Calvin A. Walker

29 Aug 1906 - 18 Apr 1980

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Calvin A. Walker

29 Aug 1906 - 18 Apr 1980
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Biography of Calvin A. Walker by Mary Jean Walker Caldwell Born in Pleasant Grove, Utah on August 29, 1906, at his parent’s home. He was the seventh child in a family of 14 children. With a lot of children close to his age he never was lonely and always had someone to do things with. The family ha

Life Information

Calvin A. Walker

Born:
Married: 29 Aug 1929
Died:

Pleasant Grove City Cemetery

301-945 Utah 146
Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah
United States
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Dan Clark

June 27, 2011
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junedraper

April 6, 2020
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jglaspie2001

April 4, 2020
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LeaBobbitt

April 16, 2020
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GraveScavenger

June 25, 2011

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Biography with Re-telling of The Legend of Timpanogos

Contributor: Dan Clark Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Biography of Calvin A. Walker by Mary Jean Walker Caldwell Born in Pleasant Grove, Utah on August 29, 1906, at his parent’s home. He was the seventh child in a family of 14 children. With a lot of children close to his age he never was lonely and always had someone to do things with. The family had a large farm with fruit trees to tend and pick, animals to feed and fields to plow and harvest. With all this, the family still found time to have rodeo’s, picnics, climb Little Mountain, and go to the Indian Meadow. Calvin had two brothers close to his age: Bill one year older, and Tom three years older. As youngsters “the boys” had a great time teasing and tormenting their older sisters, Rowena and Zola. With the family home at the base of the mountains, this was a natural stomping place for a child to go when they were sad or happy. Calvin never lost his love of his beloved mountains. He knew them like he knew his own yard. The family home was in the Pleasant Grove Third Ward, and was at the east end of a road which ran from the cemetery to the mouth of Grove Creek Canyon. The 3rd Ward was known as “Monkey Town”. Up and down the road (east to west) Calvin had many friends who ruled Monkey Town. They played a few tricks and pranks that would now put them on probation, but they thought it was all in good fun. He always remained close friends with Les, Roy, and Glen. Calvin was a tease and everyone knew this about him. His teasing was always fun and he could take a practical joke back. Calvin attended the Pleasant Grove elementary school and high school. His father was a teacher and a principal at the Pleasant Grove schools. He enjoyed school as this brought new people into his life to nickname and tease. With a ready grin and laugh it was easy for him to make friends. Calvin started calling Lucille his girl at the age most of us won’t let our kids date. Though they would from time to time go with someone else–it was only because the other wasn't available. He was shorter than Lucille at the beginning. When he finally grew up, they would sit down together and they were very close to the same size. (Calvin just had very long legs and would unwind as he stood up .) When he turned sixteen, Calvin decided to quit school, get a job, save his money, get rich, and marry Lucille as soon as she finished high school. His Dad helped him find a job working for grand dad Holman who lived with grandmother Walker in Lindon. He was too far out to come home every day after work, so he stayed there all winter. As he wasn't in school and was now a working man, the high school activities were a no-no. During the long, long hours of the winter with nothing to do after dark, he became a captive audience for his great grandfather’s stories of the early days in the Church. This man, James Alonzo Holman, personally knew the Prophet Joseph Smith and Brigham Young. He bore his testimony to Calvin many times that winter of the truthfulness of the gospel and how he knew these men were prophets. He described them is such detail that Calvin could see them in his minds eye. So strong were the stories, at times he felt like they were right there with them. He listened to stories of crossing the plains and settling the new country. The hunger and thirst the pioneers felt were very real to him. Before the winter was over Calvin went back to school because of this man. His great grandfather also told him to always, no matter what, follow the prophet, for that was the way to true happiness forever. Because of the year out of high school, he graduated a year late. During the summer he worked mining coal in the Bingham coal mine. Then on to Logan to USAC, along with brothers Tom and Bill. He milked cows at the school dairy to earn enough money to stay in school. He majored in Civil Engineering, the first three years and then changed to education. He planned to teach at the Junior High School level. He earned his B.S. degree in 1929. The summer of 1928 found Calvin working at Yellowstone. He worked on the road from Yellowstone to Bozeman, along the Madison River. The construction workers would go into town to get drunk after work and Calvin was the worker assigned to go to West Yellowstone after them in the dump truck each evening. He would load them in the back of the truck, drive them back to camp, raise the dumper, and roll them out. The boss trusted Calvin because he knew he wouldn't drink. One evening after work he was unharnessing the mules, got behind them and one, 2200 pound mule kicked him, tossing him 100 feet. This accident resulted in a popped spleen and one out of commission kidney, leaving a scar from his sternum to below his belly button because of the operation performed to find the extent of the injuries. His father and Josie went to him immediately. For a long time they were not sure he would survive. When they did release him to go home with his family he was told he only had a few years to live because of the lose of the spleen. The pain killer given to him while he recuperated was morphine; which left him addicted. Though he would overcome the dependency he would always be an addict and couldn't ever take it again. He always had an empathy for those with similar problems. Calvin married his childhood sweetheart, Lucille Wright, on August 29, 1929 in the Salt Lake Temple. They immediately loaded up in their car, newly purchased and in hock for, and left for Duchesne. Here Calvin had a job to teach school. He taught everything from girls P.E. to shop, with a smattering of math and science. He often laughed at the P.E. assignment. While here he hiked all over the Grand Daddy Lakes and fished all the streams. Often after school he would fish right there on the Duchesne River for supper. This was a much needed necessity as the country was just coming out of the depression and money was scarce. It was here that he gained a testimony of tithing, as they put it to the test many times, paying tithing first and working the budget after. The principle of tithing never failed them. He left Duchesne and taught High School in Lehi for 3 years. One of his former students tells about the class project he had to make; a cedar chest. Everything didn’t square up so he cut a little off here and sanded a little more there until all he had left was a very small jewelry box. Calvin never got after the student and let him keep at it until finished. This student later became a teacher and was influenced by the role model set for him by Calvin with the patience he exhibited. Calvin went back to summer school in Logan in 1932 to get an elementary certificate. He had decided that younger children would be the place to teach and more fun. He then transferred to the Spencer School in Orem. Calvin loved to play on words. A stop sign wasn't a stop sign, it was a s-te-ope sign. He could so confuse the kids that he had them saying union for onion or onion for union, he could do it both ways. He also had his favorite math problem: A rich man had 7 camels. He had three sons. Before the rich man died he gave his oldest son half of his camels, his second son one quarter of his camels and the youngest son got one-eighth of the camels. They were not allowed to kill any of the camels to make the division How did the rich man divide the camels? (This problem is now in the pre-algebra books in the school systems. He taught it to fifth grade students in math). As his children were growing up Calvin taught them to love the mountains. He taught all his family the beauty of the world around him and how to listen to nature. The family frequently hiked the foothills on the east side of town and played in the Monkey Town Jungle. He took the children to all his favorite places in the local mountains–Grove Creek Springs, Battle Creek Springs, Sam Green’s Grove, the top of Timp, Pittsburg Lake, Dutchman Mine, Granite Flat and the old tram at Tibble Fork. When Calvin and Lucille built their new home in Pleasant Grove, it was placed to get the best view of Timpanogos. He taught his children to ski in the winter on the wheat field at his folks place and at Mutual Dell. He taught them to play tennis, basket ball and fast pitch soft ball. (The last as a result of being the city recreation director in the summers.) Being physically active was important to him. He often (more often than not) got up in the mornings and would hike from his home to the lake and back before the rest of the family got up. For many years Tom and Calvin checked the moisture on top of the divide at Timpanoke. In the winter they took their sons on skis and climbed from Mutual Dell up and rode them down after finishing with their measurements. In the summer the families went up in a car and played in the meadow. Here he taught his children the names of the plants and trees; also which were edible and which were not edible. He frequently would recite poems from memory to his children, such as the Raggedy Man, Hiawatha, and Little Orphan Annie. He loved to read bedtime stories (or so we thought) such as Brier Rabbit, Thunder Cave and a book of Tall Tales. He was a firm believer in early to bed and early to rise. As the children became teenagers this became interpreted as the later you stay out the earlier the ice cubes or ice water will wake you up! No curfews here. During the gas rationing time of World War 2 he was transferred to the Central School in Pleasant Grove and taught fifth and sixth grade. In 1954 he became the Principal of this school and retired from that position in May 1972. He took the sixth grade children for many years on an annual fall Indian Trail hike around little mountain going up Grove Creek in the morning, crossing the falls and into the meadow for lunch, and down Battle Creek in the afternoon before school was out. Many of the other teachers offered to go and help just for the trip. Calvin received his masters degree after he had 7 of his 8 children, in 1949 from BYU. He put into practice a saying he used a lot–”Where there is a will there is a way”. He wrote a history of Pleasant Grove for his masters thesis. The children in his Fifth and Sixth Grades helped in compiling some of the stories in this thesis as part of their history study. The children thought it was fun, as they toured throughout the town and found many places they didn't know about before, such as the old fort wall. With all his schooling, Calvin did not believe in letting his studies interfere with his education. And so as each of his children left home to continue their schooling, this was the big advice. In 1918 he registered as a Boy Scout. He never got over this experience. As a boy, he had a terrific scoutmaster, Ed Warburton, and was involved in scouting all of his life. He was a Scoutmaster, Troop Committeeman, District Chairman, Explorer Leader, District Commissioner and District advancement chairman. One year, while he was Scoutmaster with Fred Shoell, H. Walker and Sam Hilton, thirty-four Scouts were awarded Eagles in his Troop 23. Under Calvin plus whoever happened to be his assistants there were 133 eagles in Troop 23 during his tenure. He received his Silver Beaver in 1942 in Provo at the Joseph Smith Memorial. He (along with son Jim) attended the National Court of Honor at Seattle, Washington in May 1948 as the Scouter Representative. This was as a result of he and Jim saving the life of Richard Cromer and his father when Richard fell into an irrigation ditch. The family vacations were sometimes at scout camp, such as Moon Lake in the Grand Daddies, Mutual Dell in American Fork Canyon and Wildwood in Provo Canyon. All his children learned the Scout Spirit (Law, Oath, Motto, and Slogan), the constellations in the sky and the Morris Code, long before the age of twelve. Why? Because the scouts met in his home (many not from his ward) and did the stars on his front yard and the Morris code from his front porch to Sam Hilton’s front porch in the mouth of Battle Creek Canyon at the power plant. The story of Gus (as everyone in scouting called Calvin) and scouting wouldn't be complete without Skunking. In American Fork Canyon in a cave, skunking was born. Only those who were skunks were allowed to know where this cave was. A scout had to be at least First Class to be allowed to be admitted. The brew the group drank and food they ate, each time the skunks met, was often cooked in his kitchen by his wife. At the end of each meeting there was a testimony bearing time for everyone. When World War 2 broke out and the boys went into the military, the skunks met to strengthen one another before leaving. When a boy received his mission call, the skunks met to bid farewell and when he returned they met for fellowship and friendship. Calvin was the Bishop of the Pleasant Grove Third Ward, the same ward where he grew up and his dad served as Bishop. He was very youth oriented in this calling. Now the scouts went camping with their Bishop. At Christmas time, as he did during World War II, he sent “his boys” that were in the Korean War a sprig of sagebrush in a letter he wrote to them, personalized for each boy. (He did the same for his children as they moved around the country.) He had some very close friends that were inactive at this time, consequently, he gathered the group together once a week in his home. This group became active and many went to the temple. Calvin loved serving the Church and being Bishop was just another way for him to accomplish this. Calvin loved to go around the area telling the Legend of Timpanogos, dressed in his blanket and headdress. He did this for family, church and civic groups, always free. Editors Note: The Legend, as Calvin told it, provides a great insight into his philosophy of life and his love of the beauty Utah Valley and the great mountain that forms it’s eastern boundary near Pleasant Grove. Calvin had the legend published–a copy of it is included here at the end of his biography. When Glen was getting his masters degree at USU he took a story telling class. He had his Dad come up, after everyone in the class had told their stories, as an example of a good story teller. The instructor was very impressed with his story telling technique and labeled him a Master Story Teller. When his children started to leave home and move away from the area, Calvin frequently traveled during the summer to visit his grandchildren. He had to make sure the children were treating their mates right, but more important his grandchildren were being taught correctly. He also visited the Statue of Liberty, (he asked the guide if the sign that read “All Walkers Free” meant all people with the Walker name really got to go to the top free), Boston, Nauvoo, Haun’s Mill where the Foutz’s had lived, Adam-ondi-ahman, Carthage and Liberty Jails, and the Hill Cumorah Pageant. Each place was very special to him. Where ever he went he met someone who knew someone he knew, or was related to a friend, or they had had similar experiences. This meeting instant friends was one of his great talents. Imagine moving into a new ward and the Bishop coming up to you in a ward party and telling you that he expected a lot of you because of your Dad. (It happened frequently to all his children as they moved around.) He loved to get together with his brothers and sisters. They frequently got together for visits or dinner or with their children for a picnic in American Fork Cave camp ground. These were fun for all but important to Calvin. He prepared for retirement by accepting a call as a temple worker in the Prove Temple a few years before he retired. This was a calling or job he had desired for many years, but traveling to Salt Lake in the winter was precarious around the point of the mountain. Then the Prove Temple was announced and Calvin and Lucille were ready to work. He now had time to pursue his interests as an artist. He took classes from Carol Harding and gave pictures to his children that he finished in this class (This wasn't his usual cartooning which was always so fun). He turned to pottery making and took a class a BYU which resulted in his buying his own wheel and oven. He gathered clay from the old brick yard in Pleasant Grove and the old mines up around Occorphur. Every grandchild had a turn trying to make a pot, in fact they got to keep the finished product. He made many beautiful pots that he would give to people who visited with him. The highlight of his retired years was a trip to Israel. He spent a week there with his daughter Nancy and her husband. Tears would well up in his eyes as he told his grandchildren of this experience and how it felt to walk where the Savior walked. He was amazed at how short the distances were from one spot to another. Gus gave his last Eagle interview the weekend before going into the hospital. He wasn't feeling well but the young man needed and deserved the interview. This young man had his Eagle Court of Honor the night of Calvin’s funeral. At his funeral a speaker stated that the real tribute to Gus was his family–his children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren who were all there. As everyone left the church at the end of the service, the children of the Central School gathered on the playground and stood at attention in tribute to this man. That is the inheritance he left us all–”Love of family”. The Legend of Timpanogos As retold By Calvin Walker “Loveliness that dies when I forget comes to life when I remember.” –Anon Many, many moons ago, far to the north of here, lived the powerful Nez Perce Indians, who were feared and dreaded by all the Indian tribes in that vast area. Their braves were fierce, fearless fighters. They were large of stature, athletic, and fleet of foot. Their horses, the Appaloosas, were the fleetest and strongest ever known. They were prized by all other tribes and many a brave lost his life in a thieving attempt to get one. Blessings from the great spirit naturally brought them the best of hunting grounds. Thus, their lands abounded in fish and water fowl of all types. Deer, elk, bison and bear were also plentiful. Their fields abounded in grains. So, the Nez Perce nation grew strong and were greatly feared by all the neighboring tribes. One year the great spirit failed to shower his blessings on the hunting and farm lands of the Nez Perce. The winter storms were very light. The spring rains failed to come. Many streams and lakes dried up. Fish and water fowl began to disappear. Grass dried up in the meadows and the big game began leaving the area. The corn, squash and bean fields began to wither for the want of water. Because their land had been blessed by the Great Spirit for so long, the Nez Perce did not sense the danger of famine. But, when the children and older people began to cry because of hunger, alarm began to fill the tribe. Their fine prized horses were even getting weak and bony. The good old chief called a council of all the braves, and plans and solutions were discussed. Were they too weak to fight or move? Were their horses strong enough to carry them through another battle? Should they desert the old, the helpless and the hungry children? What had they done to displease the Great Spirit? What could they do to again regain his favor? After many long councils, the wise old chieftain said he had a plan he hoped would save them all. With the consent of the council, he wished to send his four sons, one north, one south, one east and one west to the neighboring tribes in peace, to gain permission to enter their hunting grounds. In return, the Nez Perce would discontinue warring with their neighbors, and when the Great Spirit again looked down on them with favor, they would return to their own lands. The braves agreed. The chief’s sons were called before him, and each in turn drew a stone lot which told him the direction to go. The wise old chief instructed each in his turn. He told them of the things to watch for, and the cautions each must take. When the fourth son, Timpanac, drew his lot, it said south. The chief instructed him to follow up the river to the south, watching for food and game all the way. “Go on to the south through the pass, past the head water, to a sea of salt where you may bathe for health in the sea. Then go on again south past the salt sea to a mountain pass where you will behold a crystal clear fresh water lake overlooked by a beautiful snow capped mountain. There you will find the friendly “Fish Eaters.” There the land should abound in all things from the Great Spirit.” He wished his fourth son well and signaled him on his journey. Timpanac followed south up the river, feeding on what game and fruit the land provided, gaining back his strength and beautiful athletic physique by the time he reached the land of the salt sea. He did not tarry long to bathe in the salty brine, as his spirits were too high with the joy of again being in such a fine physical condition. Hurrying on south, he climbed the high pass to overlook the valley. The beauty that stretched before Timpanac in every direction held him long in awe and wonderment. He could not understand why his people had not left their land and come here to live. As far as the eye could see there were signs of active Indian villages. Cautiously, Timpanac picked his way down to the river that led to the lake. He avoided meeting anyone and hurried on toward the beautiful blue water. As he started southward through the Sumac and willows, following the lake shore, he became aware that he was being watched and followed by a human being. Timpanac alerted himself to attack and hurried on southward past a clear stream that entered from the east. Every trail seemed to point south toward the central village, where he hoped to find the chieftain of the “Fish Eaters. ” The cunning follower kept from view, but by the time Timpanac arrived near the Indian village, he was sure his silent friend had been an Indian maiden. Timpanac entered the Indian village and made the signs of friendship and peace to the braves that came forward. He told them in sign language who he was and that he wished to talk and smoke the pipe of peace with the chieftain. In a few moments, the braves returned with word that the chief would see him at his fire and would smoke with him. Timpanac followed the braves to the spacious tent of the chieftain of the “Fish Eaters.” Greetings were exchanged between the two chieftains with the pipe of peace. Then the “Old Fish Eater” said he would listen to the young Nez Perce brave’s story. Timpanac related in detail the wish of the Nez Perce nation, to be at peace with them and come and share their land and game in time of famine. His people would forget war and no longer plunder the “Fish Eaters” villages. They would be at peace forever. His people must have food for their families and horses. Could they come in peace and forget war? The wise old chief pondered, then counseled with Timpanac. Timpanac must see all of their hunting grounds. He must know how this land was blessed by the Great Spirit to abound in all things that were good. This land was supporting many. Could more come and live in abundance and all be happy? To every corner of the land Timpanac must go with a faithful guide to survey its resources and return to council with the old chieftain. Turning, the old chief pointed out the guide, his beautiful daughter, Ucanogos. Timpanac was immediately conscious of several things. This was the maiden that had followed him along the lake shore. This maiden had been in the tepee all during the council. The days that followed were like a beautiful dream, with Ucanogos guiding Timpanac through a wonderful fairyland. Everywhere was abundance and beauty. Timpanac completely forgot his mission on behalf of his starving people. His thoughts had turned to the beautiful princess and her land. They roamed the valley for many suns, and their thoughts seemed to be ever of each other. Why could not such beauty go on forever unmolested? Alas, jealous braves and maidens were to be found in every village. For many moons braves had sought out the fair Ucanogos. None had been received with favor. Many claimed she was sent by the Great Spirit because of her beauty, skill and fleetness. Was it fair to have their princess go to a stranger? The maidens agreed. Timpanac was a stranger, yet they worshiped him because of his great physique and litheness, and he should belong to them. The princess belonged to the tribe. The jealous, angry tribesmen voiced their protest openly and loudly to their chieftain. He must act to keep the unity of his people. The old chieftain was puzzled. He must not lose his princess nor his people. One day a call was sent for all the braves to meet in council with the chief of the tribe. At the council fire that night, the wise old chieftain told the braves that he wished his daughter to marry an eligible brave. The brave that married his daughter must prove himself worthy. He must have endurance, strength, skill and be a fearless leader, able to carry on. He told them that a series of contests had been prepared to test their abilities. Any brave who wished could enter and the winner could claim Ucanogos for his wife. All contestants wishing to enter must be at the council fire at dawn next morning. At dawn the council fire area was filled with braves. Timpanac was present. The old chieftain raised his hand and everyone listened for instructions. “Today we begin a series of contests to test your abilities, the winner of which will win Princess Ucanogos for a wife. The contests shall last for three days. The one with the highest score for the three days will be declared the winner. Each day you will travel alone without weapons or clothing except for a loin cloth. Any brave breaking any rule shall be severely punished. “Today you shall leave this fire and seek out game. The one returning to this fire before the set of the sun with the largest game shall be declared the winner of the day. Leave all your weapons and clothing, except your loin cloth, in this council area.” The old chieftain then signaled them to leave. As the day wore by, braves began returning with their prizes. Some brought large fish, others water fowl, antelope and other large game. All were brought to the fire. Just as the sun was beginning to set in the west, Timpanac came laboring in with an enormous grizzly bear and placed it before the fire. A cold silence passed over the assembled group as they eyed the huge creature lying before them. Many stole forward to see if it had been killed illegally. Murmuring and whispering started. Was this a mortal being they were competing with? Something must be done or they would lose their princess. As the sun set, the old chieftain signaled them to leave. The day’s contest was over. They must return at dawn to receive instructions for the next day. At the break of dawn the old chieftain raised his hand and all awaited his instructions for the day. “Today we test for fleetness and endurance. You are to travel as you did yesterday, with just a loin cloth. You are to start southward and go all the way around our crystal clear lake and return here. The first to return shall be declared the day’s winner.” He waved his arm for a starting signal and the braves left in a burst of speed. Timpanac lagged behind to save his strength. As he rounded the south end of the lake and started northward, he quickened his pace. When he reached the north end of the lake and crossed the river, he was again in familiar territory and near the lead in the race. The day was going fast. He knew he must hurry. As Timpanac rushed on southward through the sumac and willows, a brave leaped at him with a knife, bent on taking his life. Timpanac was forced to dispose of him quickly. Three times he was ambushed and forced to destroy the braves. The delays required him to put forth all his remaining strength in a burst of speed to finish the race first. As the braves came straggling in, there were shouts of “murder”, “foul play” and “burn him”. The tempo of anger gained as the crowd grew. The old chief finally raised his hand for silence. He told them it was late and there was not time to hear all the stories, but after the next day’s contest all would have a chance to be heard and the guilty would be punished. They must go and rest for the night and be back at dawn, as the next contest was even more severe. The braves left in small groups. They were sure Timpanac was not mortal and must be dealt with accordingly, lest something evil overtake them. At dawn the next morning, all those wishing to continue in the contest were at the council fire. The old chieftain raised his hand again and said, “Today you will travel as before and without weapons. You are to go eastward to the top of the highest peak on yonder mountain. You are to return before the set of the sun. The first to return shall be the winner of this day.” He waved his arm for the starting signal and the braves left, all but Timpanac. He found Ucanogos waiting near the river under a large cottonwood tree, where they had spent many happy hours together. Ucanogos took Timpanac by the hand to assure him that she and her father understood what had happened the previous day. Timpanac must travel with caution and be on the alert for any type of danger. She bade him good speed on his way, with her best wishes for his return to claim his prize. With a light heart and happy memories of their many days together, Timpanac left Ucanogos and sped eastward along the river and into the canyon. He followed the first stream to the left, up its narrow winding course over the cataracts and falls into the beautiful meadows of flowers. He tarried in the flowering meadows, then moved ever upward. On reaching the giant snow banks flanked with beds of flowers and streams, he paused again and longed for the day he could bring the beautiful Ucanogos here. Together they could wander in the beauties the Great Spirit had created for men. Such a place was created for people with hearts like theirs. With slow skilled footsteps he picked his way up the snowbanks that led him to the skyline. As he gazed in wonder and awe at the beautiful valley and crystal lake far below, he was sure the Great Spirit had never created anything more beautiful. He fancied he could see Ucanogos under the cottonwood tree near the river watching and waiting for his safe return. With dauntless hope and courage, Timpanac started up the narrow crest for the highest peak. As he neared the highest pinnacle, some envious braves sprang from behind a ledge to block his ascent. Timpanac had but one goal in mind–to reach the upmost peak and then race back to the valley. He cautiously maneuvered around them. Step by step he backed up the narrow crest toward the peak. As he reached the uppermost crest of the mountain, another band of jealous braves joined the attack. Timpanac, in a misstep during the struggle, fell over the ledge to the east. His body went hurtling and crashing from ledge to ledge, down, down through space, landing at the bottom in a mangled heap. The jealous braves stared down at Timpanac in stricken horror. Moments before they had gazed upon a beautiful, fearless fighting chief, supreme in all his deeds and acts. Then they, in a cowardly, jealous act, had destroyed it all. Disgust and self-hatred gripped the group, because they had gained nothing and destroyed much. With downcast eyes, fear heavy in every heart and in complete silence, they found their way back to the council fire. One of the braves summoned some courage and told the old chieftain that Timpanac had attacked them, and in the fight he was forced over the ledge of the great, high mountain. The old chieftain signaled them to leave. But, they were sure that their story was not believed. Ucanogos had followed the account in silence. At dawn the next morning, the princess could not be found in camp. Her footprints headed up the river bank toward the mountain. She had to find for herself what had happened to her lover. She found his tracks leaving the stream to the left. She followed them over the cataracts and falls into the beautiful flowering meadows. Here she, too, paused to view the beauty, then on she went, up to the snow banks flanked by beds of flowers. Here again he had lingered in awe of the beauty that spread before him. Ucanogos followed his trail as though she had been with him stepping where he had stepped, climbing up the glaciers to the skyline then pausing, as he had paused, where one could see the valley below. Why hadn't she come with him to gaze at nature’s bounteous gifts? Ucanogos cautiously picked her way on up the narrow crest to where Timpanac had been attacked. Then she read the story of his brave struggle at the summit of the great mountain where he had lost his footing and had fallen to his death far, far below. As the fair Ucanogos stepped forward to look over the ledge to behold the broken body of her loved one, all sorrow and hatred left her heart. No tears came to her eyes. The Great Spirit spoke to her and said, “You shall now see him only as a beautiful emerald pool, where his love for you may ever be reflected in its pure emerald waters as your hearts were pure for each other.” Then Ucanogos cried to the Great Spirit to let her stay by her loved one forever. In answer, the Great Spirit rent the sky with lightening and the thunder that followed shook the earth with terrifying force. The Indians in the valley fell to the earth, face down in terror. When they dared to arise, they beheld to the east of them, on the crest of the mountain, their beautiful Princess Ucanogos in perfect profile, fast asleep. The Great Spirit spoke to them, “Here, towering above you, two beautiful lovers shall remain side by side forever. Beauty shall ever be present. The birds and streams and trees and breezes shall bring them beautiful music. The plants and flowers shall bloom and send forth their finest fragrances. The winds shall ever keep them company, bringing beautiful blankets of clouds, rain and snow to show all the purity of their hearts. Anyone who trods the trails this way shall do so in reverence and respect. Henceforth and forever, Timpanac and Ucanogos shall be joined and remain side by side throughout eternity, and they shall be known through the ages as Timpanogos.”

Mary Lucille Wright Walker

Contributor: Dan Clark Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Mary Lucille Wright Walker Born: July 26, 1906 Died: December 15, 2001 Biography of Mary Lucille Wright by Mary Jean Walker Caldwell Lucille, as she was always called, was born 26 July 1906, in Lindon, Utah. As was the custom of the day, she was born at her parents home. She was the second child of Hyrum Isaac and Mary Jane Bezzant Wright. Even so, with their combined families she was the thirteenth child and would have one younger sister and two younger brothers. She immediately became the much desired property of her older sister Eileen. Her family consisted of her father, Hyrum (a farmer); her mother, Mary Jane; a younger brother, Harold; a younger sister, Emily and Don, the baby of the family. Both parents had families before they married each other. Four older brothers, Reuben, Clifford, Leon and Bert still at home as well as an older sister Eileen. Lucille fondly remembers how Bert always played with her when she was real small. Bert drowned in a ditch in Idaho when he was six years old. Harold being one and a half years younger was her playmate. One time they were playing butcher shop on their front porch using milkweed pods for meat. They ran out of milk weed pods and couldn't find any more. Lucille went into the house and got a sharp knife and proceeded to cut Harold's wrist for the badly needed meat. This was stopped quickly by her mother. Emily was three years younger and was the “little” sister. As big sisters do, Lucille objected to her “tagging along” whenever she went anyplace, and was constantly trying to ditch her. When they both became teenagers this changed and they became very close sisters. Don was seven years younger, so Lucille was his baby sitter. The day he was born, the Doctor came down the street; Harold, Em and Lucille were rushed over to their Aunt Hattie’s to play with their cousins. When they returned home they had a new baby brother. On the horseshoe shaped street where she lived were cousins by the dozens to play with. Also Grandma Bezzant lived right next door, and later she lived with them. As a child she believed, “If mama and daddy say no, ask Grandma.” Lucille was surrounded by cousins. Aunt Hattie and Uncle Sam (Bezzant) lived down the street from her house with two girls about the same age and a boy a little older. She spent much of her younger life at their home. She liked to spend the summer in their summer kitchen, it seemed there were always pies and cakes cooking, and in the winter time it made a fine playhouse. Oh, the good times she had with Clarissa and Chloe and Floyd. On the top of the hill lived Uncle Jim and Aunt Annie (Wright). They also had children the same age. One son Lafe was just a year older than Lucille, and was one of her favorite cousins. Vera, his sister, was one year younger. They picked Sego Lilies in the sand hills across from their house, and made sand castles and even built sand forts there. Aunt Annie made the best chocolate pies anyone ever ate. Up the street a ways lived Uncle Joe and Aunt Elva (Bezzant). That house was originally Grandmother and Grandfather Bezzant’s old home, it was built on short stilts. One day Mary, Elva and Lucille crawled under the house to find ant furniture, Lucille’s leg was cut on a piece of an old glass bottle which she knelt on and the adventure was canceled. Elva and Lucille often were mean to Mary and aggravated her. Once when Mary was angry, she decided to take Lucille’s rocking chair to her house, so Lucille and Elva climbed on top of the barn and threw rocks at her. She left the chair in the middle of the road and went home, which was what they wanted her to do. Of course, the chair was retrieved and played with by the twosome. Everyone in the family liked to play house on the hay stack next to the barn. The play house always extended to the attic above the barn. That was really fun. The hay stack was soft, and they liked to play on it and slide down it. This behavior was unacceptable to their father, but sometimes they did it when he wasn't around and ran the chance of punishment–they really weren't too frightened. When Lucille started school her two older brothers, Lynn and Cliff were assigned to carry her on their shoulders the one mile to her friends house and then she walked the last mile to school. In the winter sometimes her father would take them to school in the horse drawn buggy. If the snow was too deep, he drove a sled. There was no central heating in homes, but there was at the schools, so in the cold of the winter she wore two or three wool flannel petticoats under her dress, a panty waist to hold up her heavy socks, long underwear (to the ankle and to the wrist), high top shoes, boots, mittens and a muff over her hands, a heavy winter coat, scarf around most of her face, neck and head, and a hat. For a usual school day when the weather was warm, she still wore high top, button up shoes, long stockings, one petticoat, a dress and a cover-up apron. One day she decided she didn't want to wear the apron and hid it under the bridge after leaving home. That afternoon she couldn't find her apron when she returned. Her mother gave her a scotch blessing and the punishment was such that she never did the stunt again. The biggest thrill of all was when she would board the train alone and go to visit her Aunt Em (her mother’s sister), Uncle August and family. Her father would flag the train, see that she got on o.k. then the journey was up to Lucille. Aunt Em’s family always met her in Salt Lake City. What a thrill to be in the big city. Aunt Em was truly a second mother to her. She lived on 2nd west and 8th south. Lucille and her cousins walked to town to shows, sometimes they rode the trolley car. It was great fun for a country girl. The block was filled with children to play with and all were glad to see her again. Lucille grew up as much with these cousins as she did with her friends at home. There were 4 girls and 1 boy in Aunt Em’s family. Gene the boy was 11 years older than Lucille, Edna about three year older, Tess one year older, and Hazel one year younger. Aunt Em’s husband, Uncle August, was a policeman at Liberty Park. He would get rides on all the concessions and tickets at eating places for free. Did everyone ever have a good time! Sometimes these visits lasted 3 or 4 weeks. Then Lucille and one of the cousins, usually Tess, boarded the train for Pleasant Grove. Just before her High School (Junior High) years her Dad sold his farm and moved to a home/farm in Pleasant Grove–right next to the school. (This later became the Third Ward meeting house). It was here she met Calvin Walker. Theirs was a fruit farm with raspberries planted among the apple, apricot, and peach trees (especially one called Uncle Jim hale peaches) around the home in Pleasant Grove . She became a very proficient berry picker. She would put on a large brim straw hat, a cover up apron over her dress (heaven forbid that a lady wore pants) tie a lard bucket with old stockings around her waist, and go out early in the morning and stay until the two acres were finished. Her folks planted roses and peonies around the edge of the vegetable garden near the house. Her father liked crossing different varieties of roses. (When Calvin and Lucille later sold this place to the school district, she would insist these roses go with her to the new home they had built.) The side lawn had purple and white lilac trees, and a forsythia bush perfect for a play house. Her father bought her a piano and she took lessons from A. R. Overlaid, who lived just a few blocks away. She became quite proficient and accompanied different groups and people. When she finished High School, Lucille immediately started at the Brigham Young Academy, desiring to receive her normal degree and teach elementary school. After finishing her first year, she couldn't find a job where she wanted to, so she went back for one more year. She then found a teaching position in Lehi and rode the Leaping Lena–OOPS–the Suburban back and forth to work. All this time she corresponded with Calvin and he made sure that she had a date for all the big events, if he couldn't be there. When Calvin graduated from USAC with a teaching degree, they immediately decided to get married before he moved to Duchesne to teach. Lucille had been considered the family old maid at age 23 and still single. They were married in the Salt Lake temple and honeymooned on their way to Duchesne. While in Duchesne they spent a lot of time with the Madison family from Pleasant Grove. Lucille soon was pregnant with her first child and discovered that fish didn't agree with her. She never could stand fish, again. They moved to Lehi and then to Pleasant Grove. Lucille’s father passed away in early 1937. A short time later, Calvin and Lucille bought her folks home. Once again she was back to the fruit picking and canning all summer. Summer canning was always a big deal and she organized her family to help her as soon as possible. The older ones pealing veggies and fruit, the younger ones rinsing the food off and carrying their small bowls of produce to the peelers. By the time it got to peaches and pears everyone was sick of it and everyone got silly. Lucille would end up with side aches laughing with her children at nothing. But it got the work done in a good mood. She tolerated and enjoyed a good clean joke among the family (April Fools day was always a big deal), but the minute it got out of hand she immediately put a stop to it. “Enough is enough," she would say. She was a mother who believed in bribery. “If you will clean up the kitchen, I will talk your Dad into a picnic on the west side of the lake”, she would say. Or maybe it was a trip with their Dad to the junkyard, going fast over the bump on the hill. It was a treat so everyone pitched in. Picnic’s were a family tradition. They went places like the Big Springs Farm, Aunt Josie’s, Uncle Tom’s house in American Fork Canyon, Battle Creek, Granite Flat, Pittsburgh Lake, Tibble Fork, Mutual Dell, and Timpanogos Divide. This list could go on. Frequently friends and cousins were along, so everyone sat two deep, “What difference can a few extra make with this crowd”, was her answer to her children. Every fall when Calvin attended the UEA convention, she took her daughters and went shopping. Usually there was only $10.00 in her pocket and she went home with $5.00 (lunch was bought), but every hat, coat, dress and shoe anyone wanted to try, on was tried on. It was always a day to remember. She felt she needed to teach all her girls to sew, clean a house, can and cook. The funny mistakes made, like greasing a pie pan and putting a left sleeve in the right armhole, were laughed at by both and corrected. Even the boys could cook a meal and clean a house if they ever needed to do so. During the years, as her family was growing up, she was active in her church. She served in the Primary, Sunday School, Relief Society and YWMIA as a teacher and in the Presidencies. When her husband was Bishop she was one of the very first Cub Scout Den Leaders of the ward. As the years moved on the children started to marry and leave home, each one was hard for her and also a joy. Many moved away and that meant trips to parts of the country she had never seen. She was able to see the historic church sites and attend many of the church pageants. They even went to Israel. Now she and Calvin were back at the beginning, just the two of them at home. They worked in the Prove temple, which they loved. They also bought a Volkswagen Bus and went fishing. She still didn't like fish, but she would take her tatting or crocheting along to keep her busy. She always had a book along, just in case. No one ever knew what “just in case” meant. When Calvin died in 1980 she stayed in the home they built for quite so time. She died on December 15, 2001.

Great Granddad Holman (James Alonzo Holman)

Contributor: Dan Clark Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

GREAT GRANDDAD HOLMAN (James Alonzo Holman) Mary Jean Caldwell My father told family members this story and we all need to remember the lessons he learned from this early member of the church: (Story below as told by Calvin A Walker.) At the old age of 14 (really 13), I decided to get a job, make lots of money; save most of it and when my girl graduated from High School we could get married. I would by then have a house for us and we would be ready to start our family. My father, after many attempts on my part, found me a job working on the farm in Lindon for his mother and grandfather, my great granddad Holman. Now that I was a man I needed to stay there to work all winter. It also meant that High School activities were a no-no and because of the hours and the distance from their home in Lindon, I wasn’t able to see much of my girl, Lucille. From the money I earned I had to pay Grandma and Great Granddad board and room and my tithing must be paid also. There wasn’t much left over to save. When the days got short and I wasn’t so busy, I was a ready-made audience for the stories of my great granddad. He could weave stories so that I could see the things he told me and feel part of them sometimes. What a great storyteller! But the stories were far from boring, they were church history! Great Granddad knew the Prophet Joseph Smith. He could remember every detail of his looks, the way he played with the children (Great Granddad was one of them), and the way he moved among the people. It seemed to him that the Prophet knew everyone. As a child in Nauvoo it seemed to him this man was bigger than life; Great Granddad was only 9 years old when the Prophet and his brother were martyred. When the saints started west he drove a wagon and his father drove President Young’s sheep herd to the valley. He had his thirteenth birthday just before entering the Great Salt Lake Valley. (Blue books on Church History) He also personally knew Brigham Young and would tell of seeing the mantle of the Prophet Joseph Smith descending on him. He felt that this was a chosen man and a great man chosen by the Lord to continue the work started by Prophet Joseph Smith. He would describe him in a very reverent manner and always end by saying, “Follow the Prophet.” As a result of this winter, my father would always end by saying, “Follow the Prophet. Never waver from him and you will have eternal life with him. I personally knew that my Great granddad knew the first two prophets personally and he knew they were men of God. He knew beyond a doubt that Joseph Smith saw God the Father and His son Jesus Christ and he never wavered.”

CALVIN A WALKER

Contributor: Dan Clark Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Calvin was born in Pleasant Grove, Utah on 29 August 1906 at his parents, Jim and Della Walker, home. He was the seventh child in a family of 14 children. With a lot of children close to his age he never was lonely and always had someone to do things with. The family had a large farm with fruit trees to tend and pick, a garden to weed and harvest and fields to plow and harvest. With all this the family still found time to have their own rodeo’s, picnics, climb little mountain, and go to the Indian meadow. Calvin had two brothers close to his age; Bill one year older and Tom three years older. As youngsters “the boys” had a great time teasing and tormenting their older sisters, Row and Zola. Calvin always seem to know when to quit, but it was aggravating to his sisters. With the family home at the base of the mountains, this was a natural stomping place for a child to go when they were sad or happy. He never lost his love of his mountains. He knew them like he knew his own yard. The family home was in the Pleasant Grove Third ward and was on the east foothills of town. The road in front of the house went straight from the foothills to the city cemetery. (This was the town sledding hill for many years.) The Third Ward was known as “Monkey Town.” Up and down the road (east to west) Calvin had many friends who ruled Monkey Town. They played tricks and pranks that would now put them on probation, but they thought it was all in good fun and so did the adults in the area. He always remained close friends with Les, Roy and Glenn. Calvin was a tease and everyone knew this about him. His teasing was always fun and he could take a practical joke back. Calvin attended the Pleasant Grove elementary school and high school. His father was a teacher and later the principal at the Pleasant Grove schools. He enjoyed school as this brought new people into his life to nickname and tease. With a ready grin and laugh it was easy for him to make friends. Calvin started calling Lucille his girl at the age most of us won’t let our kids date. Though they would from time to time date someone else–it was only because the other wasn’t available. He was shorter than Lucille at the beginning. She was heard later to say it was embarrassing but he still was her choice. When Calvin finally grew up (straight up), they would sit down together and still were very close to the same size, he just had very long legs and would unwind as he stood up. When he turned fifteen, Calvin decided to quit school, get a job, save his money, get rich, and marry Lucille as soon as she finished high school. His Dad helped him find a job working for Great Granddad Holman and Grandma Walker in Lindon. At the Holman’s he was too far out to come in every day after work, so he stayed at the home all winter. As he wasn’t in school and was now a working man, the high school activities were a no-no. During the long, long winter and snowed in and the evening hours with nothing else to do, he became a captive audience for his great grandfather’s stories of the early days in the church. This man personally knew the Prophet Joseph Smith as a young child and had sat on his lap and Brigham Young. He frequently bore his testimony to Calvin that winter of the truthfulness of the gospel and how he knew these men were the prophets of God. He described them in such detail that Calvin could see them in his minds eye (so strong were the stories in minute detail). At times he felt like they were right there with them. He listened to stories of crossing the plains and settling the new country. The hunger and thirst the pioneers felt were very real to him. His great grandfather was one of the young men sent back with teams to bring the saints in to Zion from Nebraska and Iowa. Before the winter was over Calvin decided to go back to school because of this man. His great grandfather told him to always, no matter what, follow the prophet for that was the way to true happiness forever. Because of the year out of high school he graduated a year after his girl. During the summer, he worked mining coal in the Bingham coal mine. Then on to Logan to USAC (Utah State Agriculture College) for Calvin, Bill and Tom. He milked cows at the school dairy to earn enough money to stay in school. He majored in Civil Engineering the first three years at the AC and then changed to education. He planned to teach on the Junior High School level. “The boys” earned their B.S. degree in 1929. The summer of 1928 found Calvin working at Yellowstone. He worked on the road from Yellowstone to Bozeman, along the Madison River. The construction workers would go into town to get drunk after work and Calvin was the worker assigned to go to West Yellowstone after them in the dump truck each evening. He would load them in the back of the truck, drive back to camp, raise the dumper and roll them out. The boss trusted Calvin because he knew he wouldn’t drink with the other men. One evening after work he was taking the harnesses off the mules, got behind them and one, 2200 pound mule, kicked him tossing him 100 feet. The accident resulted in a popped spleen and one out of commission kidney; leaving a scar from his sternum to below his belly button because of the operation performed to find the extent of the injuries. His father and Josie went to him immediately. For a long time they were not sure he would survive. His skinny frame was even thinner. When he was finally released to go home with his family he was told that he had only a few years to live because of the loss of his spleen. The pain killer given to him while he recuperated was morphine; which left him an addict. Though he would overcome the dependency, he would always be an addict and couldn’t take it again. He always had an empathy for those with similar problems. He would always have to be careful with infections because of having only one kidney. Calvin married his childhood sweetheart, Lucille Wright, on August 29, 1929 (his birthday) in the Salt Lake Temple. They immediately loaded up in their car, newly purchased and in hock for, and left for Duchesne. Here Calvin had a job to teach High School (grade 7-12). He taught everything from girls P.E. to shop, with a smattering of math and science. He often laughed at the P.E. assignment. While living here he hiked all over the Granddaddy’s and fished all the lakes and streams. Often after school he would fish right there on the Duchesne River for supper. This was a much needed necessity as the country was just coming out of the depression and money was scarce when it came to buying anything but the necessities. In fact it was here that he gained a strong testimony of tithing, as they put the promise to the test many times, paying tithing first and working the budget after. They would find produce or flour and sugar on their porch the next day. The principle of tithing never failed them. He left Duchesne after one year to teach in the Junior High in Lehi for three years. The next summer Calvin went back to summer school in Logan to get a elementary certificate. He had decided that younger children would be the place to teach and more fun. He later transferred to the Spencer Grade School in Orem. One of his former students from Lehi tells about a class project he had. He started out to make a cedar chest. Everything didn’t square up so he cut a little off here and sanding a little more there until all he had left was a small cedar jewelry box. Calvin never got after the student and let him keep at it until finished. This student later became a teacher and was influenced by the role model set for him by Calvin especially the patience Calvin had exhibited. Calvin loved to play on words. A stop sign wasn’t just a stop sign, it was a s-te-o-pe sign. He could so confuse anyone that he had them saying union for onion or onion for union. Both ways worked for him. He also had a favorite math problem: A rich man had 7 camels. He had three sons. In his will he left his oldest son half of the camels, his second son one quarter of his camels and the youngest son one of his camels. He stipulated that they were not to kill any of the camels to make the division. How did the sons make the division? He taught this to his fifth and sixth grade math classes. (This problem is now in the pre-algebra books in the school systems.) As his children were growing up Calvin taught them to love the mountains. He taught all his family the beauty of the world around them and how to listen to nature. The family frequently hiked the foothills on the east side of town above his folks place and played in the Monkey Town jungle. He took the children to all his favorite places in the local mountains–Grove Creek Springs, Battle Creek Spring, the “G”, Indian Meadow behind Little Mountain, top of Timp, Sam Green;s Grove, Pittsburgh Lake, Dutchman Mine, Granite Flat and the old tram at Tibble Fork. When Calvin and Lucille built their new home in Pleasant Grove, it was placed to get the best view of Timpanogas. A favorite Saturday activity might be a ride up to the dump for the whole family with a burst of speed over the bumps so everyone lost their stomach. Other times they went nutting in west canyon or just around the Lake. There was many trips with his sons to go fishing in the Granddaddies. One of these trips Glen was carried 8 miles each way because of his foot problems. He taught his children to ski in the winter on the wheat field at his folks place and at Mutual Dell. He taught them to play tennis, basketball and fast pitch soft ball. He was the city recreation director for many summers and his family was expected to get involved. Being physically active was important to him. He often (more often than not) got up in the mornings and would walk from his home to the lake and back before the rest of the family got up. He was a very fast walker. During the World War II, Geneva Steel was built in the valley down by Utah Lake. Calvin was drafted into the service, but was exempted because of his family size, twice. He would work at Geneva during the summers and sometimes after school. That was his war duty and effort. For many years Tom and Calvin checked the moisture on top of the divide at Timpanoke. (The divide was the top of the pass between American Fork Canyon and Provo Canyon. The big argument in the family with the children quite often was which side was the prettiest and the best.) In the winter they took their sons on skis and climbed from Mutual Dell up to the top and then rode the skis down after they finished their measurement of the snow and moisture content. In the summer the families went up in cars and played in the meadow and picnicked. Here he taught his children the names of the plants and trees; also which were edible and which not to eat and how to tell sometimes which were which. For two summers he ran Mutual Dell Camp. The family spent a lot of time in the caretakers cabin. The Boy Scouts, Ward YWMIA groups, and family camps were fun for everyone to watch. The lightening and thunder storms were something to behold. They would echo and scare the kids and Calvin stayed close by to help each child through this experience. He frequently would recite poems from memory to his family; such as the Raggedy Man, Hiawatha, and Little Orphan Annie. The latter when the electricity was out and especially on Halloween. He loved to read bedtime stories (or so we all thought); such as Brier Rabbit, Thunder Cave, all of the Aesop’s Fables and a book called Tall Tales. He was a firm believer in early to bed and early to rise. As the children became teenagers this became interpreted as the later you stay out the earlier you’ll be getting up! The getting up early meant ice cubes or ice water to help you wake up! Then you got up because the bed was wet and so were you and it was miserable. No curfew here. During the gas rationing time of World War II he was transferred to the Central School in Pleasant Grove to teach fifth and sixth grade. This was right across the street from his home. During the cold winter months he and other teachers kept an ice skating pond on the lower end of the playgrounds. During recess and at noon the music played and the students learned and did ice skate. Skates were passed down throughout the whole town. Every fall Calvin would take his sixth grade students on an annual Indian Trail hike around Little Mountain. They went up Grove Creek in the morning, crossing the falls and then into the meadow for lunch. After lunch it was down Battle Creek and back to the school before the last bell rang. Many of the other teachers offered to help chaperone just for the chance to go see the meadow. Calvin received his masters in education degree after he had 7 of his eight children in 1949 from BYU. He put into a practice a saying he used a lot–“Where there is a will there is a way”. He wrote a history of Pleasant Grove for his masters thesis. The children in fifth and sixth grades for a few years helped in compiling some of the stories in this thesis as part of their social studies class. The children thought it was fun, as they toured throughout the town and found many place they didn’t know about before, such as the old fort wall. With all his schooling, Calvin did not believe in letting his studies interfere with his education. This was his big advice to his children as they left home to further their education. I believe most of them took this advice and enjoyed the experience as well as studied. In 1918 he registered as a Boy Scout. He never got over this experience. It was just the kind of program that appealed to him as a young man. He had terrific leaders and companions in scouting and he became instantly involved for life. He was an Assistant Scoutmaster, Scoutmaster, Troop Committeeman, District Chairman, Explorer Leader, District Commissioner and District Advancement Chairman. He had a habit of nicknaming the scouts in his troop. It just seemed the natural thing to do after being with them for awhile. These nick names stayed with the boys even into manhood. (He even gave all his children nicknames and some of his nephews and nieces. Aunt Josie did not like this happening to her grandchildren and often voiced her opposition.) One year, while working in scouts with Fred Shoell, H. Walker, and Sam Hilton, they had 34 Scouts awarded their Eagles. Under Calvin plus whoever happened to be working with him Troop 23 had 133 boys receive their Eagle award. He received his Silver Beaver in 1942. He, along with his son Jim, attended the National Court of Honor at Portland, Washington in May 1948 as the Scouter Representative for the Church and they received the National Award of Merit. This was as a result of Jim and him saving the life of Richard Cromer and his father when Richard fell into an irrigation ditch. The family vacations were often at scout camp; such as Moon Lake in the Granddaddies, Mutual Dell in American Fork Canyon (a church campground), and Wildwood in Provo Canyon. All his children learned the Scout Spirit (Law, Oath, Motto, and Slogan), the constellations in the sky and the Morris code before the age of twelve. Why? Because the scouts met in his home (many not from his ward) and did the stars on his front lawn and the Morris code from his front porch to Sam Hilton’s front porch in the mouth of Battle Creek at the power plant. The story of Gus (as everyone in scouting called him) and scouting wouldn’t be complete without SKUNKING. In American Fork Canyon in a cave skunking was born. Only those who were skunks were allowed to know where this cave was. A scout had to be at least First Class to be allowed to be admitted. The brew the group drank and the food they ate was often cooked in his kitchen by his wife or in the kitchen of his brother, Tom. At the end of each meeting there was a testimony bearing time for everyone. When World War 11 broke out and the boys went into the military, the skunks met to strengthen one another before leaving. When a boy received his mission call, the skunks met to bid farewell. When any of the boys returned, from the military or from a mission, they met for fellowshipping and fellowship. Calvin was the Bishop of the Pleasant Grove Third Ward, the same ward where he grew up and his dad served as Bishop. He was a very youth oriented Bishop in this calling. Now the scouts got to go camping with their Bishop. At Christmas time, as he did during World War II, he sent “his boys” that were in the Korean War a sprig of sagebrush in a letter he wrote to them, personalized for each boy. (He did the same for his children as they moved around the country.) He had some very close friends that were inactive at this time, consequently, he gathered the group together once a week in his home. This group became active and many went to the temple. This was a big thrill in his and his wife’s life. Calvin loved serving the Church and being Bishop was just another way for him to accomplish this. Calvin loved to go around the area telling the Legend of Timpanogas. He would dress in his Indian blanket and headdress with the feathers going down his back. He did this for church and civic groups around town and in the neighboring towns. When Glen was getting his masters degree at USU he took a class in story telling techniques. When everyone in the class had told their stories, Glen invited his Dad to come up and tell his legend with the instructors approval. The instructor was very impressed and labeled Calvin a Master Story Teller. When his children started to leave home and move away from the area Calvin frequently traveled during the summer to visit his grandchildren. He had to make sure the children were treating their mates right but even more important were his grandchildren being taught correctly. He visited the Statue of Liberty, (asked the guide if the sign “All Walker’s Free” meant he could go to the top free as his name was Walker.), Boston, Nauvoo, Haun’s Mill where the Foutz had lived, Adam-ondi-ahman, Carthage and Liberty Jails, and the Hill Cumorah Pageant. Each place had a special feeling for him because of his experience with his Grandad Holman. Everywhere he went he met someone who knew someone he knew or was related to a friend or they had had similar experiences. They were soon visiting about everything like they had known each other for ever. This meeting instant friends was one of his great talents. Imagine moving into a new ward and Bishop coming up to you that he expected a lot of you because of you Dad. (It happened frequently to his children as they moved around.) Getting together with his brothers and sisters was always a big event. They frequently got together to visit or have a dinner or with their children, usually at the American Fork Cave Camp Ground. These events were always fun, especially for Calvin. He prepared for retirement by accepting a call as a temple worker in the Provo Temple a few years before he retired. This was a calling or job he had desired for many years, but traveling to Salt Lake in the winter was precarious around the Point of the Mountain. Then the Provo Temple was announced and Calvin with his wife were ready to go to work. At this time he also was given a call to go to the state prison as a home teacher. This was something new the church was trying our. He with Jim Hall as his companion were assigned to a man from their home town. Sometimes they would take the man’s family up to meet with them. He even took his wife once in awhile. This was done with the hope the prisoner would be able to make it in the world when released, as he would have a support group. When he retired he had time to pursue his interests as an artist. He took classed from Carol Harding and gave pictures to his children that he finished in this class. This wasn’t his usual cartooning which was always such fun, but oil paintings to be hung in their homes. He turned to pottery making and took a class at BYU which resulted in his buying his own wheel and oven. He gathered clay from the old brickyard in Pleasant Grove and from the mines up around Occorphur. Every grandchild had a turn at the wheel as they tried to make a pot, in fact they got to keep the finished product. He made many beautiful pots that he would give to people who visited him. The highlight of his retired years was a trip to Israel. He spent a week there with his daughter Nancy and her husband, Pat. Tears would well up in his eyes as told his children and grandchildren of this experience; how it felt to walk where the Savior walked and how short the distances were from on town to another or one spot in the Bible to another. He walked from place to place most of the trip. When he taught the Gospel Doctrine class after this experience he would use this trip in his lessons. Gus gave his last Eagle interview the weekend before going into the hospital the last time. He wasn’t feeling well but the young man needed and deserved the interview. This young man had his Eagle Court of Honor the same night of Calvin’s funeral. At his funeral s speaker stated that the real tribute to “Gus” was his family–children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren who were there. As everyone left the church at the end of the funeral, the children of the Central School gathered on the playground and stood at attention in tribute to this man. That is the inheritance he left us all–“Love of family”.

Some brief information

Contributor: Dan Clark Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Calvin A. Walker Born August 29, 1906 Died April 18, 1980 *Born in Pleasant Grove in parent’s home *Seventh child out of 14 *Raised on a farm *Went to Pleasant Grove elementary and high school *Knew Lucille in his childhood *Quit school at age 16 for a year, but went back *Went to USAC and majored first in civil engineering and then education for junior high B.S. degree in 1929 *Worked in Yellowstone in 1928: boss trusted him to pick up drunken workers in the evening *Was kicked by a mule—damaged his spleen and kidney *Married Lucille August 29, 1929 in Salt Lake Temple *Taught in Duchesne: everything from P. E. to shop to math and science *Loved to hike *Taught high school in Lehi for three years *1932 got elementary certificate and taught in Spencer School in Orem *Loved the mountains *Knew how to name wild plants and knew which ones were edible or not *Active and taught children how to play ski, tennis, and basketball *Taught in Central School in Pleasant Grove—fifth and sixth grade *Became principal in 1954—retired May 1972 *Took the sixth grade children up Grove Creek in the morning, crossing the falls and into the meadow for lunch, and down Battle Creek in the afternoon *Received his master’s degree in 1949 from BYU. *1918: Registered for Boy Scout, involved in scouting all his life. Eagle Scout *Sliver Beaver in 1942 *Called Gus in scouting *Bishop of the Pleasant Grove Third Ward, the same ward where he grew up *Told Legend of Timpanogos *Traveled to Statue of Liberty, Boston, Nauvoo, Haun’s Mill, Adam-ondi-ahman, Carthage, Liberty Jail, and Hill Cumorah Pageant, and Israel *Temple worker in Provo Temple *Liked art and pottery

Calvin A Walker

Contributor: Dan Clark Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

My father was an educator for over 40 years in elementary schools. He taught at Central Elementary in Pleasant Grove, Utah for most of his career. He was the Principal there at his retirement. He was a Bishop in the Third Ward in Pleasant Grove and an avid Scouter. He was also a great storyteller and a great father.

Calvin A Walker

Contributor: Dan Clark Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Grandpa past away before I was born

Life timeline of Calvin A. Walker

1906
Calvin A. Walker was born on 29 Aug 1906
Calvin A. Walker was 11 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Calvin A. Walker was 23 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Calvin A. Walker was 24 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Calvin A. Walker was 39 years old when World War II: Nagasaki is devastated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, is dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. Thirty-five thousand people are killed outright, including 23,200-28,200 Japanese war workers, 2,000 Korean forced workers, and 150 Japanese soldiers. Nagasaki is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan. The city's name, 長崎, means "long cape" in Japanese. Nagasaki became a centre of colonial Portuguese and Dutch influence in the 16th through 19th centuries, and the Hidden Christian Sites in the Nagasaki Region have been recognized and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Part of Nagasaki was home to a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War.
Calvin A. Walker was 51 years old when Space Race: Launch of Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth. The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability. It had its origins in the missile-based nuclear arms race between the two nations that occurred following World War II, aided by captured German missile technology and personnel from the Aggregat program. The technological superiority required for such dominance was seen as necessary for national security, and symbolic of ideological superiority. The Space Race spawned pioneering efforts to launch artificial satellites, uncrewed space probes of the Moon, Venus, and Mars, and human spaceflight in low Earth orbit and to the Moon.
Calvin A. Walker was 59 years old when Thirty-five hundred United States Marines are the first American land combat forces committed during the Vietnam War. The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.
Calvin A. Walker was 67 years old when Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers leave South Vietnam. The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and the government of South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese army was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; the South Vietnamese army was supported by the United States, South Korea, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some US perspectives. The majority of Americans believe the war was unjustified. The war would last roughly 19 years and would also form the Laotian Civil War as well as the Cambodian Civil War, which also saw all three countries become communist states in 1975.
Calvin A. Walker died on 18 Apr 1980 at the age of 73
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Calvin A. Walker (29 Aug 1906 - 18 Apr 1980), BillionGraves Record 27690 Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States

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