Charles Adams

1843 - 1927

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Charles Adams

1843 - 1927
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Charles Adams (1843-1927) LIFE STORY OF CHARLES ADAMS Pioneer, Church & Civic Leader by Beatrice Adams Johnson I write this history of my grandfather Adams because he was one of Iron County's most colorful, useful and loved citizens of his day. I write it to share his story with the hundreds of desc

Life Information

Charles Adams

Born:
Died:

Parowan City Cemetery

834 Canyon Rd, Parowan, UT 84761
Parowan, Iron, Utah
United States
Transcriber

Vaccine'd Up & Sorry to See Summer Go

December 20, 2014
Photographer

ctoniburton

May 7, 2012

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Charles Adams (1843-1927)

Contributor: Vaccine'd Up & Sorry to See Summer Go Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Charles Adams (1843-1927) LIFE STORY OF CHARLES ADAMS Pioneer, Church & Civic Leader by Beatrice Adams Johnson I write this history of my grandfather Adams because he was one of Iron County's most colorful, useful and loved citizens of his day. I write it to share his story with the hundreds of descendants he has. All too few of us remaining really knew him and we want our children and grandchildren to learn of him. I write it with my own affection for him flaring into a rich memory of fifteen years of seeing him nearly every day, living three blocks from his home; and from pride in being his granddaughter. An Irishman by birth, he inherited good looks, wit and energy, plus leadership qualities that led him into most every phase of community activity, with as diversified a career as few men could attain in a lifetime. This story will be in three parts. First, the history and statistics of his life; second, the account of his experiences crossing the plains four times, told in his own words; and third, the anecdotes and stories for which he was famous, putting me in mind of Abraham Lincoln. I write this story because in the telling and retelling, the hearing and rehearing of his anecdotes, my family has become familiar with them and have asked me to record them. What will we tell our children of their great great grandfather when they want to know of their ancestor? I want him to be a real person in their lives, not a shadowy, long-gone and unknown stranger. HISTORY In the small village of Hillsborough, County Down, Ireland, on September 16th 1843, William and Mary Ann Leech Adams welcomed their first child, a son, and named him Charles. Mary Ann came from Belfast, but William called Hillsborough his home town. The maternal grandparents, Hugh and Ann Jamison Leech had come with their parents from the Highlands of Scotland. Charles' parents had joined the "Mormon" Church in 1840 and in 1844, at age three months, he was brought to America, his family having embarked from Liverpool, England on January 20th arrived in New Orleans March 1st. They left two days later for Nauvoo by boat up the Mississippi, arriving April 10th. When the boat landed at Nauvoo, many people came to greet the newcomers. Thressa Chamberlain, an old friend of the William Adams family, took the baby Charles and placed him in the arms of the Prophet Joseph Smith, who gave the tiny Irish child a blessing. From that time on, his mother said this blessing was instrumental in helping her son to be a good boy. The Adams family went through the stirring scenes in Nauvoo - the martyrdom of the Prophet and Hyrum, working and saving two years for the temple, then spending three years working in Wisconsin, Illinois and Missouri, earning money to bring the family West. In May of 1849, after burying a small son, Hugh, in Nauvoo, William finally began the journey with his family to Utah. They were in a company of one hundred wagons with Andrew H. Perkins as captain. At age six and a half, Charles was able to remember the trip - the herds of buffalo, fording the rivers, seeing Indians, some in the paraphernalia of war, painted and feathered. It took three and a half months to cross the plains, and they wintered in Salt Lake City at the fort, moving to the Eleventh Ward in the spring. Charles was big enough to be of much help when his father was called by Brigham Young to leave December 7th 1850, with a company under George A. Smith, to settle Parowan. He was in the responsible position of being the oldest of three children, his mother having another son James, two and a half, and a daughter, Annie, an infant in arms. The three young children, with their mother, left Salt Lake in March 1851, to join William and help in colonizing this part of southern Utah. Charles learned a great deal about farming, stock raising and building at an early age, under the guidance of his father. As a child he helped build the fort, pitching mud into the molds made of boards on each side. There was a corral in the center where everyone put their stock at night. Charles' father purchased an entire city block which now is the site of many familiar homes in Parowan, including the little adobe home William built for his family. It is still there but has been added to and covered with siding, so we would only know it by location. Charles also learned much from his mother, Mary Ann, who was quite an aristocratic woman. In Ireland, she was used to luxury and better things. She and her older sons, Charles and James once made quantities of soap, both for laundry and finer soap for hand use. They traveled to Salt Lake to sell it, using the money to buy a horse-hair sofa and some green plush draperies. Mary Ann truly longed for some beauty in her family's life and was perfectly willing to work hard for it. She wove all the material for their clothing in those early years and was determined that her children should have some education. William Adams got his first thirty head of sheep from John R. Robinson and then on trade with alum, copper and salt from Little Salt Lake added to his livestock until he became quite well off. When Charles was fourteen years old, his father went to Salt Lake City to work on the temple for six months, and he was able to take charge of the farm, the stock, haul the wood and assume any responsibility that came along. In 1862, at age 19, Charles was called to drive a team of four yoke of oxen with a wagon back to Winter Quarters, near Omaha, Nebraska, to being emigrants to Utah, with John R. Murdock as captain. He made three more trips across the plains, each time bringing back news of the Civil War. Some of the Utah people were Southern sympathizers but most were for the Union. Charles said that all his family felt badly when Abraham Lincoln was shot. March 31st 1863, was memorable in Charles' life, for on that day, at age 20, he married Sarah Ann Davenport daughter of Thomas and Sarah Davenport. This event took place at the Davenport home with William H. Dane, President of Parowan Stake, officiating. One week later, he started again across the plains to bring back a load of freight. In October of 1863, as he returned to Salt Lake City, he was met by his father, mother and his wife who had come to be sealed to Charles by President Brigham Young, in the Endowment House. In 1864, twin daughters were born prematurely; one stillborn and the other lived only a short time. They were named Mary Ann and Sarah Ann after the grandmother and mother. Their next child, a son, Charles Davenport Adams, was born 28 September 1866. At the time Parowan was divided into wards, Charles became second counselor to Bishop Samuel H. Rogers. In 1879, he was again counselor, this time to Bishop John H. Dalley and later to William C. Mitchell. In 1886, the two wards were reunited and he was set apart as Bishop, remaining in that position for the next seventeen years. He was then a member of the High Council until his death. From the time of his marriage and on, Charles was much involved in the building up of his own cattle and sheep herds. Also during the next twelve years, he was a member of the State Militia, subject to call at any time when there was trouble with the Indians. As noted above, Charles was a great religious leader in his community. He was also very active in civic affairs as you will see by the positions he held. He served one term as water master and several on the City Council; two terms as Mayor; Assessor and Collector of Iron County for one year, to fill a vacancy; two terms as County Commissioner; one term in the Lower House and one in the Upper House of the state Legislature in the 1890's. He also spent many years as a School Board Trustee. He became Superintendent of the Parowan Co-op in 1880. While serving in this capacity, a new roller mill was built. At this time there was a great wave of interest in co-operative enterprises all through the Church, in all Mormon settlements. There were co-op stores, co-op sheep, cattle and horse herds. In Parowan, Charles Adams entered actively into this movement and his native good sense brought him into leadership in many, many commercial and social enterprises. He was president and manager of both the Co-op Store and the Co-op Sheep Company and director in all other such businesses in the town. Charles began to raise a few head of sheep of his own and these gradually increased until he had a sizable herd and was generally considered to be, in those days, "well off." During the many years that followed he bought out the stockholders in the Co-op Sheep Company and he with his sons assumed control. He had proven that the people could have confidence in his judgement and fairness. His callings in leadership in church and civic affairs placed great responsibility upon him and this in turn developed characteristics that distinguished him. Through it all, he became a scriptorian, an example for good, a wise philosopher. In times of stress and in tense situations, his native Irish wit and judgement were often a saving grace. These human qualities, with his great faith, endeared him to his people and his family. He was elected to every office of city and county that was within the gift of the people to give him. It elevated him to a position of prominence, love and confidence to all whom he served. His beloved wife, Sarah Ann, passed away on the 24th of August 1920. Charles remained an active man, had a keen interest in sports and loved to dance. Even in his eighties I remember him dancing. Sometimes his granddaughters would duck out when they saw him coming, but most of the time they danced with him. Different ones used to have to go over to his house and prepare lunch or dinner for him. Many times my mother invited him to our home for a meal. There was a tender and loving relationship between them. They truly saw the worth of each other. Also I remember my father, Thomas, going many times to his father for some counsel or advice. Grandpa Charles had many grandchildren - most lived there in Parowan. Sometimes, when one or another would see him on the street, they would say, "Hello grandpa," and he would always ask to whom they belonged. It would be Will, or Tom, or Charl D. or one of the others. Grandpa would pat them on the head and say, "Fine boy, fine boy! Here is a dime for you." As his eyesight dimmed, the neighborhood children caught on to this easy money and would call, "Hello grandpa," usually receiving a dime. Grandpa and grandma entertained Brigham Young in their home on his many visits to the southern settlements. Always there was a place for visitors at conference or civic affairs. People brought their problems to him for advice and help. The 21st of December 1927 brought to close a life that I can only call great. A fine old Irish gentleman was now gone at the age of 84 years and 3 months. All too often, little is said of the wives of pioneers. Not so much would have been accomplished by these men without good women to back them. So this story would not be complete without a tribute to grandma Adams. Sarah Ann Davenport was a beautiful woman. In her youth she had long, dark hair which was silvery gray in her later years. She accepted her role as wife of a busy and involved man, one who was away much of the time, with courage and patience, bearing and rearing a large family, teaching and training them to be responsible citizens. In those days the labor saving household aids were unheard of, but grandma carried out her duties with womanly dignity. Her birthday was on Valentine Day and I remember her "holding court" in the parlor, welcoming each grandchild who came to present her with a birthday-Valentine greeting. Each received in return the much coveted mint candies. I remember my father taking me to see her during her last illness, caressing her cheek with his hand, looking somber, perhaps thinking of all she had done for him as he had grown up in that home. She was truly an example of pioneer womanhood. Enduring hardships and lonely times with fortitude, but joining in with her family in times of joy and rejoicing. Children of William and Mary Ann Leech Adams: Charles Married Sarah Ann Davenport Hugh Leech Died in Nauvoo James Jamison Married Caroline Elizabeth Redd Anna Catherine Married David Ward Hugh Leech Married Juliette Bayles Margaret Married Morgan Richards William Married Mary Jane Richards Emma Mabel Mitchell Rose Thomas Married Emily M. Caldwell Children of Charles and Sarah Ann Davenport Adams: Mary Ann Twin lived a short time Sarah Ann Twin stillborn Charles Davenport Married Mary Jane Whitney Sarah Farncella Married Christian Sorenson Thomas Davenport Married Maria Luella Redd Minnie Miriam Married Dr. Frank J. Burton Samuel Stillborn Mary Ann Married Ray Gudmundson William Leech Married Elizabeth D. Watson Joseph Burrows Married Isabel Chamberlain Laura Pearl Married James R. Decker Laurance James Married Augusta Dalton FROM THE PERSONAL DIARY OF CHARLES ADAMS "In the spring of 1862, when I was nineteen years old, I was called to drive a team of four yoke of oxen, with a wagon back to Winter Quarters, near Omaha, Nebraska. This, my second trip across, the plains, was to bring emigrants to Utah, under John R. Murdock as captain. "A Brother Sanders, an original pioneer to Parowan, was something of an astrologer and he had talked about my horoscope. He said that in 1862 I would come very nearly getting drowned. And this came about on this trip. When we reached the Platte River on our way out, the water was very high. I had two companions. We went in swimming and I was not a very good swimmer and did indeed come very nearly getting drowned. "The following year, at age 20, I had married Sarah Ann Davenport on March 31, 1863. A week after our marriage, I started across the plains again, this time to bring a load of freight back to Utah Territory. I had a load of three hundred pounds of gun powder, four big stoves and some machinery. On the return trip, just before reaching Loop Fork, a tributary of the Platte River, about five o'clock in the afternoon, a heavy storm burst. The lightning was carried on the telegraph wire, and struck my wagon which was just passing under the telegraph wire and tore a hole in the wagon cover. The load I had on, iron, gun powder, machinery etc., attracted the lightning, but it did not touch the gun powder. The hay under the stoves did take fire and soon as the other teamsters saw the smoke they took alarm and ran away. "I climbed into the wagon, threw off the cover, and began unloading as fast as possible. The lightning had run down the chain and struck five of the oxen, branding them and killing them. I was standing by the near wheeler, just raising my whip to touch him up. The off-swing was a lively animal and swerved away from the chain and was only slightly struck and was uninjured. I was stunned for a moment but arose and felt alright. "Coming home I had only three head of cattle out of eight. But Captain Samuel White (to whom I was assistant captain) and the boys were very kind to me, and helped me out with their animals. The next year my father paid the Church for the use of the oxen helping me home." I insert here a paragraph from an account written by William R. Palmer, giving a few more details of this dangerous experience. He wrote: "In the wagon were thirty kegs of gun powder. Charles had just crossed the river safely and was pulling up the steep bank, when lightning struck his lead cattle, killing them in their tracks. The electric current followed the hitch chain back to the wagon killing three more oxen and setting the wagon on fire. Charles was stunned by the blow and lay in gravest peril from the powder. David Bullock, following close behind, rushed over and gave him a good shake to bring him to his senses. Then Charles worked furiously to unload the gun powder before the fire reached it." "In 1866, I crossed the plains a fourth time, with Edward Thompson of Fillmore as captain. This time I took my own wagon for freight and volunteered to take a Church wagon for emigrants, starting in April and getting back in October. This was the only way some of the people, newly arrived from England and other countries, could come, by the aid of the Church, for they had given up everything to reach America." STORIES AND ANECDOTES Many and many a time Adams' have gotten together to enjoy hearing and telling these stories. They never get dull. Grandpa usually said the word "the" to sound like "thee." Also, he was known to repeat phrases for emphasis. If anyone, who may read this collection of stories, might know some that I have not recorded, please add them to the ones told here. The mail for the citizens of Parowan was delivered to, and dispensed from the home of Aunt Sarah Matheson, Scott Matheson's mother, she being the postmistress. Grandpa was one of only three or four who took the daily paper. People, eager for the news, used to come early to Aunt Sarah's parlor to look over the paper before grandpa come for it. Each morning he would walk in and ask if everyone was finished with it, then take the paper along home. Once in a Sunday School Parents' Class, the subject under discussion was the responsibility of parents for teaching their children. The discussion became pretty one-sided against the parents. If children went wrong the parents were to blame, and if children went to hell the parents would go with them. Bishop Charles Adams sat silent as long as he could, then arose and raised his arm high, as though to toss the subject back to a saner balance, he said, "Don't believe it! Don't believe it! Don't believe a word of it. The Lord's got more bad boys than I have. Don't expect to go down to hades to find the Lord!" Serious trouble arose between two men in Bishop Charles' ward. This concerned water rights, a touchy matter because of its scarcity. The Bishop had tried time and again to reconcile the two, but the trouble continued to flare. He had referred the case to the Ward Teachers of each man and recommended they appear before a Bishop's Court. "Those two had a fist fight. You have to get them together and work this problem out." Grandpa shook his head and answered, "Don't like that recommendation. Can't accept that recommendation. Had them together. Had them together. Very glad to get them apart. Keep their ways as wide apart as possible till they get more faith and more sense." Asked once by Francis M. Lyman, who was visiting at Conference time, who Bishop Adams always gave such glowing reports of his people, the ready answer was, "Catch more flies with molasses than with vinegar." When Grandpa Charles was president of the Co-op Store, it was discovered that thefts were being carried out, and it was quite same time till it was discovered how the stolen goods were being taken out of the store. In the basement there were windows with iron bars instead of glass. One day an observant young clerk saw a pile of groceries and other articles stacked near the windows, where a hand could reach through the bars and make off with the store's property. He quickly reported to grandpa and offered to spend the night in the basement to catch the thief. Grandpa shook his head negatively and said, "No Joseph, no! We'll put glass in the windows and remove the temptation, remove the temptation! I don't want to find out who it is, it might be someone we know." One night grandma got sick. According to her, she was very, very sick. She called grandpa and told him how dreadful she felt, saying, "Charles, I'm sick. I'm sick enough to die!" To which he calmly answered, "Sick are you, Sarah Ann? Think you're going to die do you, Sarah Ann? Well, well!" and turned over to go back to sleep. Grandma, infuriated, said, "No, I'm not going to die, Charles. I won't die just to please you!" When grandpa was mayor of Parowan, there was a meeting of the City Council. The discussion of the evening was about the necessity of having a fence around the cemetery. After many opinions had been expressed, and grandpa had listened to each one he put his fingers together, closed his eyes and gave the situation some thought. Finally, he said, "It's a great expense - great expense! Why build a fence around it? Those who are in there can't get out, and those who are out don't want to get in." One day Charles Timmons, went into Shorty Green's Drug Store and found grandpa sitting there. Charles went over to him and asked how he was feeling. Grandpa said, "Fine - just fine! Now who are you?" "I'm Charlie Timmons, Brother Adams, I'm going to marry your granddaughter, Imogene." Grandpa said. "Well, well, going to marry Imogene are you? For a wife? For a wife? Well, well!" Grandpa Adams used to buy things from or trade with the Indians. One day when he was preparing things to make trade, his son Thomas, said, "father, let me go do the trading. I can make a better deal, let me try." Grandpa gave him permission and Thomas started off with the items for trade. There was some bartering and Thomas kept saying to the Indians, "More, more." They would throw down more articles. Finally, when he took his load home, he was happy and proud because he had done better than his father usually did. But he was chagrined when grandpa said, "Thomas, that is too much, too much. You have not been fair with the Indians. Tomorrow you will take this much back." Humiliated, Thomas returned to the Indians, who calmly accepted the goods, saying, "We expected you back. Charles Adams heap fair man." Thomas learned a great lesson that day. When Grandpa was president of the Co-op Sheep Herd, they would winter the sheep out on the desert, through the gap. The only accessible water was from a well, where the water was acrid with the taste of alkali and unsafe to drink. Grandpa told the herders to boil the water and make tea. In the summer time, the herds were taken to the mountains, where the water, coming from springs was fresh, clear and cold. Grandpa kept making tea. His herders remonstrated with him about this, saying there was no need to boil the water. Grandpa calmly retorted that, "Thee better thee water thee better thee tea." One day grandpa's daughter, Minnie, was helping him with the bills received for groceries taken out to the sheep herds. The men were permitted to do their own ordering, and they found that there was a great quantity of Hewletts jams and preserves, put up in bucket containers, going in the supplies. Grandpa commented on this and Minnie said that she would just tell the men to cut down on this luxury, that it was constipating. Grandpa much annoyed, said, "Constipating and be damned! Its expensive! Expensive!" Sid Pritchard was herding sheep for grandpa one summer and he became very aggravated because his, so called, sheep dog would leave the herd to go chase rabbits. He sent word to grandpa to bring him a good sheep dog. Grandpa came to the camp with a dog, and Sid asked, "Will that dog chase rabbits?" Grandpa said, "You bet that dog will chase rabbits. He will just chase them all over the place." "Then take the son-of-a-gun home. I don't want a dog that chases rabbits," Sid answered, to which grandpa hurriedly replied, "But Sidney, he will only chase rabbits if you want him to chase rabbits!" One time grandpa was helping Bart Dalton, put the sheep through the chute into the creosote dip to get rid of ticks. One rambunctious ewe kicked Bart in the month, loosening one of his teeth. Angrily, he called the ewe a son-of-a-----. "Now Bartlett, now Bartlett, nice little ewe, nice ewe! Do not call her such a name." Later in the process, the same thing happened to grandpa. With great indignation, he stated, "You are right, Bartlett! She is a son-of-a------!" One day grandpa was going to drive to Buckhorn Flats in his buggy. His son, Thomas, wanted to miss school that day to go with his father, who said, "No Thomas, you cannot go. Not this time. What in the world makes you want to go to Buckhorn Flats for anyway?" The young boy had a ready answer, "Gee, dad, a fellow likes to see a little bit of the world before he dies!" One evening grandpa mounted his horse to go down to his field to take the water. When he finished the task he was tired, so he climbed in the back of his sheep wagon and went to sleep. When he awakened it was dark and quite late, so he prepared himself some supper from the supplies there, undressed and got into bed to spend the rest of the night. In the meantime, grandma became extremely worried about him. She called on the sheriff to help her search for him. The night passed without anyone finding him. The next morning when grandpa came riding back into town, he found search parties being organized. It embarrassed him, and when he got home he scolded Sarah Ann. "Next time I am gone give me three days, Sarah Ann, three days, before you worry about me. Three days before you send out a search party for me." In those early days in Parowan, there was an "outhouse" in every back yard. One early summer morning grandpa walked through his backyard and cut across his neighbor's on some errand or another. His neighbor's wife, never thinking to be caught so early in the morning, had left her privy door open to enjoy the early morning sun. Grandpa, always courteous, raised his hat as he saw her and said, "Good morning, Phoebe, Nice morning! Nice Morning!" A story along this same theme is about the outhouse down in back of the old tithing office in Parowan. Grandpa had gone down to the office to do some work when nature called. That same day, two of Aunt Sarah Matheson's daughters, sent on some errand in the vicinity, also had a hurry-up call. Finding the door to the privy fastened, with a split strap over a nail, the girls knocked on the door for admittance. Grandpa, perturbed not at all, said, "occupied ladies, sorry, but occupied, occupied!" This story is told by Aunt Mary Ollerton. "My husband and I sold Charles Adams a piece of land for a price we thought was fair and adequate amount. After a year or two, Charles came to us and said, "The land you sold me has been so valuable to me, its been worth this much more." He gave Aunt Mary $500. Grandpa always depended on Blanchard Whitney, a neighbor from across the street, to put in his heating stove. One morning grandpa told him it was getting chilly and time to bring in the stove. Grandma was there when Blanchard began his job, and she said, "Blanch, move that stove a little this way." And then, "Blanch, the stove pipe is crooked." And again, "Blanch, you could have cleaned that stove a little better." Blanchard and grandpa gritted their teeth and then, "Blanch, you have to move that stove closer to the wall." This was the last straw. Grandpa said, "Sarah Ann, let Blanchard do it and I won't tell you to go to hell, but I'll tell you to start out!" During the time grandpa was bishop, most of the dancing was square dancing. But the time came that waltzing and other round dancing came into style. This shocked grandpa, who felt the proprieties were being broken. He got up to speak to his flock at one of their sociables and counseled with them thus: "Young men and women, this is not the right way to dance. Thee boys must not swing thee girls around thee waist." When Uncle Laurence was a tiny little boy about two years old, grandpa took him into the mountains where he was going to get a load of wood, He wrapped the boy in a blanket and sat him on a nearby rock to watch him work. He worked quite steadily but frequently glanced over at the child to see if all was well. One such glance froze him with fear as he saw a rattlesnake coiled and ready to strike. Grandpa afterward marveled at what happened and said it was an answer to his prayer. In one swift movement, he caught the snake in a tight grip around the head, just below the exposed fangs, and with the other hand hurled the boy quite a distance from where he was sitting. All in the same motion, he threw the snake as far as he could in the opposite direction, ran and gathered the boy in his arms and brought him to the wagon. The little face was scratched and bruised and his hands had some slivers in them, but he was safe. This was a feat of strength that came to grandpa in time of necessity, saving his boy's life. Another time when grandpa had gone into the mountains to hunt stray cattle, he was with Brother Holyoak who was to help with the job. When night came, the two men had to make camp out in the open and spend the night. Even summer nights are cold and seeing that he had no covers on him, he shook Brother Holyoak awake and declared, "Brother Holyoak, you have taken all the covers and I am as bare as a bird." When grandpa's son, Thomas, was about seventeen years old, he needed a new pair of boots. There was a part of the old PUMI shop in town that specialized in making shoes and boots. Grandpa said he would go and order Thomas a pair of boots. Thomas said, "Now dad, I take a size nine. Be sure to order that size for me." "Size ten, Thomas, size ten, you know is right." "No, dad, I want a size nine," Tom insisted. Grandpa went to the boot maker and put in his order, telling the man to make them size ten but mark them size nine. When they were ready, they fitted perfectly and Tom triumphantly told his father how right he was to insist on size nine. Grandpa agreed that indeed he was right and the truth of the affair was not known for many years. When Thomas had a seventeen year old son, named Thomas Marion, this story is told. Young Tom wanted to go to a dance. He asked his father for seventy-five cents for the ticket. At the time of the request, his father was visiting with his grandfather, who listened with interest to the exchange of words. Tom's father said, "Now when I was a boy, younger than you, I never asked my father for spending money, no sir. I went out and earned it. I found a job and got my own money. Now I think that is what you should do. Don't you agree, father?" Grandpa, his hands folded across his stomach, nodded his head thoughtfully a few times and finally said, "Earned your own money, eh, Thomas, earned it yourself." Then turning to his grandson, he went on, "I think Thomas forgets. Yes sir, I think Thomas forgets!" Grandpa loved sports, especially in his later life. He would attend all the school events and particularly liked basketball. He had several grandsons who became very good players. At half time of a certain game, when the home team was lagging behind in the score, grandpa went over to the coach, Mr. Van Buren, and told him he would like to speak to the team. Mr. Van called them together for the conference and they all listened respectfully as grandpa told them how to play the game. "This is thee way to play thee game, boys. Just roll thee ball into thee basket - roll thee ball into the basket." When electricity came in, grandpa suggested they use some church funds for better lighting in the old rock church - a nice chandelier. One of the townspeople said, "Why do you want to spend all that money for a chandelier? Nobody could play it but Bro. Durham!" Grandpa had purchased a new pair of overshoes for himself. He put his name on the inside of them and wore them to a town social. The night was stormy and wet and when he was ready to leave he could not find his overshoes. He looked all around at every man's feet till he saw the ones he thought were his. "Brother ----, those are nice looking overshoes. Mind if I try one on?" The man reluctantly took one off and grandpa put it on. "Just fits. Just fits. Mind if I try the other one on?" The poor man knew he was found out. He took the other one off and grandpa put it on, checking first to make sure his name was in it, then said, "They look mighty nice on me. Think I'll keep them. Thank you very much! Thank you!" At the end of one fiscal year when grandpa was on the City Council, there was some money left. At a meeting it was suggested they use it to build a bridge over a small wash at the entrance into Parowan Canyon. One member vetoed the idea, saying, "Doesn't need a bridge. Why that wash is so small I can piddle half way across it." Grandpa spoke up indignantly, "Brother -------, you are out of order!" To which the man answered, "You're right, Bishop, I am out of order. If I wasn't I could piddle all the way across. This story comes from Ancel Adams, a nephew of grandpa. "I had gone with Uncle Charles to a place called Loge's corral. There were about thirty teams and wagons in all, fitted with hay racks and about twelve or fifteen bags of wool could be hauled on each one. One of the horses in Uncle Charles' team was a great big dark gray mare called Old Baby Elephant. She was temperamental and could pull as much as a team if she wanted to, or not pull at all as the notion struck. She was a noted balker. We were about half way to Milford and just before we came to the railroad tracks we saw that it was going to be quite a pull to get the loaded wagons over the rails as they stood a little above the wooden ties. Quite a few wagons got over, then it came Uncle Charles' turn. His wagon stopped as the wheels hit the rails and Old Baby Elephant was content to just let it sit right there. Down along the desert, we could see a train coming and still the horses stalled. It wasn't till someone brought an extra team to hitch to ours that we got the wagon over the tracks. Uncle had thought a lot of that old mare but at that time he did not call her Old Baby Elephant. He had a much more colorful name for her." Another story Ancel remembered about grandpa was when they were packing wool into huge bags, a big mother rat with her little ones hanging onto her would run out from the piled wool and before anyone could get to her, she would disappear again. One time when she come out, without the babies attached to her, they nearly got her, but she ducked into the nearest hiding place the pant leg of Sidney Burton's loose trousers. He jumped up and down and made quite a to-do trying to get the rat out. Uncle Charles said, "You'll have to stomp harder, Sid, or unbuckle your belt to get her out the top." Grandpa and grandma never walked to church together. He always went ahead as she was busy with the children. He always took the same seat and everyone knew that he was saving the seat beside him for his wife. Whenever he got up to speak, he would close his eyes, teeter back and forth on his heels and toes, and take his time to commence his talk. Once grandpa and grandma had a quarrel when they were quite newly married. She would not go to the social with him that night, so she braided her long hair preparatory for bed, never thinking he would go off without her, which he did. She was so angry, she decided to go by herself, so she dressed up in her best dress, arranged her hair attractively and went. A young man from the circuit court was in town and didn't know she was married so asked for several dances and wanted to see her home. This was where grandpa had had enough. He stepped in, took her arm and they went home together. The quarrel was over. Grandpa once played the part of "Pizzaro, Prince of Peru." He had to carry a maiden off the stage and this worried him. He decided to practice on grandma by throwing her over his shoulder. He had to be shown how to pick her up in his arms and carry her properly. Here are a few remembrances about grandpa. He loved to read and had accumulated quite a library. Often he would stay up late reading and didn't get up very early. Usually he was late getting his milking done and this worried grandma. In his old desk there were the old tithing records of the time when he was bishop. Scrupulously recorded in them are all the things people brought for tithing. Its truly interesting to look through them. One day a strange man came to the door, a drifter, shabby and broke and grandpa took him in. He gave his name as Ky Oliver. As I remember it, the word was that Ky was a deserter from the Civil War. He stayed the rest of his life with grandpa and is buried in the Parowan Cemetery. Grandpa never turned anyone away who needed help. Many a person was fed at his table and many a night's lodging given. It has been a pleasure to research, read and remember all I could about grandpa. I thank those whose material I have used, those who have shared their memories with me. Most especially, my appreciation to Carol Collett who did the editing, typed the master copy and knew where to have the printing done. Beatrice Adams Johnson BIOGRAPHY OF CHARLES ADAMS Parowan, Utah by Marian A. Gudmundsen 1843 I was born Sept. 16, 1843, at Banbridge, County Down, Ireland. My parents were William Adams and Mary Ann Leech Adams. My paternal grandparents were Charles Adams and Catherine Wills Adams, who came from County Cavan, Ireland. My maternal grandparents were Hugh L. Leech and Ann Jamison Leech, who came with their parents from the Highlands of Scotland. 1844 I was brought to America at the age of three months by my parents, who embarked at Liverpool, Jan. 20, 1844, for New Orleans, arriving there about March first. March 3, we left New Orleans for Nauvoo by boat, and arrived there April 10, 1844. When the boat landed at Nauvoo, the people came in great numbers to greet the newcomers: Aunt Margaret, an old friend of my parents, who had come out the year before, came on board, and came up to my mother, took my out of my mother's arms, and returned to the land and placed me in the arms of Hyrum Smith, in whose family she was living, saying, "What do you think of this for an Irish baby?" Hyrum Smith, the patriarch of the Church, gave me a blessing. To this incident my mother always attributed what she was pleased to call my "goodness." My parents went through the stirring scenes in Nauvoo, the martyrdom of the prophet and patriarch. My father worked on the temple for some time (two years). For three years he was away working in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Missouri, earning money to emigrate to Utah. 1849 About the First of May, 1849, my parents started from Springfield, Ill. on the journey to Utah, and traveled with Thomas Judd and family, Henry Barney and family and other to Council Bluffs, Iowa, reaching there about June First. (in Geo A. Smiths' train?) On July 7th, 1849, my parents commences their journey across the plains, in a company of one hundred wagons, with Andrew H. Perkins Captain, Enoch Ruse, Captain of first fifty, and ____________Allred, Captain of second fifty. Crossing the plains I well remember the herds of buffalo bellowing and crossing the Platte River, seeing them in herds by daytime and hearing them by night; and at Fort Laramie I remember seeing the Sioux Indians in all the paraphernalia of war, painted and feathers, going out to fight the Cheyennes, another tribe. We were three and a half months on our trip across the plains. The first winter in Salt Lake we lived in the Old Fort in Salt Lake City, and in the spring we moved to the Eleventh ward. During the summer of 1850, I herded cows on the East Bench. Father left in December of 1850 with a party sent to colonize Parowan, under Geo. A. Smith arriving in Parowan Jan. 13, 1851; and March 1851, my mother left Salt Lake with her three children, I being at the time seven and one half years old. My brother James was two and a half years, and my sister Annie an infant in arms. I took an active part in helping my father in farming, herding stock, and so on. When I was fourteen years old my father went to Salt Lake to work on the temple for six months from spring until fall. I took charge of his farm, hauled wood, and had the responsibility of his affairs. I worked on the farm, doing most of the work until the spring of 1862, when I was nineteen years old. I was then called to drive a team of four yoke of oxen with a wagon back to Winter Quarter, near Omaha to bring emigrants to Utah (John ___________, Capt). The following year I married Sarah Ann Davenport, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Burrows Davenport, on March 31, 1863, at Parowan in the Davenport home by Wm H. Dame, President of the Parowan Stake. A week after our marriage I started across the plains again to bring a load of freight back. I had a load of three hundred pounds of gunpowder, four big stoves, and some machinery. On the return trip, just before reaching Loop Fork a tributary of the Platte, about five PM, a heavy storm burst some miles back; the lightning was carried on the telegraph wire, and struck my wagon which was just passing under the telegraph wire, and tore a hole in the wagon cover. The load I had on -- iron stoves, etc., attracted the lightning but it did not touch the gunpowder. The hay under the stoves took fire, and as soon as the other teamsters saw the smoke, the took the alarm and ran away. I climbed into the wagon threw off the cover, and began unloading as rapidly as possible. The lightning had run down the chain and struck five of the oxen, branding and killing them. I was standing by the near wheeler just raising my whip to touch up the right wheeler. The off-swing was a lively animal and swerved away from the chain and was only slightly struck and uninjured. I was stunned for a moment but arose and felt all right. Coming home I had only three head of cattle out of eight, but the captain and boys were very kind to me and helped me out with their animals. Next year my father paid the Church for the use of the oxen helping me home. (Samuel __________ of Beaver, Capt.) I was assistant. In 1866 I crossed the plains again. This time I took my own wagon for freight and volunteered to take a church wagon for immigrants, starting in April and getting back in October. (Edmond Thompson of Fillmore, Capt.). Thus I crossed the plains seven times. Once to come out when we first emigrated when I was a small boy, being seven years of age when I reached Salt Lake -(but I can remember incidents as herds of Buffalo also a band of sever hundred Sioux Indians when we reach Fort Laramie) and as a young man I made three trips in '62, '63, and '66, taking about six months for each trip. In October, 1863, on reaching Salt Lake from my trip across the plains, my father and mother brought my wife up to Salt Lake to meet me, and we were married in the Endowment House by President Brigham Young. In the early fall of '64 twin daughters were born to us prematurely. We named them Sarah Ann and Mary Ann. One lived a short time - I blessed her naming her Mary Ann. My eldest son; Charles D. Adams was born in September 1866. In 1870 I was appointed second counselor to Samuel H. Rogers, who was chosen as Bishop of the Parowan second ward when the Parowan ward was divided. When he went to Arizona in '79 John H. dalley was made Bishop of the second ward, and the block I lived on and the one east of it were added to the First Ward and I was chosen councelor to Bishop Wm C. Mitchell of the First Ward. About 1886 the two wards were united again, and I was made Bishop of the United Wards. I was Bishop for seventeen years. Later I became a member of the High Council for Parowan Stake, serving continuously. I was enlisted in the state militia in 1859 and served until about 1870. For about twelve years I was subject to call at any time when there was any disturbance from the Indians. On Dec 24, 1860 a hundred Navajo Indians came into this locality well armed. Dec 24th we started up the canyon, about twenty five or thirty men with Edward Dalton Captain. we camped beyond -------------- on the Upper Kanab, 2nd ---- then came around by the Sevier River. We came on the tracks where the Indians had run off with a thousand horses to the mountains East of the Sevier River. Just about dark after our horses had been hobbled, I walked out a few hundred rods; I saw an Indian who struck off to the mountain. The next morning we went up in the mountains about ten miles to a level spot between a gulch and a mountain - here were the Indian fortifications. If we had gone up the night before we would all have been shot. In Sept. '69 the Navajo Indians made a raid. We followed them to the Hogsback and me an Indian. I said "we must take this Indian" but they let him go, Wm West was the Captain. We went to the Mammoth - we saw a fire, but we went on to the Scutenbaugh. Coming back we met a party of Indians with horses. The Indians ran and we got the horses. I served one term as watermaster and several terms as City Councillor. I served two terms as mayor of Parowan City; I served as assessor and collector of Iron County for one year, being appointed to fill a vacancy. I served two terms as county commissioner. I served two terms in the State Legislature - one in the Lower House and one in the Upper House in the '90's. I was made Supt of the Parowan Coop somewhere around 1880, and remained in this position about 10 years. Then Brother Morgan Richards accepted the position and held it for about five years. Then Wm H. Holyoak held it for a few years. Then I accepted the position again, and while I was in we built the new Roller Mill. I remained in for about five years. Then Simon Matheson held the position a few years; then I was re-elected, and was in six or seven years. Then a new board was made and Bro. Wilford Day was made Supt. I began in '66 to raise a few head of sheep, these gradually increased, and I joined the Cooperative Sheep Herd of which I was Supt. on and off for a long time. I gradually bought the stockholders out, and in connection with my sons assumed control. I went in with my Brothers James and Wm and Mr. Henderson and built the Hoosier. Charles Adams died Dec. 21, 1927, after a short illness. 1903-1926 Tithing Paid $3783.94 1901-1902 Estimate of Tithing $216.06 1900-1927 Tithing $4000.00 1916-1917 Donated to New Meeting House $400.00 1922-1926 Donated to Missionaries $200.00 Total $4600.00

Charles Adams 1843-1927 (Stories)

Contributor: Vaccine'd Up & Sorry to See Summer Go Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

CHARLES ADAMS STORIES In the spring of 1862, when I was nineteen years old, I was called to drive a team of four yoke of oxen, with a wagon back to Winter Quarters, near Omaha, Nebraska. This, my second trip across, the plains, was to bring emigrants to Utah, under John R. Murdock as captain. A Brother Sanders, an original pioneer to Parowan, was something of an astrologer and he had talked about my horoscope. He said that in 1862 I would come very nearly getting drowned. And this came about on this trip. When we reached the Platte River on our way out, the water was very high. I had two companions. We went in swimming and I was not a very good swimmer and did indeed come very nearly getting drowned. The following year, at age 20, I had married Sarah Ann Davenport on March 31, 1863. A week after our marriage, I started across the plains again this time to bring a load of freight back to Utah Territory. I had a load of three hundred pounds of gun powder, four big stoves and some machinery. On the return trip, just before reaching Loop Fork, a tributary of the Platte River, about five o'clock in the afternoon, a heavy storm burst. The lightning was carried on the telegraph wire, and struck my wagon which was just passing under the telegraph wire and tore a hole in the wagon cover. The load I had on, iron, gun powder, machinery etc., attracted the lightning, but it did not touch the gun powder. The hay under the stoves did take fire and soon as the other teamsters saw the smoke they took alarm and ran away. I climbed into the wagon, threw off the cover, and began unloading as fast as possible. The lightning had run down the chain and struck five of the oxen, branding them and killing them I was standing by the near wheeler, just raising my whip to touch him up. The off-swing was a lively animal and swerved away from the chain and was only slightly struck and was uninjured. I was stunned for a moment but arose and felt alright. Coming home I had only three head of cattle out of eight. But Captain Samuel White (to whom I was assistant captain) and the boys were very kind to me, and helped me out with their animals. The next year my father paid the Church for the use of the oxen helping me home. (Insert added here a paragraph from an account written by William R. Palmer, giving a few more details of this dangerous experience.) He wrote: "In the wagon were thirty kegs of gun powder. Charles had just crossed the river safely and was pulling up the steep bank, when lightning struck his lead cattle, killing them in their tracks. The electric current followed the hitch chain back to the wagon killing three more oxen and setting the wagon on fire. Charles was stunned by the blow and lay in gravest peril from the powder. David Bullock, following close behind, rushed over and gave him a good shake to bring him to his senses. Then Charles worked furiously to unload the gun powder before the fire reached it." "In 1866, I crossed the plains a fourth time, with Seward Thompson of Fillmore as captain. This time I took my own wagon for freight and volunteered to take a Church wagon for emigrants. Starting in April and getting back in October. This was the only way some of the people, newly arrived from England and other countries could come. By the aid of the Church, for they had given up everything to reach America. STORIES AND ANECDOTES Many and many a time Adamses have gotten together to enjoy hearing and telling these stories.They never get dull. Grandpa usually said the word "the" to sound like "thee." Also, he was known to repeat phrases for emphasis. If anyone, who may read this collection of stories, might know some that I have not recorded, please add them to the ones told here. The mail for the citizens of Parowan was delivered to, and dispensed from the home of Aunt Sarah Matheson, Scott Matheson‘s mother, she being the postmistress. Grandpa was one of only three or four who took the daily paper. People, eager for the news, used to come early, to Aunt Sarah's parlor to look over the paper before grandpa, came for it. Each morning he would walk in and ask if everyone was finished with it, then take the paper along home. Once in a Sunday School Parents' Class, the subject under discussion was the responsibility of parents for teaching their children. The discussion became pretty one-sided against the parents. If children went wrong the parents were to blame t and if children went to hell the parents would go with them. Bishop Charles Adams sat silent as long as he could, then arose and raised his arm high, as though to toss the subject back to a saner balance, he said,"Don't believe it! Don't believe it! Don't believe a word of it. The Lord's got more bad boys than I have. Don't expect to go down to Hades to find the Lord!" Serious trouble arose between two men in Bishop Charles' ward. This concerned water rights, a touchy matter because of its scarcity. The Bishop had tried time and again to reconcile the two, but the trouble continued to flare. He had referred the case to the Ward Teachers of each man and recommended they appear before a Bishop's Court. "Those two had a fist fight. You have to get them together and work this problem out." Grandpa shook his head and answered, "Don't like that recommendation. Can't accept that recommendation. Had them together. Had them together. Very glad to get them apart. Keep their ways as wide apart as possible till they get more faith and more sense." Asked once by Francis M. Lyman, who was visiting at Conference time, why Bishop Adams always gave such glowing reports, of his people, the ready answer was, "Catch more flies with molasses than with vinegar." When Grandpa Charles was president of the Co-op Store, It was discovered that thefts were being carried out and it was quite some time till it was discovered how the stolen goods were being taken out of the store. In the basement there were windows with iron bars instead of glass. One day an observant young clerk saw a pile of groceries and other articles stacked near the windows, where a hand could reach through the bars and make off with the store's property. He quickly reported to grandpa and offered to spend the night in the basement to catch the thief. Grandpa shook his head negatively and said "No Joseph, no! We'll put glass in the windows and remove the temptation, remove the temptation! I don't want to find out who it is; it might be someone we know." One night grandma got sick. According to her, she was very, very sick. She called grandpa and told him how dreadful she felt, saying, "Charles, I'm sick. I'm sick enough to die" To which he calmly answered, "Sick are you, Sarah Ann? Think you're going to die do you" Sarah Ann? Well, well!" and turned over to go back to sleep. Grandma, infuriated, said, "No, I'm not going to die, Charles. I won't die just to please you!" When grandpa was mayor of Parowan, there was a meeting of the City Council. The discussion of the evening was about the necessity of having a fence around the cemetery. After many opinions had been expressed, and grandpa had listened to each one he put his fingers together, closed his eyes and gave the situation some thought. Finally, he said, "It's a great expense great expense Why build a fence around it? Those who are in there can't get out, and those who are out don't want to get in." One day Charles Timmons, went into Shorty Green's Drug Store and found grandpa sitting there. Charles went over to him and asked how he was feeling. Grandpa said, "Fine - just fine! Now who are you?" "I'm Charlie Timmons, Brother Adams; I'm going to marry your granddaughter, Imogene." Grandpa said. "Well, well, going to marry Imogene are you? For a wife? For a wife? Well, well!" Grandpa Adams used to buy things from or trade with the Indians. One day when he was preparing things to make trade, his son, Thomas, said,"Father, let me go do the trading.I can make a better deal, let me try." Grandpa gave him permission and Thomas started off with the items for trade. There was some bartering and Thomas kept saying to the Indians, "More, more." They would throw down more articles. Finally, when he took his load home, he was happy and proud because he had done better -than his father usually did.But he waschagrined when grandpa said, "Thomas, that is too much, too much. You have not been fair with the Indians. Tomorrow you will take this much back." Humiliated, Thomas returned to the Indians, who calm1y accepted the goods, saying, "We expected you back. Charles Adams heap fair man." Thomas learned a great lesson that day. When grandpa was president of the Co-op Sheep Herd, they would winter the sheep out on the desert, though the gap. The only accessible water was from a well, where the water was acrid with the taste of alkali and unsafe to drink. Grandpa told the herders to boil the water and make tea. In the summer time, the herds were taken to the mountains, where the water, coming from springs, was fresh, clear and cold. Grandpa kept making tea. His herders remonstrated with him about this, saying there was no need to boil the water. Grandpa calmly retorted that, "Thee better thee water thee better thee tea." One day grandpa's daughter, Minnie, was helping him with the bills received for groceries taken out to the sheep herds. The men were permitted to do their own ordering, and they found that there was a great quantity of Hewlett’s jams and preserves, put up in bucket containers, going in the supplies. Grandpa commented on this and Minnie said that she would just tell the men to cut down on this luxury that it was constipating. Grandpa much annoyed, said, "Constipating be dammed! It’s expensive Expensive!" Sid Prichard was herding sheep for grandpa one summer and he became very aggravated because his, so called, sheep dog would leave the herd to go chase rabbits. He sent word to grandpa to bring him a good sheep dog. Grandpa came to the camp with a dog, and Sid asked, "Will that dog chase rabbits?" Grandpa said, "You bet that dog will chase rabbits. He will just chase them all over the place." "Then take the son-of-a-gun home. I don't want a dog that chases rabbits," Sid answered, to which grandpa, hurriedly replied, "But Sidney, he will only chase rabbits if you want him to chase rabbits" One time grandpa was helping Bart Dalton, put the sheep through the chute into the creosote dip to get rid of ticks. One rambunctious ewe kicked Bart in the mouth, loosening one of his teeth. Angrily, he called the ewe a son-of-a Bartlett, now Bartlett, ----nice little ewe, nice ewe” Do not call her such a name." Later the process, the same thing happened to grandpa. With great indignation, he stated, "You are right, Bartlett! She is a son-of ------------!" One day grandpa was going to drive to Buckhorn Flats in his buggy. His son, Thomas, wanted to miss school that day to go with his father, who said, "No Thomas, you cannot go. Not this time.What in the world makes you want to go to Buckhorn Flats for anyway?"The young boy had a ready answer, "Gee, dad, a fellow likes to see a little bit of the world before he dies!" One evening grandpa mounted his horse to go down to his field to take the water. When he finished the task he was tired, so he climbed in the back of his sheep wagon and went to sleep. When he awakened it was dark and quite late, so he prepared himself some supper from the supplies there, undressed and got into bed to spend the rest of the night. In the meantime, grandma became extremely worried about him. She called on the sheriff to help her search for him. The night passed without anyone finding him. he next morning when grandpacame riding back into town, he found search parties being organized. It embarrassed him and when he got home he scolded Sarah Ann. "Next time I am gone give me three days, Sarah Ann, three days, before you worry about me. Three days before you send out a search party for me." In those early days in Parowan" there was an "outhouse" in every back yard. One early summer morning grandpa walked through his backyard and cut across his neighbor's on some errand or another. His neighbor's wife, never thinking to be caught so early in the morning, had left her privy door open to enjoy the early morning sun. Grandpa, always courteous, raised his hat as he saw her and said, "Good morning, Phoebe. Nice morning, Nice morning! A story along this same theme is about the outhouse down in back of the old tithing office in Parowan. Grandpa had gone down to the office to do some work when nature called. That same day, two of Aunt Sarah Matheson's daughters, sent on some errand in the vicinity, also had a hurry-up call. Finding the door to the privy fastened, with a slit strap over a nail, the girls knocked on the door for admittance. Grandpa, perturbed not at all, said, "Occupied ladies, sorry, but occupied, occupied!" This story is told by Aunt Mary Ollerton. "My husband and I sold Charles Adams a piece of land for a price we thought was a fair and adequate amount. After a year or two, Charles came to us and said, "The land you sold me has been so valuable to me, it’s been worth this much more." He gave Aunt Mary $500. Grandpa always depended on Blanchard Whitney, a neighbor from across the street, to put in his heating stove. One morning grandpa told him it was getting chilly and time to bring in the stove. Grandma was there when Blanchard began his job, and she said, "Blanch, move that stove a little this way." And then, "Blanch, the stove pipe is crooked." And again, "Blanch, you could have cleaned that stove a little better." Blanchard and grandpa gritted their teeth and then, "Blanch, you have to move that stove closer to the wal1." This was the last straw. Grandpa said, "Sarah Ann, let Blanchard do it and I won't tell you to go to hell, but I'll tell you to start out!" During the time grandpa was bishop, most of the dancing was square dancing. But the time came that waltzing and other round dancing came into style. This shocked grandpa, who felt the proprieties were being broken. He got up to speak to his flock at one of their socials and counseled with them thus: "Young men and women, this is not the right way to dance. Thee boys must not swing thee girls around thee waist." When Uncle Laurence was a tiny little boy about two years old, grandpa took him into the mountains where he was going to get a load of wood. He wrapped the boy in a blanket and sat him on a nearby rock to watch him work. He worked quite steadily but frequently glanced over at the child to see if all was well. One such glance froze him with fear as he saw a rattlesnake coiled and ready to strike. Grandpa afterward marveled at what happened and said it was an answer to his prayer. In one swift movement, he caught the snake in a tight grip around the head, .just below the exposed fangs, and with the other hand hurled the boy quite a distance from where he was sitting. All in the same motion, he threw the snake as far as he could in the opposite direction, ran and gathered the boy in his arms and brought him to the wagon. The little face was scratched and bruised and his hands had some slivers in them, but he was safe. This was a feat of strength that came to grandpa in time of necessity, saving his boy's life. Another time when grandpa had gone into the mountains to help find stray cattle, he was with Brother Holyoak who was to help with the job. When night came, the two men had to make camp out in the open and spend the night. Even summer nights are cold and seeing that he had no covers on him, he shook Brother Holyoak awake and declared, "Brother Holyoak, you have taken all the covers and I am as bare as a bird." When grandpa‘s son, Thomas was about seventeen years, old, he needed a new pair of boots. There was a part of the old P.U.M.I. shop in town that specialized in making shoes and boots. Grandpa said he would go and order Thomas a pair of boots. Thomas said, "Now dad, I take a size nine. Be sure to order that size for me." "Size ten, Thomas, size ten, you know is right." "No, dad, I want a size nine," Tom insisted. Grandpa went to the boot maker and put in his order, telling the man to make them size ten but mark them size nine. When they were ready, they fitted perfectly and Tom triumphantly told his father how right he was to insist on size nine. Grandpa agreed that indeed he was right and the truth of the affair was not known for many years. When Thomas had a seventeen year old son, named Thomas Marion, this story is told. Young Tom wanted to go to a dance. He asked his father for seventy-five cents for the ticket. At the time of the request, his father was visiting with his grandfather, who listened with interest to the exchange of words. Tom's father said,. "Now when I was a boy, younger than you, I never asked my father for spending money, no sir. I went out and earned it. I found a job and got my own money. Now I think that is what you should do. Don't you agree, father?" Grandpa, his hands folded across his stomach, nodded his head thoughtfully a few times and finally said, "Earned your own money, eh, Thomas, earned it yourself." Then turning to his grandson, he went on, "I think Thomas forgets. Yes sir, I think Thomas forgets," Grandpa loved sports, especially in his later life. He would attend all the school events and particularly liked basket ball. He had several grandsons who became very good players. At half time of a certain game, when the hone team was lagging behind in the score, grandpa went over to the coach, Mr. Van Buren, and told him he would like to speak to the team. Mr. Van called them together for the conference and they all listened respectfully as grandpa told them how to play the game, "This is thee way to play thee game, boys. Just roll thee ball into thee basket - roll thee ball into thee basket." When electricity came in, grandpa suggested they use some church funds for better lighting in the old rock church a nice chandelier. One of the towns’ people said “Why do you want to spend all that money for a chandelier? Nobody could play it but Brother Durham" Grandpa had purchased a new pair of overshoes for himself. He put his name on the inside of them and wore them to a town social. The night was stormy and wet and when he was ready to leave he could not find his overshoes. He looked all around at every man's feet till he saw the ones he thought were his. "Brother - - - - those are nice 1ooking overshoes. Mind if I try one on?" The man reluctantly took one off and grandpa put it on. "Just fits. Just fits. Mind if I try the other one on? The poor man knew he was found out. He took the other one off and grandpa put it on, checking first to make sure his name was in it, then said,"They look might: nice on me. Think I'll keep them. Thank you very much, Thank you. At the end of one fiscal year when grandpa was on the City Council, there was some money left. At a meeting it was suggested they use it to build a bridge over a small wash at the entrance into Parowan Canyon. One member vetoed the idea, saying, "Doesn't need a bridge. Why that wash is so small I can piddle half way across it. It Grandpa spoke up indignant. "Brother - - - - - -, you are out order" To which the man answered" "You're right, Bishop, I am out of order. If I wasn't I could piddle all the way across." This story comes from Ancel Adams, a nephew of grandpa. "I had gone with Uncle Charles to a place called Loge's corral. There were about thirty teams and wagons in all, fitted with hay racks and about twelve or fifteen bags of wool could be hauled on each one. One of the horses in Uncle Charles' team was a great big dark gray mare called Old Baby Elephant. She was temperamental and could pull as much as a team if she wanted to, or not pull at all as the notion struck. She was a noted balker. We were about half way to Milford and just before we came to the railroad tracks we saw that it was going to be quite a pull to get the loaded wagons over the rails as they stood a little above the wooden ties. Quite a few wagons got over, them it came Uncle Charles' turn. His wagon stopped as the wheels hit the rails and Old Baby Elephant was content to just let it sit right there. Down along the desert, we could see a train coming and still the horses stalled. It wasn't till someone brought an extra team to hitch to ours that we got the wagon over the tracks. Uncle had thought a lot of that old mare but at that time he did not call her Old Baby Elephant. He had a much more colorful name for her." Another story Ancel remembered about grandpa was when they were packing wool into huge bags, a big mother rat with her little ones hanging onto her would run out from the piled wool and before anyone could get to her, she would disappear again. One time when she came out, without the babies attached to her, they nearly got her, but she ducked into the nearest hiding place the pant leg of Sidney Burton's loose trousers. He jumped up and made quite a to-do trying to get the rat out. Uncle Charles said, "You'll have to stomp harder, Sid, or unbuckle.” Grandpa and grandma never walked to church together. He always went ahead as she was busy with the children. He always took the same seat and everyone knew that he was saving the seat beside him for his wife. Whenever he got up to speak, he would close his eyes, teeter back and forth on his heels and toes, and take his time to commence his talk. Once grandpa and grandma had a quarrel when they were quite newly married. She would not go to the social with him that night, so she braided her long hair preparatory for bed, never thinking he would go off without her, which he did. She was so angry; she decided to go by herself, so she dressed up in her best dress, arranged her hair attractively and went. A young man from the circuit court was in town and didn’t know she was married so asked for several dances and wanted to see her home. This was where grandpa had had enough. He stepped in, took her arm and they went home together. The quarrel was over. Grandpa once played the part of "Pizzaro Prince of Peru”. He had to carry a maiden off the stage and this worried him. He decided to practice on grandma by throwing her over his shoulder. He had to be shown how to pick her up in his arms and carry her properly. Here are a few remembrances about grandpa. He loved to read and had accumulated quite a library. Often he would stay up late reading and didn't get up very early. Usually he was late getting his milking done and this worried grandma. In his old desk there were the old tithing records of the time when he was bishop. Scrupulously recorded in them are all the things people brought for tithing. It’s truly interesting to look through them. One day a strange man came to the door, a drifter, shabby and broke and grandpa took him in. He gave his name as Ky Oliver. As I remember it, the word was that Ky was a deserter from the Civil War. He stayed the rest of his life with grandpa and is buried in the Parowan cemetery. Grandpa never turned anyone away who needed help. Many a person was fed at his table and many a night's lodging given. It has been a pleasure to research, read and remember all I could about grandpa. I thank those whose material I have used those who have shared their memories with me. Most especially, my appreciation to Carol Collett who did the editing, typed the master copy and knew where to have the printing done. Beatrice Adams Johnson The Summit Coal 5 Coal was discovered in Summit Canyon soon after the Pioneers came, but it wasn't until along in the 60's that an effort was made to see if it was a large enough vein to work. There were two companies formed, one was - Thomas Davenport, William Davenport. Charles Adams, William C. McGregor and Morgan Richards contracted to open up the vein at $1.25 per foot. The other company - Jessie N. Smith, Silas S. Smith, John Topham and Joseph Fish, who hired Bill and Ben Croft to work their vein. They were working two separate veins. Morgan Richards found after working this 18 inches vein for fifteen feet, that the vein was visible at three different points, one across the mountain, and one across the canyon, all three points were uniformly eighteen inches thick. The Crofts knew the situation but said nothing about it. So Morgan Richards went to town and reported the situation. It was decided to stop work on the vein because it wouldn't be a paying proposition. Social Center The first Social Center was in the Old Log Council house. It was lighted by home made candles, perched on shingles stuck in the cracks between the logs. When the basement of the Rock Church was completed in 1868 it made a fine big Social Center for dancing and the theatre. On special occasions the dancing would start in the afternoon, interspersed with readings and singing. They'd dance all afternoon, then have group picnic and while the women cleared things up the men would go home and do their chores and then come back and dance all evening. They'd bring any kind of produce for a ticket, soap, soft soap, grain, squash, carrots, candle, anything they had. On Friday nights, there was always a big dance, when old and young would don their Sunday best and step lightly to the lifting tune of the fiddle and the little old organ. Richard Benson bought the first organ. When Thomas Durham organized the Harmonic Society, they bought the organ. Thomas Durham, Jr. usually played the fiddle, but sometimes Frank Dalton and Mark Guymon, Henry Taylor and Thomas Richards would play. Thomas Durham Sr. played the organ. Edward M. Dalton was known as the singing caller, later Enoch Rasmussen was a fine caller for the square dances. Here's a story from Samuel Mortenson, one of the old timers. "We were dancing in the basement of the Rock Church. Most of the girls were pretty nice and modest; Bishop Charles Adams didn't like the way the boys would swing the girls around the waist, and he had been telling them so in very definite terms. Some of the young people didn't like to be dictated to. As I looked across the hall I caught the eye of a pretty girl, who was usually very shy and sedate. She raised her finger beckoning me to come dance. We went in the set next to the music, and when it came time to swing she grabbed me around the waist and away we went, but not for long, for again we were stopped and again we were lectured to." (Page 256) He taught school in the East Log Schoolhouse with about sixty-five of the more advanced young people in the community for three years. The younger pupils were taught in some of the homes. Then he taught school in the West Log Schoolhouse for three years. At the time he was teaching in the West Log Schoolhouse, Joseph Fish was teaching in the East Log Schoolhouse. Charles Adams taught school there one term. In 1873, the schools had grown until it was necessary to have more room, so the basement of the Rock Church was divided into three school rooms. Morgan Richards had about 110 students with two assistants. It was a mixed school, covering all ages. The McCarthy children, William and James, and two girls came from Summit for two or three years. Morgan Richards said he had taught all the children in town at one time or another. James J. Adams taught advanced arithmetic to the older pupils, a subject in which he was very good. Annie Adams taught reading, spelling and geography. They had McGuffey's arithmetic, McGuffey's Readers, National, Bancroft's and one other Reader. Cooperative Store William C. McGregor was President of the P.D.M.I. for ten years. Joseph Fish continued as secretary for the Cooperative until 1879 when he moved to Snowflake, Arizona. President William H. Dame was Superintendent in 1877. Morgan Richards, Jr. started in as clerk the fall of 1876. Charles Adams was the next Superintendent after President William H. Dame. Morgan Richards was clerk and a member of the board for eight years. He was made Superintendent about 1884 or 1885 holding that position until November, 1894, when he was elected as the first State Auditor. He says, "I prepared the business and handed over their money, all debts were paid." Morgan Richards bought all the goods, clerked, kept the books and managed all the P.D.M.I. works. Board members were Charles Adams, William C. McGregor, William C. Mitchell, John Topham, Richard Robinson, Samuel T. Orton and Morgan Richards. The Co-op Store issued script, first paper, later aluminum to help out in the money shortage. William H. Holyoak was the next Superintendent for a few years, then Charles Adams was again Superintendent for five or six years. During this period, the P.D.M.I. built the first flour roller mill. Simon A. Matheson was the next Superintendent for a few years, when Charles Adams was again elected Superintendent for six or seven years. Wilford Day was Superintendent next. The Joke On The Superintendent One day when Charles Adams was Superintendent of the Co-op Store, a stranger came in and wanted to buy an overcoat. So he took him to the back of the store where their very limited supply of clothing was. He picked up an overcoat and said, "Try this on, Sir. That's sure a fine overcoat, just feel that cloth will you, it'll give you real service." The stranger put the overcoat on and nodded his approval. Charles Adams began to look around, and what he had done finally dawned on him. "By Jove, by Jove, sure'n that's my own overcoat."(page 384) (1) About 1870 they decided to put their sheep all together in a Cooperative Sheep Herd. Neils O. Mortenson had acquired quite a number of sheep and they had increased, until he was the biggest sheep man in Parowan, owning about two or three hundred head, so he was put in as President of the organization. They took up the land, at the 3rd House Flat in the upper Dry Lakes country, or their summer headquarters. They built corrals and a house and for many years, this was their range. The Co-op Sheep Herd was the only sheep herd for many years. Neils Mortenson was the big owner of Rush Lake, and he and David Ward and Rass Mickelson ran the Co-op Sheep Herd, here during the winter. But David Ward could see the possibilities of a fine ranch home, at Rush Lake, so he persuaded the others, to let him buy them out. He traded his twenty acre farm in the North field to Rass Mickelson. So he and Neils Mortenson, took the Co-op Sheep Herd, out to Mud Springs, where he established his winter headquarters. David Ward became the owner of Rush Lake. The Co-op Sheep Herd Co. built a house out at Mud Springs and every night the sheep were brought home and corralled. This was after- words found to be poor business for trailing thru the sagebrush, every day to and from the feed, kept it picked down to nothing, and the sheep poor. The early day sheep had coarse loose wool. Wm. H. Lyman says, "I remember going out to the Co-op Herd at Mud Springs and it's no wonder their sheep didn't bear much wool; the whole sagebrush patch for miles around, looked like a cotton field." Bishop Charles Adams says, "I had a few sheep, so when the Cooperative sheep Herd started up, I joined them. I was made superintendent off and on for a number of years. I was at one of those re-elections once, after we had had a hard winter, following a year of drought. We were losing a large number of sheep and the superintendent was very much worried about it. He finally asked to be released. John Henderson spoke up, "Well Charles Adams will not worry, if all the sheep die." Here's a funny story they tell on Bishop Charles Adams who was Irish through and through. It was the fall of the year and the sheep had been gathered and corralled for branding and counting, prior to being sent to the winter range, across the desert. Sid Prichard and two or three boys had been helping on the drive. They were running them a few at a time, thru a partly closed gate, as a chute, so Charles could count them. They had proceeded pretty well, far some few minutes, when all of a sudden a big bunch broke thru and Charles said "60 - 70 - 60 - 70 - 60 - 70 count em, Sidney count em." Charles Adams says after a number of years I gradually bought the old stockholders out and with my son assumed control of the old Co-op Sheep Herd. About this time the cattle and sheep men took up homesteads all over the mountains. A Sheep Story It was the fall of the year, when the sheep men were separating their herds and branding them, before sending them to the winter range. Bishop Charles Adams, Brose Gymon and Bart Dalton were separating their sheep at the shearing corral, by running them thru a chute; when all of a sudden one broke back and bunted into Brose and knocked him down. He got up swearing and the Bishop said, "Oh!' no, no Ambrose, a nice little ewe lamb, Ambrose, nice little ewe lamb." In a few minutes, another one broke out and hitting Charles square in the stomach sent him a rolling. As he got up his Irish was up too. He said, "Show me the son of B-Bartlett, show me the son of “B____" Later on many different people acquired more and more sheep all the Adams brothers, Charles, William, James J., Hugh L., Nelson Marsden, King Paramore and many others, until this country became a regular sheep section. The big cattle herds rather dwindled and the whole country was overrun with sheep. PAROWAN RECLAMATION PROJECT The Adams brother's Charles, Hugh L., William, Mr. James Ollorton and wife Mary Adams and James J. Adams owned the Co-op Valley and ranched there for many years. It was their lifelong dream to someday make a tunnel thru the Sink Hill and take the water that so mysteriously disappeared, down to Parowan Valley, to help reclaim some of the virgin soil. One or two minor attempts were made, but they lacked the finance for so big a project. In the spring of 1918, Wilford Day became interested in the project, and on 1 July, 1918 the Parowan Reclamation Company was organized, with the following members. Wilford Day, Mrs. Wilford Day, Bishop Hugh L. Adams Sec., Wm. A., James J. Adams & Sons. The contract was let out to Heb Ayre and Mr. Roberts, but Mr. Myers finished the job. Work started on 27 September, 1918 and the tunnel was completed 21 June, 1921, costing $38,000.00 During the construction, Roy Myers drove an old fashioned engine from an old thrasher up the Paragonah dugway, which was used to furnish, the power. It was estimated that it would water 600 acres, with the average rainfall of a normal year. The amount of water fluctuates from year to year, according to the amount of snow in the mountains. The tunnel has been subject to repairs from year to year. The summer of 1950, a good deal of work had to be done, as beavers had built a dam in the tunnel. This project has materially increased the acreage of irrigated farms in the northeastern part of Parowan Valley. Hugh L. Adams and son LeRoy are now the owners of the whole project. The Adams brothers were ever alert to the possibilities of increasing the water supply in the valley, and were always ready to push any move along this line. In the spring of 1866, President William H. Dame asked me to make a trip across the plains for emigrants. George Holyoak, William Orton, Lars Mortenson and Charles Adams were in the party. I drove two yoke of oxen and a load of lumber as far as Fillmore for Al Lemmon. I rode a dark bay horse of John A. West's all the way to Wyoming, Nebraska, on to the Missouri River, about a hundred miles from Omaha and back again. We were camped in Wyoming for about a week early in July and Mulberry, Elm and other trees grew along the river. The Whippoorwills, huck-will's-widow, bob-whites, and wild turkeys were found along the river. We did not see a buffalo on the plains. The hard winters had killed them off. As we were coming along the Platte to the Missouri River, I suffered a good deal with boils. One night as I was herding the horses and mules, my boils broke about 2 a.m. I was so relieved that I lay face down on my arms in the grassy prairie, as all my animals seemed settled for rest. I fell asleep and I don't know how long I slept when I was roused by a voice, kind and gentle, calling "Morgan! Morgan!” I woke up and at once took in the situation. Every animal had disappeared except my saddle horse which was tethered by my side. Finally, away to the southwest, possibly two miles away, I discerned three horses, tiny specks, the tail-end of the herd disappearing over the last crest. I galloped after them and found them quietly moving onward. I turned them back to the feeding grounds about a mile away my herding partner, Alma Barton, had also been asleep, but he was in the saddle and as anxious for the welfare of the herd, as I had been when I brought them back. This was the only occurrence of my falling asleep while on duty. We had about one hundred eighty animals to look after. In our train was David Bullock; his father, James Bullock, was on his way to fill a mission to Scotland. Richard Benson and Perry C. Liston were on their way to England for missions. We were in Captain Samuel Dennis White's Company, Assistant Captain, Charles Woodhouse. Charles Adams was Assistant Captain to Captain Daniel Thompson's train of ox teams. We arrived home on September 17, 1866. The Indians were on the War Path that summer. We met fleeing settlers as we journeyed westward who warned us against continuing our journey. We passed a burning station house and camped close to the Pawnees, some who came into camp to buy bacon. A few days later we struck the Cheyenne’s. None of them molested us and we felt sure we were protected. Jenkin Evans and Thomas Evans, who came from Wales, were great freighters. Their big four yoke of oxen outfits made many trips to San Bernardino, California, and to the mines in Nevada, in summer and winter. They made many trips to the Missouri River for Ebenezer Hanks. They used to get loads of grain from the Equitable store, on credit, but it was always paid in full on their return. (Page 424) FREIGHTING ACROSS THE PLAINS by Charles Adams When we reached the Platte River on the way east, the water was high. There were two companies going for emigrants. While we were camped, two young men asked me to go in swimming with them in the river, but they went on and left me alone. When I came to the rapids, I very nearly went under. It was only with almost superhuman efforts that I could turn back and finally reach the shore. I was about used up for a day or two. On March 31, 1863, I was married to Sarah Ann Davenport, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Burrows Davenport, by President of the Parowan Stake, William H. Dame. One week after I was married, I started across the plains again to get a load of freight. I loaded up with 300 pounds of gun powder; four stoves and some machinery. When we were on the other side of Green River along the Platte River, about a day's journey from Loop Fork, a tributary of the Platte, a heavy rainstorm came up about five in the afternoon. Just as I was passing under the telegraph wires, the lightning came along the wires and struck my wagon, tearing a hole in the cover. The stoves and machinery had attracted the lightning, but it did not touch the gun powder. I was standing by the near wheeler, just raising my whip to touch up the nigh wheeler. The off swing was a lively animal which swerved away from the chain and did not get struck or hurt. I was stunned for a moment, then I gat up, climbed into the wagon, threw off the cover, which was on fire, and began unloading as fast as I could. The hay under the stoves was blazing. The other teamsters saw the smoke and ran away, but seeing me at work unloading came back and helped. They were afraid the powder would go up. The lightning had gone down the chain and struck and killed five oxen, so now I only had three left out of eight. The Captain and the boys were very kind to me and helped me out with their animals. We were sure lucky to get the powder out before it caught fire. My father paid the church for the five dead oxen the next year. News spread of the narrow escape and of the amount of gunpowder they were freighting to Utah. News was received that the U.S. Military Officers were coming to search the Company for powder. So Captain White divided it among the train and when the officers came and searched the train, they did not find as much as they expected and let the Company proceed. But for the wise course of Captain White, the powder would have all been confiscated and it would have been a great loss to me. When I reached Salt Lake in October, I met my father and mother and my wife, who had come up to meet me. We were married by President Brigham Young in the Endowment House. In April, 1866, I went across the plains again with my own outfit for freight and I offered to take a church wagon for emigrants. I went in Captain Edward Thompson's Company. We made the trip without any serious trouble and got back in October. A BISHOP'S STORY Once when Charles Adams was Bishop and William C. McGregor was one of his counselors, they had a little difficulty between two of the brethren. One day Bishop Adams called them both in to have a talk with them and see if they could iron things out. But this only made matters worse, for they got into a regular fight. A few days later Bishop Adams and W m. C. McGregor were walking down the street, when William happened to see both these men, one on either side of the street. So he said, "Bishop, there's so and so, maybe it would help if we could get them together and see if we can patch things up for them." But Bishop Adams said, Oh, No No!' I had 'em together, had 'em together, couldn't hardly get 'em apart!" TRIPS ACROSS THE PLAINS Charles stated that he crossed the plains a total of four times in his biography. He said that he went with: John R. Murdock in 1862 Samuel White in 1863 Seward or Edward Thompson Company in 1866 The LDS Church History web site does not list the 1866 Company. I have not been able to identify the fourth company or the year that he went. The Edward company may have been a freighting trip and did not bring back any church immigrants so is not listed. But Charles indicated that he took a church wagon. Also many of the teamsters were not listed on the Company rosters so a search by name did not reveal the four Companies Charles went with. The 1863 company lists William as a teamster but he did not go Charles went taking one of Williams’s wagons. John R. Murdock Company (1862) The company roster does not list Charles as being part of this Company. He was an out and back teamster which may account for his not being listed. Departure: 24 July 1862 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 27 September 1862 Company Information: 700 individuals and 65 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha). Since Charles is not listed a company roster is not shown. Some of the sources for more information about this Company are listed below. Note: that Charles Adams autobiography is listed as a source. This is not a complete listing of sources listed on the LDS Church web site http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany. Adams, Charles, Autobiography, in Library of Congress, Collection of Mormon diaries [1935-1938], reel 3, item 20, 2. Anderson, Christian, The Personal Journal of Christian Anderson [1982?], 9. Full Text Bjerregaard, Anna Maria, [Interview], in "Utah Pioneer Biographies," 44 vols., 5:64, 66. Full Text Bryant, James, [Reminiscences], in Our Pioneer Heritage, 20 vols. [1958-77], 6:61-63. Christensen, Hans, [Autobiography], in Alten Christensen, comp., Heber C. Christensen--Annie Peterson: History of Their Life and Labors [1984], [14-15]. Full Text Christensen, Hans, Autobiography, 189 Clark, John Haslem, [Autobiography], in Our Pioneer Heritage, 20 vols. [1958-77], 9:427-28. Most of these source had stories that start I was on the train and --- . There was no information about the experiences of the Company while on the trail. Samuel White Company 1863 (The number shown in parentheses next to each name is the age of the pioneer at the time of the journey.) The following is a partial listing of the Company’s roster. Adams, Eliza Ellen (3) Adams, Elizabeth (7) Adams, John Vorley (31) Adams, Mary Elizabeth Hazeldine (32) Adams, Thomas (32) Adams, William (Unknown) Bennett, Henry (Unknown) Bowers, Jacob (19) Bullock, David Dunn (18) Carter, Hezekiah (20) Cavanah, John (Unknown) Felshaw, John (Unknown) Gadd, Alfred (26) Green, Charles (Unknown) Halton, William (Unknown) Hayes John Henry (10) Hepworth, Edmund (22) Hepworth, Hannah Schofield Cowling (29) The company had about 300 individuals in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha). The company arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah 15 October 1863. The Thomas Adams, on the Company roster above, is not related to William Adams. Thomas, William’s son, was only two years old in 1863 and his son Charles was 20. Based on William’s autobiography, I don’t think William was with this train. Other information indications point to Charles as the teamster with this Company. He was driving his father’s wagon. A story about this Company follows. "Trains for the East," Deseret News [Weekly], 6 May 1863,360. Trains For The East During the past week all the teams have started which are going east this spring, to assist in gathering the poor wishing to emigrate to the peaceful vales of Deseret, and for the importation of merchandize and machinery, of which large quantities will be brought, if the expectations of the many, who have either gone or sent to purchase, shall be fully realized. More or less teams in each of the church trains have gone on private account-many to assist old friends who begin to recall to mind the sayings of the prophets and wish to enjoy a season of peace, after witnessing so many scenes of turmoil and war, as they have within the last two years. The number of horse, mule and ox teams which have left for the frontiers within the last three weeks, we have no means of determining, but we are safe in saying that it exceeds that of any previous year. Capt. [William B.] Preston's company, we believe, took the lead of the Church teams, and from latest accounts received from the companies it is believed that he has passed Fort Bridger before this time, and Capt. [Samuel D.] White with the rear train is supposed to have camped somewhere in Echo Canyon last night. Bishop Hunter, who went out on the road as far as Echo to see that all things were in order and give the men some directions and advice after the companies were organized, makes a very favorable report in relation to the teams, wagons, and everything connected with their out-fit. The several companies will travel as close together as circumstances will permit, and it is believed that they will make as good time in going and returning as any teams of the kind which ever crossed the plains Stories about charles adams Bishop Charles Adams of Parowan. An Irishman by birth, he inherited Irish looks, Irish wit, and Irish energy. In every phase of community activity this man was at the head, and few men had as diversified a career. The anecdotes told about him will live in the traditions of the people because they were so human and so interesting. He was born September 16, 1843, in Ireland, but his parents brought him to Nauvoo when he was three months old. The prophet Joseph Smith took the infant Charles in his arms and blessed him. The family shared the mobbing and the persecutions of Nauvoo and were in the exodus from that city in 1846. Arriving in Utah in 1849 they were among the first families selected to help settle Iron County. They came with the company under George A. Smith, and Charles grew to manhood there, living in Parowan the rest of his life. In 1862, before Charles was nineteen years of age, he went as a teamster in a Church caravan. In March 1863 he married Sarah Ann Davenport and one week later, leaving his young wife behind, started on his second trip across the plains. The following October, when Charles got back to Salt Lake City, his wife was there to meet him and the reward for that summer separation and work was that they went through the Endowment House and were sealed by President Brigham Young. In 1866 Charles volunteered again and made his third trip to the Missouri. In the three trips, he donated eighteen months to the service of bringing the poor of the Church to Utah. 0n his last trip across the plains an accident came near costing Charles his life. The ox-team caravan was crossing the Platte River and Charles' wagon was carrying thirty kegs of gunpowder. He had crossed the river safely and was pulling up the steep bank, when lightning struck his lead cattle, killing them in their tracks. The electric current followed the hitch chain back to the wagon killing three more oxen and setting the wagon on fire. Charles was stunned and lay in gravest danger from the powder. David Bullock, following close behind, took in the situation and rushed to give assistance. A good shake brought Charles to his senses and then the two boys worked furiously to unload the powder before the fire reached it. They succeeded in removing this hazard and then extinguishing the fire. The five dead oxen were replaced from the surplus herd and Charles was able to bring his load safely through to Salt Lake City. During the 1870's a great wave of interest in cooperative enterprises swept the Church. All through the settlements, cooperatives were organized Co-op stores, Co-op sheepherds and cattleherds and the United Order. In Parowan, Charles Adams entered actively into the spirit of this movement and his native good sense soon brought him to leadership in all these commercial and social enterprises. He became president and manager of the Co-op Store, president and manager of the Co-op Sheep Company, and a director in all the others. He served on the appraisement committee in all these enterprises because the people had confidence in his judgment and fairness. June 21, 1885, the two wards which had operated for many years in Parowan were disorganized and a new ward, incorporating the whole city, was set up. Charles Adams was selected to preside as bishop over the united ward, a position he held with success and honor for seventeen years. This calling placed a great responsibility upon him and developed many of the personal characteristics that later distinguished him. He became a scripturalist, doctrinarian, an exemplar, and a wise philosopher. In tense situations, native wit was often a saving grace. At such times he spoke in short, laconic sentences. Asked by Francis M. Lyman why he always gave a glowing report of his people in conference, his quick answer was, "Catch more flies with molasses than vinegar." Once in a Sunday School parents class the subject under discussion was responsibility of parents for teaching their children. The discussion became pretty one-sided against the parents. If parents were to blame and the children did wrong and went to hell the parents would go with them. The bishop sat still and silent as long as he could; then he arose and with arms raised as high as he could reach he heaved the subject back to a saner balance with this broadside, "Don't believe it, don't believe it, don't believe a word of it. Lord's got more bad boys than I have. Don't expect to go to Hades to find the Lord." The ponderous hands came down with a wide clinching swing. These human qualities, together with his great faith endeared him to his people and they elected him to every office in city and county within their gift. In the many sided activities of churchman, bishop, high councilman, legislator, merchant, livestock man, farmer, school trustee, mayor, city councilman, county commissioner, philosopher and all-round good citizen, his energy and native intelligence elevated him to prominence, to leadership and to the love and confidence of those he served. Charles. Adams passed away in December 1927. -By William R. Palmer. Source: OUR PIONEE HERITAGE Volume 13page 319-323 THE ADAMS RANCH AT THE CO-OP VALLEY In 1869 the Adams brothers, James J., Hugh L., William and Thomas, formed a Company, with their mother, Mary Ann Adams, as head of the Company. James J. Adams says, "We had lots of cattle and decided to go into the dairy business. We sent for a big 110 gallon cheese vat and some big cheese presses. I sent for instructions on how to make cheese and we tested out two different methods. We liked the one better than the cheddar process. We started to ranch at the Co-op Valley in the early 70's. We took up the land in the valley as a homestead but failed on it, so we bought 160 acres at $1.25 per acre. The water ran from the Hoosier on down past Scoguards, then down through the narrows into the Co-op Valley, forming a big lake, at the foot of the Sink Hill, where it mysteriously disappeared. The Co-op Valley got its name from the Parowan Co-op Cattle Co. After a few years the Hoosier reservoir was built by putting a dam across the east end of the Meadow. This was built by the Adams brothers and John Henderson. The reservoir was stocked with mountain trout. Some of them grew so big that they would stick out on either side of a dishpan. John Henderson was the one who spent a lot of time and effort to get it well stocked with mountain trout. About 1880 Mary Ann Adams took a big cheese up to Salt Lake City for the State Fair, and took 1st prize. They cut it to test it out and it was so good that it didn't last long. Everyone just helped themselves to it. She intended to give it to Clarisa Smith Williams for her board and room. The ranch houses were clustered just below the spring hill, in the SE of the valley, housing the Adams Clan, from Aunt Sarann's and Aunt Mary's on the north, to Aunt Anna's and Aunt Juliette's on the south. They lived in the big company house, Aunt Anna on the south and Aunt Juliette on the north. The boys slept upstairs, climbing a big ladder. James J. and Caroline lived on the north side when they were there, but they didn't ranch as much as the others. Then there was the big milk house with the big vat and presses and milk shelves, for each family to set their Sunday's milk in the big milk pans for butter. This was before the days of separators. When the call of the hills got into their veins, away they'd hi for the summer, where the big vat was filled with milk and made into cheese, every day of the week, except Sundays. They'd take turn about, according to how much milk they got. Every morning there were cream biscuits for breakfast and how good they were, with plenty of butter and honey or molasses or elderberry jelly. The large meadow was a fine playground far all the boys and girls and many jolly hours were spent around a big bonfire, as they played hide and seek, or run sheep run, by the light of the moon, when the day's work was done. For children must help. So calves were herded in one end of the valley and the cows had to be hunted, sometimes, clear up to horse valley and brought home in time to milk. It was their nightly job to carry water from the spring, halfway up the hill to fill the bottom of the vat, to cool the milk so it wouldn't sour. Then when it was time to dip, the whey would be run off. The hot water was run off and again the bottom of the vat had to be filled with ice cold water from the spring, to cool the curd, so it wouldn't mat, before it went into the presses. It was here in the old meadow that the boys got their start at high jumping, pole vaulting and baseball and basketball, as the big bunch of cousins vied with each other to do their best. THE I. B. B. T. IRISH BASKETBALL TEAM About 1904 or 1905 the whole of Southern Utah went to Panguitch Lake, for a regular "Hot Time in the Old Town" for the 24th of July. A big basketball tournament was scheduled, with teams from all over this end of the State. The I.B.B.T. Irish Basketball Team of Adams Cousins, Morgan Adams, James L. Adams, Wm. L. Adams, Lawrence Adams and Charles Richards, beat everything hands down. Morgan, as their center champion, put the ball thru the basket, no matter how far away he was. He was champion center for the B.Y.U. for a number of years. Many of these stories came from the following book:: The History of Iron County Mission, Parowan Utah, Parowan the Mother Town, compiles by Mrs. Luella Adams Dalton, Printed by the B.Y.U. Print Service, Published by the Daughters of Utah Pioneers, Parowan Old Rock Church Mission

MORE CHARLES ADAMS STORIES

Contributor: Vaccine'd Up & Sorry to See Summer Go Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

CHARLES ADAMS STORIES In the spring of 1862, when I was nineteen years old, I was called to drive a team of four yoke of oxen, with a wagon back to Winter Quarters, near Omaha, Nebraska. This, my second trip across, the plains, was to bring emigrants to Utah, under John R. Murdock as captain. A Brother Sanders, an original pioneer to Parowan, was something of an astrologer and he had talked about my horoscope. He said that in 1862 I would come very nearly getting drowned. And this came about on this trip. When we reached the Platte River on our way out, the water was very high. I had two companions. We went in swimming and I was not a very good swimmer and did indeed come very nearly getting drowned. The following year, at age 20, I had married Sarah Ann Davenport on March 31, 1863. A week after our marriage, I started across the plains again this time to bring a load of freight back to Utah Territory. I had a load of three hundred pounds of gun powder, four big stoves and some machinery. On the return trip, just before reaching Loop Fork, a tributary of the Platte River, about five o'clock in the afternoon, a heavy storm burst. The lightning was carried on the telegraph wire, and struck my wagon which was just passing under the telegraph wire and tore a hole in the wagon cover. The load I had on, iron, gun powder, machinery etc., attracted the lightning, but it did not touch the gun powder. The hay under the stoves did take fire and soon as the other teamsters saw the smoke they took alarm and ran away. I climbed into the wagon, threw off the cover, and began unloading as fast as possible. The lightning had run down the chain and struck five of the oxen, branding them and killing them I was standing by the near wheeler, just raising my whip to touch him up. The off-swing was a lively animal and swerved away from the chain and was only slightly struck and was uninjured. I was stunned for a moment but arose and felt alright. Coming home I had only three head of cattle out of eight. But Captain Samuel White (to whom I was assistant captain) and the boys were very kind to me, and helped me out with their animals. The next year my father paid the Church for the use of the oxen helping me home. (Insert added here a paragraph from an account written by William R. Palmer, giving a few more details of this dangerous experience.) He wrote: "In the wagon were thirty kegs of gun powder. Charles had just crossed the river safely and was pulling up the steep bank, when lightning struck his lead cattle, killing them in their tracks. The electric current followed the hitch chain back to the wagon killing three more oxen and setting the wagon on fire. Charles was stunned by the blow and lay in gravest peril from the powder. David Bullock, following close behind, rushed over and gave him a good shake to bring him to his senses. Then Charles worked furiously to unload the gun powder before the fire reached it." "In 1866, I crossed the plains a fourth time, with Seward Thompson of Fillmore as captain. This time I took my own wagon for freight and volunteered to take a Church wagon for emigrants. Starting in April and getting back in October. This was the only way some of the people, newly arrived from England and other countries could come. By the aid of the Church, for they had given up everything to reach America. STORIES AND ANECDOTES Many and many a time Adamses have gotten together to enjoy hearing and telling these stories.They never get dull. Grandpa usually said the word "the" to sound like "thee." Also, he was known to repeat phrases for emphasis. If anyone, who may read this collection of stories, might know some that I have not recorded, please add them to the ones told here. The mail for the citizens of Parowan was delivered to, and dispensed from the home of Aunt Sarah Matheson, Scott Matheson‘s mother, she being the postmistress. Grandpa was one of only three or four who took the daily paper. People, eager for the news, used to come early, to Aunt Sarah's parlor to look over the paper before grandpa, came for it. Each morning he would walk in and ask if everyone was finished with it, then take the paper along home. Once in a Sunday School Parents' Class, the subject under discussion was the responsibility of parents for teaching their children. The discussion became pretty one-sided against the parents. If children went wrong the parents were to blame t and if children went to hell the parents would go with them. Bishop Charles Adams sat silent as long as he could, then arose and raised his arm high, as though to toss the subject back to a saner balance, he said,"Don't believe it! Don't believe it! Don't believe a word of it. The Lord's got more bad boys than I have. Don't expect to go down to Hades to find the Lord!" Serious trouble arose between two men in Bishop Charles' ward. This concerned water rights, a touchy matter because of its scarcity. The Bishop had tried time and again to reconcile the two, but the trouble continued to flare. He had referred the case to the Ward Teachers of each man and recommended they appear before a Bishop's Court. "Those two had a fist fight. You have to get them together and work this problem out." Grandpa shook his head and answered, "Don't like that recommendation. Can't accept that recommendation. Had them together. Had them together. Very glad to get them apart. Keep their ways as wide apart as possible till they get more faith and more sense." Asked once by Francis M. Lyman, who was visiting at Conference time, why Bishop Adams always gave such glowing reports, of his people, the ready answer was, "Catch more flies with molasses than with vinegar." When Grandpa Charles was president of the Co-op Store, It was discovered that thefts were being carried out and it was quite some time till it was discovered how the stolen goods were being taken out of the store. In the basement there were windows with iron bars instead of glass. One day an observant young clerk saw a pile of groceries and other articles stacked near the windows, where a hand could reach through the bars and make off with the store's property. He quickly reported to grandpa and offered to spend the night in the basement to catch the thief. Grandpa shook his head negatively and said "No Joseph, no! We'll put glass in the windows and remove the temptation, remove the temptation! I don't want to find out who it is; it might be someone we know." One night grandma got sick. According to her, she was very, very sick. She called grandpa and told him how dreadful she felt, saying, "Charles, I'm sick. I'm sick enough to die" To which he calmly answered, "Sick are you, Sarah Ann? Think you're going to die do you" Sarah Ann? Well, well!" and turned over to go back to sleep. Grandma, infuriated, said, "No, I'm not going to die, Charles. I won't die just to please you!" When grandpa was mayor of Parowan, there was a meeting of the City Council. The discussion of the evening was about the necessity of having a fence around the cemetery. After many opinions had been expressed, and grandpa had listened to each one he put his fingers together, closed his eyes and gave the situation some thought. Finally, he said, "It's a great expense great expense Why build a fence around it? Those who are in there can't get out, and those who are out don't want to get in." One day Charles Timmons, went into Shorty Green's Drug Store and found grandpa sitting there. Charles went over to him and asked how he was feeling. Grandpa said, "Fine - just fine! Now who are you?" "I'm Charlie Timmons, Brother Adams; I'm going to marry your granddaughter, Imogene." Grandpa said. "Well, well, going to marry Imogene are you? For a wife? For a wife? Well, well!" Grandpa Adams used to buy things from or trade with the Indians. One day when he was preparing things to make trade, his son, Thomas, said,"Father, let me go do the trading.I can make a better deal, let me try." Grandpa gave him permission and Thomas started off with the items for trade. There was some bartering and Thomas kept saying to the Indians, "More, more." They would throw down more articles. Finally, when he took his load home, he was happy and proud because he had done better -than his father usually did.But he waschagrined when grandpa said, "Thomas, that is too much, too much. You have not been fair with the Indians. Tomorrow you will take this much back." Humiliated, Thomas returned to the Indians, who calm1y accepted the goods, saying, "We expected you back. Charles Adams heap fair man." Thomas learned a great lesson that day. When grandpa was president of the Co-op Sheep Herd, they would winter the sheep out on the desert, though the gap. The only accessible water was from a well, where the water was acrid with the taste of alkali and unsafe to drink. Grandpa told the herders to boil the water and make tea. In the summer time, the herds were taken to the mountains, where the water, coming from springs, was fresh, clear and cold. Grandpa kept making tea. His herders remonstrated with him about this, saying there was no need to boil the water. Grandpa calmly retorted that, "Thee better thee water thee better thee tea." One day grandpa's daughter, Minnie, was helping him with the bills received for groceries taken out to the sheep herds. The men were permitted to do their own ordering, and they found that there was a great quantity of Hewlett’s jams and preserves, put up in bucket containers, going in the supplies. Grandpa commented on this and Minnie said that she would just tell the men to cut down on this luxury that it was constipating. Grandpa much annoyed, said, "Constipating be dammed! It’s expensive Expensive!" Sid Prichard was herding sheep for grandpa one summer and he became very aggravated because his, so called, sheep dog would leave the herd to go chase rabbits. He sent word to grandpa to bring him a good sheep dog. Grandpa came to the camp with a dog, and Sid asked, "Will that dog chase rabbits?" Grandpa said, "You bet that dog will chase rabbits. He will just chase them all over the place." "Then take the son-of-a-gun home. I don't want a dog that chases rabbits," Sid answered, to which grandpa, hurriedly replied, "But Sidney, he will only chase rabbits if you want him to chase rabbits" One time grandpa was helping Bart Dalton, put the sheep through the chute into the creosote dip to get rid of ticks. One rambunctious ewe kicked Bart in the mouth, loosening one of his teeth. Angrily, he called the ewe a son-of-a Bartlett, now Bartlett, ----nice little ewe, nice ewe” Do not call her such a name." Later the process, the same thing happened to grandpa. With great indignation, he stated, "You are right, Bartlett! She is a son-of ------------!" One day grandpa was going to drive to Buckhorn Flats in his buggy. His son, Thomas, wanted to miss school that day to go with his father, who said, "No Thomas, you cannot go. Not this time.What in the world makes you want to go to Buckhorn Flats for anyway?"The young boy had a ready answer, "Gee, dad, a fellow likes to see a little bit of the world before he dies!" One evening grandpa mounted his horse to go down to his field to take the water. When he finished the task he was tired, so he climbed in the back of his sheep wagon and went to sleep. When he awakened it was dark and quite late, so he prepared himself some supper from the supplies there, undressed and got into bed to spend the rest of the night. In the meantime, grandma became extremely worried about him. She called on the sheriff to help her search for him. The night passed without anyone finding him. he next morning when grandpacame riding back into town, he found search parties being organized. It embarrassed him and when he got home he scolded Sarah Ann. "Next time I am gone give me three days, Sarah Ann, three days, before you worry about me. Three days before you send out a search party for me." In those early days in Parowan" there was an "outhouse" in every back yard. One early summer morning grandpa walked through his backyard and cut across his neighbor's on some errand or another. His neighbor's wife, never thinking to be caught so early in the morning, had left her privy door open to enjoy the early morning sun. Grandpa, always courteous, raised his hat as he saw her and said, "Good morning, Phoebe. Nice morning, Nice morning! A story along this same theme is about the outhouse down in back of the old tithing office in Parowan. Grandpa had gone down to the office to do some work when nature called. That same day, two of Aunt Sarah Matheson's daughters, sent on some errand in the vicinity, also had a hurry-up call. Finding the door to the privy fastened, with a slit strap over a nail, the girls knocked on the door for admittance. Grandpa, perturbed not at all, said, "Occupied ladies, sorry, but occupied, occupied!" This story is told by Aunt Mary Ollerton. "My husband and I sold Charles Adams a piece of land for a price we thought was a fair and adequate amount. After a year or two, Charles came to us and said, "The land you sold me has been so valuable to me, it’s been worth this much more." He gave Aunt Mary $500. Grandpa always depended on Blanchard Whitney, a neighbor from across the street, to put in his heating stove. One morning grandpa told him it was getting chilly and time to bring in the stove. Grandma was there when Blanchard began his job, and she said, "Blanch, move that stove a little this way." And then, "Blanch, the stove pipe is crooked." And again, "Blanch, you could have cleaned that stove a little better." Blanchard and grandpa gritted their teeth and then, "Blanch, you have to move that stove closer to the wal1." This was the last straw. Grandpa said, "Sarah Ann, let Blanchard do it and I won't tell you to go to hell, but I'll tell you to start out!" During the time grandpa was bishop, most of the dancing was square dancing. But the time came that waltzing and other round dancing came into style. This shocked grandpa, who felt the proprieties were being broken. He got up to speak to his flock at one of their socials and counseled with them thus: "Young men and women, this is not the right way to dance. Thee boys must not swing thee girls around thee waist." When Uncle Laurence was a tiny little boy about two years old, grandpa took him into the mountains where he was going to get a load of wood. He wrapped the boy in a blanket and sat him on a nearby rock to watch him work. He worked quite steadily but frequently glanced over at the child to see if all was well. One such glance froze him with fear as he saw a rattlesnake coiled and ready to strike. Grandpa afterward marveled at what happened and said it was an answer to his prayer. In one swift movement, he caught the snake in a tight grip around the head, .just below the exposed fangs, and with the other hand hurled the boy quite a distance from where he was sitting. All in the same motion, he threw the snake as far as he could in the opposite direction, ran and gathered the boy in his arms and brought him to the wagon. The little face was scratched and bruised and his hands had some slivers in them, but he was safe. This was a feat of strength that came to grandpa in time of necessity, saving his boy's life. Another time when grandpa had gone into the mountains to help find stray cattle, he was with Brother Holyoak who was to help with the job. When night came, the two men had to make camp out in the open and spend the night. Even summer nights are cold and seeing that he had no covers on him, he shook Brother Holyoak awake and declared, "Brother Holyoak, you have taken all the covers and I am as bare as a bird." When grandpa‘s son, Thomas was about seventeen years, old, he needed a new pair of boots. There was a part of the old P.U.M.I. shop in town that specialized in making shoes and boots. Grandpa said he would go and order Thomas a pair of boots. Thomas said, "Now dad, I take a size nine. Be sure to order that size for me." "Size ten, Thomas, size ten, you know is right." "No, dad, I want a size nine," Tom insisted. Grandpa went to the boot maker and put in his order, telling the man to make them size ten but mark them size nine. When they were ready, they fitted perfectly and Tom triumphantly told his father how right he was to insist on size nine. Grandpa agreed that indeed he was right and the truth of the affair was not known for many years. When Thomas had a seventeen year old son, named Thomas Marion, this story is told. Young Tom wanted to go to a dance. He asked his father for seventy-five cents for the ticket. At the time of the request, his father was visiting with his grandfather, who listened with interest to the exchange of words. Tom's father said,. "Now when I was a boy, younger than you, I never asked my father for spending money, no sir. I went out and earned it. I found a job and got my own money. Now I think that is what you should do. Don't you agree, father?" Grandpa, his hands folded across his stomach, nodded his head thoughtfully a few times and finally said, "Earned your own money, eh, Thomas, earned it yourself." Then turning to his grandson, he went on, "I think Thomas forgets. Yes sir, I think Thomas forgets," Grandpa loved sports, especially in his later life. He would attend all the school events and particularly liked basket ball. He had several grandsons who became very good players. At half time of a certain game, when the hone team was lagging behind in the score, grandpa went over to the coach, Mr. Van Buren, and told him he would like to speak to the team. Mr. Van called them together for the conference and they all listened respectfully as grandpa told them how to play the game, "This is thee way to play thee game, boys. Just roll thee ball into thee basket - roll thee ball into thee basket." When electricity came in, grandpa suggested they use some church funds for better lighting in the old rock church a nice chandelier. One of the towns’ people said “Why do you want to spend all that money for a chandelier? Nobody could play it but Brother Durham" Grandpa had purchased a new pair of overshoes for himself. He put his name on the inside of them and wore them to a town social. The night was stormy and wet and when he was ready to leave he could not find his overshoes. He looked all around at every man's feet till he saw the ones he thought were his. "Brother - - - - those are nice 1ooking overshoes. Mind if I try one on?" The man reluctantly took one off and grandpa put it on. "Just fits. Just fits. Mind if I try the other one on? The poor man knew he was found out. He took the other one off and grandpa put it on, checking first to make sure his name was in it, then said,"They look might: nice on me. Think I'll keep them. Thank you very much, Thank you. At the end of one fiscal year when grandpa was on the City Council, there was some money left. At a meeting it was suggested they use it to build a bridge over a small wash at the entrance into Parowan Canyon. One member vetoed the idea, saying, "Doesn't need a bridge. Why that wash is so small I can piddle half way across it. It Grandpa spoke up indignant. "Brother - - - - - -, you are out order" To which the man answered" "You're right, Bishop, I am out of order. If I wasn't I could piddle all the way across." This story comes from Ancel Adams, a nephew of grandpa. "I had gone with Uncle Charles to a place called Loge's corral. There were about thirty teams and wagons in all, fitted with hay racks and about twelve or fifteen bags of wool could be hauled on each one. One of the horses in Uncle Charles' team was a great big dark gray mare called Old Baby Elephant. She was temperamental and could pull as much as a team if she wanted to, or not pull at all as the notion struck. She was a noted balker. We were about half way to Milford and just before we came to the railroad tracks we saw that it was going to be quite a pull to get the loaded wagons over the rails as they stood a little above the wooden ties. Quite a few wagons got over, them it came Uncle Charles' turn. His wagon stopped as the wheels hit the rails and Old Baby Elephant was content to just let it sit right there. Down along the desert, we could see a train coming and still the horses stalled. It wasn't till someone brought an extra team to hitch to ours that we got the wagon over the tracks. Uncle had thought a lot of that old mare but at that time he did not call her Old Baby Elephant. He had a much more colorful name for her." Another story Ancel remembered about grandpa was when they were packing wool into huge bags, a big mother rat with her little ones hanging onto her would run out from the piled wool and before anyone could get to her, she would disappear again. One time when she came out, without the babies attached to her, they nearly got her, but she ducked into the nearest hiding place the pant leg of Sidney Burton's loose trousers. He jumped up and made quite a to-do trying to get the rat out. Uncle Charles said, "You'll have to stomp harder, Sid, or unbuckle.” Grandpa and grandma never walked to church together. He always went ahead as she was busy with the children. He always took the same seat and everyone knew that he was saving the seat beside him for his wife. Whenever he got up to speak, he would close his eyes, teeter back and forth on his heels and toes, and take his time to commence his talk. Once grandpa and grandma had a quarrel when they were quite newly married. She would not go to the social with him that night, so she braided her long hair preparatory for bed, never thinking he would go off without her, which he did. She was so angry; she decided to go by herself, so she dressed up in her best dress, arranged her hair attractively and went. A young man from the circuit court was in town and didn’t know she was married so asked for several dances and wanted to see her home. This was where grandpa had had enough. He stepped in, took her arm and they went home together. The quarrel was over. Grandpa once played the part of "Pizzaro Prince of Peru”. He had to carry a maiden off the stage and this worried him. He decided to practice on grandma by throwing her over his shoulder. He had to be shown how to pick her up in his arms and carry her properly. Here are a few remembrances about grandpa. He loved to read and had accumulated quite a library. Often he would stay up late reading and didn't get up very early. Usually he was late getting his milking done and this worried grandma. In his old desk there were the old tithing records of the time when he was bishop. Scrupulously recorded in them are all the things people brought for tithing. It’s truly interesting to look through them. One day a strange man came to the door, a drifter, shabby and broke and grandpa took him in. He gave his name as Ky Oliver. As I remember it, the word was that Ky was a deserter from the Civil War. He stayed the rest of his life with grandpa and is buried in the Parowan cemetery. Grandpa never turned anyone away who needed help. Many a person was fed at his table and many a night's lodging given. It has been a pleasure to research, read and remember all I could about grandpa. I thank those whose material I have used those who have shared their memories with me. Most especially, my appreciation to Carol Collett who did the editing, typed the master copy and knew where to have the printing done. Beatrice Adams Johnson The Summit Coal 5 Coal was discovered in Summit Canyon soon after the Pioneers came, but it wasn't until along in the 60's that an effort was made to see if it was a large enough vein to work. There were two companies formed, one was - Thomas Davenport, William Davenport. Charles Adams, William C. McGregor and Morgan Richards contracted to open up the vein at $1.25 per foot. The other company - Jessie N. Smith, Silas S. Smith, John Topham and Joseph Fish, who hired Bill and Ben Croft to work their vein. They were working two separate veins. Morgan Richards found after working this 18 inches vein for fifteen feet, that the vein was visible at three different points, one across the mountain, and one across the canyon, all three points were uniformly eighteen inches thick. The Crofts knew the situation but said nothing about it. So Morgan Richards went to town and reported the situation. It was decided to stop work on the vein because it wouldn't be a paying proposition. Social Center The first Social Center was in the Old Log Council house. It was lighted by home made candles, perched on shingles stuck in the cracks between the logs. When the basement of the Rock Church was completed in 1868 it made a fine big Social Center for dancing and the theatre. On special occasions the dancing would start in the afternoon, interspersed with readings and singing. They'd dance all afternoon, then have group picnic and while the women cleared things up the men would go home and do their chores and then come back and dance all evening. They'd bring any kind of produce for a ticket, soap, soft soap, grain, squash, carrots, candle, anything they had. On Friday nights, there was always a big dance, when old and young would don their Sunday best and step lightly to the lifting tune of the fiddle and the little old organ. Richard Benson bought the first organ. When Thomas Durham organized the Harmonic Society, they bought the organ. Thomas Durham, Jr. usually played the fiddle, but sometimes Frank Dalton and Mark Guymon, Henry Taylor and Thomas Richards would play. Thomas Durham Sr. played the organ. Edward M. Dalton was known as the singing caller, later Enoch Rasmussen was a fine caller for the square dances. Here's a story from Samuel Mortenson, one of the old timers. "We were dancing in the basement of the Rock Church. Most of the girls were pretty nice and modest; Bishop Charles Adams didn't like the way the boys would swing the girls around the waist, and he had been telling them so in very definite terms. Some of the young people didn't like to be dictated to. As I looked across the hall I caught the eye of a pretty girl, who was usually very shy and sedate. She raised her finger beckoning me to come dance. We went in the set next to the music, and when it came time to swing she grabbed me around the waist and away we went, but not for long, for again we were stopped and again we were lectured to." (Page 256) He taught school in the East Log Schoolhouse with about sixty-five of the more advanced young people in the community for three years. The younger pupils were taught in some of the homes. Then he taught school in the West Log Schoolhouse for three years. At the time he was teaching in the West Log Schoolhouse, Joseph Fish was teaching in the East Log Schoolhouse. Charles Adams taught school there one term. In 1873, the schools had grown until it was necessary to have more room, so the basement of the Rock Church was divided into three school rooms. Morgan Richards had about 110 students with two assistants. It was a mixed school, covering all ages. The McCarthy children, William and James, and two girls came from Summit for two or three years. Morgan Richards said he had taught all the children in town at one time or another. James J. Adams taught advanced arithmetic to the older pupils, a subject in which he was very good. Annie Adams taught reading, spelling and geography. They had McGuffey's arithmetic, McGuffey's Readers, National, Bancroft's and one other Reader. Cooperative Store William C. McGregor was President of the P.D.M.I. for ten years. Joseph Fish continued as secretary for the Cooperative until 1879 when he moved to Snowflake, Arizona. President William H. Dame was Superintendent in 1877. Morgan Richards, Jr. started in as clerk the fall of 1876. Charles Adams was the next Superintendent after President William H. Dame. Morgan Richards was clerk and a member of the board for eight years. He was made Superintendent about 1884 or 1885 holding that position until November, 1894, when he was elected as the first State Auditor. He says, "I prepared the business and handed over their money, all debts were paid." Morgan Richards bought all the goods, clerked, kept the books and managed all the P.D.M.I. works. Board members were Charles Adams, William C. McGregor, William C. Mitchell, John Topham, Richard Robinson, Samuel T. Orton and Morgan Richards. The Co-op Store issued script, first paper, later aluminum to help out in the money shortage. William H. Holyoak was the next Superintendent for a few years, then Charles Adams was again Superintendent for five or six years. During this period, the P.D.M.I. built the first flour roller mill. Simon A. Matheson was the next Superintendent for a few years, when Charles Adams was again elected Superintendent for six or seven years. Wilford Day was Superintendent next. The Joke On The Superintendent One day when Charles Adams was Superintendent of the Co-op Store, a stranger came in and wanted to buy an overcoat. So he took him to the back of the store where their very limited supply of clothing was. He picked up an overcoat and said, "Try this on, Sir. That's sure a fine overcoat, just feel that cloth will you, it'll give you real service." The stranger put the overcoat on and nodded his approval. Charles Adams began to look around, and what he had done finally dawned on him. "By Jove, by Jove, sure'n that's my own overcoat."(page 384) (1) About 1870 they decided to put their sheep all together in a Cooperative Sheep Herd. Neils O. Mortenson had acquired quite a number of sheep and they had increased, until he was the biggest sheep man in Parowan, owning about two or three hundred head, so he was put in as President of the organization. They took up the land, at the 3rd House Flat in the upper Dry Lakes country, or their summer headquarters. They built corrals and a house and for many years, this was their range. The Co-op Sheep Herd was the only sheep herd for many years. Neils Mortenson was the big owner of Rush Lake, and he and David Ward and Rass Mickelson ran the Co-op Sheep Herd, here during the winter. But David Ward could see the possibilities of a fine ranch home, at Rush Lake, so he persuaded the others, to let him buy them out. He traded his twenty acre farm in the North field to Rass Mickelson. So he and Neils Mortenson, took the Co-op Sheep Herd, out to Mud Springs, where he established his winter headquarters. David Ward became the owner of Rush Lake. The Co-op Sheep Herd Co. built a house out at Mud Springs and every night the sheep were brought home and corralled. This was after- words found to be poor business for trailing thru the sagebrush, every day to and from the feed, kept it picked down to nothing, and the sheep poor. The early day sheep had coarse loose wool. Wm. H. Lyman says, "I remember going out to the Co-op Herd at Mud Springs and it's no wonder their sheep didn't bear much wool; the whole sagebrush patch for miles around, looked like a cotton field." Bishop Charles Adams says, "I had a few sheep, so when the Cooperative sheep Herd started up, I joined them. I was made superintendent off and on for a number of years. I was at one of those re-elections once, after we had had a hard winter, following a year of drought. We were losing a large number of sheep and the superintendent was very much worried about it. He finally asked to be released. John Henderson spoke up, "Well Charles Adams will not worry, if all the sheep die." Here's a funny story they tell on Bishop Charles Adams who was Irish through and through. It was the fall of the year and the sheep had been gathered and corralled for branding and counting, prior to being sent to the winter range, across the desert. Sid Prichard and two or three boys had been helping on the drive. They were running them a few at a time, thru a partly closed gate, as a chute, so Charles could count them. They had proceeded pretty well, far some few minutes, when all of a sudden a big bunch broke thru and Charles said "60 - 70 - 60 - 70 - 60 - 70 count em, Sidney count em." Charles Adams says after a number of years I gradually bought the old stockholders out and with my son assumed control of the old Co-op Sheep Herd. About this time the cattle and sheep men took up homesteads all over the mountains. A Sheep Story It was the fall of the year, when the sheep men were separating their herds and branding them, before sending them to the winter range. Bishop Charles Adams, Brose Gymon and Bart Dalton were separating their sheep at the shearing corral, by running them thru a chute; when all of a sudden one broke back and bunted into Brose and knocked him down. He got up swearing and the Bishop said, "Oh!' no, no Ambrose, a nice little ewe lamb, Ambrose, nice little ewe lamb." In a few minutes, another one broke out and hitting Charles square in the stomach sent him a rolling. As he got up his Irish was up too. He said, "Show me the son of B-Bartlett, show me the son of “B____" Later on many different people acquired more and more sheep all the Adams brothers, Charles, William, James J., Hugh L., Nelson Marsden, King Paramore and many others, until this country became a regular sheep section. The big cattle herds rather dwindled and the whole country was overrun with sheep. PAROWAN RECLAMATION PROJECT The Adams brother's Charles, Hugh L., William, Mr. James Ollorton and wife Mary Adams and James J. Adams owned the Co-op Valley and ranched there for many years. It was their lifelong dream to someday make a tunnel thru the Sink Hill and take the water that so mysteriously disappeared, down to Parowan Valley, to help reclaim some of the virgin soil. One or two minor attempts were made, but they lacked the finance for so big a project. In the spring of 1918, Wilford Day became interested in the project, and on 1 July, 1918 the Parowan Reclamation Company was organized, with the following members. Wilford Day, Mrs. Wilford Day, Bishop Hugh L. Adams Sec., Wm. A., James J. Adams & Sons. The contract was let out to Heb Ayre and Mr. Roberts, but Mr. Myers finished the job. Work started on 27 September, 1918 and the tunnel was completed 21 June, 1921, costing $38,000.00 During the construction, Roy Myers drove an old fashioned engine from an old thrasher up the Paragonah dugway, which was used to furnish, the power. It was estimated that it would water 600 acres, with the average rainfall of a normal year. The amount of water fluctuates from year to year, according to the amount of snow in the mountains. The tunnel has been subject to repairs from year to year. The summer of 1950, a good deal of work had to be done, as beavers had built a dam in the tunnel. This project has materially increased the acreage of irrigated farms in the northeastern part of Parowan Valley. Hugh L. Adams and son LeRoy are now the owners of the whole project. The Adams brothers were ever alert to the possibilities of increasing the water supply in the valley, and were always ready to push any move along this line. In the spring of 1866, President William H. Dame asked me to make a trip across the plains for emigrants. George Holyoak, William Orton, Lars Mortenson and Charles Adams were in the party. I drove two yoke of oxen and a load of lumber as far as Fillmore for Al Lemmon. I rode a dark bay horse of John A. West's all the way to Wyoming, Nebraska, on to the Missouri River, about a hundred miles from Omaha and back again. We were camped in Wyoming for about a week early in July and Mulberry, Elm and other trees grew along the river. The Whippoorwills, huck-will's-widow, bob-whites, and wild turkeys were found along the river. We did not see a buffalo on the plains. The hard winters had killed them off. As we were coming along the Platte to the Missouri River, I suffered a good deal with boils. One night as I was herding the horses and mules, my boils broke about 2 a.m. I was so relieved that I lay face down on my arms in the grassy prairie, as all my animals seemed settled for rest. I fell asleep and I don't know how long I slept when I was roused by a voice, kind and gentle, calling "Morgan! Morgan!” I woke up and at once took in the situation. Every animal had disappeared except my saddle horse which was tethered by my side. Finally, away to the southwest, possibly two miles away, I discerned three horses, tiny specks, the tail-end of the herd disappearing over the last crest. I galloped after them and found them quietly moving onward. I turned them back to the feeding grounds about a mile away my herding partner, Alma Barton, had also been asleep, but he was in the saddle and as anxious for the welfare of the herd, as I had been when I brought them back. This was the only occurrence of my falling asleep while on duty. We had about one hundred eighty animals to look after. In our train was David Bullock; his father, James Bullock, was on his way to fill a mission to Scotland. Richard Benson and Perry C. Liston were on their way to England for missions. We were in Captain Samuel Dennis White's Company, Assistant Captain, Charles Woodhouse. Charles Adams was Assistant Captain to Captain Daniel Thompson's train of ox teams. We arrived home on September 17, 1866. The Indians were on the War Path that summer. We met fleeing settlers as we journeyed westward who warned us against continuing our journey. We passed a burning station house and camped close to the Pawnees, some who came into camp to buy bacon. A few days later we struck the Cheyenne’s. None of them molested us and we felt sure we were protected. Jenkin Evans and Thomas Evans, who came from Wales, were great freighters. Their big four yoke of oxen outfits made many trips to San Bernardino, California, and to the mines in Nevada, in summer and winter. They made many trips to the Missouri River for Ebenezer Hanks. They used to get loads of grain from the Equitable store, on credit, but it was always paid in full on their return. (Page 424) FREIGHTING ACROSS THE PLAINS by Charles Adams When we reached the Platte River on the way east, the water was high. There were two companies going for emigrants. While we were camped, two young men asked me to go in swimming with them in the river, but they went on and left me alone. When I came to the rapids, I very nearly went under. It was only with almost superhuman efforts that I could turn back and finally reach the shore. I was about used up for a day or two. On March 31, 1863, I was married to Sarah Ann Davenport, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Burrows Davenport, by President of the Parowan Stake, William H. Dame. One week after I was married, I started across the plains again to get a load of freight. I loaded up with 300 pounds of gun powder; four stoves and some machinery. When we were on the other side of Green River along the Platte River, about a day's journey from Loop Fork, a tributary of the Platte, a heavy rainstorm came up about five in the afternoon. Just as I was passing under the telegraph wires, the lightning came along the wires and struck my wagon, tearing a hole in the cover. The stoves and machinery had attracted the lightning, but it did not touch the gun powder. I was standing by the near wheeler, just raising my whip to touch up the nigh wheeler. The off swing was a lively animal which swerved away from the chain and did not get struck or hurt. I was stunned for a moment, then I gat up, climbed into the wagon, threw off the cover, which was on fire, and began unloading as fast as I could. The hay under the stoves was blazing. The other teamsters saw the smoke and ran away, but seeing me at work unloading came back and helped. They were afraid the powder would go up. The lightning had gone down the chain and struck and killed five oxen, so now I only had three left out of eight. The Captain and the boys were very kind to me and helped me out with their animals. We were sure lucky to get the powder out before it caught fire. My father paid the church for the five dead oxen the next year. News spread of the narrow escape and of the amount of gunpowder they were freighting to Utah. News was received that the U.S. Military Officers were coming to search the Company for powder. So Captain White divided it among the train and when the officers came and searched the train, they did not find as much as they expected and let the Company proceed. But for the wise course of Captain White, the powder would have all been confiscated and it would have been a great loss to me. When I reached Salt Lake in October, I met my father and mother and my wife, who had come up to meet me. We were married by President Brigham Young in the Endowment House. In April, 1866, I went across the plains again with my own outfit for freight and I offered to take a church wagon for emigrants. I went in Captain Edward Thompson's Company. We made the trip without any serious trouble and got back in October. A BISHOP'S STORY Once when Charles Adams was Bishop and William C. McGregor was one of his counselors, they had a little difficulty between two of the brethren. One day Bishop Adams called them both in to have a talk with them and see if they could iron things out. But this only made matters worse, for they got into a regular fight. A few days later Bishop Adams and W m. C. McGregor were walking down the street, when William happened to see both these men, one on either side of the street. So he said, "Bishop, there's so and so, maybe it would help if we could get them together and see if we can patch things up for them." But Bishop Adams said, Oh, No No!' I had 'em together, had 'em together, couldn't hardly get 'em apart!" TRIPS ACROSS THE PLAINS Charles stated that he crossed the plains a total of four times in his biography. He said that he went with: John R. Murdock in 1862 Samuel White in 1863 Seward or Edward Thompson Company in 1866 The LDS Church History web site does not list the 1866 Company. I have not been able to identify the fourth company or the year that he went. The Edward company may have been a freighting trip and did not bring back any church immigrants so is not listed. But Charles indicated that he took a church wagon. Also many of the teamsters were not listed on the Company rosters so a search by name did not reveal the four Companies Charles went with. The 1863 company lists William as a teamster but he did not go Charles went taking one of Williams’s wagons. John R. Murdock Company (1862) The company roster does not list Charles as being part of this Company. He was an out and back teamster which may account for his not being listed. Departure: 24 July 1862 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 27 September 1862 Company Information: 700 individuals and 65 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha). Since Charles is not listed a company roster is not shown. Some of the sources for more information about this Company are listed below. Note: that Charles Adams autobiography is listed as a source. This is not a complete listing of sources listed on the LDS Church web site http://lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany. Adams, Charles, Autobiography, in Library of Congress, Collection of Mormon diaries [1935-1938], reel 3, item 20, 2. Anderson, Christian, The Personal Journal of Christian Anderson [1982?], 9. Full Text Bjerregaard, Anna Maria, [Interview], in "Utah Pioneer Biographies," 44 vols., 5:64, 66. Full Text Bryant, James, [Reminiscences], in Our Pioneer Heritage, 20 vols. [1958-77], 6:61-63. Christensen, Hans, [Autobiography], in Alten Christensen, comp., Heber C. Christensen--Annie Peterson: History of Their Life and Labors [1984], [14-15]. Full Text Christensen, Hans, Autobiography, 189 Clark, John Haslem, [Autobiography], in Our Pioneer Heritage, 20 vols. [1958-77], 9:427-28. Most of these source had stories that start I was on the train and --- . There was no information about the experiences of the Company while on the trail. Samuel White Company 1863 (The number shown in parentheses next to each name is the age of the pioneer at the time of the journey.) The following is a partial listing of the Company’s roster. Adams, Eliza Ellen (3) Adams, Elizabeth (7) Adams, John Vorley (31) Adams, Mary Elizabeth Hazeldine (32) Adams, Thomas (32) Adams, William (Unknown) Bennett, Henry (Unknown) Bowers, Jacob (19) Bullock, David Dunn (18) Carter, Hezekiah (20) Cavanah, John (Unknown) Felshaw, John (Unknown) Gadd, Alfred (26) Green, Charles (Unknown) Halton, William (Unknown) Hayes John Henry (10) Hepworth, Edmund (22) Hepworth, Hannah Schofield Cowling (29) The company had about 300 individuals in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha). The company arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah 15 October 1863. The Thomas Adams, on the Company roster above, is not related to William Adams. Thomas, William’s son, was only two years old in 1863 and his son Charles was 20. Based on William’s autobiography, I don’t think William was with this train. Other information indications point to Charles as the teamster with this Company. He was driving his father’s wagon. A story about this Company follows. "Trains for the East," Deseret News [Weekly], 6 May 1863,360. Trains For The East During the past week all the teams have started which are going east this spring, to assist in gathering the poor wishing to emigrate to the peaceful vales of Deseret, and for the importation of merchandize and machinery, of which large quantities will be brought, if the expectations of the many, who have either gone or sent to purchase, shall be fully realized. More or less teams in each of the church trains have gone on private account-many to assist old friends who begin to recall to mind the sayings of the prophets and wish to enjoy a season of peace, after witnessing so many scenes of turmoil and war, as they have within the last two years. The number of horse, mule and ox teams which have left for the frontiers within the last three weeks, we have no means of determining, but we are safe in saying that it exceeds that of any previous year. Capt. [William B.] Preston's company, we believe, took the lead of the Church teams, and from latest accounts received from the companies it is believed that he has passed Fort Bridger before this time, and Capt. [Samuel D.] White with the rear train is supposed to have camped somewhere in Echo Canyon last night. Bishop Hunter, who went out on the road as far as Echo to see that all things were in order and give the men some directions and advice after the companies were organized, makes a very favorable report in relation to the teams, wagons, and everything connected with their out-fit. The several companies will travel as close together as circumstances will permit, and it is believed that they will make as good time in going and returning as any teams of the kind which ever crossed the plains Stories about charles adams Bishop Charles Adams of Parowan. An Irishman by birth, he inherited Irish looks, Irish wit, and Irish energy. In every phase of community activity this man was at the head, and few men had as diversified a career. The anecdotes told about him will live in the traditions of the people because they were so human and so interesting. He was born September 16, 1843, in Ireland, but his parents brought him to Nauvoo when he was three months old. The prophet Joseph Smith took the infant Charles in his arms and blessed him. The family shared the mobbing and the persecutions of Nauvoo and were in the exodus from that city in 1846. Arriving in Utah in 1849 they were among the first families selected to help settle Iron County. They came with the company under George A. Smith, and Charles grew to manhood there, living in Parowan the rest of his life. In 1862, before Charles was nineteen years of age, he went as a teamster in a Church caravan. In March 1863 he married Sarah Ann Davenport and one week later, leaving his young wife behind, started on his second trip across the plains. The following October, when Charles got back to Salt Lake City, his wife was there to meet him and the reward for that summer separation and work was that they went through the Endowment House and were sealed by President Brigham Young. In 1866 Charles volunteered again and made his third trip to the Missouri. In the three trips, he donated eighteen months to the service of bringing the poor of the Church to Utah. 0n his last trip across the plains an accident came near costing Charles his life. The ox-team caravan was crossing the Platte River and Charles' wagon was carrying thirty kegs of gunpowder. He had crossed the river safely and was pulling up the steep bank, when lightning struck his lead cattle, killing them in their tracks. The electric current followed the hitch chain back to the wagon killing three more oxen and setting the wagon on fire. Charles was stunned and lay in gravest danger from the powder. David Bullock, following close behind, took in the situation and rushed to give assistance. A good shake brought Charles to his senses and then the two boys worked furiously to unload the powder before the fire reached it. They succeeded in removing this hazard and then extinguishing the fire. The five dead oxen were replaced from the surplus herd and Charles was able to bring his load safely through to Salt Lake City. During the 1870's a great wave of interest in cooperative enterprises swept the Church. All through the settlements, cooperatives were organized Co-op stores, Co-op sheepherds and cattleherds and the United Order. In Parowan, Charles Adams entered actively into the spirit of this movement and his native good sense soon brought him to leadership in all these commercial and social enterprises. He became president and manager of the Co-op Store, president and manager of the Co-op Sheep Company, and a director in all the others. He served on the appraisement committee in all these enterprises because the people had confidence in his judgment and fairness. June 21, 1885, the two wards which had operated for many years in Parowan were disorganized and a new ward, incorporating the whole city, was set up. Charles Adams was selected to preside as bishop over the united ward, a position he held with success and honor for seventeen years. This calling placed a great responsibility upon him and developed many of the personal characteristics that later distinguished him. He became a scripturalist, doctrinarian, an exemplar, and a wise philosopher. In tense situations, native wit was often a saving grace. At such times he spoke in short, laconic sentences. Asked by Francis M. Lyman why he always gave a glowing report of his people in conference, his quick answer was, "Catch more flies with molasses than vinegar." Once in a Sunday School parents class the subject under discussion was responsibility of parents for teaching their children. The discussion became pretty one-sided against the parents. If parents were to blame and the children did wrong and went to hell the parents would go with them. The bishop sat still and silent as long as he could; then he arose and with arms raised as high as he could reach he heaved the subject back to a saner balance with this broadside, "Don't believe it, don't believe it, don't believe a word of it. Lord's got more bad boys than I have. Don't expect to go to Hades to find the Lord." The ponderous hands came down with a wide clinching swing. These human qualities, together with his great faith endeared him to his people and they elected him to every office in city and county within their gift. In the many sided activities of churchman, bishop, high councilman, legislator, merchant, livestock man, farmer, school trustee, mayor, city councilman, county commissioner, philosopher and all-round good citizen, his energy and native intelligence elevated him to prominence, to leadership and to the love and confidence of those he served. Charles. Adams passed away in December 1927. -By William R. Palmer. Source: OUR PIONEE HERITAGE Volume 13page 319-323 THE ADAMS RANCH AT THE CO-OP VALLEY In 1869 the Adams brothers, James J., Hugh L., William and Thomas, formed a Company, with their mother, Mary Ann Adams, as head of the Company. James J. Adams says, "We had lots of cattle and decided to go into the dairy business. We sent for a big 110 gallon cheese vat and some big cheese presses. I sent for instructions on how to make cheese and we tested out two different methods. We liked the one better than the cheddar process. We started to ranch at the Co-op Valley in the early 70's. We took up the land in the valley as a homestead but failed on it, so we bought 160 acres at $1.25 per acre. The water ran from the Hoosier on down past Scoguards, then down through the narrows into the Co-op Valley, forming a big lake, at the foot of the Sink Hill, where it mysteriously disappeared. The Co-op Valley got its name from the Parowan Co-op Cattle Co. After a few years the Hoosier reservoir was built by putting a dam across the east end of the Meadow. This was built by the Adams brothers and John Henderson. The reservoir was stocked with mountain trout. Some of them grew so big that they would stick out on either side of a dishpan. John Henderson was the one who spent a lot of time and effort to get it well stocked with mountain trout. About 1880 Mary Ann Adams took a big cheese up to Salt Lake City for the State Fair, and took 1st prize. They cut it to test it out and it was so good that it didn't last long. Everyone just helped themselves to it. She intended to give it to Clarisa Smith Williams for her board and room. The ranch houses were clustered just below the spring hill, in the SE of the valley, housing the Adams Clan, from Aunt Sarann's and Aunt Mary's on the north, to Aunt Anna's and Aunt Juliette's on the south. They lived in the big company house, Aunt Anna on the south and Aunt Juliette on the north. The boys slept upstairs, climbing a big ladder. James J. and Caroline lived on the north side when they were there, but they didn't ranch as much as the others. Then there was the big milk house with the big vat and presses and milk shelves, for each family to set their Sunday's milk in the big milk pans for butter. This was before the days of separators. When the call of the hills got into their veins, away they'd hi for the summer, where the big vat was filled with milk and made into cheese, every day of the week, except Sundays. They'd take turn about, according to how much milk they got. Every morning there were cream biscuits for breakfast and how good they were, with plenty of butter and honey or molasses or elderberry jelly. The large meadow was a fine playground far all the boys and girls and many jolly hours were spent around a big bonfire, as they played hide and seek, or run sheep run, by the light of the moon, when the day's work was done. For children must help. So calves were herded in one end of the valley and the cows had to be hunted, sometimes, clear up to horse valley and brought home in time to milk. It was their nightly job to carry water from the spring, halfway up the hill to fill the bottom of the vat, to cool the milk so it wouldn't sour. Then when it was time to dip, the whey would be run off. The hot water was run off and again the bottom of the vat had to be filled with ice cold water from the spring, to cool the curd, so it wouldn't mat, before it went into the presses. It was here in the old meadow that the boys got their start at high jumping, pole vaulting and baseball and basketball, as the big bunch of cousins vied with each other to do their best. THE I. B. B. T. IRISH BASKETBALL TEAM About 1904 or 1905 the whole of Southern Utah went to Panguitch Lake, for a regular "Hot Time in the Old Town" for the 24th of July. A big basketball tournament was scheduled, with teams from all over this end of the State. The I.B.B.T. Irish Basketball Team of Adams Cousins, Morgan Adams, James L. Adams, Wm. L. Adams, Lawrence Adams and Charles Richards, beat everything hands down. Morgan, as their center champion, put the ball thru the basket, no matter how far away he was. He was champion center for the B.Y.U. for a number of years. CHARLES AND SARAH ANN ADAMS FAMILY May of the stories came ffrom The history of the Iron CountyMission, Parowan Utah the Mother Town

Memories of My Grandfather, Charles Adams

Contributor: Vaccine'd Up & Sorry to See Summer Go Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Charles Adams Charles Adams was born September 16, 1843, to William and Mary Ann Leach Adams in Hillsborough, County Down, Ireland. They had joined the Mormon Church in 1840. They left to come to America, January 20, 1844, from Liverpool, England. They arrived in New Orleans, March 1, 1844. They left for Nauvoo by boat up the Mississippi River and arrived, April 10, 1844. After working to earn money, they came to Utah. They were called by Brigham Young to leave with a company under George A. Smith to settle Parowan, December 7, 1850. Charles married Sarah Ann Davenport, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Burrows Davenport, March 31, 1863. He died December 1927 in Parowan, Utah. I remember Grandfather Adams so very well, and to think of him is to think of all the true stories that are lovingly told about him. He was truly an Irishman ful of wit and wisdom. The many stories are so colorful that they are always told and retold whenever the families would get together. There is never a dull moment when the time is spent telling of Grandfather's stories, and we never get tired of hearing and rehearing them. Grandfather held many positions in Parowan, responsible positions. Many people would go to him for advice. He was City Councilman, Mayor, and many other besides Bishop for many, many years. When he was at Sunday School, and they would ask questions. Even though his eyes were closed, and everyone thought he was asleep, up would go his hand to answer the questions. The teacher would say, "Brother Adams, we thought you were asleep." And he would promptly say, "A man is not always asleep when he has his eyes closed." And he would answer the question. I think of one of my favorite stories is when they were having a city councilman meeting and he was Mayor. They were to discuss the needs for a fence around the cemetary. After a little discussion, "Grandpa said,"Well, Let's see now. Why build a fence around the cemetary? Those that are in there can't get out and those that are out, don't want to get in." Some time later, however, a beautiful rock fence was built around the cemetary and it is very attractive. Grandfather loved to dance. He would walk forward from one corner of the dance hall to another and so forth, around the hall with his partner going backward all the way. I am glad that I had the privilege of dancing with hin many times, even though at the time I probably didn't really enjoy that method of dancing. I think that he danced with all the grandchildren when we were in our teens. One time when he was down to our place and we were all out side visiting as he was leaving. He asked me how old I was, and I said sixteen y ears. He said that I was just the same age and the size that grandma was when he married her. I really thought that was too young but they married much younger then. Written by Imogene A. Timmons

Life timeline of Charles Adams

1843
Charles Adams was born in 1843
Charles Adams was 16 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Charles Adams was 26 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Charles Adams was 36 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Charles Adams was 46 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Charles Adams was 51 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Charles Adams was 60 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Charles Adams was 69 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Charles Adams died in 1927 at the age of 84
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Charles Adams (1843 - 1927), BillionGraves Record 12002569 Parowan, Iron, Utah, United States

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