and Uncle John Walker could purchase a home in Provo. Aunt Alice Bertin was given a piece of ground west of the home which land was now too much for grandmother to care for --- this land was mostly pasture-land, yet, as the city drained it to put in streets,, Alice was able to sell lots to private individuals as well as Brigham Young University. Grandmother had a flare for words and was a natural born poetess. She would get an inspiration in the night (in her later life) get up and write these thoughts. She wrote a poem based on her experiences through the early years of her life and entitled it "The Pioneers" which describes their simple pleasures, entertainment, dress, customs, and dancing (beneath the.drip of candles). When my mother and I came out to Utah in the fall of 1.935 so I might attend the university, she was still working on and revising this bit of prose. Grandmother was invited to recite this poem, to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers and went to Salt Lake City to give it but was disappointed by another taking too much time and they had to delete her from the program. She was beginning to ail and when mother and I arrived in the fall of 1935 she was unable to care for her garden and home, yet she taught me how to irrigate, and we were able to harvest the fall crops and enjoy the "fruits" of her labor. Mother was her constant nurse during her terminal illness and, although she was suffering, she never complained. Mother and I had prayer at her bedside every night. We, her descendents, appreciate the faith and love of the Gospel of Jesus Christ which she instilled in all her family, whom she dearly loved, and her every effort was expended in their behalf and for their happiness. A great and monumental heritage.

Charles Conrad

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

CHARLES CONRAD Charles Conrad came to Utah from Detroit Michigan, in 1864 and has given this country the benefit of his experience gained in other places. Born in Brownstownship, Wayne Co. Michigan, 20 November 1831. He was the son of Charles Ferdinand Conrad & Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad. Charles Ferdinand, his father was a native of Newton Penn. where he was born 15 Sept. 1808 and married 18 Feb. 1830 Seneca Ontario Co. New York, immigrating to Mich, the year Charles was born, and settling on a farm he bought from the government, consisting of a quarter section of land, mostly covered with timber. He cleared land, cultivated and made a good farm of it, becoming one of the prominent men of his community and holding the office of Justice of the Peace, etc. He also owned an 80 acre farm at Trenton Michigan. Charles Ferdinand died in 1884. Charles grew to manhood in Michigan and received an education there. He also spent some time on his Father=s place at Trenton, remaining at home until he started for Utah in 1864. His mother, Sarah, was the mother of 11 children. She joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in 1841 and came to Provo, Utah in 1863. Four children came with their mother. They were; Charles, George, Serrine, (named for the Elder who brought them the Gospel) and Elizabeth. Sarah died in Provo on 24 Dec 1879. In 1864, Charles followed his mother to Utah, in company with his brothers George, Serrine, his Uncle Frederick Schott Conrad and his brother-in-law James Hooks. They had but one wagon between them and left Iowa 12 May 1864. Traveled as far as Julesburg before they caught up with any other immigrants. There they crossed the Platte river 13 times, making boats of their wagon beds, with which to ferry their goods across and swimming their cattle and them- selves. Although the Indians were out on the war path, none of the party were molested and they reached Salt Lake City in safety, 12 Aug. 1864. They tarried 11 days in that place, then came direct to Provo. Charles bought a home in the center of Provo and there for three years followed gardening. He also rented other land, and during the time of the Black Hawk War rented the farm of J.A. Bean. In 1870 he bought a farm in eastern part of town, which was at that time a mile further out than any other place. First he bought 8 acres, then added to it from time to time, (uncultivated land) until he finally had a good farm of 27 acres within the city limits, well improved, all fenced, and built a comfortable brick home there on. He also preempted 160 acres on the south fork of Provo Canyon, in 1880 and there built a home and began keeping stock following that for several years and at this time has part of this land under cultivation. Mr Conrad was the first man to open up land in the canyon. For 6 years he acted as Police of Provo under instruction of A.O.Smoot. He also did considerable lumbering in the mts. and furnished the material for the old Tabernacle building. He also took active part in building many of the canals, & was a director of the upper east union. He was a member of Provo Canyon Read Go. and has done much towards making and keeping the road thru the canyon in good repair. Charles Conrad married 10 Nov. 1873, Mary E. Holdaway, daughter of Shadrach Holdaway and Lucinda Haws Holdaway. They have 9 children, Mary Elizabeth, Charles S.,Warren N., Arthur M., Milton W., Eva L., Lewis A., Alice, and Angus, who died in infancy. In political belief Mr Conrad is a Democrat and for many years has been in public office. Has seen jury duty, trying a number of prominent cases under Judge Emerson. Charles Conrad joined the church in 1866. He was ordained an Elder and set apart as lst Coun. to Pres. Kemp, of Provo; Ordained a Seventy 26 January 1869; Ordained a High Priest in 1891 and set apart as lst. Counselor. to Bishop Alexander Glllispie, of the Pleasant View Ward, Provo, which position he resigned eight years later on account of failing health. Charles Conrad began at the foot of the ladder and has climbed step by step, until he is now in position of affluence, enjoying the confidence and esteem of his friends and associates, being numbered among the influential and substantial men of Utah County. The above copied from: Portrait and Gen. and Biographical record of the State of Utah ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Charles Conrad was born in Browntownship, Wayne Co., Michigan in 1831 where his father, Charles Ferdinand Conrad, and his mother, Sarah Adams Bitely, were prosperous and comfortably settled down...until they were taught about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His mother was convinced it was true, and was baptized in 1841. His father never did join the church. Charles followed his father's example and was not baptized at the time. His mother remained faithful, however, and after her children were grown, she followed the saints to Utah in 1863. A year later, Charles, two other brothers, a brother-in-law, and an uncle joined her at Provo. Two years after arriving, Charles, too, was convinced, and was baptized into the church at age 35. Once baptized, he became very active in the Pleasant View Ward, and became a counselor to Bishop Gillespie in 1891. When Charles was 33 years old, he noticed an eight-year-old dark-eyed girl playing in his neighbor's front room. Her name was Mary Elizabeth, and she was the only girl in the Holdaway family. She was bright and loquacious, and Charles, admiring her charming ways, rubbed her mass of dark curls and announced that he was going to wait for her to grow up so he could marry her. Nine years later, on Nov 10th 1873, he did just that! They were married when he was 42 and his bride, seventeen. Charles Conrad knew he was a fortunate man to get her, not only for her beauty, but also because of her great desire for a family and the many skills she had acquired with which she could care for one. Charles Conrad had worked for six years as a policeman to earn money for land, had done a lot of lumbering in the mountains, and had taken part in building many of the irrigation canals, and had accumulated many acres of land in the northeast section of town. The couple settled down in a new brick home Charles built on the corner of his 27 acres of land, all within city limits, well-improved, and fenced. They also preempted 160 acres on the South Fork of Provo Canyon, and in 1880 built another home there. They began keeping cattle in South Fork, and put part of the land under cultivation as well. Charles was the first man to open up land in the South Fork of Provo Canyon. On 21 Mar 1875 there was born a beautiful little replica of Mary Elizabeth to Charles and Mary, whom they named Mary Elizabeth, also. She became known as Lizzie, a beautiful little girl with dark brown eyes and heavy dark hair that curled more gently than her mother's tight curls. Next came a son whom they named Charles after his father. By Joyce Muhlestein Great Granddaughter In Law

Letter from Charles Conrad to his wife Mary

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

In January 1910, Mary took a train from Provo, Utah to Somerset, Colorado to attend the wedding of her daughter Eva. This was only weeks before Charles passed away on February 7th. She needed a large trunk to take a set of china dishes and a feather bed tick as a wedding present with her on the train. This letter/poem was written on January 17th by Charles for this occasion to his sweet wife Mary. My wife who got in a terrible fret, to go to Somerset And she asked me, “won’t you go too?” Said I, “I’d like well to go, But I’m not well enough you know.” “Well then,” says she, “I will go.” “Go then,” said I “and go you may and we will find the pay.” So she began to work and fret to fix for Somerset. So I got her a grip sack. Says she, “That is too big for me to pack.” So I took it back. And now, says she, “My trunk is too small. I must have one that’s big enough to hold all.” So in she went without Art’s consent Took his big trunk, turned out his junk and says, “Without a doubt, that will hold, if I turn his all out.” So out they went by her consent And hers went in with a laugh and a grin. But when she got her things all in tack She complained much about her lame back. “Now,” says she, “as I’m about to start, I will to you a kiss impart.” I gave her a kiss and a smack Wished her a safe come back. So away to the depot she went And for a ticket to Somerset her money she spent And while on the road to Somerset the groom and bride she met. “Now,” says the groom, “to Somerset we’ll take a stride.” So in the train for Somerset they took their seat. When there, their friend they greet. Although the train was late they found, the Walker gate. And when once inside, hand in hand went the groom and bride, And were welcomed at the Walker fireside.

Charley loves Mary (Charles Conrad and Mary Elizabeth Holdaway story)

Contributor: finnsh Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Chapter One --Charley Little Charley was born on the 20th of November 1831 on an eighty acre farm in Brownstown, Michigan. Their farm was bordered to the east by Mud Street, which ran along the Detroit River and was a well-traveled road for people who traveled between Detroit, Michigan and Chicago, Illinois. Charley’s father’s name was also Charles, Charles Ferdinand and his mother was Sarah Adams Bitely. His father was a prominent figure in the area and served as a Justice of the Peace for the town of Trenton. Charley grew up in the American Frontier with plenty of trees, wild animals and room to hunt and explore as a young man. He especially enjoyed finding the flint heads and old muskets left behind from the battles fought in the War of 1812. A crudely marked stone remained on their property marking the names of the men who died there in the battle. He wondered about what it was like thirty years ago. This made his life very exciting to him.   When Charley was ten years old, a Mormon missionary named Elder Sirrine came to the area. His mother and sister readily accepted their message and were baptized. Charley and his father were not. For twenty-two years his mother stayed in Michigan, but in 1863 she decided to take her family to Utah to live with the Saints. The next year Charley decided to follow. He intended to go all the way to California, however once in Utah he decided to stay.   Chapter Two -- Mary Elizabeth Mary Elizabeth was born September 12, 1856 in Provo, Utah to Shadrach Holdaway and Lucinda Haws. Her father had marched with the Mormon Battalion and had prospected for gold in California finding about three-thousand dollars worth. Family stories say that he was the first man to pay his tithing with gold. Shadrach and Lucinda took their money and traveled back east to purchase items to start the Utah Woolen Mills. Their first home was on the north side of Center Street and 500 West. Eventually, they settled an area along the Provo River in an area called Vineyard. The shores of Utah Lake were to the west. They were a prosperous family and had another home up the south fork of Provo Canyon, where they logged trees for buildings and homes. Shadrach and Cindy’s life was not always perfect. Their first two boys died in infancy. Then they had four strong boys. When Mary Elizabeth was born her mother was so happy. But when Mary was only three months old she took sick and one day stopped breathing. Mary’s father was away and her mother was determined that she was not going to lose another baby. She got the consecrated oil and kept rubbing it all over Mary’s body and prayed. Mary began breathing again and color returned to her face. Following Mary came two more healthy brothers, who were followed by two girls that also died. One last boy came to the family, and last but not least, what Mary always wanted a little sister, Amanda. As Mary grew she became was a charming girl with big brown eyes and curly brown hair.   Chapter Three --Homesteading Charley purchased a home near the Woolen Mills. It was favorably located in town, however the water from the Woolen Mills would flood his yard. Eventually, Brother Young purchased the land and Charley started looking for a place to homestead. It was during this time that Charley happened to see a young girl playing in a yard nearby. She had big brown eyes and curly brown hair. He half-jokingly said, “I think I’ll wait for that one to grow up.” Over the years Charley worked hard as a policeman and used his money to buy twenty-seven acres on the northeast corner of Provo at 800 North and 700 East. It was a good place to build a home with an irrigation canal running through it and large cottonwood trees. He built a comfortable home with logs from Provo Canyon. It had tall ceilings to keep the house cool in the summer and a vegetable cellar to store food in. He invited his mother Sarah and brother to come and live there. In the meantime, at the age of 35, Charley was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. He received the priesthood and actively participated in the Pleasant View Ward. Chapter Four --Married Life On November 10th, 1873, Charley and Mary were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. He was forty-two and she was seventeen. He had worked hard to provide everything that his bride would need. He had waited nine years and was going to make sure that she was the happiest bride in the world. And she was. Mary was educated and articulate. She busied herself with the joy of homemaking. She planted a garden with vegetables, melons and flowers. They had fruit and walnut trees. They raised chickens and horses and cattle and cows; all the necessities of life. Mary felt her life was full and happy. Charles was a self-made veterinarian and would trade with the other farmers his expertise for food. Children were born to Charles and Mary. First born was a girl. She had soft curly brown hair like her mother and they named her Mary Elizabeth. Next a boy was born whom they named for both grandfathers, Charles Shadrach. Eventually, they had five more boys; Warren, Arthur, Milton, Angus, Louis and two more girls Eva and Alice. Charles (as he was now called) and Mary lived many happy years together in the Pleasant View Ward. In 1891 Charles was called to be a counselor to Bishop Gillespie and he served for eight years until his health failed and he had to be released. As their children grew, most of them moved away from Provo. First Lizzie and then Eva moved to Colorado. The boys wanted to try homesteading in Canada, but Alice stayed in Provo. Mary loved being at her home in Provo, but would go and visit her children wherever they were. After Charles died she loved keeping her garden growing and sharing with anyone who came to visit her. Her grandchildren especially loved the sweet melons that she grew from seeds.   Charles passed away February 7, 1910 at the age of 79. Mary Elizabeth lived another twenty-five years and joined her eternal sweetheart Charles, December 11, 1935. They are both buried in the Provo Cemetery.

BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH ADAMS BITELY CONRAD

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH ADAMS BITELY CONRAD Sarah Adams Bitely was the daughter of Peter Bitely and Elizabeth Maria Douglas. She was born in the State of Vermont on the 21st of February 1802. She was named after the mid-wife, Sarah Adams, who attended her mother. This woman had no children and asked that the little girl be given her name, so she was given the name of Sarah Adams Bitely. Sarah Adams Bitely married Charles Ferdinand Conrad February 8, 1830, in the town of Seneca, Ontario County, New York. Their first child, John was born in Fayette , Seneca County, New York. He died when only two months old. The second child was a girl, Elizabeth, she was born in the town of Seneca, Ontario County, New York. A little later the family moved from New York to Brownstown, Wayne County, Michigan, where Mr. Conrad took up 80 acres of land, which was located on Mud Street going into Detroit. This was all new country, thickly timbered, and full of wild animals, especially deer, and bear. There were a few panthers and these animals with their peculiar cry were feared and many stories where told about them leading the settlers into the forest with their cries because it was thought that some child was lost. The trees had to be cut and burned so as to clear the land before it could be farmed. Among the other trees in this section of the country were hardwood trees such as the hickory, oak, end ash. Mr. Conrad leased a piece of his land on the north East Corner of his property for a school house. This school was used for many years. He was a prominent leader in his community and held the of office of Justice of the Peace at Trenton, Michigan. Nine children were born to Sarah Adams Bitely and Charles F. Conrad in Brownstown, Wayne County, Michigan. They were poor, but sturdy and loved the new country in spite of the hardships of pioneering. Many times they had only potatoes and salt to eat, sometimes they even lacked the salt to eat with the potatoes. Although Mr. Conrad was interested in his community he didn’t seem to take any of the responsibilities of his family, and many times the children went to school without shoes. Elizabeth wore her father’s old shoes when she had to go out in the snow on an errand. The snow sometimes piled up in drifts of three and four feet. It was so deep that it was possible to sleigh ride over the fences. Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad’s fourth child, William caused her a great deal of worry. He loved to hunt and whenever he found his father’s rifle in the house he would take it and go out hunting. When anyone asked where he was, his father would look in the corner where his rifle always stood and missing it would say "Bill's gone hunting, the rifle’s gone." One day he shot two large bucks, they had been fighting and had locked horns so that his one shot killed them both. Sarah Adams Bitely joined the church in 1843, immediately after hearing Elder M. Sirrine KNQK-QS3 preach the gospel. She and her daughter Elizabeth were interested from the first words of Elder Serrine. They accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints gladly, joyously, without question as though it was just what they had long been waiting for, and their faith never wavered through the troubles and hardships they endured in coming west and pioneering another new country. Mr. Conrad joined the church with his wife. They desired to join the Saints in Illinois and left their home in Brownstown. They traveled as far as LaHarpe, Illinois, here they learned that the prophet Joseph Smith had been killed. This caused them to turn about and go back to Michigan. Some time later Sarah's husband left the church. In 1862 Sarah Adams Bitely came to Utah in the company of another lady who had joined the church. Before they got to Missouri they were sitting in the train when two drunken men knowing that they were Mormons began to annoy them. They marched against them when they walked up the aisle and laughed drunkenly. Sarah took her shawl pin, which was about three inches long, and fixed it so that the next time these men came walking along and fell against them this pin stuck into them. After a few stabs they went away and didn't bother them again. Sarah Adams Bitely located in Provo. Her first home was in a little log cabin, where the administration building now stands. In 1864 her sons Charlie, George, and Serrine, her brother-in-law Frederick S. Conrad, and her son-in-law James Hooks joined her in Utah. They had traveled across the plains with one wagon between them, and reached Salt Lake City in August 1864. In Oct. 1870 her daughter Elizabeth, who had married James Hooks came to Provo with her four children. They came all the way from Michigan to Salt Lake City by train. Her son Daniel Schotte Conrad went to Kansas, where he died in 1878, and William Thomas Conrad died in St. Louis. Miles Henry Conrad was killed by a shot through a window one night while he was sitting by his stove. A short time after Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad came to Utah she was sealed to George Brown, a blacksmith who lived across the road from her. Her son Charlie bought a lot on Third North and Second West, just a block north of the Woolen Mills, which was finished in 1821. The brick work was up when Elizabeth joined her mother in Provo, another story was built on in the spring of 1871. The mill race had to be built up so as to get enough power for the machinery to run by, and this caused water to seep over on Charlie's land and onto the land owned by Mrs. Dan Jones, this ruined their gardens and President Young bought this land from them. Charlie then bought property out on Eighth North and Seventh East where his wife is still living. He built a home here on this land a mile from any other residence and his mother lived there for two years with her son George. Charlie had married and was living on his father-in-law's farm down by the lake. Later he brought his wife out to his land and built a home west of his mother's about a block. When Sarah Adams Bitely began to fail in health she went to live with her daughter, Elizabeth Conrad Hooks, who was living just a short distance south, where her son and his family are still living. Sarah Adams Bitely died in her daughter's home on the 29th of December 1879. She was 77 years old at the time of her death. Biography written by Bertha Louise Hooks November 26, 1934 Provo, Utah (Great granddaughter of Sarah Adams Bitely)

Mary Elizabeth Holdaway by her Grandson Tell

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Mary Elizabeth Holdaway by Grandson, Grant Tell Muhlestein Mary Elizabeth Holdaway, born 12 Sept. 1856 to SHEDRICK HOLDAWAY and LUCINDA HAWS, was reared in a large pioneer family where work and austerity gave demands to all family members. Mary Elizabeth carried the attributes of a true pioneer throughout her life. She was frugal, but generous, and no visitor ever left her garden (after her family was raised) without taking along a bouquet of flowers, or something from the fruit and vegetable garden. She was a great lover of all kinds of plants, and learned the art of grafting so that the seedling fruits could be grafted with better varieties if they did not produce a better kind than anything in the fruit orchard. Grandfather Charles Conrad, born 12 Nov. 1831 to Charles Ferdinand Conrad and Sarah Adams Bitely, saw this Mary Elizabeth Holdaway as a child --- attractive, brown eyes, curley dark hair, and winsome smile --- and vowed that be would wait until she grew to womanhood at which time he would marry her. When this young lady reached seventeen years and ten months, they were married the 10 Nov. 1873 in the Salt Lake Endowment House. My mother, their first child, was born 21 March 1875 and, like her mother.. learning, as well, to care for their food and clothing needs. Grandfather was a self-made veterinarian and often cared for sick animals through a full night. His clients promised grains or fruits at harvest time and often this fell through, so grandmother was compelled to grow and produce most of their food needs. Grandfather had acquired considerable land in the NorthEast part of Provo. They built their home on the corner of 7th East and 8th North --- a large one-story, double-brick home with a small fruit-and vegetable cellar. This was a double-brick construction and the lumber came from the Shedrick Holdaway Lumber Mill in South Fork of Provo Canyon- --a very hard and sturdy native pine almost impossible to drive nails into or to cut with a saw once cured, as we found later when the ceilings were lowered and rooms built in the attic area. This high-ceiling home was cool both in summer and winter. Good home-produced foods seemed to keep the family in health. There was plenty of milk and cream and home-churned butter. The grains were taken to the Mill and used in their natural state. Grandmother was an excellent cook and seamstress--providing wholesome food for the family and clothing for all. The landmark for the Ccnrad hcme was a huge cottonwood tree which was planted by nature long before the white man made inroads to the West. This tree provided the Conrad home with shade and comfort in the summertime. When the home was finished, one of the first things planted near the large cottonwood tree were some black walnut seeds. One grew vigorous and tall and provided the family with much enjoyment each year. As the grandchildren came to visit grandmother, they would ask to crack nuts under the Cottonwood --- sitting on a large stone bench that surrounded it. The soil near the home was quite rocky--being the residue of streams that once came over the area. In fact, my father-in-law, Gordon Phillips, sold land and gravel from an area which he purchased from the Conrad estate just north of the Conrad home. They had seeds of select cantaloupe and watermelon brought from Kentucky. Grandmother would save seeds from the cantaloupe with the smallest centers and the most meat, and the thin-rinded melons with the best:flavor. As a child I remember the strong and pleasant odor of the melons as grandmother cut them open to serve to her guests or relatives. The sweetness and perfume of those days seems to be missing in the melons we purchase at the markets today. They kept both beef and dairy cattle and, of necessity, a herd bull--one of which was notoriously mean. On one occasion grandmother had to cross the pasture where the bull was kept and he was aroused and came at her loudly bellowing. When he got too close, she fell to the ground, lying on her back, and, as the bull charged her, she would kick him in the mouth and continue. to push herself toward the barn area where the hog pen offered some kind of retreat. She reached the pig stye at a moment when the bull had stopped to appraise this strange woman's actions, and she was able to get over the wall and fall to the ground and gratefully rningle with the hogs. When their sixth child, Angus, died at the age of eight months, grandfather brought home a buck fawn deer which grandmother breast fed until it was weaned. This fawn grew to maturity and loved grandmother, of course, but he was hard to control since few fences would hold him and he was mean with strangers --- and especially with the boys who came by and threw rocks and sticks at him. One day some boys up on the "university" property threw stones and one struck him in the head and he fell to the ground dead, thus he provided meat for the Conrad family for some time. Grandmother loved to share plants with anyone who showed an interest in them. She grew many kinds of perennials and always had colorful annuals. She was able to plant sweet peas in the late fall and give them winter protection and have them grow and blossom for Memorial Day. Often the hundreds of peony plants she grew would not quite make their blooming coincide with Memorial Day and, if they were early, she would cut the buds and put them in cold storage at the "Ice Plant. But she could usually provide her "customers" with some flowers for this occasion. Any money she received for flowers, roots, vegetables or fruit was put into a jar in the kitchen to pay her taxes in the fall. Grandmother gave her five sons, Charles, Warren, Arthur, Milton, and Lewis their "inheritance" as young men who wished to establish themselves in a new land in Canada (Taber, Alberta). She gave her daughter, Eva a like stipened so she and Uncle John Walker could purchase a home in Provo. Aunt Alice Bertin was given a piece of ground west of the home which land was now too much for grandmother to care for --- this land was mostly pasture-land, yet, as the city drained it to put in streets,, Alice was able to sell lots to private individuals as well as Brigham Young University. Grandmother had a flare for words and was a natural born poetess. She would get an inspiration in the night (in her later life) get up and write these thoughts. She wrote a poem based on her experiences through the early years of her life and entitled it "The Pioneers" which describes their simple pleasures, entertainment, dress, customs, and dancing (beneath the.drip of candles). When my mother and I came out to Utah in the fall of 1.935 so I might attend the university, she was still working on and revising this bit of prose. Grandmother was invited to recite this poem, to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers and went to Salt Lake City to give it but was disappointed by another taking too much time and they had to delete her from the program. She was beginning to ail and when mother and I arrived in the fall of 1935 she was unable to care for her garden and home, yet she taught me how to irrigate, and we were able to harvest the fall crops and enjoy the "fruits" of her labor. Mother was her constant nurse during her terminal illness and, although she was suffering, she never complained. Mother and I had prayer at her bedside every night. We, her descendents, appreciate the faith and love of the Gospel of Jesus Christ which she instilled in all her family, whom she dearly loved, and her every effort was expended in their behalf and for their happiness. A great and monumental heritage.

Charles Conrad

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

CHARLES CONRAD Charles Conrad came to Utah from Detroit Michigan, in 1864 and has given this country the benefit of his experience gained in other places. Born in Brownstownship, Wayne Co. Michigan, 20 November 1831. He was the son of Charles Ferdinand Conrad & Sarah Adams Bitely Conrad. Charles Ferdinand, his father was a native of Newton Penn. where he was born 15 Sept. 1808 and married 18 Feb. 1830 Seneca Ontario Co. New York, immigrating to Mich, the year Charles was born, and settling on a farm he bought from the government, consisting of a quarter section of land, mostly covered with timber. He cleared land, cultivated and made a good farm of it, becoming one of the prominent men of his community and holding the office of Justice of the Peace, etc. He also owned an 80 acre farm at Trenton Michigan. Charles Ferdinand died in 1884. Charles grew to manhood in Michigan and received an education there. He also spent some time on his Father=s place at Trenton, remaining at home until he started for Utah in 1864. His mother, Sarah, was the mother of 11 children. She joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in 1841 and came to Provo, Utah in 1863. Four children came with their mother. They were; Charles, George, Serrine, (named for the Elder who brought them the Gospel) and Elizabeth. Sarah died in Provo on 24 Dec 1879. In 1864, Charles followed his mother to Utah, in company with his brothers George, Serrine, his Uncle Frederick Schott Conrad and his brother-in-law James Hooks. They had but one wagon between them and left Iowa 12 May 1864. Traveled as far as Julesburg before they caught up with any other immigrants. There they crossed the Platte river 13 times, making boats of their wagon beds, with which to ferry their goods across and swimming their cattle and them- selves. Although the Indians were out on the war path, none of the party were molested and they reached Salt Lake City in safety, 12 Aug. 1864. They tarried 11 days in that place, then came direct to Provo. Charles bought a home in the center of Provo and there for three years followed gardening. He also rented other land, and during the time of the Black Hawk War rented the farm of J.A. Bean. In 1870 he bought a farm in eastern part of town, which was at that time a mile further out than any other place. First he bought 8 acres, then added to it from time to time, (uncultivated land) until he finally had a good farm of 27 acres within the city limits, well improved, all fenced, and built a comfortable brick home there on. He also preempted 160 acres on the south fork of Provo Canyon, in 1880 and there built a home and began keeping stock following that for several years and at this time has part of this land under cultivation. Mr Conrad was the first man to open up land in the canyon. For 6 years he acted as Police of Provo under instruction of A.O.Smoot. He also did considerable lumbering in the mts. and furnished the material for the old Tabernacle building. He also took active part in building many of the canals, & was a director of the upper east union. He was a member of Provo Canyon Read Go. and has done much towards making and keeping the road thru the canyon in good repair. Charles Conrad married 10 Nov. 1873, Mary E. Holdaway, daughter of Shadrach Holdaway and Lucinda Haws Holdaway. They have 9 children, Mary Elizabeth, Charles S.,Warren N., Arthur M., Milton W., Eva L., Lewis A., Alice, and Angus, who died in infancy. In political belief Mr Conrad is a Democrat and for many years has been in public office. Has seen jury duty, trying a number of prominent cases under Judge Emerson. Charles Conrad joined the church in 1866. He was ordained an Elder and set apart as lst Coun. to Pres. Kemp, of Provo; Ordained a Seventy 26 January 1869; Ordained a High Priest in 1891 and set apart as lst. Counselor. to Bishop Alexander Glllispie, of the Pleasant View Ward, Provo, which position he resigned eight years later on account of failing health. Charles Conrad began at the foot of the ladder and has climbed step by step, until he is now in position of affluence, enjoying the confidence and esteem of his friends and associates, being numbered among the influential and substantial men of Utah County. The above copied from: Portrait and Gen. and Biographical record of the State of Utah ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Charles Conrad was born in Browntownship, Wayne Co., Michigan in 1831 where his father, Charles Ferdinand Conrad, and his mother, Sarah Adams Bitely, were prosperous and comfortably settled down...until they were taught about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His mother was convinced it was true, and was baptized in 1841. His father never did join the church. Charles followed his father's example and was not baptized at the time. His mother remained faithful, however, and after her children were grown, she followed the saints to Utah in 1863. A year later, Charles, two other brothers, a brother-in-law, and an uncle joined her at Provo. Two years after arriving, Charles, too, was convinced, and was baptized into the church at age 35. Once baptized, he became very active in the Pleasant View Ward, and became a counselor to Bishop Gillespie in 1891. When Charles was 33 years old, he noticed an eight-year-old dark-eyed girl playing in his neighbor's front room. Her name was Mary Elizabeth, and she was the only girl in the Holdaway family. She was bright and loquacious, and Charles, admiring her charming ways, rubbed her mass of dark curls and announced that he was going to wait for her to grow up so he could marry her. Nine years later, on Nov 10th 1873, he did just that! They were married when he was 42 and his bride, seventeen. Charles Conrad knew he was a fortunate man to get her, not only for her beauty, but also because of her great desire for a family and the many skills she had acquired with which she could care for one. Charles Conrad had worked for six years as a policeman to earn money for land, had done a lot of lumbering in the mountains, and had taken part in building many of the irrigation canals, and had accumulated many acres of land in the northeast section of town. The couple settled down in a new brick home Charles built on the corner of his 27 acres of land, all within city limits, well-improved, and fenced. They also preempted 160 acres on the South Fork of Provo Canyon, and in 1880 built another home there. They began keeping cattle in South Fork, and put part of the land under cultivation as well. Charles was the first man to open up land in the South Fork of Provo Canyon. On 21 Mar 1875 there was born a beautiful little replica of Mary Elizabeth to Charles and Mary, whom they named Mary Elizabeth, also. She became known as Lizzie, a beautiful little girl with dark brown eyes and heavy dark hair that curled more gently than her mother's tight curls. Next came a son whom they named Charles after his father. By Joyce Muhlestein Great Granddaughter In Law

Letter from Charles Conrad to his wife Mary

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

In January 1910, Mary took a train from Provo, Utah to Somerset, Colorado to attend the wedding of her daughter Eva. This was only weeks before Charles passed away on February 7th. She needed a large trunk to take a set of china dishes and a feather bed tick as a wedding present with her on the train. This letter/poem was written on January 17th by Charles for this occasion to his sweet wife Mary. My wife who got in a terrible fret, to go to Somerset And she asked me, “won’t you go too?” Said I, “I’d like well to go, But I’m not well enough you know.” “Well then,” says she, “I will go.” “Go then,” said I “and go you may and we will find the pay.” So she began to work and fret to fix for Somerset. So I got her a grip sack. Says she, “That is too big for me to pack.” So I took it back. And now, says she, “My trunk is too small. I must have one that’s big enough to hold all.” So in she went without Art’s consent Took his big trunk, turned out his junk and says, “Without a doubt, that will hold, if I turn his all out.” So out they went by her consent And hers went in with a laugh and a grin. But when she got her things all in tack She complained much about her lame back. “Now,” says she, “as I’m about to start, I will to you a kiss impart.” I gave her a kiss and a smack Wished her a safe come back. So away to the depot she went And for a ticket to Somerset her money she spent And while on the road to Somerset the groom and bride she met. “Now,” says the groom, “to Somerset we’ll take a stride.” So in the train for Somerset they took their seat. When there, their friend they greet. Although the train was late they found, the Walker gate. And when once inside, hand in hand went the groom and bride, And were welcomed at the Walker fireside.

Charley loves Mary (Charles Conrad and Mary Elizabeth Holdaway story)

Contributor: William Herron Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Chapter One --Charley Little Charley was born on the 20th of November 1831 on an eighty acre farm in Brownstown, Michigan. Their farm was bordered to the east by Mud Street, which ran along the Detroit River and was a well-traveled road for people who traveled between Detroit, Michigan and Chicago, Illinois. Charley’s father’s name was also Charles, Charles Ferdinand and his mother was Sarah Adams Bitely. His father was a prominent figure in the area and served as a Justice of the Peace for the town of Trenton. Charley grew up in the American Frontier with plenty of trees, wild animals and room to hunt and explore as a young man. He especially enjoyed finding the flint heads and old muskets left behind from the battles fought in the War of 1812. A crudely marked stone remained on their property marking the names of the men who died there in the battle. He wondered about what it was like thirty years ago. This made his life very exciting to him.   When Charley was ten years old, a Mormon missionary named Elder Sirrine came to the area. His mother and sister readily accepted their message and were baptized. Charley and his father were not. For twenty-two years his mother stayed in Michigan, but in 1863 she decided to take her family to Utah to live with the Saints. The next year Charley decided to follow. He intended to go all the way to California, however once in Utah he decided to stay.   Chapter Two -- Mary Elizabeth Mary Elizabeth was born September 12, 1856 in Provo, Utah to Shadrach Holdaway and Lucinda Haws. Her father had marched with the Mormon Battalion and had prospected for gold in California finding about three-thousand dollars worth. Family stories say that he was the first man to pay his tithing with gold. Shadrach and Lucinda took their money and traveled back east to purchase items to start the Utah Woolen Mills. Their first home was on the north side of Center Street and 500 West. Eventually, they settled an area along the Provo River in an area called Vineyard. The shores of Utah Lake were to the west. They were a prosperous family and had another home up the south fork of Provo Canyon, where they logged trees for buildings and homes. Shadrach and Cindy’s life was not always perfect. Their first two boys died in infancy. Then they had four strong boys. When Mary Elizabeth was born her mother was so happy. But when Mary was only three months old she took sick and one day stopped breathing. Mary’s father was away and her mother was determined that she was not going to lose another baby. She got the consecrated oil and kept rubbing it all over Mary’s body and prayed. Mary began breathing again and color returned to her face. Following Mary came two more healthy brothers, who were followed by two girls that also died. One last boy came to the family, and last but not least, what Mary always wanted a little sister, Amanda. As Mary grew she became was a charming girl with big brown eyes and curly brown hair.   Chapter Three --Homesteading Charley purchased a home near the Woolen Mills. It was favorably located in town, however the water from the Woolen Mills would flood his yard. Eventually, Brother Young purchased the land and Charley started looking for a place to homestead. It was during this time that Charley happened to see a young girl playing in a yard nearby. She had big brown eyes and curly brown hair. He half-jokingly said, “I think I’ll wait for that one to grow up.” Over the years Charley worked hard as a policeman and used his money to buy twenty-seven acres on the northeast corner of Provo at 800 North and 700 East. It was a good place to build a home with an irrigation canal running through it and large cottonwood trees. He built a comfortable home with logs from Provo Canyon. It had tall ceilings to keep the house cool in the summer and a vegetable cellar to store food in. He invited his mother Sarah and brother to come and live there. In the meantime, at the age of 35, Charley was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. He received the priesthood and actively participated in the Pleasant View Ward. Chapter Four --Married Life On November 10th, 1873, Charley and Mary were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. He was forty-two and she was seventeen. He had worked hard to provide everything that his bride would need. He had waited nine years and was going to make sure that she was the happiest bride in the world. And she was. Mary was educated and articulate. She busied herself with the joy of homemaking. She planted a garden with vegetables, melons and flowers. They had fruit and walnut trees. They raised chickens and horses and cattle and cows; all the necessities of life. Mary felt her life was full and happy. Charles was a self-made veterinarian and would trade with the other farmers his expertise for food. Children were born to Charles and Mary. First born was a girl. She had soft curly brown hair like her mother and they named her Mary Elizabeth. Next a boy was born whom they named for both grandfathers, Charles Shadrach. Eventually, they had five more boys; Warren, Arthur, Milton, Angus, Louis and two more girls Eva and Alice. Charles (as he was now called) and Mary lived many happy years together in the Pleasant View Ward. In 1891 Charles was called to be a counselor to Bishop Gillespie and he served for eight years until his health failed and he had to be released. As their children grew, most of them moved away from Provo. First Lizzie and then Eva moved to Colorado. The boys wanted to try homesteading in Canada, but Alice stayed in Provo. Mary loved being at her home in Provo, but would go and visit her children wherever they were. After Charles died she loved keeping her garden growing and sharing with anyone who came to visit her. Her grandchildren especially loved the sweet melons that she grew from seeds.   Charles passed away February 7, 1910 at the age of 79. Mary Elizabeth lived another twenty-five years and joined her eternal sweetheart Charles, December 11, 1935. They are both buried in the Provo Cemetery.

Life timeline of Charles Conrad

Charles Conrad was born on 20 Nov 1831
Charles Conrad was 9 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Charles Conrad was 28 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Charles Conrad was 29 years old when American Civil War: Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States, who advocated for states' rights to expand slavery.
Charles Conrad was 48 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Charles Conrad was 50 years old when The world's first international telephone call is made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine, United States. A telephone call is a connection over a telephone network between the called party and the calling party.
Charles Conrad was 67 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
Charles Conrad was 77 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Charles Conrad died on 7 Feb 1910 at the age of 78
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Charles Conrad (20 Nov 1831 - 7 Feb 1910), BillionGraves Record 32508893 Provo, Utah, Utah, United States

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