Cecil Oliver Poor

3 Jan 1898 - 23 May 1946

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Cecil Oliver Poor

3 Jan 1898 - 23 May 1946
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History of Cecil Oliver Poor By LeGrande C. Poor My father, Cecil Oliver Poor, was a great man and a great example for me. He was a man of integrity. He was the best friend a young boy could have. He was not afraid of work. He honored his priesthood. He paid his tithing. He showed by example what he
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Life Information

Cecil Oliver Poor

Born:
Married: 24 Oct 1923
Died:

Herriman Cemetery

6018 Heritage Hill Dr
Herriman, Salt Lake, Utah
United States
Transcriber

afoley

September 18, 2011
Photographer

Grampachoochoo

September 17, 2011

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Cecil Oliver Poor

Contributor: afoley Created: 7 months ago Updated: 7 months ago

History of Cecil Oliver Poor By LeGrande C. Poor My father, Cecil Oliver Poor, was a great man and a great example for me. He was a man of integrity. He was the best friend a young boy could have. He was not afraid of work. He honored his priesthood. He paid his tithing. He showed by example what he expected me to do. The two histories which I have included here were written by him in his own handwriting as was his diary which is also included. The story about my dad’s accident was written by Alice Morrey Bailey who was a nurse at the hospital. In her story she recalls how he was singing “It Ain’t Going to Rain No More No more” at the top of his voice when he arrived at the hospital. She later asked him why. He responded that he either had to sing or swear and he didn’t swear. She shared this with me when we worked together at the University of Utah and she found out that he was my father He grew up on a farm in Missouri. He attended Union Chapel Public School, District No. 55. His brothers Earl and Rollin are listed with him, together with nineteen others, in a publication of 1915. His father, needing him on the farm and took him out of school. All his life he regretted that he hadn’t had more education. He was self educated. He took every course offered where he worked such as first aid courses. He told me that if I didn’t turn out better than he did that he would consider himself a failure because I had and would have more opportunities that he did. That wish for me was the motivation to attend and graduate from college. In his papers is a letter of recommendation from W. B. Herron and is dated at Hunnewell, Mo. February 12, 1918. It is typed on what appears to be a letterhead although that part is not included. I suspect that W. B. Herron was associated with the local bank, although that is a guess on my part. The letter says: To Whom It May Concern:- This is to certify that I have known Cecil O. Poor for seventeen years. And gladly recommend him as a young man of good habits, honorable, honest, and worthy of confidence. /s/ W. B. Herron He enlisted in the U. S. Army in 1919. His history details where he served. In a communiqué dated April 5, 1922 entitled “Results of Inspection” he is complimented for his “neatness of dress and soldierly qualities in maintaining high standards in the discharge of duties to which assigned”. On June 29, 1929 he is given a pass to visit the city of Honolulu. The reason the pass was given is stated, “for his neatness of dress and soldierly qualities in maintaining high standard in the discharge of duties to which assigned”. These descriptions can be applied to everything he did during his life. It would appear that those of us who consider ourselves “perfectionists” can trace that trait to my dad. On December 19, 1919, my father sent a Christmas card to his family from Beresvoka, Siberia. He was proud of his service to his country. He joined an organization called the Veterans of Foreign Wars and was a member at the time of his death.. He originally came to Utah because of his health. He stayed with an Uncle, a half brother of his mother. I don’t think he was treated very well. From there he went to Herriman and worked on farms and ranches of people there. It was there that he and my mother met. He was waiting to be drafted when the armistice was signed. He later joined the Army and on his return he and my mother were married on October 23, 1923, in the Salt Lake Temple. The Hunnewell Graphic announced their marriage. Later in 1923 the Hunnewell Graphic reported that dad’s parents gave the newlyweds a dinner party. They were there on their honeymoon for a month. The party consisted of the brothers and sisters of dad’s mother and father and also friends. Dad told the story of how the train made an unscheduled stop in Hunnewell when he and Mom went there on their honeymoon. Apparently Hunnewell was not a scheduled stop. Dad told the conductor in no uncertain terms that he had been promised in Salt Lake that it would stop there so the conductor stopped the train. It was quite a sensation for the train to stop and especially for a local boy and his bride to get off the train. When I was drafted in World War II I asked to serve in the infantry because my father had. I was small and the infantry didn’t want me for which I since became grateful. I was placed in the Navy instead. Dad worked hard all his life to support his family. I was born in 1924 and my father was still recovering from a mine accident. Five years later came the depression. He and my mother raised their family during a very difficult time. At that time we were poor in more than name yet I didn’t know it. I have no memories of ever wanting for anything. I have many memories of him working. He worked in the mine at Lark, Utah. At the mine explosives came in wooden boxes. Occasionally he would bring some of those boxes home which we used in many ways. He was self employed for a period of time in a shoe repair business at Riverton. I remember visiting him there. I have a picture of him in the shoe shop. He had this shop from November, 1931 to August 1935. In October 1935 he was employed at the Lark mine. At the time he was injured he was working for the Ohio Copper Company. I was always of the opinion that he was a superman and could do anything. In 1943 he had to leave the mine because of his health and went to work for the Salt Lake and Utah Railroad Company. While working for them he was involved in a couple of accidents. One involved two freight engines colliding and in the other he was sideswiped by a Yellow Cab and injured. I recall during the depression that he took a job as a bookkeeper with the Civilian Conservation Corps, one of the New Deal programs. He did this to support his family. This meant that he was away for a long period of time. He did what he had to do even when he didn’t have an automobile. His diary records him walking to Riverton and back, a distance of five miles or more No one could have been more devoted to his family than he was. He was a part of my life until the day he died. He was active in scouts when Reg and I were scouts. He and my mother made us sleeping bags. In addition to putting them together, they would also waterproof them. He together with his brother Earl and my grandfather and others of the family invested in chickens. Us kids gathered eggs each night after school. He and the others, including us kids as we got older cleaned chicken coops, usually on holidays. My dad, when he would come home from the mine at night, would, during haying season, help my grandfather by hauling hay. He suffered from hemorrhoids and at times they were painful yet he still helped out. My mother would shuck corn for her father and receive a pig in return. When it was butchered my father would cure it. I recall him doing this in the “cellar” on our place. The house in which we lived was an old pioneer house with no built in closets. My father built closets in each bedroom and cupboards in the kitchen. A convert to the Church, he worked diligently in the positions to which he was called to serve. He was a charter subscriber to The New Improvement Era. He was a life member of the Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Association. His church service and ordination to offices in the priesthood are detailed in his history I recall on one occasion that the speakers in Sacrament Meeting were overly long, and another guy and I got up and left. We were sitting in this fellow’s car when the meeting ended. My dad came up to us an all he said was, “If they want to keep you guys interested they need to quit on time.” In May of l943 I left for the Navy in World War II. My mother told me that after they returned home from seeing me off at the train station that my father sat down with his head in his hands and sobbed. In 1946 I returned to the United States from the Philippines. We docked at San Francisco. I remember calling home from a pay phone on the dock. A strange voice answered the phone. When my father got on the phone I asked him who it was and he answered, “That was my good friend Dr. Sorenson” who had dropped in to see him. My dad was a friend to everyone. I am convinced that my father stayed alive until I got home from the Navy. Three weeks after I was discharged he had a heart attack and died on May 23, 1946. He was only 48 when he died. At the 50th reunion of my class at Jordan High School the daughter of the rural mail carrier that my dad would substitute for came up to me and told me that her father had the utmost respect for my father. My dad would schedule his vacation from the mine at the time that the mail carrier wanted to take his so he could substitute for him. That meant that my father never had a vacation. I recall on one occasion that Uncle Earl was going on the bus to Missouri to visit his parents and wanted my dad to go with him. My father felt that his family needed that money worse and so he didn’t go. One of my dad’s favorite quotations was this one by Abraham Lincoln, “You can fool some of the people all of the time…and all of the people some of the time…but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time My sister Elise told me about how my dad liked to have her play the song “Beautiful Dreamer” on the piano. She said, “Tonight I was playing Beautiful Dreamer and thought of my Dad and how much I played it for him on the piano before he died. I wondered what he thought about when it was played.” She also told me of how my dad, when he was working on the railroad, would come home with sheet music for the piano for her. It didn’t cost much by today’s standards perhaps 5 or 10 cents, but he sacrificed in order for her to have it. Much of what follows comes from records he kept himself. I have inserted explanatory remarks where appropriate. The following was taken from a green looseleaf notebook that had this note on the cover, “Cecil 0. Poor, Private File, 701”. This was in Dad’s own handwriting. Cecil Oliver Poor, son of Arthur D. Poor and Mary E. Whitelock born January 3, 1898, at Hunnewell, Shelby County, Missouri. Baptized July 6, 1919, by Elder Orrin R. Freeman, and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, July 6, 1919 by Elder Samuel Butterfield. Ordained a Deacon, November 6, 1922, by Thomas Butterfield. Teacher, February 5, 1923 by Joseph H. Crump. Priest, August 12, 1923 by Thomas Butterfield. Elder, September 30, 1923 by Arthur W. Crane. Seventy, October 29, 1933 by Levi Edgar Young at West Jordan “Line of ordination of Cecil 0. Poor to the Office of Seventy in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints” The Prophet Joseph ordained Joseph Young a Seventy on February 28, 1835. Joseph Young ordained Edmund Ellsworth a seventy on March 8, 1843. Edmond Ellsworth ordained Seymour B. Young a seventy on February 18, 1857. Seymour B. Young ordained Levi Edgar Young a seventy on June 18, 1897. Levi Edgar Young ordained Cecil 0. Poor a seventy on October 29, 1933. Levi Edgar Young was ordained one of the First seven Presidents of Seventy on January 23, 1910; by Apostle John Henry Smith. John Henry Smith was ordained an Apostle on October 27, 1880 by Apostle Wilford Woodruff. Wilford Woodruff was ordained an Apostle on April 26, 1893 at Far West, Missouri by Brigham Young. Brigham Young was ordained an Apostle on February 14, 1835, by David Whitmer, one of the Three Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, and the ordination was confirmed at the same time by the First Presidency of the Church, then Joseph Smith, Jr., Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams. Joseph Smith, Jr., was ordained an Apostle under the hands of Peter, James and John, sometime in June, 1829. Peter, James and John was ordained Apostles by the Lord, Jesus Christ. (St. John XV) (From Line of Ordination of Levi Edgar Young) Became a Life Member of the Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Association of the Herriman Ward, (Jordan Stake) 29 September 1923, Later changed to West Jordan Stake. Served until September 1, 1929) (Second Life Member of Ward —John A. Butterfield First) Heber J. Grant First Life member of Church 1918) Was set apart as Ward Secretary of the M.I.A. 1 September 1924 by George J. Miller and served as such until 1 September 1929. Member of the Geneological Society 1 September 1924. Second assistant to Heber Butterfield Chairman of the Herriman Ward Society 1926. First Assistant to Lafe Crane, Chairman of the Society, 15 October 1927.Member of the Genealogical Society 1924, Ward Teacher since 1924. Chairman of Genealogical Society May 3, 1931. Second Counselor to Thomas T. Freeman, President of the 5th Quorum of Elders. Secretary of 5th Quorum of Elders of the West Jordan Stake, Herriman Ward, also acting Secretary. Set apart 17 December 1929 as secretary of the Fifth Quorumof Elders of the West Jordan Stake, Herriman Ward with John A. Miller as President, Alonzo H. Freemen 1st Counselor and C. Earl Poor 2nd Counselor. Charter Subscriber to The New Improvement Era September 23, 1929. Was called as Acting Secretary of the 94th Quorum of Seventy. First Assistant Superintendent to Parley P. Butterfield of the Herriman Sunday School, Win. Henry Butterfield as 2nd Assistant. Have taken part in all ward activites. Attended meetings all the time except when my work did not permit. 1939 Was asked by Bishop Milton Bodell to be Secretary of the Aaronic Priesthood Committee. Relieved as Ward Teacher. Was called to act as Chairman of the Aaronic Priesthood Committee of the Herriman Ward 1 January 1939. Chairman Ward Scout Committee 1 Jan 1940. Cecil O. Poor, Chairman George K, Parry Committeeman Harold S. Swasey “ James Art Miller Scoutmaster Russel Parker, Assistant Scoutmaster With the following boys in troop 138. George R. Butterfield, Senior Patrol Leader Reginald A. Poor, Patrol Leader (Rattlesnake) Lowell J. Parry, Patrol Leader (Flying Eagle) Richard J. Christensen Ass’t P.L. (Rattlesnake) Julian J. Foreman, Ass’t P.L. (Flying Eagle) John W. Eastman, J. Woodruff Butterfield, Merrell L. Butterfield, E. Grant Butterfield, Wallace R. Butterfield, Roy S. Christensen, Everett T. Parry. Called and registered as Troop Committeeman (Chairman) Troop 138. Reached the rank of (Star Scout) (BSA). 1941 Reregistered —138. Released as 1st Asst. to Parley P. Butterfield in Sunday School. From a personal record sheet in Dad’s handwriting: “Attended public schools at Union Chapel and Kendall, eight years – Two years High School at Hunnewell High School. Vocation: 1. Clerical work 2. Mining 3. Shoe repairing 4. Sub. R.F.D. carrier Church Positions: 1. Life member of Y.M.M.I.A.-Sept 29, 1923 2. Secretary of MIA 3. Member of Genealogical Society of Ward 4. Ward Teacher 5. Second Counselor 5 Quorum of Elders 6. Secretary of 5 Quorum of Elders 7. Chairman of Geneological Society 8. Secretary of 94 Quorum of Seventy 9. First Assistant Supt. Of Herriman S.S. 10. Secretary of Aaronic Priesthood committee. Places of residence: Lived at Hunnewell, Missouri; Shelbina, Missouri, Springville, Spanish Fork, Lehi, Utah. Am making my home at Herriman.” Autobiography of Cecil Oliver Poor (From his green binder) Cecil Oliver Poor, eldest son of Arthur 0. Poor and Mary E. Whitelock Poor, born Jan 3rd 1898 about 2 1/2 miles southwest of Hunnewell, Shelby County, Missiouri, on what was known as the Old Cox Place. My education consisted of eight years in the grade schools of Union Chapel #55 and Kendall School, and two years in the Hunnewell High School. My first teacher in the Grade School was Otha Rivercombs, a son of Aunt Rebecka Ribercombs. I worked around Hunnewell, Missouri, until 1917. I came to Utah 1917, arrived in Provo, Utah Sept 9, 1917. Went to work at Spanish Fork for the L. A. & S. L. R. R. on September 10, 1917. Worked for the Company at Spanish Fork until November 1917 and moved to Lehi and stayed there until the following summer when I came to Herriman. (This was sometime in June, 1918) and went to work for Bishop Franklin T. Crane on the ranch. Worked for Bishop Crane until just before the last draft for the Worlds War. I went back to Hunnewell, Shelby County, Missouri to register for the last draft, 18 to 45. I registered at Shelbina, Missouri about twelve miles west of Hunnewell. Registration Certificate To Whom It May Concern, Greetings. These Presents Attest, That in accordance with the proclamation of the President of the United States, and in compliance with law, Cecil Oliver Poor, 300 N. Center Street, Shelbina, Missouri, has submitted himself to registration and has by me been duly registered this 12th day of Sept. 1918. Under the supervision of the Local Board on the back hereof. Local Board of the County by J. A. Daniel of Shelby, State of Mo. Registrar Shelbyville, Mo. I was called on November 11, 1918 to leave for camp at Waco, Texas, but did not leave as the Armistice was signed on that date. I worked around home for a few months for different ones picking corn. I came back to Utah arriving at Lehi on January 20, 1919 and worked a few months for the railroad company coming to Herriman again in the spring of 1919 and went to work for William A. Crane on his ranch southwest of Herriman. On July 6, 1919, I was baptized by Orrin R. Freeman and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Samuel Butterfield. I worked for W. A. Crane until August 4, 1919 when I quit and went to Salt Lake City, Utah and applied for enlistment in the United States Army for Service in Siberia with the A. E. F. and the 27th U. S. Infantry. Enlisted on August 7, 1919 at the (Presidio) of San Francisco, California. After eight days of camp duty, August 15, 1919, I set sail with my comrads for Vladivostok, Siberia on the United States Army Transport Logan (an old cattle boat) by the way of Honolulu, H.T. Arrived at Vladivostok, Siberia September 6, 1919. After a few weeks at the Old Balloon Shed, we went by train (Side Door Pullman) inland to Beresovka, Siberia, Eight miles west of Verkhine, Udinsk. We were stationed here several months. The winter being long and cold. On January 4 and 5, 1920 engaged in the Battle of Mukheens (Moocheeno). While stationed at Beresovka we went to Lake Baikal and the land that is known as the south end of the land of the midnight sun. While stationed in Beresovka our duty consisted of guard duty, cutting wood to keep the barracks warm. Our barracks were about two hundred feet long and about thirty feet wide. They were built of brick. The walls were doubled with an air surface between them. An eight inch wall on the outside with an air space of about six inch and an eight inch wall on the inside, making a wall of twenty two inches. There were twelve or fourteen stoves in each building. These stoves were about six feet in diameter, made of brick, with boiler plate on the outside. The brick sides were about eighteen inches thick, the firebox about three feet with an eighteen inch fire door and a twelve inch door to take the ashes out. The wood was cut twenty-four inches long. The buildings were of one story construction and the fires were kept burning day and night. After arriving at Beresovka these buildings were whitewashed inside and outside. There were about thirty of these buildings in the camp. Some were officers quarters, hospital building, Post Canteen (or store) Regimental Headquarters, Y.M.C.A. and K. of C. buildings and the Red Cross had a building. The boys were treated best by the K. of C. Although a Catholic organization what they had they gave freely. The other organization had plenty but you had to pay for it. After January 4 and 5 everything was pretty quiet. Plenty of snow and cold weather. Our clothing consisted of woolen underwear, 0. D. uniforms, fur caps, mits, and sheep lined coats. On January 16, 1920, we marched from Beresovka to Verkhnie, Udinsk a distance of eight miles with a full war time equipment. Rifle, one hundred rounds of ammunition, hand grenades. Dress in woolens. If you don’t think this is fun you should try it sometime. After arriving at Verkhine, Udinsk we boarded the side door pullman and started for Vladivostok. Here we went into camp for a few weeks. On March 10, 1920, we set sail for Manila, P. I. on board the U. S. A. T. Thomas by the way of Nagasaki, Japan, arriving at Manila on March 17, 1920, Saint Patrick Day. We went into camp at Camp Thomas H. Barry for twenty one days. These twenty one days seemed like years. It was hard to get used to the change as it was so hot there, going from one extreme to another. Our duty there was very light. After twenty one days we went into camp at Cuartel De Infanteria. While stationed at Manila our duty consisted of the usual garrison duty, training, guard duty and rest. I was at nearly every town on the island of Luzon - Fort William McKinley, Corregidor. Our amusement consisted of the very best picture shows, sports of all kinds, swimming in the ocean where the jelly fishes were as thick as flees and the size ranged from the size of a dollar to fourteen inches in diameter. While stationed at Manila, P. I., I took leave and seen parts of China and Japan. Tinsin, China, where the 15th U. S. Infantry is stationed, Peking China, where a detachment of the Marine Corps is stationed, the Great Wall of China and other parts of China and Japan. Our clothing was very light. olive drab cotton uniform, B.V.D., cotton shirts and campaign hats with light blue cord. Our stay at Manila was enjoyed by all. On December 15, 1920, we packed up our troubles in our old barracks bags and boarded the U.S.A.T. Thomas and leaving Manila and the islands behind never to see again, we sailed for the Hawaiian Islands, the place of paradise, arriving at Honolulu on January 4, 1921. On this trip we celebrated New Year’s eve twice on account of crossing the time line. After we got off of the transport we walked about one mile to the railroad and boarded the train for Schofield Barracks, twenty five miles from Honolulu. We arrived there after dark greeted only by a cold dismal rain. But this was just an incident in the life of a soldier, and we quickly accustomed ourselves to the new surroundings. My stay in the Hawaiian Islands was a very pleasant one. My duty consisted of duty in the Company Headquarters, Regimental Headquarters and Department Headquarters, Detachment of the Hawaiian Department as clerical worker. On March 9, 1921, I went with my company to Fort Shafter and remained there until July 2, 1921, returning to Schofield Barracks. After returning to Schofield Barracks I was detailed on special duty at Regimental Headquarters as clerk mimeograph operator. At this duty I remained until I left for the U.S.A. for discharge. On July, 1922, after bidding a faire adieu to my comrades, the gang plank was pulled and we steamed out and started for the U.S.A., arriving at Fort McDowell, California in August, 1922. On August 8, 1922 I received an Honorable Discharge from the U. S. Army completing 3 years and 2 days service. After being discharged I started for Utah, arriving in Salt Lake City on the Western Pacific August 12, 1922, returning to Herriman and going to work for Thomas S. Butterfield. I was advanced through the Aaronic Priesthood to the Office of an Elder in the Melchizedek Priesthood. On October 24, 1923 was married in the Salt Lake Temple to Fannie Fern Miller by George F. Richards, a gal that I had known since 1918 while working for Bishop F. T. Crane. After an extended trip through the east we returned to Herriman to make our home. On January 7, 1924 I went to work for the Ohio Copper Company at Lark, Utah. On May 16, 1924 at 12:30 a.m. while working as motorman I was hurt and did not return to work until October 1924. I worked for the company until March 1, 1931. On that date I was laid off due to a shut down. On November 27, 1931 I rented a shoe equipment at Riverton and repaired shoes for four years, selling out my business in October 12, 1935. I went to work for the U. S. Smelting Refining and Mining Company on that date, at which place I am still working as a lineman. At various times since 1931 I have carried the mail on R.F.D. #1. Since February 17, 1938, I have been a Bonded Substitute carrier. I carried the U. S. Mail on Route #1 for 13 months. After spending a 10 day vacation in Idaho with LeGrande, I went to work for the Combine Mines and Metal Co. at Butterfield Canyon, staying there until May 32, 1944. Left the mines on Dr. Paul S. Richards advice to get out of the mines. Went to work for the S. L. & U. R. R. - Orem Line - on June 3, 1944, as a trolleyman, brakeman. Made a conductor on November 6, 1944. On April 21 at 11:40 p.m. while working at 14th south and 2nd west I was hurt by a car, (Yellow Cab) side swiping my train, cutting my leg receiving a friction burn which has laid me up from April 21 to the present time. Still off. In 1938 my father Cecil 0. Poor started a diary. It covers the period from January 1, 1938 until April 10, 1938 It was hand written in a small five year diary with four lines for each date and five years of that date on a page. January 1, 1938 Up at 11:30 on night shift. Took children to Lark for Athletic Party supper with Ray and Mabelle. January 2, 1938 Sunday - Up 8:30 Sunday School - meeting - S. S. Board Meeting. Came home after Xmas holidays with Geo. J.Miller & family. January 3, 1938 Borned at Hunnewell, Mo. Monday - Birthday - Up 6 a.m. helped Fern get started to wash. Went to Riverton. Walked back. Worked night shift. - “Presents”. January 4, 1938 Up at Noon. Went Ward Teaching for Dec. Weather good. - no snow. All well. Night shift. January 5, 1938 Up at noon — Fern went to lecture at school house. No snow. Weather still warm. Night shift. Income tax returns came. January 6, 1938 Up at noon. Fern went Relief Society teaching. Weather is cold & Cloudy. No snow. January 7, 1938 Up noon. Weather hazy around mountains. Sun tries to shine at times. Warmer no snow. Last night of night shift — $5.55 January 8, 1938 Up-10-. Weather cloudy. Temperature changeable. Very little snow. January 9, 1938 Sunday. Officers and Teachers Prayer meeting. S.S. Union meeting. Sacrament meeting. January 10, 1938 Day shift. Pay day. Priesthood meeting and Gen. Society. January 11, 1938 Day shift. Union meeting at Lark. M.I.A. meeting. Practice play after meeting. January 12, 1938 Day shift. Utah Poultry banquet and dance. Weather warm-no snow. January 13, 1938 Thursday went to farewell party for Ceo. J. Miller and Walter E. Crane at ward house. January 14, 1938 Friday. Half of day shift in. Weather nice and pleasant. No snow. January 15, 1938 Saturday. Salt Lake City. Paid Ins — got tires. Filed income tax return. Cloudy, rained. Practiced play over home 8 p.m. January 16, 1938 Sunday. Partly cloudy, colder, no snow. S School MIA U meeting. Sac. meeting. January 17, 1938 Monday. Cloudy, light rain and snow. Priesthood meeting. Practice play over home. January 18, 1938 Tuesday. MIA show at school auditorium. Cloudy, warmer, no snow. January 19, 1938 Wednesday. Partly cloudy. Very little snow. Went to show at Lark. January 20, 1938 Thursday. Fair and warmer. No snow. Went to practice. January 21, 1938 Friday. Went teaching - District #8. Weather good. No snow. Last day of day shift. January 22, 1938 Saturday. Clear and warm. Went to Riverton — Midvale. Got lumber for cupboard. January 23, 1938 Sunday. Cloudy stormed a little all day. Light snow with strong north and west wind. Usual Sunday meetings. January 24, 1938 Monday. Night shift. Colder, no snow - clear. Worked on cupboard. January 25, 1938 Tuesday Pay day. Weather condition same as Monday. Worked on cupboard. 54.30 Old Age Tax .54 Hasp. 1.00=52.76 January 26, 1938 Wednesday Warmer, clear no snow. Up at noon. January 27, 1938 Thursday. Still clear, no snow, colder. Worked on cupboard. Up at noon. 18’ in 200 drift-6344- 56 shaft U. S. Mines. January 28, 1938 Friday One week of night shift in. Up at noon. Worked on cupboard. Clear and warmer. January 29, 1938 Saturday Warmer, snow very lift, melting fast. Up 10:30, breakfast with family. January 30, 1938 Sunday Weather warmer, no storm. Went to Sunday School convension. January 31, 1938 Monday. Weather moderate, cloudy. Temperature moderate, no storm. February 1, 1938 Tuesday - Colder, snowing when we came home at 4 p.m. Snowed and rained most all day. February 2, 1938 Wednesday. Clear in morning Cloudy and a little colder afternoon. Snow all gone. February 3, 1938 Thursday -Snow, about 7 inches. Started at 1:30 in the morning. No wind. Had quite a time getting home fr. Lark. February 4, 1938 Friday Weather warmer. Snowing melting fast. February 5, 1938 Saturday -Weather is still good, snow still going. February 6, 1938 Sunday - Up early went to S.S. and S.M. Practice at 2 p.m. Conjoint meeting 6:30. February 7, 1938 Monday - Day shift. Weather warmer. No storm, snow going into the ground. Practiced play at school auditorium. February 8, 1938 Tuesday. - Very little change in temperature. No storm, cloudy. The play entitled “Big Brother” presented M.I.A. February 9, 1938 Wednesday - Weather good, snow all gone. Went to show with boys. February 10, 1938 Thursday - “Pay Day” Very little change in weather. 61.05 U 1.00 Ath .25 Tax .61 = $59.19 February 11, 1938 Friday - Came home from work. Elise has the scarlet fever. Getting along fine. February 12, 1938 Saturday- (no entry) (No entries made from February 12 to February 24) February 25, 1938 Friday - Pay Day 58.05 Hosp 1.00 Tax .58 = $56.47 (No entries made from February 26 to March 9) March 10, 1938 Tuesday - 49.35 U.D. $1.00 Ath .25 Tax .49 = $47.61 (No entries made March 11,12 and 13) March 14, 1938 Monday - Came home from work at 4 p.m. The Dr. had been up and said Reggie has the scarlet fever. Elise had been out 1 week. March 15, 1938 Reggie has been pretty sick, is broke out more than Elise was but is getting along fine. March 16, 1938 Everyone is getting along fine. March 17, 1938 Everyone feeling better. Snow storm during the morning. March 18, 1938 Everyone feeling better. Last day of day shift. March 19, 1938 Saturday - Everyone getting along pretty good. March 20, 1938 Sunday - Everyone feeling better. Storm Sunday evening and night. March 21, 1938 Monday Night shift. Reggie has been in one week. Cold and stormy. March 22, 1938 Everyone getting along pretty good. March 23, 1938 All feeling better March 24, 1938 Everyone better March 25, 1938 Wednesday Golden has S. Fever. Gave Ray $5 on piano. 61.05= Hosp 1.00 Tax .61 = 59.44 March 26, 1938 Everyone getting along pretty good. March 27, 1938 All are better March 28, 1938 Everyone getting along pretty good. March 29, 1938 Everyone feeling better. March 30. 1938 Everyone feeling better. March 31, 1938 Everyone are feeling better. April 1, 1938 1899 Fern’s birthday. She did not have a very good birthday. Elise had Louise make a cake for her to give Fern. April 2, 1938 Saturday Everyone getting along fine. April 3, 1938 Sunday. Gen. conference. No S.S. Everyone getting along pretty good. April 4, 1938 Reggie was released to go to school on the 11. Legrande went back to school today. Day shift. Elise came home. April 5, 1938 Stormy weather Everyone getting along pretty good. April 6, 1938 Stormy weather. Everyone feeling fine. April 7, 1938 Thursday - 18 feet this week. Weather has improved. Everyone fine. April 8, 1938 Friday April 9, 1938 Saturday Pay day April 10, 1938 Sunday Diary ends. At the end of the diary my dad had created a chart which I have reproduced here. It is a record of his income from January 10, 1938 until September 24, 1938. 1938 # UD Hosp Ath Tax 1-10 3/9 5683 12-31-37 63.00 12 @ 5 1/4 3.00 .25 .63 59.12 1-25 “ 6002 1-15-38 54.30 6 @ 555=4 @ 5 1/4 1.00 .54 52.76 2-10 “ 6319 1-31-38 61.05 11-555 1.00 ,25 .61 59.19 2-25 “ 6635 2-15-38 58.05 1.00 .58 56.47 3-10 “ 6948 2-28-38 49.35 2 @ 5 1/4 7@ 555 1.00 .25 .49 47.61 3-25 “ 7267 3-15-38 61.05 11 @ 555 1.00 .61 59.44 4-9 “ 7580 3-31-38 66.60 12 @ 555 1.00 .25 .67 64.68 4-25 “ 7881 4-15-38 61.05 11 @ 555 1.00 .61 59.44 5-10 “ 8180 4-30-38 55.20 10 555-30c 1.00 ,25 ,55 53.40 5-25 “ 8479 5-15-38 55.50 10 555 1.00 .56 53.94 6-10 “ 8774 5-31-38 66.60 12-555 1.00 .25 .67 64.68 6-25 “ 9068 6-15-38 61.05 11-555 1.00 .61 59.44 7-9 “ 9360 6-30-38 58.30 11-530 1.00 .25 .58 56.17 7-22 “ 9647 7-15 58.30 1.00 .58 56.72 8-10 “ 9936 7-31-38 53. 1.00 .25 .53 51.22 8-25 “ 9-10 “ 10508 8-31 65.10 1.00 .25 .65 63.20 9-24 “ 10791 9-15-38 56.18 1.00 .56 54.62 10-10 The large column is his record of the number of days worked times the rate per day. For instance, the first entry indicates that he worked 12 days in that period at $5.25 per day. UD is union dues. Hosp is health insurance and Ath is the employee activity fee. The last column is his take home pay for two weeks While I attended the University of Utah, I worked as secretary for the University Research Committee. Carl J. Christensen was chairman of the committee for part of the time I worked there. In his office was another woman, Alice Morrey Bailey. In finding out my name she wanted to know if I was related to Cecil 0. Poor. When I informed her he was my father she said she had been a nurse at the Bingham Canyon Hospital when my father was taken there after an injury at the Lark Mine. She told me about events when he was brought there. I asked her to tell me about it and she provided this story. This event occurred before I was born on October 1, 1924. I recall hearing that my dad was on crutches when I was born. He and my mother were living with her parents at the time. CECIL 0. POOR by Alice Morrey Bailey “There’s been an accident at the mine. Send the doctor quick.” This message received at the Bingham Canyon Hospital in the wee hours of night in late 1923 or early 1924, set in motion a chain of routine events. I was the night nurse in this twenty-five bed hospital at that time. (I worked there from October 1923 to September 1924, so it had to be in that time span.) After I had called Dr. Paul Richards, who lived across the street, I set about getting treatments and medicines due the patients in order to get them out of the way for emergency. It was not long coming. “Get Mrs. Howe and the operating room nurses up. We’re bringing in a man who is badly injured. He will have to have surgery.” This was the message from the mine, the instructions from Dr. Richards. I did as he told me, went around and closed all doors to the rooms of the patients and it was not long until I heard the siren coming down the canyon. The hospital, in those days, was owned by Dr. Straup, who also headed the Salt Lake County Hospital. It was operated for the benefit of the U. S. Mine, and I believe the Highland Boy. Utah Copper (later Kennecott Copper), had an emergency station manned by Dr. Frazier and an interne. Their patients were then sent to the St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake City for further treatment as needed. You never know what to expect in a hospital where emergency is routine. Certainly not what came with the patient, who was singing at the top of his lungs: “Oh, it ain’t a goin’ to rain no more, no more.” What was this? delirium? At any rate we set to cutting the carbide-smelling clothes off the patient, who gave his name loudly and firmly as “Cecil 0. Poor.” He had been caught between an ore car and a timber in the depths of the mine, and his abdomen was ripped open from his right rib-cage to his left hip, a gash that widened to several inches. Parts of his intestines were protruding out of about a two—inch incision into his belly. It was determined that his pelvis was also fractured. He disappeared into the operating room and was there a considerable amount of time. I was probably off duty when he came out, as I do not remember that, after his singing was quieted by anesthesia. I do remember that when I came on duty the next evening, a twelve—hour shift, from seven P.M. to seven A.M., he was in a private room his abdomen and he had a cast from his waist to his knees. It had only the crotch cut out, and this I remember well, because he had to be lifted onto the bedpan when necessary, and the nurse had to stay with him to hold him on, clean him and get him off. “Were you delirious the night you cane in?” I asked him when he had recovered from the shock and the surgery. “No! I had to either sing or swear, and I don’t swear.” Cecil was a model patient, undemanding under these difficult circumstances, and everyone in the hospital admired his cheerful spirit and his ability to recover. At the same time we had another patient named Joe Bannock, who had come in with a cut finger some weeks before. The finger would not heal, and Wasserman tests revealed that he had syphilis. First his finger had to amputated, then his hand, and so on, until his whole left arm had to be taken. “That is the difference.” said Dr. Richards. “There is Cecil Poor, a clean—living kid who has never taken anything into his body to harm it. And there is Joe, a dirty, scummy fellow who stops at nothing. Can’t even survive a cut finger, while Poor is bounding back to health after his ordeal.” Cecil was responsible for my losing my job on one occasion, due to no fault of his own. I had two floors to care for, the private and semi—private rooms upstairs, and the wards downstairs. I got pretty adept at negotiating the stairs. In one of the downstairs wards there were about fourteen people with broken backs and these were in traction, plus one fellow named Bray who was in for a minor infection. This infection required ice packs, and he was a demanding fellow, as he was a foreman and liked to use that leverage to throw his weight around. He did not wait until his ice bag ceased to be cold to ask for more ice, and one night started to ring his bell for attention. I had just answered a call to Cecil, a bedpan call, and there was nothing I could do about the bell. Bray kept his finger on that bell, ringin9 it constantly for the next half hour while I was attending Poor. Eventually I appeared in the doorway of the ward and the ice bag hit me in the chest. “Why didn’t you answer my bell?” asked Bray. “You’ve been off in some corner asleep. I’ll get your job for this.” Well, only the day before I had been commended highly because I had closed the doors the night Poor came in, and even his singing didn’t arouse the hospital. “If it had been any other nurse on duty that night, the whole hospital would have been jumping.” I felt pretty proud of that commendation, glad to be the night nurse entrusted with a great deal of responsibility for a girl of twenty. I explained to Mr. Bray as best I could what had happened, but he did not believe me, insisted that I had been off sleeping somewhere. Dr. Straup was coming out that day and Mr Bray told him about the incident, demanded that I be fired. He would accept no quarter on the matter, said he would demand to be transferred to another hospital and raise Hell with the industrial commission. was called on the carpet by Dr. Straup. When I told him what had really occurred, he said placatingly: “Well, let’s change you to days and put you on another floor, let him think you are fired.” That didn’t suit me at all, not after just having been voted Best Night nUrse. I told Dr. Straup I would quit. I would not go on days, nor be put in another situation. I felt that it was Mr. Bray who was at fault, and the hospital should back me u~. I can see it was a hard place for Dr. Straup. He took it under advisement and went back to duty as usual. I told the patients it was my last night and bade them goodbye. Those patients in Mr. Bray’s ward had heard the whole thing, so came to my defense in a body. When Dr. Straup came in to see them they told him that if I was fired they would all demand to be transferred to a Salt Lake City Hos~ita1. One after the other told of my kindness and efficiency in their behalf, so the hard place became harder for Dr. Straup. He assured them that I was not being fire, that I was resigning instead, but they would have none of it. They said that Bray was a trouble—maker an had caused ill feelings all around. The upshot of it was that Mr. Bray was discharged, as he was well enough already to go home and continue his ice packs as long as he cared to. Dr. Straup called me into the office again and asked me if I was not happy there. I said yes I was, except that I had a very hot room in which to sleep, and had been promised a raise in wages which had not come through. I got a five dollar raise, from $25.00 per week to $30. I was also given a more suitable room. Well, of course, this was nothing to do with Cecil 0. Poor except that he acted as a catalyst for it. He was moved into that same ward and bolstered my statement that I was really attending him on the night in question. I never forgot him, for he was a fine LDS young man, willing to defend his gospel among those people from all over the world, who comprised that ward. Many were the discussions held among those patients, and they admired Cecil as much as the staff did. Imagine my surprise many years later, while working at the University of Utah, to meet LeGrande Poor a son of Cecil, and to quickly establish that they were related. was secretary to Dr. C. J. Christensen, by this time, and LeGrande was the secretary of the graduate students or research students, as I remember. I met his sister, learned of his family and that his father had been dead many years, never having fully recovered from the awful injuries suffered in that mine accident.

Cecil Oliver Poor

Contributor: StoneScriber Created: 7 months ago Updated: 1 month ago

History of Cecil Oliver Poor By LeGrande C. Poor My father, Cecil Oliver Poor, was a great man and a great example for me. He was a man of integrity. He was the best friend a young boy could have. He was not afraid of work. He honored his priesthood. He paid his tithing. He showed by example what he expected me to do. The two histories which I have included here were written by him in his own handwriting as was his diary which is also included. The story about my dad’s accident was written by Alice Morrey Bailey who was a nurse at the hospital. In her story she recalls how he was singing “It Ain’t Going to Rain No More No more” at the top of his voice when he arrived at the hospital. She later asked him why. He responded that he either had to sing or swear and he didn’t swear. She shared this with me when we worked together at the University of Utah and she found out that he was my father He grew up on a farm in Missouri. He attended Union Chapel Public School, District No. 55. His brothers Earl and Rollin are listed with him, together with nineteen others, in a publication of 1915. His father, needing him on the farm and took him out of school. All his life he regretted that he hadn’t had more education. He was self educated. He took every course offered where he worked such as first aid courses. He told me that if I didn’t turn out better than he did that he would consider himself a failure because I had and would have more opportunities that he did. That wish for me was the motivation to attend and graduate from college. In his papers is a letter of recommendation from W. B. Herron and is dated at Hunnewell, Mo. February 12, 1918. It is typed on what appears to be a letterhead although that part is not included. I suspect that W. B. Herron was associated with the local bank, although that is a guess on my part. The letter says: To Whom It May Concern:- This is to certify that I have known Cecil O. Poor for seventeen years. And gladly recommend him as a young man of good habits, honorable, honest, and worthy of confidence. /s/ W. B. Herron He enlisted in the U. S. Army in 1919. His history details where he served. In a communiqué dated April 5, 1922 entitled “Results of Inspection” he is complimented for his “neatness of dress and soldierly qualities in maintaining high standards in the discharge of duties to which assigned”. On June 29, 1929 he is given a pass to visit the city of Honolulu. The reason the pass was given is stated, “for his neatness of dress and soldierly qualities in maintaining high standard in the discharge of duties to which assigned”. These descriptions can be applied to everything he did during his life. It would appear that those of us who consider ourselves “perfectionists” can trace that trait to my dad. On December 19, 1919, my father sent a Christmas card to his family from Beresvoka, Siberia. He was proud of his service to his country. He joined an organization called the Veterans of Foreign Wars and was a member at the time of his death.. He originally came to Utah because of his health. He stayed with an Uncle, a half brother of his mother. I don’t think he was treated very well. From there he went to Herriman and worked on farms and ranches of people there. It was there that he and my mother met. He was waiting to be drafted when the armistice was signed. He later joined the Army and on his return he and my mother were married on October 23, 1923, in the Salt Lake Temple. The Hunnewell Graphic announced their marriage. Later in 1923 the Hunnewell Graphic reported that dad’s parents gave the newlyweds a dinner party. They were there on their honeymoon for a month. The party consisted of the brothers and sisters of dad’s mother and father and also friends. Dad told the story of how the train made an unscheduled stop in Hunnewell when he and Mom went there on their honeymoon. Apparently Hunnewell was not a scheduled stop. Dad told the conductor in no uncertain terms that he had been promised in Salt Lake that it would stop there so the conductor stopped the train. It was quite a sensation for the train to stop and especially for a local boy and his bride to get off the train. When I was drafted in World War II I asked to serve in the infantry because my father had. I was small and the infantry didn’t want me for which I since became grateful. I was placed in the Navy instead. Dad worked hard all his life to support his family. I was born in 1924 and my father was still recovering from a mine accident. Five years later came the depression. He and my mother raised their family during a very difficult time. At that time we were poor in more than name yet I didn’t know it. I have no memories of ever wanting for anything. I have many memories of him working. He worked in the mine at Lark, Utah. At the mine explosives came in wooden boxes. Occasionally he would bring some of those boxes home which we used in many ways. He was self employed for a period of time in a shoe repair business at Riverton. I remember visiting him there. I have a picture of him in the shoe shop. He had this shop from November, 1931 to August 1935. In October 1935 he was employed at the Lark mine. At the time he was injured he was working for the Ohio Copper Company. I was always of the opinion that he was a superman and could do anything. In 1943 he had to leave the mine because of his health and went to work for the Salt Lake and Utah Railroad Company. While working for them he was involved in a couple of accidents. One involved two freight engines colliding and in the other he was sideswiped by a Yellow Cab and injured. I recall during the depression that he took a job as a bookkeeper with the Civilian Conservation Corps, one of the New Deal programs. He did this to support his family. This meant that he was away for a long period of time. He did what he had to do even when he didn’t have an automobile. His diary records him walking to Riverton and back, a distance of five miles or more No one could have been more devoted to his family than he was. He was a part of my life until the day he died. He was active in scouts when Reg and I were scouts. He and my mother made us sleeping bags. In addition to putting them together, they would also waterproof them. He together with his brother Earl and my grandfather and others of the family invested in chickens. Us kids gathered eggs each night after school. He and the others, including us kids as we got older cleaned chicken coops, usually on holidays. My dad, when he would come home from the mine at night, would, during haying season, help my grandfather by hauling hay. He suffered from hemorrhoids and at times they were painful yet he still helped out. My mother would shuck corn for her father and receive a pig in return. When it was butchered my father would cure it. I recall him doing this in the “cellar” on our place. The house in which we lived was an old pioneer house with no built in closets. My father built closets in each bedroom and cupboards in the kitchen. A convert to the Church, he worked diligently in the positions to which he was called to serve. He was a charter subscriber to The New Improvement Era. He was a life member of the Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Association. His church service and ordination to offices in the priesthood are detailed in his history I recall on one occasion that the speakers in Sacrament Meeting were overly long, and another guy and I got up and left. We were sitting in this fellow’s car when the meeting ended. My dad came up to us an all he said was, “If they want to keep you guys interested they need to quit on time.” In May of l943 I left for the Navy in World War II. My mother told me that after they returned home from seeing me off at the train station that my father sat down with his head in his hands and sobbed. In 1946 I returned to the United States from the Philippines. We docked at San Francisco. I remember calling home from a pay phone on the dock. A strange voice answered the phone. When my father got on the phone I asked him who it was and he answered, “That was my good friend Dr. Sorenson” who had dropped in to see him. My dad was a friend to everyone. I am convinced that my father stayed alive until I got home from the Navy. Three weeks after I was discharged he had a heart attack and died on May 23, 1946. He was only 48 when he died. At the 50th reunion of my class at Jordan High School the daughter of the rural mail carrier that my dad would substitute for came up to me and told me that her father had the utmost respect for my father. My dad would schedule his vacation from the mine at the time that the mail carrier wanted to take his so he could substitute for him. That meant that my father never had a vacation. I recall on one occasion that Uncle Earl was going on the bus to Missouri to visit his parents and wanted my dad to go with him. My father felt that his family needed that money worse and so he didn’t go. One of my dad’s favorite quotations was this one by Abraham Lincoln, “You can fool some of the people all of the time…and all of the people some of the time…but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time My sister Elise told me about how my dad liked to have her play the song “Beautiful Dreamer” on the piano. She said, “Tonight I was playing Beautiful Dreamer and thought of my Dad and how much I played it for him on the piano before he died. I wondered what he thought about when it was played.” She also told me of how my dad, when he was working on the railroad, would come home with sheet music for the piano for her. It didn’t cost much by today’s standards perhaps 5 or 10 cents, but he sacrificed in order for her to have it. Much of what follows comes from records he kept himself. I have inserted explanatory remarks where appropriate. The following was taken from a green looseleaf notebook that had this note on the cover, “Cecil 0. Poor, Private File, 701”. This was in Dad’s own handwriting. Cecil Oliver Poor, son of Arthur D. Poor and Mary E. Whitelock born January 3, 1898, at Hunnewell, Shelby County, Missouri. Baptized July 6, 1919, by Elder Orrin R. Freeman, and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, July 6, 1919 by Elder Samuel Butterfield. Ordained a Deacon, November 6, 1922, by Thomas Butterfield. Teacher, February 5, 1923 by Joseph H. Crump. Priest, August 12, 1923 by Thomas Butterfield. Elder, September 30, 1923 by Arthur W. Crane. Seventy, October 29, 1933 by Levi Edgar Young at West Jordan “Line of ordination of Cecil 0. Poor to the Office of Seventy in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints” The Prophet Joseph ordained Joseph Young a Seventy on February 28, 1835. Joseph Young ordained Edmund Ellsworth a seventy on March 8, 1843. Edmond Ellsworth ordained Seymour B. Young a seventy on February 18, 1857. Seymour B. Young ordained Levi Edgar Young a seventy on June 18, 1897. Levi Edgar Young ordained Cecil 0. Poor a seventy on October 29, 1933. Levi Edgar Young was ordained one of the First seven Presidents of Seventy on January 23, 1910; by Apostle John Henry Smith. John Henry Smith was ordained an Apostle on October 27, 1880 by Apostle Wilford Woodruff. Wilford Woodruff was ordained an Apostle on April 26, 1893 at Far West, Missouri by Brigham Young. Brigham Young was ordained an Apostle on February 14, 1835, by David Whitmer, one of the Three Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, and the ordination was confirmed at the same time by the First Presidency of the Church, then Joseph Smith, Jr., Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams. Joseph Smith, Jr., was ordained an Apostle under the hands of Peter, James and John, sometime in June, 1829. Peter, James and John was ordained Apostles by the Lord, Jesus Christ. (St. John XV) (From Line of Ordination of Levi Edgar Young) Became a Life Member of the Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Association of the Herriman Ward, (Jordan Stake) 29 September 1923, Later changed to West Jordan Stake. Served until September 1, 1929) (Second Life Member of Ward —John A. Butterfield First) Heber J. Grant First Life member of Church 1918) Was set apart as Ward Secretary of the M.I.A. 1 September 1924 by George J. Miller and served as such until 1 September 1929. Member of the Geneological Society 1 September 1924. Second assistant to Heber Butterfield Chairman of the Herriman Ward Society 1926. First Assistant to Lafe Crane, Chairman of the Society, 15 October 1927.Member of the Genealogical Society 1924, Ward Teacher since 1924. Chairman of Genealogical Society May 3, 1931. Second Counselor to Thomas T. Freeman, President of the 5th Quorum of Elders. Secretary of 5th Quorum of Elders of the West Jordan Stake, Herriman Ward, also acting Secretary. Set apart 17 December 1929 as secretary of the Fifth Quorumof Elders of the West Jordan Stake, Herriman Ward with John A. Miller as President, Alonzo H. Freemen 1st Counselor and C. Earl Poor 2nd Counselor. Charter Subscriber to The New Improvement Era September 23, 1929. Was called as Acting Secretary of the 94th Quorum of Seventy. First Assistant Superintendent to Parley P. Butterfield of the Herriman Sunday School, Win. Henry Butterfield as 2nd Assistant. Have taken part in all ward activites. Attended meetings all the time except when my work did not permit. 1939 Was asked by Bishop Milton Bodell to be Secretary of the Aaronic Priesthood Committee. Relieved as Ward Teacher. Was called to act as Chairman of the Aaronic Priesthood Committee of the Herriman Ward 1 January 1939. Chairman Ward Scout Committee 1 Jan 1940. Cecil O. Poor, Chairman George K, Parry Committeeman Harold S. Swasey “ James Art Miller Scoutmaster Russel Parker, Assistant Scoutmaster With the following boys in troop 138. George R. Butterfield, Senior Patrol Leader Reginald A. Poor, Patrol Leader (Rattlesnake) Lowell J. Parry, Patrol Leader (Flying Eagle) Richard J. Christensen Ass’t P.L. (Rattlesnake) Julian J. Foreman, Ass’t P.L. (Flying Eagle) John W. Eastman, J. Woodruff Butterfield, Merrell L. Butterfield, E. Grant Butterfield, Wallace R. Butterfield, Roy S. Christensen, Everett T. Parry. Called and registered as Troop Committeeman (Chairman) Troop 138. Reached the rank of (Star Scout) (BSA). 1941 Reregistered —138. Released as 1st Asst. to Parley P. Butterfield in Sunday School. From a personal record sheet in Dad’s handwriting: “Attended public schools at Union Chapel and Kendall, eight years – Two years High School at Hunnewell High School. Vocation: 1. Clerical work 2. Mining 3. Shoe repairing 4. Sub. R.F.D. carrier Church Positions: 1. Life member of Y.M.M.I.A.-Sept 29, 1923 2. Secretary of MIA 3. Member of Genealogical Society of Ward 4. Ward Teacher 5. Second Counselor 5 Quorum of Elders 6. Secretary of 5 Quorum of Elders 7. Chairman of Geneological Society 8. Secretary of 94 Quorum of Seventy 9. First Assistant Supt. Of Herriman S.S. 10. Secretary of Aaronic Priesthood committee. Places of residence: Lived at Hunnewell, Missouri; Shelbina, Missouri, Springville, Spanish Fork, Lehi, Utah. Am making my home at Herriman.” Autobiography of Cecil Oliver Poor (From his green binder) Cecil Oliver Poor, eldest son of Arthur 0. Poor and Mary E. Whitelock Poor, born Jan 3rd 1898 about 2 1/2 miles southwest of Hunnewell, Shelby County, Missiouri, on what was known as the Old Cox Place. My education consisted of eight years in the grade schools of Union Chapel #55 and Kendall School, and two years in the Hunnewell High School. My first teacher in the Grade School was Otha Rivercombs, a son of Aunt Rebecka Ribercombs. I worked around Hunnewell, Missouri, until 1917. I came to Utah 1917, arrived in Provo, Utah Sept 9, 1917. Went to work at Spanish Fork for the L. A. & S. L. R. R. on September 10, 1917. Worked for the Company at Spanish Fork until November 1917 and moved to Lehi and stayed there until the following summer when I came to Herriman. (This was sometime in June, 1918) and went to work for Bishop Franklin T. Crane on the ranch. Worked for Bishop Crane until just before the last draft for the Worlds War. I went back to Hunnewell, Shelby County, Missouri to register for the last draft, 18 to 45. I registered at Shelbina, Missouri about twelve miles west of Hunnewell. Registration Certificate To Whom It May Concern, Greetings. These Presents Attest, That in accordance with the proclamation of the President of the United States, and in compliance with law, Cecil Oliver Poor, 300 N. Center Street, Shelbina, Missouri, has submitted himself to registration and has by me been duly registered this 12th day of Sept. 1918. Under the supervision of the Local Board on the back hereof. Local Board of the County by J. A. Daniel of Shelby, State of Mo. Registrar Shelbyville, Mo. I was called on November 11, 1918 to leave for camp at Waco, Texas, but did not leave as the Armistice was signed on that date. I worked around home for a few months for different ones picking corn. I came back to Utah arriving at Lehi on January 20, 1919 and worked a few months for the railroad company coming to Herriman again in the spring of 1919 and went to work for William A. Crane on his ranch southwest of Herriman. On July 6, 1919, I was baptized by Orrin R. Freeman and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Samuel Butterfield. I worked for W. A. Crane until August 4, 1919 when I quit and went to Salt Lake City, Utah and applied for enlistment in the United States Army for Service in Siberia with the A. E. F. and the 27th U. S. Infantry. Enlisted on August 7, 1919 at the (Presidio) of San Francisco, California. After eight days of camp duty, August 15, 1919, I set sail with my comrads for Vladivostok, Siberia on the United States Army Transport Logan (an old cattle boat) by the way of Honolulu, H.T. Arrived at Vladivostok, Siberia September 6, 1919. After a few weeks at the Old Balloon Shed, we went by train (Side Door Pullman) inland to Beresovka, Siberia, Eight miles west of Verkhine, Udinsk. We were stationed here several months. The winter being long and cold. On January 4 and 5, 1920 engaged in the Battle of Mukheens (Moocheeno). While stationed at Beresovka we went to Lake Baikal and the land that is known as the south end of the land of the midnight sun. While stationed in Beresovka our duty consisted of guard duty, cutting wood to keep the barracks warm. Our barracks were about two hundred feet long and about thirty feet wide. They were built of brick. The walls were doubled with an air surface between them. An eight inch wall on the outside with an air space of about six inch and an eight inch wall on the inside, making a wall of twenty two inches. There were twelve or fourteen stoves in each building. These stoves were about six feet in diameter, made of brick, with boiler plate on the outside. The brick sides were about eighteen inches thick, the firebox about three feet with an eighteen inch fire door and a twelve inch door to take the ashes out. The wood was cut twenty-four inches long. The buildings were of one story construction and the fires were kept burning day and night. After arriving at Beresovka these buildings were whitewashed inside and outside. There were about thirty of these buildings in the camp. Some were officers quarters, hospital building, Post Canteen (or store) Regimental Headquarters, Y.M.C.A. and K. of C. buildings and the Red Cross had a building. The boys were treated best by the K. of C. Although a Catholic organization what they had they gave freely. The other organization had plenty but you had to pay for it. After January 4 and 5 everything was pretty quiet. Plenty of snow and cold weather. Our clothing consisted of woolen underwear, 0. D. uniforms, fur caps, mits, and sheep lined coats. On January 16, 1920, we marched from Beresovka to Verkhnie, Udinsk a distance of eight miles with a full war time equipment. Rifle, one hundred rounds of ammunition, hand grenades. Dress in woolens. If you don’t think this is fun you should try it sometime. After arriving at Verkhine, Udinsk we boarded the side door pullman and started for Vladivostok. Here we went into camp for a few weeks. On March 10, 1920, we set sail for Manila, P. I. on board the U. S. A. T. Thomas by the way of Nagasaki, Japan, arriving at Manila on March 17, 1920, Saint Patrick Day. We went into camp at Camp Thomas H. Barry for twenty one days. These twenty one days seemed like years. It was hard to get used to the change as it was so hot there, going from one extreme to another. Our duty there was very light. After twenty one days we went into camp at Cuartel De Infanteria. While stationed at Manila our duty consisted of the usual garrison duty, training, guard duty and rest. I was at nearly every town on the island of Luzon - Fort William McKinley, Corregidor. Our amusement consisted of the very best picture shows, sports of all kinds, swimming in the ocean where the jelly fishes were as thick as flees and the size ranged from the size of a dollar to fourteen inches in diameter. While stationed at Manila, P. I., I took leave and seen parts of China and Japan. Tinsin, China, where the 15th U. S. Infantry is stationed, Peking China, where a detachment of the Marine Corps is stationed, the Great Wall of China and other parts of China and Japan. Our clothing was very light. olive drab cotton uniform, B.V.D., cotton shirts and campaign hats with light blue cord. Our stay at Manila was enjoyed by all. On December 15, 1920, we packed up our troubles in our old barracks bags and boarded the U.S.A.T. Thomas and leaving Manila and the islands behind never to see again, we sailed for the Hawaiian Islands, the place of paradise, arriving at Honolulu on January 4, 1921. On this trip we celebrated New Year’s eve twice on account of crossing the time line. After we got off of the transport we walked about one mile to the railroad and boarded the train for Schofield Barracks, twenty five miles from Honolulu. We arrived there after dark greeted only by a cold dismal rain. But this was just an incident in the life of a soldier, and we quickly accustomed ourselves to the new surroundings. My stay in the Hawaiian Islands was a very pleasant one. My duty consisted of duty in the Company Headquarters, Regimental Headquarters and Department Headquarters, Detachment of the Hawaiian Department as clerical worker. On March 9, 1921, I went with my company to Fort Shafter and remained there until July 2, 1921, returning to Schofield Barracks. After returning to Schofield Barracks I was detailed on special duty at Regimental Headquarters as clerk mimeograph operator. At this duty I remained until I left for the U.S.A. for discharge. On July, 1922, after bidding a faire adieu to my comrades, the gang plank was pulled and we steamed out and started for the U.S.A., arriving at Fort McDowell, California in August, 1922. On August 8, 1922 I received an Honorable Discharge from the U. S. Army completing 3 years and 2 days service. After being discharged I started for Utah, arriving in Salt Lake City on the Western Pacific August 12, 1922, returning to Herriman and going to work for Thomas S. Butterfield. I was advanced through the Aaronic Priesthood to the Office of an Elder in the Melchizedek Priesthood. On October 24, 1923 was married in the Salt Lake Temple to Fannie Fern Miller by George F. Richards, a gal that I had known since 1918 while working for Bishop F. T. Crane. After an extended trip through the east we returned to Herriman to make our home. On January 7, 1924 I went to work for the Ohio Copper Company at Lark, Utah. On May 16, 1924 at 12:30 a.m. while working as motorman I was hurt and did not return to work until October 1924. I worked for the company until March 1, 1931. On that date I was laid off due to a shut down. On November 27, 1931 I rented a shoe equipment at Riverton and repaired shoes for four years, selling out my business in October 12, 1935. I went to work for the U. S. Smelting Refining and Mining Company on that date, at which place I am still working as a lineman. At various times since 1931 I have carried the mail on R.F.D. #1. Since February 17, 1938, I have been a Bonded Substitute carrier. I carried the U. S. Mail on Route #1 for 13 months. After spending a 10 day vacation in Idaho with LeGrande, I went to work for the Combine Mines and Metal Co. at Butterfield Canyon, staying there until May 32, 1944. Left the mines on Dr. Paul S. Richards advice to get out of the mines. Went to work for the S. L. & U. R. R. - Orem Line - on June 3, 1944, as a trolleyman, brakeman. Made a conductor on November 6, 1944. On April 21 at 11:40 p.m. while working at 14th south and 2nd west I was hurt by a car, (Yellow Cab) side swiping my train, cutting my leg receiving a friction burn which has laid me up from April 21 to the present time. Still off. In 1938 my father Cecil 0. Poor started a diary. It covers the period from January 1, 1938 until April 10, 1938 It was hand written in a small five year diary with four lines for each date and five years of that date on a page. January 1, 1938 Up at 11:30 on night shift. Took children to Lark for Athletic Party supper with Ray and Mabelle. January 2, 1938 Sunday - Up 8:30 Sunday School - meeting - S. S. Board Meeting. Came home after Xmas holidays with Geo. J.Miller & family. January 3, 1938 Borned at Hunnewell, Mo. Monday - Birthday - Up 6 a.m. helped Fern get started to wash. Went to Riverton. Walked back. Worked night shift. - “Presents”. January 4, 1938 Up at Noon. Went Ward Teaching for Dec. Weather good. - no snow. All well. Night shift. January 5, 1938 Up at noon — Fern went to lecture at school house. No snow. Weather still warm. Night shift. Income tax returns came. January 6, 1938 Up at noon. Fern went Relief Society teaching. Weather is cold & Cloudy. No snow. January 7, 1938 Up noon. Weather hazy around mountains. Sun tries to shine at times. Warmer no snow. Last night of night shift — $5.55 January 8, 1938 Up-10-. Weather cloudy. Temperature changeable. Very little snow. January 9, 1938 Sunday. Officers and Teachers Prayer meeting. S.S. Union meeting. Sacrament meeting. January 10, 1938 Day shift. Pay day. Priesthood meeting and Gen. Society. January 11, 1938 Day shift. Union meeting at Lark. M.I.A. meeting. Practice play after meeting. January 12, 1938 Day shift. Utah Poultry banquet and dance. Weather warm-no snow. January 13, 1938 Thursday went to farewell party for Ceo. J. Miller and Walter E. Crane at ward house. January 14, 1938 Friday. Half of day shift in. Weather nice and pleasant. No snow. January 15, 1938 Saturday. Salt Lake City. Paid Ins — got tires. Filed income tax return. Cloudy, rained. Practiced play over home 8 p.m. January 16, 1938 Sunday. Partly cloudy, colder, no snow. S School MIA U meeting. Sac. meeting. January 17, 1938 Monday. Cloudy, light rain and snow. Priesthood meeting. Practice play over home. January 18, 1938 Tuesday. MIA show at school auditorium. Cloudy, warmer, no snow. January 19, 1938 Wednesday. Partly cloudy. Very little snow. Went to show at Lark. January 20, 1938 Thursday. Fair and warmer. No snow. Went to practice. January 21, 1938 Friday. Went teaching - District #8. Weather good. No snow. Last day of day shift. January 22, 1938 Saturday. Clear and warm. Went to Riverton — Midvale. Got lumber for cupboard. January 23, 1938 Sunday. Cloudy stormed a little all day. Light snow with strong north and west wind. Usual Sunday meetings. January 24, 1938 Monday. Night shift. Colder, no snow - clear. Worked on cupboard. January 25, 1938 Tuesday Pay day. Weather condition same as Monday. Worked on cupboard. 54.30 Old Age Tax .54 Hasp. 1.00=52.76 January 26, 1938 Wednesday Warmer, clear no snow. Up at noon. January 27, 1938 Thursday. Still clear, no snow, colder. Worked on cupboard. Up at noon. 18’ in 200 drift-6344- 56 shaft U. S. Mines. January 28, 1938 Friday One week of night shift in. Up at noon. Worked on cupboard. Clear and warmer. January 29, 1938 Saturday Warmer, snow very lift, melting fast. Up 10:30, breakfast with family. January 30, 1938 Sunday Weather warmer, no storm. Went to Sunday School convension. January 31, 1938 Monday. Weather moderate, cloudy. Temperature moderate, no storm. February 1, 1938 Tuesday - Colder, snowing when we came home at 4 p.m. Snowed and rained most all day. February 2, 1938 Wednesday. Clear in morning Cloudy and a little colder afternoon. Snow all gone. February 3, 1938 Thursday -Snow, about 7 inches. Started at 1:30 in the morning. No wind. Had quite a time getting home fr. Lark. February 4, 1938 Friday Weather warmer. Snowing melting fast. February 5, 1938 Saturday -Weather is still good, snow still going. February 6, 1938 Sunday - Up early went to S.S. and S.M. Practice at 2 p.m. Conjoint meeting 6:30. February 7, 1938 Monday - Day shift. Weather warmer. No storm, snow going into the ground. Practiced play at school auditorium. February 8, 1938 Tuesday. - Very little change in temperature. No storm, cloudy. The play entitled “Big Brother” presented M.I.A. February 9, 1938 Wednesday - Weather good, snow all gone. Went to show with boys. February 10, 1938 Thursday - “Pay Day” Very little change in weather. 61.05 U 1.00 Ath .25 Tax .61 = $59.19 February 11, 1938 Friday - Came home from work. Elise has the scarlet fever. Getting along fine. February 12, 1938 Saturday- (no entry) (No entries made from February 12 to February 24) February 25, 1938 Friday - Pay Day 58.05 Hosp 1.00 Tax .58 = $56.47 (No entries made from February 26 to March 9) March 10, 1938 Tuesday - 49.35 U.D. $1.00 Ath .25 Tax .49 = $47.61 (No entries made March 11,12 and 13) March 14, 1938 Monday - Came home from work at 4 p.m. The Dr. had been up and said Reggie has the scarlet fever. Elise had been out 1 week. March 15, 1938 Reggie has been pretty sick, is broke out more than Elise was but is getting along fine. March 16, 1938 Everyone is getting along fine. March 17, 1938 Everyone feeling better. Snow storm during the morning. March 18, 1938 Everyone feeling better. Last day of day shift. March 19, 1938 Saturday - Everyone getting along pretty good. March 20, 1938 Sunday - Everyone feeling better. Storm Sunday evening and night. March 21, 1938 Monday Night shift. Reggie has been in one week. Cold and stormy. March 22, 1938 Everyone getting along pretty good. March 23, 1938 All feeling better March 24, 1938 Everyone better March 25, 1938 Wednesday Golden has S. Fever. Gave Ray $5 on piano. 61.05= Hosp 1.00 Tax .61 = 59.44 March 26, 1938 Everyone getting along pretty good. March 27, 1938 All are better March 28, 1938 Everyone getting along pretty good. March 29, 1938 Everyone feeling better. March 30. 1938 Everyone feeling better. March 31, 1938 Everyone are feeling better. April 1, 1938 1899 Fern’s birthday. She did not have a very good birthday. Elise had Louise make a cake for her to give Fern. April 2, 1938 Saturday Everyone getting along fine. April 3, 1938 Sunday. Gen. conference. No S.S. Everyone getting along pretty good. April 4, 1938 Reggie was released to go to school on the 11. Legrande went back to school today. Day shift. Elise came home. April 5, 1938 Stormy weather Everyone getting along pretty good. April 6, 1938 Stormy weather. Everyone feeling fine. April 7, 1938 Thursday - 18 feet this week. Weather has improved. Everyone fine. April 8, 1938 Friday April 9, 1938 Saturday Pay day April 10, 1938 Sunday Diary ends. At the end of the diary my dad had created a chart which I have reproduced here. It is a record of his income from January 10, 1938 until September 24, 1938. 1938 # UD Hosp Ath Tax 1-10 3/9 5683 12-31-37 63.00 12 @ 5 1/4 3.00 .25 .63 59.12 1-25 “ 6002 1-15-38 54.30 6 @ 555=4 @ 5 1/4 1.00 .54 52.76 2-10 “ 6319 1-31-38 61.05 11-555 1.00 ,25 .61 59.19 2-25 “ 6635 2-15-38 58.05 1.00 .58 56.47 3-10 “ 6948 2-28-38 49.35 2 @ 5 1/4 7@ 555 1.00 .25 .49 47.61 3-25 “ 7267 3-15-38 61.05 11 @ 555 1.00 .61 59.44 4-9 “ 7580 3-31-38 66.60 12 @ 555 1.00 .25 .67 64.68 4-25 “ 7881 4-15-38 61.05 11 @ 555 1.00 .61 59.44 5-10 “ 8180 4-30-38 55.20 10 555-30c 1.00 ,25 ,55 53.40 5-25 “ 8479 5-15-38 55.50 10 555 1.00 .56 53.94 6-10 “ 8774 5-31-38 66.60 12-555 1.00 .25 .67 64.68 6-25 “ 9068 6-15-38 61.05 11-555 1.00 .61 59.44 7-9 “ 9360 6-30-38 58.30 11-530 1.00 .25 .58 56.17 7-22 “ 9647 7-15 58.30 1.00 .58 56.72 8-10 “ 9936 7-31-38 53. 1.00 .25 .53 51.22 8-25 “ 9-10 “ 10508 8-31 65.10 1.00 .25 .65 63.20 9-24 “ 10791 9-15-38 56.18 1.00 .56 54.62 10-10 The large column is his record of the number of days worked times the rate per day. For instance, the first entry indicates that he worked 12 days in that period at $5.25 per day. UD is union dues. Hosp is health insurance and Ath is the employee activity fee. The last column is his take home pay for two weeks While I attended the University of Utah, I worked as secretary for the University Research Committee. Carl J. Christensen was chairman of the committee for part of the time I worked there. In his office was another woman, Alice Morrey Bailey. In finding out my name she wanted to know if I was related to Cecil 0. Poor. When I informed her he was my father she said she had been a nurse at the Bingham Canyon Hospital when my father was taken there after an injury at the Lark Mine. She told me about events when he was brought there. I asked her to tell me about it and she provided this story. This event occurred before I was born on October 1, 1924. I recall hearing that my dad was on crutches when I was born. He and my mother were living with her parents at the time. CECIL 0. POOR by Alice Morrey Bailey “There’s been an accident at the mine. Send the doctor quick.” This message received at the Bingham Canyon Hospital in the wee hours of night in late 1923 or early 1924, set in motion a chain of routine events. I was the night nurse in this twenty-five bed hospital at that time. (I worked there from October 1923 to September 1924, so it had to be in that time span.) After I had called Dr. Paul Richards, who lived across the street, I set about getting treatments and medicines due the patients in order to get them out of the way for emergency. It was not long coming. “Get Mrs. Howe and the operating room nurses up. We’re bringing in a man who is badly injured. He will have to have surgery.” This was the message from the mine, the instructions from Dr. Richards. I did as he told me, went around and closed all doors to the rooms of the patients and it was not long until I heard the siren coming down the canyon. The hospital, in those days, was owned by Dr. Straup, who also headed the Salt Lake County Hospital. It was operated for the benefit of the U. S. Mine, and I believe the Highland Boy. Utah Copper (later Kennecott Copper), had an emergency station manned by Dr. Frazier and an interne. Their patients were then sent to the St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake City for further treatment as needed. You never know what to expect in a hospital where emergency is routine. Certainly not what came with the patient, who was singing at the top of his lungs: “Oh, it ain’t a goin’ to rain no more, no more.” What was this? delirium? At any rate we set to cutting the carbide-smelling clothes off the patient, who gave his name loudly and firmly as “Cecil 0. Poor.” He had been caught between an ore car and a timber in the depths of the mine, and his abdomen was ripped open from his right rib-cage to his left hip, a gash that widened to several inches. Parts of his intestines were protruding out of about a two—inch incision into his belly. It was determined that his pelvis was also fractured. He disappeared into the operating room and was there a considerable amount of time. I was probably off duty when he came out, as I do not remember that, after his singing was quieted by anesthesia. I do remember that when I came on duty the next evening, a twelve—hour shift, from seven P.M. to seven A.M., he was in a private room his abdomen and he had a cast from his waist to his knees. It had only the crotch cut out, and this I remember well, because he had to be lifted onto the bedpan when necessary, and the nurse had to stay with him to hold him on, clean him and get him off. “Were you delirious the night you cane in?” I asked him when he had recovered from the shock and the surgery. “No! I had to either sing or swear, and I don’t swear.” Cecil was a model patient, undemanding under these difficult circumstances, and everyone in the hospital admired his cheerful spirit and his ability to recover. At the same time we had another patient named Joe Bannock, who had come in with a cut finger some weeks before. The finger would not heal, and Wasserman tests revealed that he had syphilis. First his finger had to amputated, then his hand, and so on, until his whole left arm had to be taken. “That is the difference.” said Dr. Richards. “There is Cecil Poor, a clean—living kid who has never taken anything into his body to harm it. And there is Joe, a dirty, scummy fellow who stops at nothing. Can’t even survive a cut finger, while Poor is bounding back to health after his ordeal.” Cecil was responsible for my losing my job on one occasion, due to no fault of his own. I had two floors to care for, the private and semi—private rooms upstairs, and the wards downstairs. I got pretty adept at negotiating the stairs. In one of the downstairs wards there were about fourteen people with broken backs and these were in traction, plus one fellow named Bray who was in for a minor infection. This infection required ice packs, and he was a demanding fellow, as he was a foreman and liked to use that leverage to throw his weight around. He did not wait until his ice bag ceased to be cold to ask for more ice, and one night started to ring his bell for attention. I had just answered a call to Cecil, a bedpan call, and there was nothing I could do about the bell. Bray kept his finger on that bell, ringin9 it constantly for the next half hour while I was attending Poor. Eventually I appeared in the doorway of the ward and the ice bag hit me in the chest. “Why didn’t you answer my bell?” asked Bray. “You’ve been off in some corner asleep. I’ll get your job for this.” Well, only the day before I had been commended highly because I had closed the doors the night Poor came in, and even his singing didn’t arouse the hospital. “If it had been any other nurse on duty that night, the whole hospital would have been jumping.” I felt pretty proud of that commendation, glad to be the night nurse entrusted with a great deal of responsibility for a girl of twenty. I explained to Mr. Bray as best I could what had happened, but he did not believe me, insisted that I had been off sleeping somewhere. Dr. Straup was coming out that day and Mr Bray told him about the incident, demanded that I be fired. He would accept no quarter on the matter, said he would demand to be transferred to another hospital and raise Hell with the industrial commission. was called on the carpet by Dr. Straup. When I told him what had really occurred, he said placatingly: “Well, let’s change you to days and put you on another floor, let him think you are fired.” That didn’t suit me at all, not after just having been voted Best Night nUrse. I told Dr. Straup I would quit. I would not go on days, nor be put in another situation. I felt that it was Mr. Bray who was at fault, and the hospital should back me u~. I can see it was a hard place for Dr. Straup. He took it under advisement and went back to duty as usual. I told the patients it was my last night and bade them goodbye. Those patients in Mr. Bray’s ward had heard the whole thing, so came to my defense in a body. When Dr. Straup came in to see them they told him that if I was fired they would all demand to be transferred to a Salt Lake City Hos~ita1. One after the other told of my kindness and efficiency in their behalf, so the hard place became harder for Dr. Straup. He assured them that I was not being fire, that I was resigning instead, but they would have none of it. They said that Bray was a trouble—maker an had caused ill feelings all around. The upshot of it was that Mr. Bray was discharged, as he was well enough already to go home and continue his ice packs as long as he cared to. Dr. Straup called me into the office again and asked me if I was not happy there. I said yes I was, except that I had a very hot room in which to sleep, and had been promised a raise in wages which had not come through. I got a five dollar raise, from $25.00 per week to $30. I was also given a more suitable room. Well, of course, this was nothing to do with Cecil 0. Poor except that he acted as a catalyst for it. He was moved into that same ward and bolstered my statement that I was really attending him on the night in question. I never forgot him, for he was a fine LDS young man, willing to defend his gospel among those people from all over the world, who comprised that ward. Many were the discussions held among those patients, and they admired Cecil as much as the staff did. Imagine my surprise many years later, while working at the University of Utah, to meet LeGrande Poor a son of Cecil, and to quickly establish that they were related. was secretary to Dr. C. J. Christensen, by this time, and LeGrande was the secretary of the graduate students or research students, as I remember. I met his sister, learned of his family and that his father had been dead many years, never having fully recovered from the awful injuries suffered in that mine accident.

Life Timeline of Cecil Oliver Poor

1898
Cecil Oliver Poor was born on 3 Jan 1898
Cecil Oliver Poor was 8 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
1905
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Cecil Oliver Poor was 19 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
1917
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Cecil Oliver Poor was 32 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
1929
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Cecil Oliver Poor was 42 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
1939
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Cecil Oliver Poor died on 23 May 1946 at the age of 48
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Cecil Oliver Poor (3 Jan 1898 - 23 May 1946), BillionGraves Record 236054 Herriman, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

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