C. Frederick Chadwick

6 Aug 1860 - 25 Jan 1910

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C. Frederick Chadwick

6 Aug 1860 - 25 Jan 1910
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Sarah Goode Marshall Chadwick is celebrated as the first woman to enter the Salt Lake Valley with the first Great Handcart Company from Foreign Nations, predominantly from the British Isles. Organizer-Captain Edmund Ellsworth, reluctant to allow this thirty-four year old widow and her six small chil
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Life Information

C. Frederick Chadwick

Born:
Died:

Dayton Cemetery

Highway 36
Dayton, Franklin, Idaho
United States
Transcriber

BarbaraLeishman

September 22, 2013
Photographer

BarbaraLeishman

September 20, 2013

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Memories

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SARAH GOODE MARSHALL CHADWICK

Contributor: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Sarah Goode Marshall Chadwick is celebrated as the first woman to enter the Salt Lake Valley with the first Great Handcart Company from Foreign Nations, predominantly from the British Isles. Organizer-Captain Edmund Ellsworth, reluctant to allow this thirty-four year old widow and her six small children to join his huge company, feared she could be "a hindrance." Sarah prevailed, "Well, Captain Ellsworth," the determined woman declared, "I'm going and I'll beat you there!" Her vision of Zion before her, she withstood hardships and near starvation on the long arduous journey. On the night before the Company would enter the Salt Lake Valley, Captain Ellsworth granted her permission for an early morning start. Therefore, after three months and seventeen days, she pulled her handcart into the Salt Lake Valley. She had indeed beaten Captain Ellsworth there. Sarah Goode, the daughter of George Goode and Selina Mary Ann Holder was born 2 March 1821 in Mithelldean or Abbinhall, Gloucestershire, England. She married Thomas Marshall 7 May 1843. Six children were born to the union: Levenia, Selina, Tryphenia, Louisa, George and Sarah. She enjoyed reading the Bible. She wholeheartedly embraced the Gospel upon hearing the Elders preach. Many times she walked twenty miles up and down rugged hills to meetings, carrying her baby, Sarah. Her testimony grew in spite of her husband's bitter opposition and regular beatings. The death of her husband, Thomas Marshall, in 1854, left her penniless. She supported her family by serving as a lady' maid by day and making kid gloves by night; an art she learned in girlhood. After two years of frugal living she had set aside enough money to realize her dream to "Come to Zion." The night before her departure for Zion, family and friends warned her that she and her family would lose their lives. An Elder lifted his hand, "In the Name of Israel's God...(Sarah)...will go to Zion and not lose one child.." They boarded the ship named Samuel Curling, sailing from Liverpool, England on Saturday, 19 April 1856. Arriving in Boston 23 May 1856, they traveled by rail to Iowa City to prepare for the long journey. Food was scarce crossing the plains. Flour was rationed to two ounces per person. They took turns using the bake ovens at night to prepare the next day's food. One late evening a young man approached,"I'm starving to death," he said. Many times Sarah thanked the Lord she had shared her ration with him, for he was found dead the next morning. "If I had not done so my conscience would condemn me." Many days the Company traveled until dark before finding water to camp. One evening Sarah discovered her eight year old girl, Tryphenia, missing. Hungry wolves circled nearby. "I cannot rest until my daughter is found," she told the Captain. The child, having fallen asleep along the trail, was recovered the following morning to great rejoicing. Sarah Goode Marshall married widower Joseph Chadwick in January of 1857. Two sons were born; William and Charles Frederick. They lived in Franklin, Idaho. She and her children gleaned the fields, gathering scattered heads of grain to make flour for bread. One day her axe was missing. After prayer she found it where her husband had stolen and buried it. Buckskins tediously prepared for her little boy's suit disappeared. Her prayers were answered when she discovered them hidden among willows under a shed. Joseph and Sarah Marshall Chadwick and her daughter, Selina Marshall Gregory and their families were the first settlers in Franklin, Idaho. They homesteaded and she and her husband operated a mercantile business until his death in 1878. "I don't believe in giving an apple where there is an orchard," the frugal woman stated. She gave hope and encouragement to humanity and as a midwife brought many souls into the world. She maintained a steadfast devotion to the Gospel throughout her mortal life. She died on 23 April 1904 at age 83 in Dayton, Idaho. Burial at Franklin, Idaho Cemetery. The original family history is taken from the written research of great granddaughter, Lulu Preece Parry. Plaque purchased and history condensed by the descendants of Iona May Fuller Knight and Mary Levenia Fuller Ericksen, daughters of Delilah Martha Davis Fuller Pike, daughter of Mary Levenia Gregory Davis, daughter of Selina Marshall Gregory, daughter of Sarah Goode Marshall Chadwick.

Life timeline of C. Frederick Chadwick

1860
C. Frederick Chadwick was born on 6 Aug 1860
C. Frederick Chadwick was 17 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
C. Frederick Chadwick was 28 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
C. Frederick Chadwick was 31 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
C. Frederick Chadwick was 45 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
C. Frederick Chadwick died on 25 Jan 1910 at the age of 49
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Grave record for C. Frederick Chadwick (6 Aug 1860 - 25 Jan 1910), BillionGraves Record 5231378 Dayton, Franklin, Idaho, United States

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