Bishop Collier Earl

15 Mar 1843 - 5 Jul 1918

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Bishop Collier Earl

15 Mar 1843 - 5 Jul 1918
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Grave site information of Bishop Collier Earl (15 Mar 1843 - 5 Jul 1918) at Lehi Cemetery in Lehi, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Bishop Collier Earl

Born:
Died:

Lehi Cemetery

1098 N 400 E St
Lehi, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father - Mother

Headstone Description

Father
Transcriber

trishkovach

December 25, 2011
Transcriber

R and N Englestead

May 29, 2012
Transcriber

JFC

May 30, 2012
Photographer

Bointston

December 11, 2011

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Life Sketch of Sarah A. Goates Earl

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Sarah A. Goates, the eldest daughter of William and Susan Larkin Goates, was born in Cambridge, England, October 20, 1846, and migrated to Utah with her parents and two younger children, Martha and Joseph W., sailing from Liverpool, Tuesday, February 10, 1852 on the ship Ellen Marie, taking about six weeks to make the voyage, landing at New Orleans from where they went to St. Louis, enroute to Utah. Crossing the plains in Captain A. O. Smoot's company of thirty-one wagons, Sarah and her father being very sick with Mountain Fever most of the way, arriving at Salt Lake City, Utah, September 3, and about two weeks later locating at Lehi City, Utah. At this place and at an early age she took up her duties on the farm, helping her father clear the land of brush as best she could She was baptized in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at the age of eight years, by Brother Able Evans. The family having many experiences with the crickets and grasshoppers, at one time they being so numerous that large trenches were dug and the water turned in them, then with a brush they would beat the pests in to drown. She would often clean the wool from the brush where the sheep had pulled it out, wash it and send it to Provo to be carded; it would then be spun into yarn, dyed and woven into cloth. Sarah made the material for her own and her sister Martha's wedding dresses. She showed and early liking for the better things in life, and would work at anything so she could have nice things, also taking every advantage of opportunities to educate herself. Sarah was a member of the Lehi Choir, and was active in social work. On December 28, 1868, she was married to Bishop Collier Earl of Monroeville, Ohio, in the Endowment House at Salt Lake City, Utah, by President Wilford Woodruff, making Lehi her home for a short while, and at this place her first child, Charles W. was born. In November 1869, they moved to Heber City, Utah, and resided at this place for thirteen years. At this place she made a host of friends who have remained steadfast through all these years. There were five children born at this residence; namely Susan, *lida, Rebecca, Olive and John L. In July 1879 black diphtheria caused the death of the three oldest girls, all three of them being buried within eleven days. Sarah was among the first to join the Relief Society and is still a member. In 1882 the family moved back to Lehi where they have since resided, coming very highly recommended by President Abraham Hatch. At Lehi four children were born, Clara, Alama, Jesse, and Parah. In February 1888, Sarah, with Uncle Geo. W. Larkin when to the Logan Temple to do work for the family. She having the privilege of being baptized for her grandmother Ann Raynor. Ann Raynor was the first wife of Thomas Larkin and was born in England in 1792; dying July 8, 1821, and leaving one child, Susan Larkin Goates. Sarah was an ideal mother and took much pleasure in looking after her family. She never sought publicity of any kind, but was ever ready with a helping hand for the sick and needy. She buried her husband July 5, 1918, at the age of seventy-five years. Sarah always impressed one with her quiet dignity and unassuming ways. One of her many teaching was "return good for eve," which she practiced herself. Sarah has ever been an industrious and faithful wife, a good neighbor and a devoted Latter-day Saint, coming through many hardship of early days with faith unshaken. [Written in pencil:] Died November 13, 1932. Written by Mrs. Sarah Earl Wright (daughter)

Biographical Sketch of Bishop Collier Earl

Contributor: trishkovach Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Bishop Collier Earl, son of Charles Earl and Nancy Viana Allen, was born March 15th, 1843, at Monroeville, Huron County, Ohio. He attended the public schools until he was 17 years of age. On the 29th day of August 1860, he left his home going to California via the isthmus of Panama, arriving at San Francisco, September 22, 1860; leaving San Francisco for Los Angeles September 28th where he stayed until May 8th, 1861, entering the employ of the Overland Mail Company and coming to Utah via Saint George, arriving in Lehi, Utah on the 4th day of July 1861. He then went on to the western desert to assist in building the telegraph line to Faust Creek, Tooele Co., being present when the last connecting link was made and the first message flashed across the great American Continent. He then moved to Cedar Fort where he made his home for eight years. While there he served as a minute man and a term of enlistment in the State Guards against the Indians in Captain William Thurman's Company. For several years he followed the avocation of freighter, making two trips to the terminal of the U.P.R.R. at Jules Burg for Walker Brothers of Salt Lake City, also several trips to Boise, Idaho, and to Montana, during which he had some hair breadth escapes and exciting adventures with the Indian, but was fortunate enough to escape serious trouble. Bishop Collier Earl was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints February 3, 1863, at Cedar Fort, Utah, by Elder Eli Bennett, and confirmed by Elder Allen Weeks the same day. While living at Cedar Fort he was called to drive an ox team across the plains to Benton to bring in the last train of emigrants who crossed the plains in wagons, being a member of Captain John Hollman's Company, which mission he filled with honor and integrity. He was ordained an Elder and married Sarah Ann Goates of Lehi in the old Endowment House of Salt Lake City, Dec. 28, 1868, by whom he ahd ten children, four boys and six girls. Three girls and one boy have preceded him to the Great Beyond. He moved to Heber City, Utah in November of 1869 where he continued to reside for thirteen years, removing to Lehi November 1882, where he lived up to the time of his demise. Brother Earl followed the business of Tin Smith and Sheet Metal Worker up to the year 1905, also farming and stock raising. He held the office of Road Supervisor for three years. He was employed by the Utah Idaho Sugar Co. during the last campaign and was in their employment at the time he was stricken with his last illness, which proved fatal and during which he suffered greatly, but with fortitude and patience. He died July 5, 1918 aged 75 years, three months and twenty days, in full faith of the Gospel bearing his testimony to the truthfulness of the same and in the hopes of glorious resurrection. He was a kind and indulgent father and husband and leaves a loving and faithful wife, three sons and three daughters, and nine grandchildren to mourn his loss, together with a host of relatives and friends. Three of Bishop Collier Earl's sons: Charles W., Alama B., Jesse A. followed the utility line of work. His four grandsons and three great grandsons have followed the same occupation. [Found in a packet with a biographical sketch of his wife, Sarah Goates, written by his daughter Sarah Earl]

Life Sketch of Sarah A. Goates Earl

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Sarah A. Goates, the eldest daughter of William and Susan Larkin Goates, was born in Cambridge, England, October 20, 1846, and migrated to Utah with her parents and two younger children, Martha and Joseph W., sailing from Liverpool, Tuesday, February 10, 1852 on the ship Ellen Marie, taking about six weeks to make the voyage, landing at New Orleans from where they went to St. Louis, enroute to Utah. Crossing the plains in Captain A. O. Smoot's company of thirty-one wagons, Sarah and her father being very sick with Mountain Fever most of the way, arriving at Salt Lake City, Utah, September 3, and about two weeks later locating at Lehi City, Utah. At this place and at an early age she took up her duties on the farm, helping her father clear the land of brush as best she could She was baptized in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at the age of eight years, by Brother Able Evans. The family having many experiences with the crickets and grasshoppers, at one time they being so numerous that large trenches were dug and the water turned in them, then with a brush they would beat the pests in to drown. She would often clean the wool from the brush where the sheep had pulled it out, wash it and send it to Provo to be carded; it would then be spun into yarn, dyed and woven into cloth. Sarah made the material for her own and her sister Martha's wedding dresses. She showed and early liking for the better things in life, and would work at anything so she could have nice things, also taking every advantage of opportunities to educate herself. Sarah was a member of the Lehi Choir, and was active in social work. On December 28, 1868, she was married to Bishop Collier Earl of Monroeville, Ohio, in the Endowment House at Salt Lake City, Utah, by President Wilford Woodruff, making Lehi her home for a short while, and at this place her first child, Charles W. was born. In November 1869, they moved to Heber City, Utah, and resided at this place for thirteen years. At this place she made a host of friends who have remained steadfast through all these years. There were five children born at this residence; namely Susan, *lida, Rebecca, Olive and John L. In July 1879 black diphtheria caused the death of the three oldest girls, all three of them being buried within eleven days. Sarah was among the first to join the Relief Society and is still a member. In 1882 the family moved back to Lehi where they have since resided, coming very highly recommended by President Abraham Hatch. At Lehi four children were born, Clara, Alama, Jesse, and Parah. In February 1888, Sarah, with Uncle Geo. W. Larkin when to the Logan Temple to do work for the family. She having the privilege of being baptized for her grandmother Ann Raynor. Ann Raynor was the first wife of Thomas Larkin and was born in England in 1792; dying July 8, 1821, and leaving one child, Susan Larkin Goates. Sarah was an ideal mother and took much pleasure in looking after her family. She never sought publicity of any kind, but was ever ready with a helping hand for the sick and needy. She buried her husband July 5, 1918, at the age of seventy-five years. Sarah always impressed one with her quiet dignity and unassuming ways. One of her many teaching was "return good for eve," which she practiced herself. Sarah has ever been an industrious and faithful wife, a good neighbor and a devoted Latter-day Saint, coming through many hardship of early days with faith unshaken. [Written in pencil:] Died November 13, 1932. Written by Mrs. Sarah Earl Wright (daughter)

Biographical Sketch of Bishop Collier Earl

Contributor: R and N Englestead Created: 3 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Bishop Collier Earl, son of Charles Earl and Nancy Viana Allen, was born March 15th, 1843, at Monroeville, Huron County, Ohio. He attended the public schools until he was 17 years of age. On the 29th day of August 1860, he left his home going to California via the isthmus of Panama, arriving at San Francisco, September 22, 1860; leaving San Francisco for Los Angeles September 28th where he stayed until May 8th, 1861, entering the employ of the Overland Mail Company and coming to Utah via Saint George, arriving in Lehi, Utah on the 4th day of July 1861. He then went on to the western desert to assist in building the telegraph line to Faust Creek, Tooele Co., being present when the last connecting link was made and the first message flashed across the great American Continent. He then moved to Cedar Fort where he made his home for eight years. While there he served as a minute man and a term of enlistment in the State Guards against the Indians in Captain William Thurman's Company. For several years he followed the avocation of freighter, making two trips to the terminal of the U.P.R.R. at Jules Burg for Walker Brothers of Salt Lake City, also several trips to Boise, Idaho, and to Montana, during which he had some hair breadth escapes and exciting adventures with the Indian, but was fortunate enough to escape serious trouble. Bishop Collier Earl was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints February 3, 1863, at Cedar Fort, Utah, by Elder Eli Bennett, and confirmed by Elder Allen Weeks the same day. While living at Cedar Fort he was called to drive an ox team across the plains to Benton to bring in the last train of emigrants who crossed the plains in wagons, being a member of Captain John Hollman's Company, which mission he filled with honor and integrity. He was ordained an Elder and married Sarah Ann Goates of Lehi in the old Endowment House of Salt Lake City, Dec. 28, 1868, by whom he ahd ten children, four boys and six girls. Three girls and one boy have preceded him to the Great Beyond. He moved to Heber City, Utah in November of 1869 where he continued to reside for thirteen years, removing to Lehi November 1882, where he lived up to the time of his demise. Brother Earl followed the business of Tin Smith and Sheet Metal Worker up to the year 1905, also farming and stock raising. He held the office of Road Supervisor for three years. He was employed by the Utah Idaho Sugar Co. during the last campaign and was in their employment at the time he was stricken with his last illness, which proved fatal and during which he suffered greatly, but with fortitude and patience. He died July 5, 1918 aged 75 years, three months and twenty days, in full faith of the Gospel bearing his testimony to the truthfulness of the same and in the hopes of glorious resurrection. He was a kind and indulgent father and husband and leaves a loving and faithful wife, three sons and three daughters, and nine grandchildren to mourn his loss, together with a host of relatives and friends. Three of Bishop Collier Earl's sons: Charles W., Alama B., Jesse A. followed the utility line of work. His four grandsons and three great grandsons have followed the same occupation. [Found in a packet with a biographical sketch of his wife, Sarah Goates, written by his daughter Sarah Earl]

Life Sketch of Sarah A. Goates Earl

Contributor: JFC Created: 3 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Sarah A. Goates, the eldest daughter of William and Susan Larkin Goates, was born in Cambridge, England, October 20, 1846, and migrated to Utah with her parents and two younger children, Martha and Joseph W., sailing from Liverpool, Tuesday, February 10, 1852 on the ship Ellen Marie, taking about six weeks to make the voyage, landing at New Orleans from where they went to St. Louis, enroute to Utah. Crossing the plains in Captain A. O. Smoot's company of thirty-one wagons, Sarah and her father being very sick with Mountain Fever most of the way, arriving at Salt Lake City, Utah, September 3, and about two weeks later locating at Lehi City, Utah. At this place and at an early age she took up her duties on the farm, helping her father clear the land of brush as best she could She was baptized in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at the age of eight years, by Brother Able Evans. The family having many experiences with the crickets and grasshoppers, at one time they being so numerous that large trenches were dug and the water turned in them, then with a brush they would beat the pests in to drown. She would often clean the wool from the brush where the sheep had pulled it out, wash it and send it to Provo to be carded; it would then be spun into yarn, dyed and woven into cloth. Sarah made the material for her own and her sister Martha's wedding dresses. She showed and early liking for the better things in life, and would work at anything so she could have nice things, also taking every advantage of opportunities to educate herself. Sarah was a member of the Lehi Choir, and was active in social work. On December 28, 1868, she was married to Bishop Collier Earl of Monroeville, Ohio, in the Endowment House at Salt Lake City, Utah, by President Wilford Woodruff, making Lehi her home for a short while, and at this place her first child, Charles W. was born. In November 1869, they moved to Heber City, Utah, and resided at this place for thirteen years. At this place she made a host of friends who have remained steadfast through all these years. There were five children born at this residence; namely Susan, *lida, Rebecca, Olive and John L. In July 1879 black diphtheria caused the death of the three oldest girls, all three of them being buried within eleven days. Sarah was among the first to join the Relief Society and is still a member. In 1882 the family moved back to Lehi where they have since resided, coming very highly recommended by President Abraham Hatch. At Lehi four children were born, Clara, Alama, Jesse, and Parah. In February 1888, Sarah, with Uncle Geo. W. Larkin when to the Logan Temple to do work for the family. She having the privilege of being baptized for her grandmother Ann Raynor. Ann Raynor was the first wife of Thomas Larkin and was born in England in 1792; dying July 8, 1821, and leaving one child, Susan Larkin Goates. Sarah was an ideal mother and took much pleasure in looking after her family. She never sought publicity of any kind, but was ever ready with a helping hand for the sick and needy. She buried her husband July 5, 1918, at the age of seventy-five years. Sarah always impressed one with her quiet dignity and unassuming ways. One of her many teaching was "return good for eve," which she practiced herself. Sarah has ever been an industrious and faithful wife, a good neighbor and a devoted Latter-day Saint, coming through many hardship of early days with faith unshaken. [Written in pencil:] Died November 13, 1932. Written by Mrs. Sarah Earl Wright (daughter)

Biographical Sketch of Bishop Collier Earl

Contributor: JFC Created: 3 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Bishop Collier Earl, son of Charles Earl and Nancy Viana Allen, was born March 15th, 1843, at Monroeville, Huron County, Ohio. He attended the public schools until he was 17 years of age. On the 29th day of August 1860, he left his home going to California via the isthmus of Panama, arriving at San Francisco, September 22, 1860; leaving San Francisco for Los Angeles September 28th where he stayed until May 8th, 1861, entering the employ of the Overland Mail Company and coming to Utah via Saint George, arriving in Lehi, Utah on the 4th day of July 1861. He then went on to the western desert to assist in building the telegraph line to Faust Creek, Tooele Co., being present when the last connecting link was made and the first message flashed across the great American Continent. He then moved to Cedar Fort where he made his home for eight years. While there he served as a minute man and a term of enlistment in the State Guards against the Indians in Captain William Thurman's Company. For several years he followed the avocation of freighter, making two trips to the terminal of the U.P.R.R. at Jules Burg for Walker Brothers of Salt Lake City, also several trips to Boise, Idaho, and to Montana, during which he had some hair breadth escapes and exciting adventures with the Indian, but was fortunate enough to escape serious trouble. Bishop Collier Earl was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints February 3, 1863, at Cedar Fort, Utah, by Elder Eli Bennett, and confirmed by Elder Allen Weeks the same day. While living at Cedar Fort he was called to drive an ox team across the plains to Benton to bring in the last train of emigrants who crossed the plains in wagons, being a member of Captain John Hollman's Company, which mission he filled with honor and integrity. He was ordained an Elder and married Sarah Ann Goates of Lehi in the old Endowment House of Salt Lake City, Dec. 28, 1868, by whom he ahd ten children, four boys and six girls. Three girls and one boy have preceded him to the Great Beyond. He moved to Heber City, Utah in November of 1869 where he continued to reside for thirteen years, removing to Lehi November 1882, where he lived up to the time of his demise. Brother Earl followed the business of Tin Smith and Sheet Metal Worker up to the year 1905, also farming and stock raising. He held the office of Road Supervisor for three years. He was employed by the Utah Idaho Sugar Co. during the last campaign and was in their employment at the time he was stricken with his last illness, which proved fatal and during which he suffered greatly, but with fortitude and patience. He died July 5, 1918 aged 75 years, three months and twenty days, in full faith of the Gospel bearing his testimony to the truthfulness of the same and in the hopes of glorious resurrection. He was a kind and indulgent father and husband and leaves a loving and faithful wife, three sons and three daughters, and nine grandchildren to mourn his loss, together with a host of relatives and friends. Three of Bishop Collier Earl's sons: Charles W., Alama B., Jesse A. followed the utility line of work. His four grandsons and three great grandsons have followed the same occupation. [Found in a packet with a biographical sketch of his wife, Sarah Goates, written by his daughter Sarah Earl]

Life timeline of Bishop Collier Earl

1843
Bishop Collier Earl was born on 15 Mar 1843
Bishop Collier Earl was 16 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Bishop Collier Earl was 20 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Bishop Collier Earl was 32 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Bishop Collier Earl was 44 years old when Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show opens in London. William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody was an American scout, bison hunter, and showman. He was born in Le Claire, Iowa Territory, but he lived for several years in his father's hometown in Toronto Township, Ontario, Canada, before the family returned to the Midwest and settled in the Kansas Territory.
Bishop Collier Earl was 50 years old when Electrical engineer Nikola Tesla gives the first public demonstration of radio in St. Louis, Missouri. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
Bishop Collier Earl was 61 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Bishop Collier Earl died on 5 Jul 1918 at the age of 75
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Grave record for Bishop Collier Earl (15 Mar 1843 - 5 Jul 1918), BillionGraves Record 529518 Lehi, Utah, Utah, United States

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