Benjamin Freeman Bird

19 Jan 1778 - 20 Feb 1862

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Benjamin Freeman Bird

19 Jan 1778 - 20 Feb 1862
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Transcribed from a digitized image of the clipping. Source was not named. “ In Springville City, Utah County, Feb, 20, Benjamin Freeman Bird, age 85 years 1 month and 1 day. Father Bird was born in Essex County, New Jersey, and had been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints n
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Life Information

Benjamin Freeman Bird

Born:
Died:

Springville City Cemetery

200 West 400 South
Springville, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Ancestry's cemetery record for Melva Lou Bird, (daughter of M W and A H Bird) records 18 Dec 1881 as her death
, Pioneer

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Obituary transcription Benjamin Freeman Bird

Contributor: Becky Created: 1 year ago Updated: 8 months ago

Transcribed from a digitized image of the clipping. Source was not named. “ In Springville City, Utah County, Feb, 20, Benjamin Freeman Bird, age 85 years 1 month and 1 day. Father Bird was born in Essex County, New Jersey, and had been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints nearly twenty-seven years, having been baptized in Southport, Chemung County, New York in June, 1835. (sic) He emigrated to Far West, Mo., in 1835, (sic) and after the saints were driven from that State, he settled at Nauvoo, and shared in their persecutions in, and ultimate expulsion from, Illinois. From Nauvoo he went to the frontier, and from there he emigrated to Utah, arriving in Great Salt Lake City in 1850, where he resided two years, and then moved to Springville. He was universally respected, and lived and died a saint.”

Obituary transcription Benjamin Freeman Bird

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

Transcribed from a digitized image of the clipping. Source was not named. “ In Springville City, Utah County, Feb, 20, Benjamin Freeman Bird, age 85 years 1 month and 1 day. Father Bird was born in Essex County, New Jersey, and had been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints nearly twenty-seven years, having been baptized in Southport, Chemung County, New York in June, 1835. (sic) He emigrated to Far West, Mo., in 1835, (sic) and after the saints were driven from that State, he settled at Nauvoo, and shared in their persecutions in, and ultimate expulsion from, Illinois. From Nauvoo he went to the frontier, and from there he emigrated to Utah, arriving in Great Salt Lake City in 1850, where he resided two years, and then moved to Springville. He was universally respected, and lived and died a saint.”

Autobiography

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

In the winter of 1832, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his wife Marabah Reeves lived in a comfortable home in Southport, New York with eight of their nine living children. As the snow blanketed the New York countryside, a single Elder from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints knocked at their door. He asked for admittance and keep since he was a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and was preaching without purse or script. Benjamin and Marabah were touched by the testimony that he bore. Over the next few weeks, by reading the Book of Mormon, they became convinced that his message was true. Since the Elder had moved on, the Bird’s grasped at the only link that would tie them to the glorious message that they had received, they subscribed to the STAR. Because the Church was in its very early infancy, having been only 31 months since the church was organized, the Bird family had nowhere else to turn for additional information. In the first edition of the MESSENGER AND ADVOCATE printed at Kirtland, Ohio in October 2, 1834; Oliver Cowdrey, then Second Elder in the Church, published the following excerpt: Mr. Benjamin F Bird, of Southport, Tioga Co. New York writes under date of November 14, 1833 and says, “I have received your papers almost one year; and because I held the Book of Mormon as sacred as I do the Bible, the Methodist Church (though I had been a regular member almost 37 years)., turned me out; but I bless God for it, for though they cast me out Jesus took me in. “He further adds, that he does not know as he shall ever have a privilege of uniting with his church, as he never saw but one Elder, whom he solicited to preach twice; that it caused a great stir and noise among the people, & c.” “If any of the Elders are passing near, would they not do well to call? - - - We circulate some few papers in that place, the most of which is through the agency of our aged friend of whom we have been speaking, and from whom we acknowledge the receipt of money for the same.” Before a team of Elders could respond to Benjamin’s request, he lost his sweet-heart Marabah in the winter of 1833, leaving him with a heavy heart and the responsibility of raising eight children. As he shared his testimony of the truthfulness of the Church of Jesus Christ with his friends, many mocked, but a few hearts were touched. One who came to know by the Spirit that Benjamin’s testimony was true, was a woman named Margaret Crain. After a short courtship they were married on the 25th day of April, 1833. A year later, Margaret bore Benjamin a beautiful daughter whom they named Margaret Jane. Finally in June of 1834, a team of Mormon Elders came to the area and having the necessary authority, Benjamin, his wife Margaret and several of the married children of Benjamin and Marabah, with their spouses, were baptized. Shortly after the birth of their next child, Benjamin, his unmarried family and his three married sons with their families, moved to Kirtland, Ohio as part of the gathering of Israel. Upon their arrival they found the spiritual condition of the Church to be very gloomy indeed. Several members of the Quorum of the Twelve including two of the three witnesses had spoken out against the Prophet. Secret meetings were being held, which finally culminated in Joseph having to escape for Kirtland in the dead of the night in January of 1838. The Bird families were convinced that the Prophet was in the right and that those who had come out in open rebellion against him had: the waging tongues of apostate devils.” Charles Bird represented his father’s large family at the meeting of the Counsel of the Seventies in the attic story of the Kirtland Temple. He pledged the support of the Bird family in what later was to be known as the Kirtland Camp. By commandment from the Lord, this camp of Saints, who were faithful to the Lord’s Prophet, took the wearisome trek to Jackson County, Missouri, ending their seven month march by camping at the site of Adam-Ondi-Ahman. In January, 1839, the Bird families were residing at Far West, Missouri, and were aggrieved participants in the maleficent scenes of murder; rape and pillage have since proved to be one of the worst persecutions ever imposed upon any people, the so-called Far West War. Benjamin Freeman Bird and his son Charles Bird had signed the affidavit wherein they covenanted with the other inhabitants of Far West to stand by and assist one another “to the utmost of our abilities in removing to the State of Missouri.” They bound themselves to the extent of all their available property to be disposed of by the committee for the purpose of providing means for the removal of the poor and destitute from the state. Their covenant was in vain when they were ruthlessly driven from Far West. As they left Far West, the Bird families looked back and saw their homes in flames. They left Missouri with only the clothes on their backs in the dead of the winter, with nowhere to go, after suffering the Far West holocaust. While at Kirtland and Far West, the Bird families and particularly Charles and his wife Mary Ann Kennedy, became personal, close acquaintances with the Prophet Joseph Smith and his wife Emma. They gathered at Nauvoo with the rest of the Saints. In January 1840, Benjamin purchased the property now known as the Bird-Browning on Main Street from the Prophet Joseph Smith for $300.00 They built a nice two room log cabin with a root cellar, which has been restored by the Church, and dug a well which is now the south side of the property. In the spring of 1843 they built the two-story brick structure. (Later, they sold the property to Jonathan Browning who then added on the first story of the middles section and even later the gunsmith and blacksmith shops. Browning lived in the brick home approximately 2 years, and then it was occupied by Lucy Mack Smith (1845-1846), the Mother of the Prophet Joseph Smith. It was while she was living here that she wrote her autobiography which included the biography of her son. This is one of the most popular histories on the life of the Prophet Joseph Smith even to this day (1980). Subsequent owners are thought to have added the small second story onto the middle section, the kitchen and probably even later individuals with German architectural liking, added the porch onto the back of the original two story living quarters. Benjamin and his family lived in the log cabin for three years and in the two story brick structure for a few months. During this time they enjoyed all of the special cultural events that have come to mark the Nauvoo period as being one of the most unique in history. Since converts from all over the world came to Nauvoo and established their homes during those years, there was a great mixing of culture and arts. Bound by oneness, all being Latter-Day-Saints, there was a friendly blending of a variety of cultures and a feeling of personal pride and friendliness. The people, who had been persecuted and driven from Ohio and then Missouri, now lived in relative peace. They enjoyed a pronounced zest for life, which enabled them to live and appreciate the unique cultural advantage that was theirs. The Bird families traded at the store of the Prophet Joseph Smith, and often attended parties and socials at the Mansion House. There were several occasions where Benjamin played a friendly game of croquet with his friends and neighbors, which included Joseph, Hyrum, Wilford Woodruff and Heber C. Kimball. While living in the log cabin, Benjamin and Margaret were blessed with a baby daughter, who being born at this time of relative peace and prosperity, brought a great deal of joy and happiness into their lives. Also at Nauvoo, Benjamin enjoyed the association of several of his children and many of his grandchildren. His sons Phineas, Charles, James and Samuel all had their families at Nauvoo. He still had living at home two sons by Marabah and the 3 children by Margaret. In the fall of 1843, disruptions, both internal and external to the Church were caused by John C. Bennett and William Law, who were at one time counselors to the Prophet Joseph in the first Presidency. Benjamin with his home on Main Street was in the middle of all the excitement and persecution. Because Benjamin was now 65 years old and had three children at home under the age of 9, he desired to move to a quiter location. As mentioned earlier, he sold his property and the newly built brick home to Jonathon Browning and purchased a large 50 acre farm on the outskirts of Nauvoo. Benjamin and all of his sons participated in the building of the Nauvoo Temple. One of his sons, Richard, was called on a mission to the Wisconsin Pineries. Here he served on a Council of Directors under Bishop George Miller (who was called at the death of Bishop Edward Partridge) where he was involved in making a schedule of every man’s property and making a general distribution under an order similar to the law of consecration. While on his Mission Richard was involved in cutting down pine trees, which were then floated down the Mississippi River to Nauvoo where they ultimately were used in the building of the Temple according to family history two of his sons were called on proselyting missions in the Eastern States. Because Benjamin’s son, Charles and wife Mary Ann, had become so close to Joseph and Emma the Prophet invited Charles to be one of his personal bodyguards. In 1839 the Prophet had called Charles to the First Quorum of the Seventies. He was ordained by Joseph Young. In December 1844, Charles was made the Senior President of the Nineteenth Quorum of Seventies, Joseph’s bodyguards used the system that when it was Charles turn to take over on guard duty, one of the men previously on duty would ride to the top of the hill close to the Bird home and take off his hat and wave it. Charles would wave back to let them know that he had received the signal to come and take over. Charles had been on duty the day before the Prophet was murdered and had gone back home for fresh clothing and supplies for the Prophet and the men imprisoned with him. The day the Prophet was killed, the messenger rode to the top of the hill, dismounted his horse, knelt on the ground and bowed his head, Charles knew by the sad motion the the Prophet was dead. Charles went into town, and it was his team and wagon that carried the bodies of the prophet and his brother Hyrum away from the team and wagon that carried the bodies of the Prophet and his brother Hyrum away from the Mansion House. Charles was always proud of his wagons and outstanding teams and always kept them in excellent condition. It is ironic that the hill on which the messenger knelt to signal Charles that the Prophet had been murdered is the same hill on which the old graveyard now stands. After the death of the Prophet Joseph, the Birds along with the other Saints worked under armed guard to complete the Temple. Most of the Birds received their endowments on the third floor rooms of the Nauvoo Temple. In the large third story at the front of the building was where the dressing rooms and chambers for the preparatory ordinances were located. They were sealed to their spouses in the large rectangular room beneath the Gable. In fact, Nauvoo Temple records indicate that Charles Bird was an ordained Temple worker, which means that he worked night and day to assist those Saints who desired to receive their special endowments to do so, before the mob could destroy their Temple or drive them out. In two months (December 10, 1845 to February 5, 1846) Charles assisted the more than 5,000 Saints who were endowed in the Nauvoo Temple in the twelve and a half hour ceremony. This included washings and anointing’s, the endowment and the sealing of families. The ceremony was basically the same as it is today except it was acted out on platforms, sheets were hung from the ceiling to make rooms or compartments and there were several lengthy discussions instructing the candidates on the covenants they were entering into. Emma was so concerned that the mobocrats would dig up the body of her husband, the Prophet Joseph and desecrate his grave for the $1,000.00 reward that was pending for him “dead or alive”, that she had ten men bury the remains of her husband and Hyrum in the basement of the Nauvoo House. Because at least ten people knew that they were buried there, her concern continued to mount, until one night she appeared at the home of Charles Bird and asked that he be one of the four trusted men to help her rebury the bodies in a secret tomb near the old Spring House, near the Old Homestead. Charles used his team and wagon. They loaded the dirt from the floor of the Old Homestead. Charles used his team and wagon. They loaded the dirt from the floor of the cellar of the Old Spring House onto the back of Charles wagon. Charles then drove his wagon out as far as he could into the back of Charlie’s wagon. Charles then drove his wagon out as far as he could into the Mississippi River and unloaded the dirt, thereby leaving no evidence that the martyrs were buried there. Then Charles, Emma and the three loyal friends dug up the coffins from the Nauvoo House put them in Charles’ wagon and drove them across the street to the old Spring House and secretly reburied them. Emma’s trust and confidence in these four men was so complete that she did not tell anyone, not even her own children, where Joseph was buried, until on her death bed some 14 years later. What a special tribute to the integrity of Charles Bird and his reciprocal love towards Joseph, Hyrum and Emma. Benjamin and his sons and their families were present after the martyrdom when Sidney Rigdon claimed that he was the guardian of the Church. They witnessed President Brigham Young transfigured into the voice, appearance and personality of the Prophet Joseph Smith and felt the Spirit bear witness to their souls that the Twelve should preside. In January 1846, the presiding Brethren decided to move west. President Brigham Young, knowing that Charles had one of the best teams of horses in the City of Nauvoo. He asked Charles if he would be the first person to cross the Mississippi River on the ice. On February 25, 1846, Benjamin Freeman Bird stood under the old tree at the end of Teardrop Lane and watched his son drive his loaded wagon across the frozen river to see if the ice was firm enough to cross. Because several of the Birds’ were weavers by trade, Benjamin and his sons and their families were asked to remain at Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters and assist in the outfitting of the emigrant Saints. Many had been driven out of their homes without an opportunity to take the necessary clothing and other items that they would need to make the long trek into the wilderness to they knew not where. The Bird family set up a woolen mill, of sorts, similar to the one that they had at Nauvoo, and thereby assisted in the emigration of the thousands of homeless Saints. In 1850 the Brethren invited the Bird families to come west. They emigrated with the Milo Andrus Company. There were 206 persons and 51 wagons in the Company. On this train with Benjamin Freeman Bird were his wife and small children and Richard and James with their families. This was the first company of emigrating Saints for the season, leaving Missouri in June of 1850. They took the pioneer trail on which the year before trains had passed which had been stricken with cholera. As the pioneers moved along they saw the bones of their dead comrades, as their bodies had been ripped out of their shallow graves by wolves and other scavengers and scattered over the country side. Benjamin’s son William marched with the Mormon Battalion in the historic trek that has come to be known as the symbol of dedication and patriotism of the Latter-Day-Saint people. To show the magnanimity and noble characters of the Bird’s and their spouses, and the love the Bird’s felt for their spouses, the sacrifices of Charles’ wife Mary Ann Kennedy, is illustrative. Mary Ann, after leaving her comfortable home in Hampton New York (She was the daughter of a doctor) experienced the apostasy of the Kirtland era and of the Far West War with six children under the age of 11 and at the time was six months pregnant. She bore child while destitute in the wilderness before reaching Nauvoo, bore three children at Nauvoo, one at Winter Quarters, one while crossing the plains at Council Point and another at Salt Lake City. This means that she bore children at or near every major church historical site during these periods of driving’s and persecutions. She was pregnant and had a small family to care for during those times of serious trial when so many people of less character left the church. Mary Ann recalled having seen her come being burnt to the ground by the mobs four times during her lifetime as she is fleeing with her family for their lives. On one occasion, Charles and Mary Ann and their small family found themselves in the middle of the wilderness in the snow. They had to abandon their wagon containing all that they owned in this world. Mary Ann, pregnant, so over-extended herself in the care of her small family that her toes on one foot became so seriously frost bitten that she had to have them amputated without anesthesia. When the Charles and Mary Ann Bird family eventually arrived in Salt Lake City, they had only the clothes on their backs as possessions, but were grateful to be alive. The Bird families had paid a dear price indeed, to be gathered in the tops of the mountains to worship the God of Abraham. Soon after arriving in Salt Lake City, Benjamin had the privilege of being present when Apostle George A. Smith called his son James Bird to be the first Bishop of the Provo Second Ward and was also present when Elder Smith ordained him to that Office. Because of his advancing age and the trials he had been subjected to for the last 14 years, Benjamin found the peaceful seclusion of the Rocky Mountains particularly delightful. Several of the Bird families settled in the beautiful area of Springville and there Benjamin enjoyed the association of many of his numerous grandchildren and watched them wax strong in the Gospel. Benjamin crossed over into the Spirit world a content and happy man in 1862 and is buried near the home of his dreams in Springville, Utah References: Family Bible of Benjamin Freeman Bird LDS Temple Records Stake and Ward Records in the possession of Clifford J. Stratton The Documentary History of the Church Numerous family histories and family records in the possession of C.J. Stratton

Benjamin Freeman Bird--History

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

Benjamin Freeman Bird 1778-1862 Compiled by Marla Stone Walker 2011 Benjamin Freeman Bird was born January 19, 1778, in Rahway, Essex County, New Jersey. He was the fifth of eleven children of Jeremiah Bird and Elizabeth Marsh.1 He had four sisters and six brothers.2 It was almost two years before Benjamin was christened, possibly because the Revolutionary War was raging in the New Jersey area. However, on October 17, 1779, Benjamin was christened in the First Presbyterian Church in Morristown, Morris County, New Jersey, as Freeman Bird. (In his early years, Benjamin was evidently known as "Freeman.") In this year of 1778, France sent a fleet to help the colonists; in return, the colonists had to sign an agreement that they would fight until they won their independence from England. It was about this time that the battle for the Hudson River was in progress, and Howe was prevented from crossing New Jersey. This was also the year Washington was at Valley Forge, and pursued the English across New Jersey. The year 1780 was the gloomiest year of the revolutionary war, but in the year 1783 on the 19th day of April the war ended. With this event there began a real struggle. The soldiers were returning home, sick and tired. It had been a hard war, with little enough for the soldiers, who had suffered untold hardships with short rations, poor clothing, and severely cold winters. It was a slow, hard road to recovery. About 1787, the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad and the Erie Canal were built for transportation, and Ohio, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin were added to the union. These states, formed on public land, gave Congress an opportunity to sell land to the people and use the proceeds to pay off the debt incurred by the War of Independence. Changes took place in the lives of the Bird family. It would be interesting to know what part the Bird family played in this period. Nothing is known of Benjamin’s youth. He seems to have been a very intelligent and active person.3 Benjamin was almost eleven years old when his father died on November 29, 1788, in Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey. It is not known if his mother remarried. Benjamin evidently remained in the New Jersey area because on February 22, 1801, he married Meribah "Milly" Reeves in Rahway. The handwritten record reads, "Freeman Bird to Milly Reeve. I certify that on the twenty second day of February in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and one I married Freeman Bird of Roxbury in the County of Morris and State of Newjersey to Milly Reeve of the same place--dated the fourth day of March AD 1801. Wm Grandin Minister of the Gosple. Received and Recorded the 4th March Ad 1801. C. Russell Clk [Clerk]".(from 2 4Ludy p. 4-5 5Stratton, PART V, P. 16-17. 6Ludy, P. 4-5. 7Stratton, PART V. P. 17. 8Ludy, P. 4-5. the Morris County Clerk’s office; original spelling and grammar retained). Benjamin was 23 years old, and Meribah was 16 years old. Both were residents of Roxbury, New Jersey. Meribah had been born on May 8, 1784, in Rahway, Morris County, New Jersey, the daughter of Phineas and Mary Taylor Reeves.4 This was the year the nation’s capitol was moved from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C. The Capitol building construction began in 1800. Benjamin, being the third son, seems to be the one who pulled up stakes and left the old homestead, moving to Flanders in Morris County and starting a home for his new bride. People were building more substantial homes at this time; many even built mansions, some of which still stand today. Lovely churches were built and industry was expanding. Church was still the center of social life, with dinners and teas and dancing. Benjamin Freeman had lived when Washington, then John Adams wasPresident. Now in 1801-1809 Thomas Jefferson was President.5 Morris County records show that Benjamin paid taxes from 1802 to 1807 as follows: 1802, Freeman Bird, 1 house and lot, 1 cow. 1803, Benjamin F. Bird. 1805 Benjamin F. Bird, 1 house and lot, 1 horse, 2 cows. 1806, Benjamin F. Bird, 1 house and lot, 2 cows, 1 horse. 1807, Benjamin F. Bird, 1 house and lot, 2 horses, 3 cows. Several deeds conveying property to or from Benjamin were also recorded in Morris County during this time period. The last one found stated: "10 August 1805 Benjamin F. Bird and his wife Meribay of Roxbury, in the county of Morris, state of New Jersey, to [names] trustees of the school house in FlandersB[description was not copied] signed Benj. F. Bird and Mariba Bird. Witness: Kelsey Bird [brother of Benjamin] and Peter Smith." The deed was actually recorded July 5, 1834. Benjamin and Meribah’s oldest son was born on January 29, 1802, in Flanders, Morris County, NJ. They named him Phineas Reeves Bird. Their family grew quickly. Charles was born September 19, 1803, and Samuel was born March 19, 1805, both in Flanders. James was born December 22, 1807 in Roxbury. Benjamin and Meribah moved their family to New York sometime in the next fourteen months because their first daughter was born on February 8, 1809, at Romulus, Seneca County, NY. They named her Elizabeth. The family evidently moved to several places in the area in the next few years. On January 16, 1811, George was born in Hector, Tompkins County, NY. The Birds suffered tragedy on January 16, 1813, when their almost 4-year-old daughter died. Two months later on March 30, 1813, Kelsey was born. Unfortunately, another child died on October 17, 1813--twoand- a-half-year-old George. The family moved again, this time to Southport, Tioga County, NY, where little Polly was born on June 13, 1815. Polly was also called Mary.6 It would be interesting to know the reason for these moves, as these places are not far apart. The counties in this area have been divided many times since these early days.7 Another son was born on May 2, 1817, also in Southport. Benjamin and Meribah decided to name him George, possibly in memory of their little son who had died three and a half years earlier. Tragically, this little one--not yet a year old--also died, on February 24, 1818. A year later on January 24, 1819, Amanda Ann was born. Benjamin and Meribah’s eleventh child, Richard, was born on October 13, 1820. And their youngest son, William, was born on July 18, 1823. All three were born in Southport.8 The following is an excerpt of a letter which gives a description of the farm. "In old Southport, I climbed the highest peaks and took chestnut burs from the topmost boughs. I drove my carriage up Pouring Run that comes down by Fassets and wound around up on Green Hill in front of the old school house, where I could see Elias Gustin cradling oats on the highest field of the grandpa Bird farm. George Rogers was raking rye across the gully and Mike Ronshey was hauling hay on the Uncle James Bird place and Jake Ronsheys son was doing the same on the Job Tobias farm and Stephen Brown was mowing mate and 3 9Nauvoo Ancestors, Aug. 2006 Land and Records File Browser CD, Bird, Benjamin Freeman p. 63. "Excerpt from a letter written by one of Benjamin F. Bird’s grandchildren from Spring Hill, Kansas. Signer and date unknown. . . . The balance of the letter was not there, but gives one some picture of the farm of Benjamin Freeman Bird." 10Stratton, PART V, P. 17-18. 11 Miss Florence Bird, The Bird Family, (Written in response to a query by Arthamese Denny in June, 1960), p. 1-3. Repository: Chemung County Historical Society, 415 E. Water Street, Elmira, NY 14901, ph. 607.734.4167, Call Number Bird Family file BF05-015. her Milford Bird and Jennie composed the party on ??? Hill. As Jennie is still a cripple and could not cross and recross the state line nor strattle blackberry brush gracefully, nor peel burch bark, nor pick huckleberries, nor hunt the wintergreen and barberry, she sat on the brink of the hill and assorted berries and took notes as she viewed the landscape over. We could see away upon the hill at Pa’s old house and barn, orchard and buckwheat field in bloom. What a grand sight it was and how she enjoyed it. Well, when we came into her with our basket filled she said, ‘I have been looking for a crazy quilt pattern for a long time and now I have it.’ She pointed to the field where Elias Gustin was at work. He had laid his swaths of oats up, down and across the steep side hill in every conceivable direction that he could best climb up and down and the swaths as they lay, as she said, made the finest crazy quilt pattern that you ever saw. We visited Elias and spent all day there. Some of the apple trees that grandpa grafted, using mud for wax, still bear and the old barn looks inside just as it did. I wanted that old wooden grannery lock that grandpa made, but it could not be found-----."9 During this period the prosperity of this new nation was established. There seemed to be plenty of employment, materials, and opportunities for all. It was a time when many immigrants came to this new country. There was a trend toward building cities, beautiful homes, and churches. America was young and growing and Madison was President, a man who greatly loved peace and tried constantly to avoid war or contentions. Benjamin and his family undoubtedly heard many stories of the sea and of the battles fought there between the ships of our country and those of France and England. The United States was proud of her ships and seamen. She was not strong enough at this time to fight an offensive war, but with her ships she gained respect from England and France by capturing and destroying their shipping. One of our ships at this time was known as "Old Ironsides" or by its real name, the "Constitution." In 1817, the year little George was born, steam ships were being constructed to take the place of sails, and Alabama and Mississippi were added to the union. The question of slavery was one of the big issues facing the government, and England was still smuggling slaves into the south. John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson were presidents while Benjamin’s children were growing to responsibility. Their son Samuel was born the same year as Joseph Smith, and Richard was born the year that Joseph received the great vision of God the Father, and His Son, Jesus Christ.10 In the 1830 census, Benjamin F. Bird is listed in Southport, Tioga County, NY. The listing includes 2 males aged 5 to 10 years [William and Richard]; 2 females aged 10 to 15 years [Amanda and Polly]; 1 male aged 15 to 20 [Kelsey]: 1 male aged 20 to 30 [James]; 1 female aged 40 5o 50 [Meribah] and 1 male aged 50 to 60 [Benjamin]. Thus a total of eight persons were part of the household. Sometime in the next three years, the family moved to Portsmouth, Chemung County, NY. The following is from a history written by Florence Bird, great-granddaughter of Benjamin and Margaret and his second wife, Margaret Crane. "When he [Benjamin] first came to this section from New Jersey, Mr. Bird lived on the road which still bears his name - the "Bird Creek Road". His farm was the first one on the Pennsylvania side of the State line. it is now (1960) owned and occupied by Mr. D. Collier, who reports that the site of the Bird cabin is still marked by some stones - remnants of either the foundation or of the fireplace and chimney. Previous to the death of his first wife, Mr. Bird and his family had moved to the South Creek Road - the farm on the northeast corner of the Rodgers Road. The cemetery in which Meriba Reeves Bird is buried is a plot on this farm."11 4 12Ludy, P. 4-5. 13Walsh, p. 1 14Messenger and Advocate, Vol. 1 No. 3, Dec. 1834, p. 45. (The Evening and Morning Star was published in Kirtland from 1832-1835. The Messenger and Advocate was published from October 1834- Sept, 1835.) 15Stratton, p. 1.. 16Messenger and Advocate, Dec., 1836, p. 45; original spelling and grammar retained). 17Ludy, p. 5. In the meantime, the oldest sons were marrying and beginning their own families. Phineas married Melissa Coalman; and they established their home in Elmira, Chemung County, NY, where their oldest son was born on October 13, 1823. They named him George Washington Bird, and he was only three months younger than his Uncle William. Charles married Mary Ann Kennedy on March 22, 1826, in Covington, Tioga County, PA. They, soon started a family. Samuel married Casiah Brown on April 5, 1826. He died February 13, 1828. James went back to New Jersey where he married Jane Mott Carpenter in 1831. Kelsey married Sally Carpenter Allbright; and Polly married Joel Matthews on March 27, 1832.12 In the winter of 1832, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his wife Marabah Reeves lived in a comfortable home in Southport, New York. They were members of the Methodist Church. Benjamin was one of five elected governing men of the Methodist Church 13 As the snow blanketed the New York country side, a single elder from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints knocked on their door. He asked for admittance and keep, since he was a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and was preaching without purse or script. Benjamin and Marabah were touched by the testimony that he bore. Over the next few weeks, by reading the Book of Mormon, they became convinced that his message was true. Since the Elder had moved on, the Bird's grasped at the only link that would tie them to the glorious message that they had received, they subscribed to the Messenger And Advocate . Because the Church was in its very early infancy, having been only 31 months since the Church was organized, the Bird family had no where else to turn for additional information. In the first edition of the Messenger and Advocate printed at Kirtland, Ohio, in October 1834, Oliver Cowdery, then Second Elder in the Church, published the following excerpt: "Mr. Benj. F. Bird, of Southport, Tioga Co., N. Y., writes under date of Nov. 14 (1833) and says: 'I have received your papers almost one year: and because I held the Book of Mormon as sacred as I do the bible, the Methodist (though I had been a regular member almost 37 years) turned me out; but I bless God for it; for though they cast me out Jesus took me in."14 "He further adds, that he does not know as he shall ever have a privilege of uniting with his Church, as he never saw but one elder, whom he solicited to preach twice; that it caused a great stir and noise among the people, & etc."15 "If any of the elders are passing near, would they not do well to call?--We circulate some few papers in that place, the most of which is through the agency of our aged friend of whom we have been speaking, and from whom we acknowledge the receipt of money for the same."16 Before a team of elders could respond to Benjamin's request, he lost his sweetheart Marabah on February 13, 1833, leaving him with a heavy heart.17 She was buried on the family farm. These two had shared 33 years of joy, happiness, and struggle. Some of the older children were married, and the youngest was ten years old; four were still under eighteen years of age. Merabah’s death occurred three years after the church was organized in Fayette, Seneca County, NY, which was not far from Chemung County. Jackson was President and Daniel Webster and Patrick Henry were statesmen of the day. Banking and tariffs were issues troubling the government, railroads were becoming an important means of transportation, and trains looked like little stagecoaches fastened together. From the year 1830 a new era of progress began throughout the world, especially in the United States. The steam engine brought forth steam ships and trains, the printing press was invented, and with improved transportation and communication the time between places was shortened. Inventions began to come forth by the thousands, matches were invented and were distributed all over the country; schools were improved. Books were more readily obtainable, 5 18Stratton, PART V, P. 18. 19Ludy, p. 5. 20Stratton, p. 1. 21Ludy, p. 5. 22Ludy, Diana R. "The Benjamin Freeman Bird Story--Part 2". For the Birds, Issue Number 11, p. 4. 23Nauvoo Ancestors, From notes that Lola Brimhall found in Nauvoo. 24Stratton, p. 1. and everyone had the opportunity of some education. The printing press made it possible for more people to get news, and gave more reason for learning to read. Because books were more plentiful, ideas were more freely exchanged. 18 As Benjamin shared his testimony of the truthfulness of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints with his friends, many mocked, but a few hearts were touched. Benjamin met a woman named Margaret Crane Daley in Chemung County, NY. She was born June 2, 1797, in Caldwell, Essex County, NY,. Margaret was the widow of Thomas B. Daley. After a short courtship they were married on the 25th day of April, 1833. A year later, Margaret bore Benjamin a beautiful daughter whom they named Margaret Jane on April 9, 1834, in Wellsburg, Chemung County, NY.19 Finally in June of 1834, a team of Mormon elders came to the area and having the necessary authority, Benjamin, and several of the married children of Benjamin and Marabah, with their spouses, were baptized.20 In the December, 1836, edition of the Messenger and Advocate, we also find: "The following is a list of the names of ministers of the gospel, belonging to the church of the Latter Day Saints, whose Licenses were recorded the last quarter, in the License Records, in Kirtland, Ohio. By THOMAS BURDICK. Recording Clerk. Kirtland, Dec. 1, 1836. Elder’s names. . . . Benjamine F. Bird. . ." (P. 432; original spelling retained).21 "On June 20, 1837, Benjamin and Margaret Bird had their second child--a son that they named Benjamin F. Bird. He was also born in Wellsburg, Chemung County, NY."22 Shortly after his birth, Benjamin, his unmarried family, and his three married sons with their families, moved to Kirtland, Ohio, as part of the gathering of Israel. Benjamin’s two married daughters remained in New York, and some of their descendants were later in Kansas. "There was a good relationship and feeling between the children of the 2nd wife and those of Meribah Reeves apparently, as the half sister Margaret often expressed a desire to see them and wrote frequently."23 Upon their arrival in Kirtland they found the spiritual condition of the Church to be very gloomy indeed. Several members of the Quorum of the Twelve, including two of the three witnesses, had spoken out against the Prophet. Secret meetings were being held, which finally culminated in Joseph Smith having to escape from Kirtland in the dead of the night in January of 1838. The Bird families were convinced that the Prophet was in the right and that those who had come out in open rebellion against him had "the wagging tongues of apostate devils". Charles Bird represented his father's large family at the meeting of the Council of the Seventies in the attic story of the Kirtland Temple. He pledged the support of the Bird family in what was later to be known as the Kirtland Camp. By commandment from the Lord, this camp of Saints, who were faithful to the Lord's Prophet, took the wearisome trek to Jackson County, Missouri, ending their seven month march by camping at the site of Adam-Ondi-Ahman.24 In 1838, the Benjamin Bird family moved to Far West, Caldwell County, Missouri, to settle with hundreds of other church families in what was then the frontier. Benjamin bought 160 acres and began to build and farm. In January 1839, the Bird families were residing at Far West, Missouri, and were aggrieved participants in the maleficent scenes of murder, rape and pillage which have since proved to be one of the worst persecutions ever imposed upon any people; the so-called Far West War. Benjamin Freeman Bird and his son Charles Bird had signed the affidavit wherein they covenanted with the other inhabitants of Far West to stand by and assist one another "to the utmost of our abilities in removing from the State of Missouri." They bound themselves to the extent of all their available property to be disposed of by a committee for the purpose of providing means for the removal of the poor and destitute from the state. 6 25Smith, Joseph. History of the Church, Deseret News. Salt Lake City, Utah. 1948. Volume: 3, Page 251- 154. 26Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 4-5. 27Clark V. Johnson, ed., Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict, pp. 141- 142: the original spelling and grammar were retained.) 28Stratton, p. 1-2 Their covenant was in vain, and they were ruthlessly driven from Far West. As they left Far West, the Bird families looked back and saw their homes in flames. They left Missouri with only the clothes on their backs in the dead of Winter, with nowhere to go, after having suffered the Far West holocaust.25 In the Aroet Hale Autobiography typescript which is on file at Brigham Young University, we read. "Father had a good team and wagon when we went to Missouri. He lost everything and was helped out of Missouri by one of the brethren by the name of Bird" (p. 6). Since no initial or first name is given, this could well have been Benjamin or Phineas or Charles. At any rate, all three of the Birds assisted others as best they could. Benjamin took his family first to Adams County, Illinois. There on May 13, 1839, Benjamin filed a document with the government asking for redress for property losses because of being driven from Missouri.26 The document declares: "The S[t]ate of Mosura Dr to Benjm F Bird "1838 To money and time Expende in moveing from NY State to mosura $130.00 "to hors and wagon and harnes taken by the mob returne after ten day $20.00 "1839 Damag in the sail of 160 akers of Land $500 "To Damag and not haveing the Libertey that the Laws of the Land garentee to Everey Sivelisd Citiso[n] and being Driven outht of the State by Mob $6000.00 "To Damag money Spent and time Lost in Moving out of the State $100.00 "[Total damages] $6750.00 "I certify the a bove acount to Be Just and true a cording to the Best of my Knowldg "Benjm F. Bird "[Sworn to before C. M. Woods, C.C.C., Adams Col, IL, 13 May 1839.]"27 While at Kirtland and Far West, the Bird families and particularly Charles Bird and his wife Mary Ann Kennedy, became personal close acquaintances with the Prophet Joseph Smith and his wife Emma. They gathered at Nauvoo with the rest of the Saints. In January, 1840, Benjamin purchased the property now known as the Bird- Browning Site on Main Street from the Prophet Joseph Smith for $300. They built a nice two room log cabin with a root cellar, which has been restored by the Church, and dug a well which is now on the south side of the property. In the spring of 1843 they built the two story brick structure. Benjamin and his family lived in the log cabin for three years and in the two story brick structure for a few months. (Later they sold the property to Jonathan Browning, who then added on the first story of the middle section and even later, the gunsmith and blacksmith shops. Browning lived in the brick home approximately two years, then it was occupied by Lucy Mack Smith (1845-1846), the mother of the Prophet Joseph Smith. It was while she was living here that she wrote her autobiography which included the biography of her son. This is one of the most popular histories on the life of the Prophet Joseph even to this day (1980). Subsequent owners are thought to have added the small second story onto the middle section, the kitchen and probably even later individuals with German architectural liking, added the porch onto the back of the original two story living quarters. During that time they enjoyed all the special cultural events that have come to mark the Nauvoo period as being one of the most unique in history. Since converts from all over the world came to Nauvoo and established their homes during those years, there was a great mixing of cultures and arts. Bound by oneness, all being Latter-day Saints, there was a friendly blending of a variety of cultures and a feeling of personal pride and friendliness. These people, who had been persecuted and driven from Ohio and then Missouri, now lived in relative peace. They enjoyed a pronounced zest for life which enabled them to enjoy and appreciate the unique cultural advantages that were theirs. The Bird families traded at the store of the Prophet Joseph Smith and often attended parties and socials at the Mansion House. There were several occasions where Benjamin played a friendly game of croquet with his friends and neighbors which included Joseph, Hyrum, Wilford Woodruff and Heber C. Kimball.28 7 29Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 5. 30Stratton, p .3. 31Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 5. 32Nauvoo Ancestors. Nauvoo Land and Records File. High Priest Records 8. 33Walsh, p. 4. While living in the log cabin, Benjamin and Margaret were blessed with a baby daughter, who being born at this time of relative peace and prosperity, brought a great deal of joy and happiness into their lives. Martha Marie, was born in Nauvoo on June 2, 1840.29 Also at Nauvoo, Benjamin enjoyed the association of several of his children and many of his grandchildren. His sons Phinias, Charles, and James all had their families at Nauvoo, and he still had living at home with him two sons by Maraba and the three children by Margaret.30 In the 1840 census, Benjamin is found in Nauvoo: 1 male and 1 female under age 5 [Benjamin T. and Martha]; 1 female aged 5 to 10 [Margaret]; 1 male aged 20 to 30 [probably Richard or William]; 1 female aged 40 to 50 [Margaret]; and 1 male aged 60 to 70 [Benjamin F.]. A total of 6 were in the household, and 1 other person was "employed" in agriculture. In a special census taken in Nauvoo in 1842. Benjamin and Margaret are listed with their three children--"Margaret J., Benjamin T., and Martha M."--"under 8" years of age. Benjamin received his patriarchal blessing on February 9, 1842, under the hands of Hyrum Smith. (Appendix) He was a member of the Nauvoo Fourth Ward.31 In the fall of 1843, disruptions, both internal and external to the Church, were caused by John C. Bennet and William Law, who were at one time counselors to the Prophet Joseph in the First Presidency. Benjamin with his home on Main Street was in the middle of all the excitement and persecution. Because Benjamin was now 65 years old and had three children at home under the age of 9, he desired to move to a quieter location. As mentioned earlier, he sold the property and the newly built brick home to Jonathen Browning and purchased a large 50 acre farm on the outskirts of Nauvoo near LaCrosse. Benjamin and all of his sons participated in the building of the Nauvoo Temple. Phineas and Richard were called on a Mission to the Wisconsin Pineries. Here Richard served on a Council of Directors under Bishop George Miller (who was called at the death of Bishop Edward Partridge) where he was involved in making a schedule of every man's property and making a general distribution under an order similar to the law of consecration. While on his mission, Richard and Phineas were involved in cutting down pine trees which were then floated down the Mississippi River to Nauvoo, where they ultimately were used in the building of the Temple. According to family history, two of his sons were called on proselyting missions to the eastern states. After the death of the Prophet Joseph, the Birds, along with the other Saints, worked under armed guard to complete the Temple. Most of the Birds received their endowments in the third floor rooms of the Nauvoo Temple. The dressing rooms and chambers for preparatory ordinances were located in the large third story at the front of the building . They were sealed to their spouses in the large rectangular room beneath the gable. In fact Nauvoo Temple records indicate that Charles Bird was an ordained Temple Worker, which means that he worked night and day to assist those Saints who desired to receive their special endowments to do so, before the mob could destroy their Temple or drive them out. In two months (Dec. 10, 1845 to February 5, 1846) Charles assisted more than 5,000 Saints who were endowed in the Nauvoo Temple in the twelve and a half hour ceremony. This included washings and annointings, the endowment and the sealing of families. The ceremony was basically the same as it is today (1980) except that it was acted out on platforms, sheets were hung from the ceiling to make rooms or compartments, and there were several lengthy discussions instructing the candidates about the covenants they were going to make. Benjamin and his sons and their families were present after the martyrdom when Sidney Rigdon claimed that he was to be guardian of the Church. They witnessed President Brigham Young transfigured into the voice, appearance and personality of the Prophet Joseph Smith and felt the Spirit bear witness to their souls that the Twelve should preside. On 7 Jan. 1846, Benjamin was ordained a high priest in the church by John Murdock.32 At a conference on 15 December 1846, Benjamin was sustained a member of the High Council of the Church.33 8 34Stratton, PART V. P. 19. 35Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 5-6. 36Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 5-6. 371860 US Census, Southport, Chemung, New York. Series: M653 Roll: 730 Page: 655. 38Research done by Larry Mace, 8 March 2004. Church Archives Film # 3144, WR f Pt.2, #4 Lake Branch 1848-1851. 39Bennett, Richard E. MORMONS AT THE MISSOURI, 1846-1852 "AND SHOULD WE DIE . . ." University of Oklahoma Press: Norman and London. 1946. p. 217-18.. 40Stratton, p. 3. 41Walsh, p. 4. Benjamin and four of his sons--Charles, James, Richard, and William--decided to leave Nauvoo and move west, following the leadership of Brigham Young. Benjamin’s oldest son Phineas was in Wisconsin cutting timber at that time. He went to Texas and later joined with the Reorganized Latter Day Saints. Benjamin was active in helping the Saints prepare themselves to leave, especially to those who were old or helpless and dependent on others. He was indeed his brother’s keeper, endowed with a great love, tolerance, and sympathy toward the poor and the sick. Benjamin left Nauvoo with Brigham Young in the first company of saints, and traveled with them to a place they named Council Bluffs.34 The Mormon settlement of Winter Quarters was established. He stayed in Winter Quarters at least three years to plant crops and farm in order to supply food for the Saints going through on their way to Utah.35 Evidently Margaret chose to leave Benjamin and to return to New York with their three children because she died in Wellsburg, Chemung County, on March 24, 1865. The three children eventually married and continued living in the Wellsburg area.36 Margaret is listed in the 1860 United States Census in Southport, Chemung, New York with her son Benjamin and daughter Margaret.37 In a church record dated July 17th 1848 the following information is given: “Meeting called to order by Elders George A. Smith and Ezra T. Benson at the house of brother Green for the purpose of reorganizing the branch. Chose father Burd {Benjamin F. Bird} president, Frui Ames Counsyler, Joseph H. Tippets, clerk and also father Burd to act as Bishop for said branch. Meeting closed by sining {singing?} and prayer. {Beneath this entry were the members of the Lake Branch. These names included: Benjame {Benjamin} F. Burd {Bird} and Jane Burd {This was probably not Jane Gully, as her husband died in 1849 on their way to the Salt Lake Valley}. This Church record established several things. First, Benjamin Freeman Bird was chosen as Branch President of the Lake Branch at Winter Quarters at that time and was also temporarily assigned as Bishop over the Branch. Secondly, this establishes that his second wife, Margaret, did not appear to be with him and probably had returned to New York.38 There were many settlements in the Bluffs area. By the end of 1848 there were 40 branches in the area. "A branch president managed local affairs in his area and reported directly to the Pottawattamie High Council." In the list of Mormon Branches/Communities in Western Iowa, 21 December 1848, Benjamin F. Bird is listed as president of the Lake Branch.39 Because several of the Bird's were weavers by trade, Benjamin and his sons and their families were asked to remain at Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters and assist in the outfitting of the emigrant Saints. Many had been driven out of their homes without opportunity to take the necessary clothing and other items that they would need to make the long trek into the wilderness to where they knew not. The Bird family set up a woolen mill of sorts, similar to the one that they had at Nauvoo, and thereby assisted in the emigration of the thousands of homeless Saints.40 After three years at Council Bluffs, Apostle Hyde released them to come to the Salt Lake valley.41 In 1850 the Brethren invited the Bird families to come West. They emigrated with the Milo Andrus Company. There were 206 9 42Stratton, p. 3. 43Information taken from the Record Book of a Great-great-granddaughter - Amy B. Schwendiman - supplied by Mrs. Ben Williams - Idaho Falls. Facts arranged by Nora Lund- Historian of Nibley Park D.U.P. Camp - Jan. 1961. 2. 44Stratton,. P. 3-4. 45Stratton, PART V.P.19. 46Stratton, p. 3-4. 47Ludy, Issue Number 11, p.6. 48Stratton, PART V. P. 20. 49Sons of the Utah Pioneers, Conquerors of the West. 50Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 6 persons and 51 wagons in the Company.42 Benjamin was 72 years of age when he made the trek. He traveled with his son Charles Bird, his wife Mary Ann and 10 children.43 Richard and James and their families were in the same group.. This was the first company of emigrating Saints for the season, leaving Missouri on June 3, 1850.44 They crossed the Missouri River that day, and traveled along the south bank of Salt Creek. The water was high with the spring runoff and when they reached the crossing, the bridge was washed away, so they built a raft and floated the wagons across. Brother Hyde told this company of saints as they left that if they would be faithful and prayerful and keep the name of God Holy that they would reach the Salt Lake Valley without trouble or disaster, and they did.45 They took the pioneer trail over which the year before trains had passed which had been stricken with cholera. As the pioneers moved along they saw the bones of their dead comrades as their bodies had been ripped out of their shallow graves by wolves and other scavengers and scattered over the countryside.46 They made it west in good time--60 days--with only 1 birth and 1 death the whole trip! Benjamin then settled in Salt Lake City.47 Captain Andrus was a brave and spiritual man. When he drove into the Valley he had a large sign on each side of his wagon; one side read "Holiness to the Lord" and the other "Hail to the Governor of Deseret." Members of this company knew most of the people who were in the Salt Lake Valley, so it was a joyous reunion with families and friends.48 They arrived in the Valley on 30 Aug 1850.49 Benjamin's son, William, marched with the Mormon Battalion in the historic trek that has come to be known as the symbol of dedication and patriotism of the Latter-day Saint people. Benjamin married a third time. His new wife’s name was Jane Frilick Gully. Jane had two daughters by her previous marriage to Samuel Gully. Her daughters were Martha, born about 1835 in Alabama and Harriet, born about 1840 in Mississippi. Jane was born in Newburn, North Carolina on May 27, 1798. Most of our records reflect a marriage date in 1852. That is the date that they were sealed to each other in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. In the 1850 census taken in Salt Lake County, Benjamin F. Bird, aged 73, was listed with Jane, aged 55, Harriet Gully aged 10, and Martha Gully aged 15. Benjamin’s occupation was mason.50 10 51Stratton, p. 4. 52Records of S. Mahlon Edwards, PO Box 1373, Logandale NV, 89021. 53Deseret News, Wed, Mar. 26, 1862, p. 304: the original spelling and grammar were retained). 54Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 6 Soon after arriving in Salt Lake City, Benjamin had the privilege of being present when Apostle George A. Smith called Benjamin’s son James Bird to be the first Bishop of the Provo Second Ward and was also present with Elder Smith ordained him to that office. Because of his advancing age and the trials he had been subjected to for the last 14 years, Benjamin found the peaceful seclusion of the Rocky Mountains particularly delightful. Several of the Bird families were sent to settle in the beautiful area of Springville in Utah County and there Benjamin enjoyed the associations of many of his numerous grandchildren and watched them wax strong in the Gospel.51 He moved to Springville two years after his arrival in Utah, where he is found in a special census taken in Utah in 1856. In the 1860 census, Benjamin F. Bird was still in Springville. He was 82 years of age, and there were 2 in the household. His occupation was shown as broom maker. His real wealth was listed at $150 and his personal wealth as $100. Benjamin died in Springville, Utah. His obituary read, "DIED In Springville City, Utah county, Feb. 20, [1862,] BENJAMIN FREEMAN BIRD, aged 85 [sic] years 1 month and 1 day." After he died his widow, Jane, went to live with Benjamin’s son, James in St. George, Utah. After James died Jane lived with James’ granddaughter, Maribah Ann Bird Woods in Clover Valley, Lincoln, Nevada. She passed away there.52 Obituary “Father Bird was born in Essex county, New Jersey, and had been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints nearly twenty-seven years, having been baptized in Southport Chemung county, New York, in June, 1835. He emigrated to Far West, Mo., in 1838, and after the saints were driven from that State, he settled at Nauvoo, and shared in their persecutions in and ultimate expulsion from Illinois. From Nauvoo he went to the frontiers, and from there he emigrated to Utah, arriving in Great Salt Lake City in 1850, where he resided two years, and then moved to Springville. He was universally respected, and lived and died a saint.--”53 Benjamin was buried in the Springville City Cemetery. His descendants number in the thousands today.54 References Bennett, Richard E. MORMONS AT THE MISSOURI, 1846-1852 "AND SHOULD WE DIE . . ." University of Oklahoma Press: Norman and London. 1946. p. 217-18.. Bird, Miss Florence The Bird Family, (Written in response to a query by Arthamese Denny in June, 1960), p. 1-3. Repository: Chemung County Historical Society, 415 E. Water Street, Elmira, NY 14901, ph. 607.734.4167, Call Number Bird Family file BF05-015. Clark V. Johnson, ed., Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict, pp. 141- 142: the original spelling and grammar were retained. 11 Deseret News, Wed Mar 26, 1862. 1860 US Census, Southport, Chemung, New York. Series: M653 Roll: 730 Page: 655. Family Bible of Benjamin Freeman Bird LDS Temple Records Ludy, Diana R. "The Benjamin Freeman Bird Story". For the Birds, Issue Number 10 Ludy, Diana R. "The Benjamin Freeman Bird Story--Part 2". For the Birds, Issue Number 11 Mace, Larry. Research done 8 March 2004. Church Archives Film # 3144, WR f Pt.2, #4 Lake Branch 1848-1851. Messenger and Advocate, Dec., 1836, p. 45; original spelling and grammar retained. Nauvoo Ancestors, Aug. 2006 Land and Records File Browser CD, Bird, Benjamin Freeman Numerous family histories and family records in the possession of C. Stratton. 4225 Weems Way, Sparks Nevada 89431. (702) 673-9182. RLDS Church History 2:313-315; LDS Church History Sons of the Utah Pioneers, Conquerors of the West. Stake and Ward Records in the possession of Clifford J. Stratton Stratton, Clifford J. PIONEER STORIES. "Benjamin Freeman Bird and Marabah Reeves". Genealogical Department, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. US/CAN 929.273 st 82 p. Schwendiman, Amy Bird. Information taken from the Record Book of a Great-great-granddaughter - Amy B.- supplied by Mrs. Ben Williams - Idaho Falls. Facts arranged by Nora Lund- Historian of Nibley Park D.U.P. Camp - Jan. 1961. 2. The Documentary History of the Church Walsh, Susan. Benjamin Freeman Bird - Biography, 1980. 12 APPENDIX 13 Marriage Record Recd and Recorded the 4th March AD, C. Russell Clark. Freeman Bird to Milly Reeve. I certify that on the twenty second day of February in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and one I married Freeman Bird of Roxbury in the County of Morris and State of Newjersey to Milly Reeve of the same place- dated the fourth day of March AD 1801. Wm Grandin Minister of the Gospel Received and Recorded the 4th March AD 1801. C. Russell Clk 14 New York Genealogical Records, 1675-1920 Record about Benjamin Bird Name: Benjamin Bird Event: Lived Year: 1800 Place: Chenango County: Chenango Province: New York Source: Reel 24, 1800 Federal Census of New York, Microfilm Series M32 Publisher: National Archives, Washington, DC. Additional info: See Family History Library, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Page: 231 New Jersey Census, 1772-1890 Record Name: BENJAMIN BIRD State: NJ County: Morris County Township: Chester Year: 1802 Record Type: June Tax List Page: 002 Database: NJ Early Census Index 15 Ministers of the Gospel Lynn & Pat Sagers - Oct 28, 2006 Categories: Benjamin F. Bird family In the Messenger and Advocate, vol 3, number 3, page 431-432, it states: "The following is a list of the names of Ministers of the Gospel, belonging to the church of the Latter Day Saints, whose Licences [Licenses] were recorded the last Quarter, in the Licence [Licenses] Records, in Kirtland, Ohio. By Thomas Burdick. Recording Clerk. Kirtland, Dec. 1, 1836. Elder's Names. Truman O. Angel, Solomon Angel, Asa Anson, , Ezekiel Barnes, Noah Bulkey, Amos Babcock, Samuel Brown, Jeremy Bartlett, John Badger, Gideon H. Carter, Samuel Conklin, Austin Cowls, Joseph W. Cole, Silas Davis, Jonathan Dunham, Amos B. Fuller, Jonathan H. Hale, Thomas Hayes, Nathaniel Homes, Dana Jacobs, Ozias Kilbourn, Daniel Kent, John Kempton, John Lawson, Richard Mann, Orin Perry, Philip Packard, Gustavus A. Perry, Abram Rose, Carvil Rigdon, Stephen Shumway, Otis Shumway, James C. Snow, Sylvester B. Stoddard, Charles Smith, William W. Spencer, C. W. Stilwell, Alvah L. Tippits, Alvah Tippits, William Willsey, Benj. S. Wilber, Levi B. Wilder, Ira J. Wiles. Priests. Jacob K. Butterfield, H.N. Byington, Elijah B. Gaylord, Samuel Parker, Jeremiah Wilby. Teacher. Joseph Fielding. (page 432)" I found this record while I was doing research on the Perrys - not sure if you already had this piece of information. Pat L. Bird Sagers Patriarchal Blessing The Patriarchal Blessing of Benjamin F. Bird, Son of Jeremiah & Elizabeth Bird, Born in the Township of Rahway, Co. of Essex, & State of New Jersey, the 19th day of January, 1778. Brother Benjamin, I lay my Hands upon your Head, in the Name & by the authority of Jesus Christ, to bless you, which Blessing shall be fulfilled in future, in the Order of God’s providence, according to the Gifts of the Spirit, & Gifts & Callings of God, unto you, agreeable to the Holy Priesthood also, & the right of Lineage, which shall be fulfilled upon your Head, a Portion in time, & the residue of Eternity, for in time you shall be blest with a knowledge of the Mysteries of God, even unto a fulness, if your Faith fail not to sustain you, & preserve your Days upon the Earth, & you shall be blest Temporally & Spiritually, in Basket, & in Store, for a Reward of your Sacrifices wherein you have been sacrificed, unto the restoring of Four Fold, which is the Mind of the Spirit, for the integrity of your Heart, together with the Gifts of the Spirit which is to come in the Order of the Kingdom, by the Priesthood, in its legal authority, according to the Lineage of your Fathers, which seemeth to be in the Lineage of Aaron, to be received according to the Blessings which are sealed upon that Lineage & Priesthood, with all its Light, & Life, & qualifying Powers to prepare you for that which is in future, the same to come to pass, & be fulfilled, unto the fulness of the Covenant made unto Abraham, Issac, & Jacob, & the day shall come when you shall stand forth & bear Testimony of the things of God, according to your authority given you, & the Blessings that shall be Sealed upon you in the House of the Lord, in the day of your anointing, for you shall be blest, & your Posterity after you, with the Holy Priesthood, from Generation to Generation, & your Name shall be perpetuated & held in Honour, as one of the Noble and Honorable in the kingdom of God, whilst the Earth shall stand, & you shall come to your Inheritance in the Resurrection, with your Children, And Fathers House according to the Covenants to your Fathers, still your days shall be lengthened out, & you shall see much of the Salvation of God, & you shall be saved in the Celestial Glory, which Blessings & promise I Seal upon your Head henceforth, & you shall go down to your Grave in Peace, not withstanding the perilous Times that shall exist, to Sleep but for a Moment, to be awaked by the Sounding of the Trump of God, at the resurrection of the Just. These are the Blessings that I Seal upon your Head. Even so, Amen. Given by Hyrum Smith, at Nauvoo, Illinois, February 9th 1842. James Sloan B Clerk Book of Patriarchal Blessings Index, Volume: 4 Page: 246 16 Benjamin Freeman Bird home/property in Nauvoo Dale L. Berge, BYU Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2, p.209 The Jonathan Browning property was acquired by Nauvoo Restoration, Incorporated, from the estate of Charles H. Hudson, who died 11 April, 1968. Mr. Hudson had lived in the Browning house for a few years when he was first married, but when the house he was building on the northwest quarter of Lot 2 was finished, he moved from the Browning house to the new home. This move took place in 1916, after which the Browning house was not reoccupied. Since 1916 the house was used mostly for storage and was allowed to decay. Mr. Hudson married Louise Schoell, who was the daughter of Fred Schoell, owner of the home from 1890 to 1912. Lot 2, Block 118, was originally purchased from Joseph Smith, trustee for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, by Benjamin F. Bird in 1840. After Bird had paid nearly $300 on the lot, he requested a deed for the south half and reverted the north half back to Joseph Smith. However, no record of the deed has been located. Dale L. Berge, BYU Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2, p.209 Jonathan Browning obtained the south half of Lot 2, Block 118, about 1843, the same year that he was baptized into the Mormon Church. He left Nauvoo in 1846 during the Exodus of the Mormons, and sometime thereafter the mother of Joseph Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, temporarily lived in the Browning Nauvoo home and shop. When the trustees of the Church sold the property to Peter Poncin in 1847, records indicate that on the property there was a “good brick house”, “also a good brick blacksmith shop and a small frame barn and a log house.” 6(l) Dale L. Berge, BYU Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2, p.210 During the historic Mormon period from 1839-1846, the northwest quarter of Lot 2, Block 118, was owned by George W. Harris, a watchmaker, while Heber C. Kimball owned the northeast quarter, which he subdivided into three smaller lots. The north half of Lot 3 to the south of Jonathan Browning was owned by Henry G. Sherwood. Shadrach Roundy and others owned the property to the rear of Jonathan’s property. 11/15/95 Printed from the LDS Collectors Library Page 1 9:57:38 PM ©1995 Infobases, Inc. 17 Benjamin Freeman Bird home in Nauvoo before restoration Taken : July 1970. Owner: Ila Peck Picture of Benjamin Freeman Bird home (Browning Home) and taken from a different position than the preceding picture. It is hanging on the wall inside the restored home. 18 Picture of the first cabin of Benjamin Freeman Bird in Nauvoo as restored today. It sits immediately behind the two story home in background which was built later. (Larry Mace: 28 May 2003) 19 Description: First constructed by Benjamin Freeman Bird, the house and property were sold to Jonathan Browning in 1843. The two-story section was built by Benjamin--and probably the 1-story portion seen here, as well as the cabin directly behind the brick home (the cabin is a reconstruction on the original foundation.) Diana Ludy is in the foreground. Date Taken: June 1994. Owner: Diana Ludy. Picture of bed inside restored Bird cabin at Nauvoo. By Larry Mace, 28 May 2003. 20 Picture of interior of Bird cabin as restored today. Notice herbs hung drying near fireplace by Larry Mace 28 May 2003. Picture of eating area of restored Bird cabin in Nauvoo by Larry Mace 28 May 2003. 21 Living room inside restored Bird (Browning) home in Nauvoo. By Larry Mace, 28 May 2003. This is a picture of the upstairs bedroom as it looks today in the restored Bird (Browning) home in Nauvoo. By Larry Mace, 28 May, 2003. 22 This is the fireplace in the upstairs bedroom in the resored Bird home in Nauvoo. By Larry Mace, 28 May, 2003. Benjamin Bird owned 50 acres near Fountain Green, IL, about 30 miles east of Nauvoo, IL. James Bird also owned some of the land in the foreground. By Diana Ludy, 1996. 23 24 25 26 1850 United States Federal Census Record Name: Benjamin Freeman Bird Age: 73 Estimated birth year: abt 1777 Birth place: New York Gender: Male Home in 1850 (City, County, State): Not Stated, Great Salt Lake, Utah Teritory Died In Springville City, Utah County, February 20, Benjamin Freeman Bird, aged 85 years I month and l day. Father Bird was born in Essex County, New Jersey, and has been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints nearly twenty—seven years, having been baptized in Southport, Chemung county, New York, in June, 1835. He emigrated to Far West, Mo. in 183- , and after the saints were driven from that state, settled at Nauvoo, and shared in their persecutions in, and ultimate expulsion from, Illinois. From Nauvoo he went to the frontiers, and from there he emigrated to Utah, arriving in Great Salt Lake City in 1850 where he resided two years, and then moved to Springville. He was universally respected, and lived and died a Saint Utah Cemetery Inventory Record Name: Benjamin Freeman Bird Birth Date: 19 January 1778 Birth Place: Essexcounty,newjers Death Date: 20 February 1862 Death Place: Springville Burial Date: 0 0 0 Cemetery: Springville City Cemetery Source: Sexton / Grant Grave Location: Blk. 59 Lot 1 Pos. 1

LIFE SKETCH OF KELSEY BIRD

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

Kelsey Bird was born January 11, 1837 at Hector, Tompkin Co., New York, to Charles and Mary Ann Kennedy. Kelsey was born just a few months after his parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, they being baptized in August 18, 1836. Six children were born in New York. One account claims another son, James, was born in Pennsylvania. Another son was born in 1839 at Far West. He died the same day. Bradford K, was born January 26, 1840 in Clayton, Adam Co., Illinois. They took an active part in the church and in the development of the community. Charles received his endownment in the Nauvoo Temple January 2, 1846. Charles Bird and his father, Benjamin Freeman Bird, were merchants in New York and in New Jersey. Charles and Benjamin were religious men as evidenced by their writings, etc., such as wills and legal documents. They were fairly well educated and had considerable wealth. These men heard the gospel and joined the church in its very early days. Benjamin Freeman was baptized in 1835, only five years after the organization of the church. These families were well-to-do. Their sacrifice and devotion to their new found faith places them in that unselfish group of pioneers who were responsible for the rapid growth of the church. Benjamin Freeman Bird was born January 19, 1778, the son of Jeremiah F. Bird., who was born about 1748, both in Rahway, Essex Co., New Jersey. Benjamin married Meribah Reeves, who was born May 8, 1784 in Essex Co., New Jersey. Charles was born September 19, 1803, in Flanders, Morris Co., New Jersey. Mary Ann Kennedy was born December 7, 1807, in Barrington , Massachusetts. These families moved west with the early church members. After the death of the Prophet when permanent plans were being made to move west, the Bird families were in Brigham Young's group and came with him as far as Council Bluffs. Charles was put in charge of a group by President Brigham Young to remain at Council Bluffs and raise corn and wheat for the companies who would arrive the following year. Here they served for three years, 1847 to 1850. They left from the Missouri River June 3, 1850 with the Milo Andrus Company. It consisted of 206 persons, 51 wagons, 9 horses, 6 mules, 184 oxen, 122 cows, 44 sheep, 6 yearlings, 19 dogs, 1 pig and 2 ducks. Thomas Steed wrote in his diary, "We crossed the Missouri River and traveled along the south side. At Salt Creek the streams were so high that the bridges were washed away. We built rafts and floated our wagons across. Sickness and death was before us and behind us. Brother Hyde told us the day our company was organized that if we would be faithful and keep the name of God sacred, we should be blessed with health and protected on our journey. One birth and one death occurred on the journey, so we entered Salt Lake Valley with the same number of persons as we left Council Bluffs With." Captain Andrus wrote, "we have passed the graves of hundreds, yet God has preserved us, for which we feel thankful. Peace and union prevail in our mist," They arrived in Salt Lake City August 3, 1850. Kelsey was about 13 1/2 years old at this time. They settled in Cottonwood, where Charles was bishop for many years. On the 15th day of February, 1853 Charles married his second wife, Sarah Ann Dunsdon. Under assignment from Brigham Young, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his son Richard were sent to Springville, Charles and his family to Mendon, Cache Co., Utah, and James and William into Idaho. Charles took up land in Mendon and built himself a home for his wife Mary Ann and their 14 children, and Sarah Ann and their 11 children. Mary Ann died October 1 1867, leaving the care of her younger children to Sarah Ann. Charles was a prominent man in Cache Co., being educated and having some wealth, which he generously shared with the church and community. He died at Mendon September 29, 1884. Sarah Ann lived until her family was raised, her death date being December 5, 1899. Kelsey spent his early manhood in Mendon. At the age of about twenty-five he married Eliza Jane Perry, age 16,in the old endowment house on May 18, 1861. She was the daughter of Orren Alonzo Perry and Mary Ann Hoops. They made their home in Mendon. Where he, Kelsey, farmed. He was very successful, having sheep, cattle and horses. He accumulated the best farm equipment t be had at that time. On December 6, 1861 a little daughter (Mary Ann) was born, who died at birth. On the 28th of October 1862 a little son was born, and he also died at birth (named Charles Alonzo). The a little girl was born on the 16th of October 1863. They named her Eliza Jane. On the 20th of January, 1865 Kelsey Charles Arrived. On the 23rd of February, 1867 Kelsey took a second wife, Ann Muir. They were Married in the old endowment house. She was the daughter of Walter Muir and Mary Ross. She was born May 7, 1848 in Crofthead, Reafsewshire, Scotland. It was in Scotland that they joined the church. It was not to be the father's privilege to come to Utah. He died in Scotland on August 15, 1860, just a short time after joining the church. Mary said her greatest desire since joining the church was to raise her children in the fear of the Lord and to raise them to be a credit to the church. So leaving her comfortable home and many of her dear ones, three of whom were buried in Scotland, she, with a family of five (three boys and two girls) set sail from Liverpool in the sailing ship "Art Wright", May 28, 1866. Two of her children had emigrated to America previously. She arrived in New York July 6, 1866. Leaving here, they crossed the river in a down pour of rain in an open cattle boat, which was flat surfaced with just a chain around the outside. This was just at the close of the Civil War, when means of travel was very difficult. Landing at New Haven, they boarded the train, reaching Montreal. They continued from here, still traveling by train, until they reached the banks of the Missouri July 22nd. After five days of travel across the plains, they were visited by a band of five hundred Pawnee Indian warriors who told them if they would give them flour, meat, etc., that they could travel over their lands unmolested and that they could use their wood for fires and the oxen could feed on their grass. Two or three oxen had to be given to the Indians for meat. The rest of the journey across the plains began July 25, 1866 with ox teams. Mary Muir walked nearly all the way, arriving in Salt Lake City in October, 1866. They remained in Salt Lake City only for a few days, then traveled northward to Mendon, Cache Co., Utah. Here Mary remained until her death, earning her living by caring for the sick. The final destination of Mary Ross Muir in Mendon provides the setting for her daughter, Annie Muir, and Kelsey Bird to meet and marry. As was stated earlier, she became the second wife. Eliza Jane and Ann became good friends. Their love for each other lasted through out their lives, and they loved each other's children. Ann's children called Eliza Jane 'Aunt Jane' and Eliza Jane's children call Ann 'Aunt Annie'. On November 7,1867 Alonzo William was born to Eliza Jane. Then on March 10,1868 Kelsey Walter was born to Annie. The next two babies were born with in two days of each other. Maribah, a little girl, was born to Annie July 23, 1870 and Lewis Richard was born to Eliza Jane July 25, 1870. On December 30, 1871 Moses George Albert was born to Annie. On March 19, 1873 Sarah Ann was born to Eliza Jane . On March 7, 1874 Annie presented her husband with twin boys, Peter Alma and James Alvin. On December 28, 1875 another little girl, Agnes Betsy, came to Annie. Soon after this Kelsey, with nine other families, was sent to Vermillion in Sevier, Co., Utah by Brigham Young. Some of the other men were Peter Gotfredson, Dastrup, and Cudddabacks. Their trip to Vermillion was slow and tedious because of their stock and farm equipment, nine small children, household furnishings and food supplies. They brought cows. horses and sheep, chickens and pigs. they could not travel many miles each day and water was a necessity at the camp. One of their camps was at Salt Lake Creek, south of Levan. When they made camp at night, the children would her the stock after the day's journey. They arrived in Vermillion in the early spring of 1875. Of course the crops would be the first consideration. Kelsey put the first plow in the Vermillion Canal. That was their only source of water, and it is still a main water source. After planting as much ground as they could get cleared for the first year's crop and getting sufficient water onto the land for irrigation, the next concern was a permanent home. Kelsey hauled logs from the canyon and built on the east side of the Sevier River. He planted the trees that still grow by the Black Knowels. He also made corrals and planted a garden. The garden then belonged to the women. While at Vermillion Kelsey took Kelsey Walter, who was between 9 and 10 years old (and maybe other sons??) with a team and wagon to Manti to work on the temple. He donated three weeks with his team getting rocks out and hauling them. On August 6, 1876 a little girl was born to Eliza Jane. They named her Rosetta. She was Eliza Jane's last baby. She was never well after that. Annie gave birth to John Henry in February(either 24th or 28th), 1878. Later, both families lived in Gooseberry --- about 1879. Kelsey was very superior physically and had great ambition. He was always a good provider. He was a stern man and demanded obedience from his children. He was appointed and set apart as presiding elder of the Gooseberry Branch of Salina Ward on January 21, 1883 by Bishop Jens Jensen. Eliza Jane was appointed president of the Wheat Association and also treasurer of the Relief Society, being set apart the same day, also by Bishop Jensen. At one time Eliza Jane's two oldest girls, then in their teens, wanted new dresses for some particular occasion. Without asking, Annie loaded some wheat on the wagon and took it to Salina, sold it, and bought material for the dresses. Then she and Eliza Jane made the dresses. Kelsey, with the aid of a George Gates, built a good sized house -- two large rooms on each side with loft bedrooms and a lean-to-kitchen on each side. Each family had one side of the house., giving them at least three bedrooms each and their lean-to kitchens. There was a large fireplace in each part of the house. On February 27, 1880 Joseph Smith Bird was born. On June 20, 1882 a little boy, Mart Andrew, was born; he died the same day. (Annie's children) On November 11, 1884 Annie presented her husband with the second set of twin boys --- David Mormon and Brigham Abraham. Hyrum Leroy arrived December 29, 1886 and two years later on October 14, 1888 Mary Ann was born. Ettia Frances is listed on the family group sheet, but no date is given. (This made 14 children for Annie and 8 for Eliza Jane) The authorities of the land were after Kelsey for having two wives. So he took Eliza Jane and her family, some sheep and cattle and went to Benjamin, Utah Co., Utah and started over again. He left Annie and her family in Gooseberry. But he was taken to court, nevertheless. On Tuesday, October 22, 1889 (On Martha Jane Smith's birth date) in the 1st district court at Provo, Utah, Kelsey Bird of Benjamin, Utah was sentenced by Judge Blackburn to six months imprisonment and $300.00 fine for unlawful cohabitation. Monday, April 21, 1890 Kelsey Bird of Benjamin was discharged from the penitentiary. (copied from the church Chronology by Martha Jane Smith, May 20, 1953, at Price, Utah.) Then, on February, 20 1900 Eliza Jane died. Alonzo and his wife, Martha Abigail, said that as they sat with her that night they heard voices speak above her bed. The following is a copy of a newspaper clipping found in the family Bible: Benjamin, Utah -- Death and burial of Eliza Jane Perry Bird. Special correspondence, Benjamin, Utah Co., Utah, February 20th, of 1900. today we buried our beloved Sister Eliza Jane Perry Bird, wife of brother Kelsey Bird, who died of dropsy. She was born March 10, 1845. The funeral was held in the meeting house and was well attended. President Ann Bingham in behalf of the Relief Society bore testimony to the faithful labors of Mrs. Bird in that organization until her health became so bad that she could not attend to the same. Bishop A.J.B. Stewart, Bishop Arglye of Lake Shore, and a number of othes made addresses ulogistic of the sterling character of the deceased. Kelsey Bird was ordained a High Priest July 11, 1903 by Charles Breverton. I In his declining years, his son Alonzo W. Bird and family moved to Benjamin in order to take care of him. He had a large family, most of whom were boys. These active, energetic boys climbed the trees, picked the fruit, scattered the chickens, etc. These actions bothered their grandfather so much that Alonzo moved his family to another farm some distance away. Martha Jane, the oldest daughter, used to walk to grandpa's every day to care for him. He gave her two pretty vases, a glass plate with the picture of the temple on it and a turine. These items she valued very much. When Alonzo and family moved to Idaho, Grandfather Kelsey sold his place and went to live with Lewis R. Bird. Later he went to Mendon to see his sisters and died at their place in Mendon on the 29th of April, 1909. Lewis took him from Mendon to Benjamin for burial. Written by Martha Jane Bird Smith copied by Donna (Dee) Bird

Benjamin Fessman Bird and Marabah Reeves

Contributor: finnsh Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

(In the winter of 1832, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his wife Marabah reeves lived in a comfortable home in Southport, New York with eight of their none living children. As the snow blanketed the New York country side, a single Elder from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints knocked on their door. He asked for admittance and keep. since he was a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and was preaching without purse of script, Benjamin and Marabah were touched by the testimony that he bore. Over the next few weeks, by reading the Book of Mormon, they became convinced that his message was true. Since the Elder had moved on, the Bird's grasped at the only link that would tie the to the glorious message that they had received, they subscribed to the Star. Because the Church was in its very early infancy, having been only 31 months since the church was organized, the Bird Family had no where else to turn for additional information. In the first addition of the Messenger And Advocate printed at Kirtland, Ohio in October 1834: "Mr. Benj. F. Bird of Southport, Tioga C., N. Y., writes under date of Nov. 14 (1833) and says: "I have received your papers almost one year: and because I Held the Book of Mormon as sacred as I do the Bible, The Methodist ( though I had been a regular member almost 37 years,) turned me out but I bless god for it: for though they cast me out Jesus took me in." "He further adds, that he dose not know as he shall ever have a privilege of uniting with his church, as he never saw but on elder, whom he solicited to preach twice: that it caused a great stir and noise among the people. "If any of the elders are passing near, would they not do well to Call? we circulate some few papers in that place, the most of which is trough the agency of our aged friend of whom we have been speaking, and from whom we acknowledge the receipt of money for the same." before a team of Elders could respond to Benjamin's request, he lost his sweetheart Marabah in the winter of 1833, leaving him with a heavy heart and the responsibility of raising eight children. As he shared his testimony of the truthfulness of the Church of Jesus Christ with his friends, many mocked, but a few hearts were touched. One who came to know by the spirit that Benjamin's testimony was true, was a women named Margaret Crain. After a short courtship; they were married on the 25th day of April, 1933 A year later, Margaret bore Benjamin a beautiful daughter whom they named Margaret Jane. Finally in June of 1834, a team of morman elders came to the area and having the necessary authority, Benjamin, his wife Margaret and several of the married children of Benjamin and Marabah, with their sposes were baptized.

Autobiography

Contributor: Becky Created: 1 year ago Updated: 8 months ago

In the winter of 1832, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his wife Marabah Reeves lived in a comfortable home in Southport, New York with eight of their nine living children. As the snow blanketed the New York countryside, a single Elder from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints knocked at their door. He asked for admittance and keep since he was a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and was preaching without purse or script. Benjamin and Marabah were touched by the testimony that he bore. Over the next few weeks, by reading the Book of Mormon, they became convinced that his message was true. Since the Elder had moved on, the Bird’s grasped at the only link that would tie them to the glorious message that they had received, they subscribed to the STAR. Because the Church was in its very early infancy, having been only 31 months since the church was organized, the Bird family had nowhere else to turn for additional information. In the first edition of the MESSENGER AND ADVOCATE printed at Kirtland, Ohio in October 2, 1834; Oliver Cowdrey, then Second Elder in the Church, published the following excerpt: Mr. Benjamin F Bird, of Southport, Tioga Co. New York writes under date of November 14, 1833 and says, “I have received your papers almost one year; and because I held the Book of Mormon as sacred as I do the Bible, the Methodist Church (though I had been a regular member almost 37 years)., turned me out; but I bless God for it, for though they cast me out Jesus took me in. “He further adds, that he does not know as he shall ever have a privilege of uniting with his church, as he never saw but one Elder, whom he solicited to preach twice; that it caused a great stir and noise among the people, & c.” “If any of the Elders are passing near, would they not do well to call? - - - We circulate some few papers in that place, the most of which is through the agency of our aged friend of whom we have been speaking, and from whom we acknowledge the receipt of money for the same.” Before a team of Elders could respond to Benjamin’s request, he lost his sweet-heart Marabah in the winter of 1833, leaving him with a heavy heart and the responsibility of raising eight children. As he shared his testimony of the truthfulness of the Church of Jesus Christ with his friends, many mocked, but a few hearts were touched. One who came to know by the Spirit that Benjamin’s testimony was true, was a woman named Margaret Crain. After a short courtship they were married on the 25th day of April, 1833. A year later, Margaret bore Benjamin a beautiful daughter whom they named Margaret Jane. Finally in June of 1834, a team of Mormon Elders came to the area and having the necessary authority, Benjamin, his wife Margaret and several of the married children of Benjamin and Marabah, with their spouses, were baptized. Shortly after the birth of their next child, Benjamin, his unmarried family and his three married sons with their families, moved to Kirtland, Ohio as part of the gathering of Israel. Upon their arrival they found the spiritual condition of the Church to be very gloomy indeed. Several members of the Quorum of the Twelve including two of the three witnesses had spoken out against the Prophet. Secret meetings were being held, which finally culminated in Joseph having to escape for Kirtland in the dead of the night in January of 1838. The Bird families were convinced that the Prophet was in the right and that those who had come out in open rebellion against him had: the waging tongues of apostate devils.” Charles Bird represented his father’s large family at the meeting of the Counsel of the Seventies in the attic story of the Kirtland Temple. He pledged the support of the Bird family in what later was to be known as the Kirtland Camp. By commandment from the Lord, this camp of Saints, who were faithful to the Lord’s Prophet, took the wearisome trek to Jackson County, Missouri, ending their seven month march by camping at the site of Adam-Ondi-Ahman. In January, 1839, the Bird families were residing at Far West, Missouri, and were aggrieved participants in the maleficent scenes of murder; rape and pillage have since proved to be one of the worst persecutions ever imposed upon any people, the so-called Far West War. Benjamin Freeman Bird and his son Charles Bird had signed the affidavit wherein they covenanted with the other inhabitants of Far West to stand by and assist one another “to the utmost of our abilities in removing to the State of Missouri.” They bound themselves to the extent of all their available property to be disposed of by the committee for the purpose of providing means for the removal of the poor and destitute from the state. Their covenant was in vain when they were ruthlessly driven from Far West. As they left Far West, the Bird families looked back and saw their homes in flames. They left Missouri with only the clothes on their backs in the dead of the winter, with nowhere to go, after suffering the Far West holocaust. While at Kirtland and Far West, the Bird families and particularly Charles and his wife Mary Ann Kennedy, became personal, close acquaintances with the Prophet Joseph Smith and his wife Emma. They gathered at Nauvoo with the rest of the Saints. In January 1840, Benjamin purchased the property now known as the Bird-Browning on Main Street from the Prophet Joseph Smith for $300.00 They built a nice two room log cabin with a root cellar, which has been restored by the Church, and dug a well which is now the south side of the property. In the spring of 1843 they built the two-story brick structure. (Later, they sold the property to Jonathan Browning who then added on the first story of the middles section and even later the gunsmith and blacksmith shops. Browning lived in the brick home approximately 2 years, and then it was occupied by Lucy Mack Smith (1845-1846), the Mother of the Prophet Joseph Smith. It was while she was living here that she wrote her autobiography which included the biography of her son. This is one of the most popular histories on the life of the Prophet Joseph Smith even to this day (1980). Subsequent owners are thought to have added the small second story onto the middle section, the kitchen and probably even later individuals with German architectural liking, added the porch onto the back of the original two story living quarters. Benjamin and his family lived in the log cabin for three years and in the two story brick structure for a few months. During this time they enjoyed all of the special cultural events that have come to mark the Nauvoo period as being one of the most unique in history. Since converts from all over the world came to Nauvoo and established their homes during those years, there was a great mixing of culture and arts. Bound by oneness, all being Latter-Day-Saints, there was a friendly blending of a variety of cultures and a feeling of personal pride and friendliness. The people, who had been persecuted and driven from Ohio and then Missouri, now lived in relative peace. They enjoyed a pronounced zest for life, which enabled them to live and appreciate the unique cultural advantage that was theirs. The Bird families traded at the store of the Prophet Joseph Smith, and often attended parties and socials at the Mansion House. There were several occasions where Benjamin played a friendly game of croquet with his friends and neighbors, which included Joseph, Hyrum, Wilford Woodruff and Heber C. Kimball. While living in the log cabin, Benjamin and Margaret were blessed with a baby daughter, who being born at this time of relative peace and prosperity, brought a great deal of joy and happiness into their lives. Also at Nauvoo, Benjamin enjoyed the association of several of his children and many of his grandchildren. His sons Phineas, Charles, James and Samuel all had their families at Nauvoo. He still had living at home two sons by Marabah and the 3 children by Margaret. In the fall of 1843, disruptions, both internal and external to the Church were caused by John C. Bennett and William Law, who were at one time counselors to the Prophet Joseph in the first Presidency. Benjamin with his home on Main Street was in the middle of all the excitement and persecution. Because Benjamin was now 65 years old and had three children at home under the age of 9, he desired to move to a quiter location. As mentioned earlier, he sold his property and the newly built brick home to Jonathon Browning and purchased a large 50 acre farm on the outskirts of Nauvoo. Benjamin and all of his sons participated in the building of the Nauvoo Temple. One of his sons, Richard, was called on a mission to the Wisconsin Pineries. Here he served on a Council of Directors under Bishop George Miller (who was called at the death of Bishop Edward Partridge) where he was involved in making a schedule of every man’s property and making a general distribution under an order similar to the law of consecration. While on his Mission Richard was involved in cutting down pine trees, which were then floated down the Mississippi River to Nauvoo where they ultimately were used in the building of the Temple according to family history two of his sons were called on proselyting missions in the Eastern States. Because Benjamin’s son, Charles and wife Mary Ann, had become so close to Joseph and Emma the Prophet invited Charles to be one of his personal bodyguards. In 1839 the Prophet had called Charles to the First Quorum of the Seventies. He was ordained by Joseph Young. In December 1844, Charles was made the Senior President of the Nineteenth Quorum of Seventies, Joseph’s bodyguards used the system that when it was Charles turn to take over on guard duty, one of the men previously on duty would ride to the top of the hill close to the Bird home and take off his hat and wave it. Charles would wave back to let them know that he had received the signal to come and take over. Charles had been on duty the day before the Prophet was murdered and had gone back home for fresh clothing and supplies for the Prophet and the men imprisoned with him. The day the Prophet was killed, the messenger rode to the top of the hill, dismounted his horse, knelt on the ground and bowed his head, Charles knew by the sad motion the the Prophet was dead. Charles went into town, and it was his team and wagon that carried the bodies of the prophet and his brother Hyrum away from the team and wagon that carried the bodies of the Prophet and his brother Hyrum away from the Mansion House. Charles was always proud of his wagons and outstanding teams and always kept them in excellent condition. It is ironic that the hill on which the messenger knelt to signal Charles that the Prophet had been murdered is the same hill on which the old graveyard now stands. After the death of the Prophet Joseph, the Birds along with the other Saints worked under armed guard to complete the Temple. Most of the Birds received their endowments on the third floor rooms of the Nauvoo Temple. In the large third story at the front of the building was where the dressing rooms and chambers for the preparatory ordinances were located. They were sealed to their spouses in the large rectangular room beneath the Gable. In fact, Nauvoo Temple records indicate that Charles Bird was an ordained Temple worker, which means that he worked night and day to assist those Saints who desired to receive their special endowments to do so, before the mob could destroy their Temple or drive them out. In two months (December 10, 1845 to February 5, 1846) Charles assisted the more than 5,000 Saints who were endowed in the Nauvoo Temple in the twelve and a half hour ceremony. This included washings and anointing’s, the endowment and the sealing of families. The ceremony was basically the same as it is today except it was acted out on platforms, sheets were hung from the ceiling to make rooms or compartments and there were several lengthy discussions instructing the candidates on the covenants they were entering into. Emma was so concerned that the mobocrats would dig up the body of her husband, the Prophet Joseph and desecrate his grave for the $1,000.00 reward that was pending for him “dead or alive”, that she had ten men bury the remains of her husband and Hyrum in the basement of the Nauvoo House. Because at least ten people knew that they were buried there, her concern continued to mount, until one night she appeared at the home of Charles Bird and asked that he be one of the four trusted men to help her rebury the bodies in a secret tomb near the old Spring House, near the Old Homestead. Charles used his team and wagon. They loaded the dirt from the floor of the Old Homestead. Charles used his team and wagon. They loaded the dirt from the floor of the cellar of the Old Spring House onto the back of Charles wagon. Charles then drove his wagon out as far as he could into the back of Charlie’s wagon. Charles then drove his wagon out as far as he could into the Mississippi River and unloaded the dirt, thereby leaving no evidence that the martyrs were buried there. Then Charles, Emma and the three loyal friends dug up the coffins from the Nauvoo House put them in Charles’ wagon and drove them across the street to the old Spring House and secretly reburied them. Emma’s trust and confidence in these four men was so complete that she did not tell anyone, not even her own children, where Joseph was buried, until on her death bed some 14 years later. What a special tribute to the integrity of Charles Bird and his reciprocal love towards Joseph, Hyrum and Emma. Benjamin and his sons and their families were present after the martyrdom when Sidney Rigdon claimed that he was the guardian of the Church. They witnessed President Brigham Young transfigured into the voice, appearance and personality of the Prophet Joseph Smith and felt the Spirit bear witness to their souls that the Twelve should preside. In January 1846, the presiding Brethren decided to move west. President Brigham Young, knowing that Charles had one of the best teams of horses in the City of Nauvoo. He asked Charles if he would be the first person to cross the Mississippi River on the ice. On February 25, 1846, Benjamin Freeman Bird stood under the old tree at the end of Teardrop Lane and watched his son drive his loaded wagon across the frozen river to see if the ice was firm enough to cross. Because several of the Birds’ were weavers by trade, Benjamin and his sons and their families were asked to remain at Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters and assist in the outfitting of the emigrant Saints. Many had been driven out of their homes without an opportunity to take the necessary clothing and other items that they would need to make the long trek into the wilderness to they knew not where. The Bird family set up a woolen mill, of sorts, similar to the one that they had at Nauvoo, and thereby assisted in the emigration of the thousands of homeless Saints. In 1850 the Brethren invited the Bird families to come west. They emigrated with the Milo Andrus Company. There were 206 persons and 51 wagons in the Company. On this train with Benjamin Freeman Bird were his wife and small children and Richard and James with their families. This was the first company of emigrating Saints for the season, leaving Missouri in June of 1850. They took the pioneer trail on which the year before trains had passed which had been stricken with cholera. As the pioneers moved along they saw the bones of their dead comrades, as their bodies had been ripped out of their shallow graves by wolves and other scavengers and scattered over the country side. Benjamin’s son William marched with the Mormon Battalion in the historic trek that has come to be known as the symbol of dedication and patriotism of the Latter-Day-Saint people. To show the magnanimity and noble characters of the Bird’s and their spouses, and the love the Bird’s felt for their spouses, the sacrifices of Charles’ wife Mary Ann Kennedy, is illustrative. Mary Ann, after leaving her comfortable home in Hampton New York (She was the daughter of a doctor) experienced the apostasy of the Kirtland era and of the Far West War with six children under the age of 11 and at the time was six months pregnant. She bore child while destitute in the wilderness before reaching Nauvoo, bore three children at Nauvoo, one at Winter Quarters, one while crossing the plains at Council Point and another at Salt Lake City. This means that she bore children at or near every major church historical site during these periods of driving’s and persecutions. She was pregnant and had a small family to care for during those times of serious trial when so many people of less character left the church. Mary Ann recalled having seen her come being burnt to the ground by the mobs four times during her lifetime as she is fleeing with her family for their lives. On one occasion, Charles and Mary Ann and their small family found themselves in the middle of the wilderness in the snow. They had to abandon their wagon containing all that they owned in this world. Mary Ann, pregnant, so over-extended herself in the care of her small family that her toes on one foot became so seriously frost bitten that she had to have them amputated without anesthesia. When the Charles and Mary Ann Bird family eventually arrived in Salt Lake City, they had only the clothes on their backs as possessions, but were grateful to be alive. The Bird families had paid a dear price indeed, to be gathered in the tops of the mountains to worship the God of Abraham. Soon after arriving in Salt Lake City, Benjamin had the privilege of being present when Apostle George A. Smith called his son James Bird to be the first Bishop of the Provo Second Ward and was also present when Elder Smith ordained him to that Office. Because of his advancing age and the trials he had been subjected to for the last 14 years, Benjamin found the peaceful seclusion of the Rocky Mountains particularly delightful. Several of the Bird families settled in the beautiful area of Springville and there Benjamin enjoyed the association of many of his numerous grandchildren and watched them wax strong in the Gospel. Benjamin crossed over into the Spirit world a content and happy man in 1862 and is buried near the home of his dreams in Springville, Utah References: Family Bible of Benjamin Freeman Bird LDS Temple Records Stake and Ward Records in the possession of Clifford J. Stratton The Documentary History of the Church Numerous family histories and family records in the possession of C.J. Stratton

Benjamin Freeman Bird--History

Contributor: Becky Created: 1 year ago Updated: 8 months ago

Benjamin Freeman Bird 1778-1862 Compiled by Marla Stone Walker 2011 Benjamin Freeman Bird was born January 19, 1778, in Rahway, Essex County, New Jersey. He was the fifth of eleven children of Jeremiah Bird and Elizabeth Marsh.1 He had four sisters and six brothers.2 It was almost two years before Benjamin was christened, possibly because the Revolutionary War was raging in the New Jersey area. However, on October 17, 1779, Benjamin was christened in the First Presbyterian Church in Morristown, Morris County, New Jersey, as Freeman Bird. (In his early years, Benjamin was evidently known as "Freeman.") In this year of 1778, France sent a fleet to help the colonists; in return, the colonists had to sign an agreement that they would fight until they won their independence from England. It was about this time that the battle for the Hudson River was in progress, and Howe was prevented from crossing New Jersey. This was also the year Washington was at Valley Forge, and pursued the English across New Jersey. The year 1780 was the gloomiest year of the revolutionary war, but in the year 1783 on the 19th day of April the war ended. With this event there began a real struggle. The soldiers were returning home, sick and tired. It had been a hard war, with little enough for the soldiers, who had suffered untold hardships with short rations, poor clothing, and severely cold winters. It was a slow, hard road to recovery. About 1787, the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad and the Erie Canal were built for transportation, and Ohio, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin were added to the union. These states, formed on public land, gave Congress an opportunity to sell land to the people and use the proceeds to pay off the debt incurred by the War of Independence. Changes took place in the lives of the Bird family. It would be interesting to know what part the Bird family played in this period. Nothing is known of Benjamin’s youth. He seems to have been a very intelligent and active person.3 Benjamin was almost eleven years old when his father died on November 29, 1788, in Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey. It is not known if his mother remarried. Benjamin evidently remained in the New Jersey area because on February 22, 1801, he married Meribah "Milly" Reeves in Rahway. The handwritten record reads, "Freeman Bird to Milly Reeve. I certify that on the twenty second day of February in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and one I married Freeman Bird of Roxbury in the County of Morris and State of Newjersey to Milly Reeve of the same place--dated the fourth day of March AD 1801. Wm Grandin Minister of the Gosple. Received and Recorded the 4th March Ad 1801. C. Russell Clk [Clerk]".(from 2 4Ludy p. 4-5 5Stratton, PART V, P. 16-17. 6Ludy, P. 4-5. 7Stratton, PART V. P. 17. 8Ludy, P. 4-5. the Morris County Clerk’s office; original spelling and grammar retained). Benjamin was 23 years old, and Meribah was 16 years old. Both were residents of Roxbury, New Jersey. Meribah had been born on May 8, 1784, in Rahway, Morris County, New Jersey, the daughter of Phineas and Mary Taylor Reeves.4 This was the year the nation’s capitol was moved from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C. The Capitol building construction began in 1800. Benjamin, being the third son, seems to be the one who pulled up stakes and left the old homestead, moving to Flanders in Morris County and starting a home for his new bride. People were building more substantial homes at this time; many even built mansions, some of which still stand today. Lovely churches were built and industry was expanding. Church was still the center of social life, with dinners and teas and dancing. Benjamin Freeman had lived when Washington, then John Adams wasPresident. Now in 1801-1809 Thomas Jefferson was President.5 Morris County records show that Benjamin paid taxes from 1802 to 1807 as follows: 1802, Freeman Bird, 1 house and lot, 1 cow. 1803, Benjamin F. Bird. 1805 Benjamin F. Bird, 1 house and lot, 1 horse, 2 cows. 1806, Benjamin F. Bird, 1 house and lot, 2 cows, 1 horse. 1807, Benjamin F. Bird, 1 house and lot, 2 horses, 3 cows. Several deeds conveying property to or from Benjamin were also recorded in Morris County during this time period. The last one found stated: "10 August 1805 Benjamin F. Bird and his wife Meribay of Roxbury, in the county of Morris, state of New Jersey, to [names] trustees of the school house in FlandersB[description was not copied] signed Benj. F. Bird and Mariba Bird. Witness: Kelsey Bird [brother of Benjamin] and Peter Smith." The deed was actually recorded July 5, 1834. Benjamin and Meribah’s oldest son was born on January 29, 1802, in Flanders, Morris County, NJ. They named him Phineas Reeves Bird. Their family grew quickly. Charles was born September 19, 1803, and Samuel was born March 19, 1805, both in Flanders. James was born December 22, 1807 in Roxbury. Benjamin and Meribah moved their family to New York sometime in the next fourteen months because their first daughter was born on February 8, 1809, at Romulus, Seneca County, NY. They named her Elizabeth. The family evidently moved to several places in the area in the next few years. On January 16, 1811, George was born in Hector, Tompkins County, NY. The Birds suffered tragedy on January 16, 1813, when their almost 4-year-old daughter died. Two months later on March 30, 1813, Kelsey was born. Unfortunately, another child died on October 17, 1813--twoand- a-half-year-old George. The family moved again, this time to Southport, Tioga County, NY, where little Polly was born on June 13, 1815. Polly was also called Mary.6 It would be interesting to know the reason for these moves, as these places are not far apart. The counties in this area have been divided many times since these early days.7 Another son was born on May 2, 1817, also in Southport. Benjamin and Meribah decided to name him George, possibly in memory of their little son who had died three and a half years earlier. Tragically, this little one--not yet a year old--also died, on February 24, 1818. A year later on January 24, 1819, Amanda Ann was born. Benjamin and Meribah’s eleventh child, Richard, was born on October 13, 1820. And their youngest son, William, was born on July 18, 1823. All three were born in Southport.8 The following is an excerpt of a letter which gives a description of the farm. "In old Southport, I climbed the highest peaks and took chestnut burs from the topmost boughs. I drove my carriage up Pouring Run that comes down by Fassets and wound around up on Green Hill in front of the old school house, where I could see Elias Gustin cradling oats on the highest field of the grandpa Bird farm. George Rogers was raking rye across the gully and Mike Ronshey was hauling hay on the Uncle James Bird place and Jake Ronsheys son was doing the same on the Job Tobias farm and Stephen Brown was mowing mate and 3 9Nauvoo Ancestors, Aug. 2006 Land and Records File Browser CD, Bird, Benjamin Freeman p. 63. "Excerpt from a letter written by one of Benjamin F. Bird’s grandchildren from Spring Hill, Kansas. Signer and date unknown. . . . The balance of the letter was not there, but gives one some picture of the farm of Benjamin Freeman Bird." 10Stratton, PART V, P. 17-18. 11 Miss Florence Bird, The Bird Family, (Written in response to a query by Arthamese Denny in June, 1960), p. 1-3. Repository: Chemung County Historical Society, 415 E. Water Street, Elmira, NY 14901, ph. 607.734.4167, Call Number Bird Family file BF05-015. her Milford Bird and Jennie composed the party on ??? Hill. As Jennie is still a cripple and could not cross and recross the state line nor strattle blackberry brush gracefully, nor peel burch bark, nor pick huckleberries, nor hunt the wintergreen and barberry, she sat on the brink of the hill and assorted berries and took notes as she viewed the landscape over. We could see away upon the hill at Pa’s old house and barn, orchard and buckwheat field in bloom. What a grand sight it was and how she enjoyed it. Well, when we came into her with our basket filled she said, ‘I have been looking for a crazy quilt pattern for a long time and now I have it.’ She pointed to the field where Elias Gustin was at work. He had laid his swaths of oats up, down and across the steep side hill in every conceivable direction that he could best climb up and down and the swaths as they lay, as she said, made the finest crazy quilt pattern that you ever saw. We visited Elias and spent all day there. Some of the apple trees that grandpa grafted, using mud for wax, still bear and the old barn looks inside just as it did. I wanted that old wooden grannery lock that grandpa made, but it could not be found-----."9 During this period the prosperity of this new nation was established. There seemed to be plenty of employment, materials, and opportunities for all. It was a time when many immigrants came to this new country. There was a trend toward building cities, beautiful homes, and churches. America was young and growing and Madison was President, a man who greatly loved peace and tried constantly to avoid war or contentions. Benjamin and his family undoubtedly heard many stories of the sea and of the battles fought there between the ships of our country and those of France and England. The United States was proud of her ships and seamen. She was not strong enough at this time to fight an offensive war, but with her ships she gained respect from England and France by capturing and destroying their shipping. One of our ships at this time was known as "Old Ironsides" or by its real name, the "Constitution." In 1817, the year little George was born, steam ships were being constructed to take the place of sails, and Alabama and Mississippi were added to the union. The question of slavery was one of the big issues facing the government, and England was still smuggling slaves into the south. John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson were presidents while Benjamin’s children were growing to responsibility. Their son Samuel was born the same year as Joseph Smith, and Richard was born the year that Joseph received the great vision of God the Father, and His Son, Jesus Christ.10 In the 1830 census, Benjamin F. Bird is listed in Southport, Tioga County, NY. The listing includes 2 males aged 5 to 10 years [William and Richard]; 2 females aged 10 to 15 years [Amanda and Polly]; 1 male aged 15 to 20 [Kelsey]: 1 male aged 20 to 30 [James]; 1 female aged 40 5o 50 [Meribah] and 1 male aged 50 to 60 [Benjamin]. Thus a total of eight persons were part of the household. Sometime in the next three years, the family moved to Portsmouth, Chemung County, NY. The following is from a history written by Florence Bird, great-granddaughter of Benjamin and Margaret and his second wife, Margaret Crane. "When he [Benjamin] first came to this section from New Jersey, Mr. Bird lived on the road which still bears his name - the "Bird Creek Road". His farm was the first one on the Pennsylvania side of the State line. it is now (1960) owned and occupied by Mr. D. Collier, who reports that the site of the Bird cabin is still marked by some stones - remnants of either the foundation or of the fireplace and chimney. Previous to the death of his first wife, Mr. Bird and his family had moved to the South Creek Road - the farm on the northeast corner of the Rodgers Road. The cemetery in which Meriba Reeves Bird is buried is a plot on this farm."11 4 12Ludy, P. 4-5. 13Walsh, p. 1 14Messenger and Advocate, Vol. 1 No. 3, Dec. 1834, p. 45. (The Evening and Morning Star was published in Kirtland from 1832-1835. The Messenger and Advocate was published from October 1834- Sept, 1835.) 15Stratton, p. 1.. 16Messenger and Advocate, Dec., 1836, p. 45; original spelling and grammar retained). 17Ludy, p. 5. In the meantime, the oldest sons were marrying and beginning their own families. Phineas married Melissa Coalman; and they established their home in Elmira, Chemung County, NY, where their oldest son was born on October 13, 1823. They named him George Washington Bird, and he was only three months younger than his Uncle William. Charles married Mary Ann Kennedy on March 22, 1826, in Covington, Tioga County, PA. They, soon started a family. Samuel married Casiah Brown on April 5, 1826. He died February 13, 1828. James went back to New Jersey where he married Jane Mott Carpenter in 1831. Kelsey married Sally Carpenter Allbright; and Polly married Joel Matthews on March 27, 1832.12 In the winter of 1832, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his wife Marabah Reeves lived in a comfortable home in Southport, New York. They were members of the Methodist Church. Benjamin was one of five elected governing men of the Methodist Church 13 As the snow blanketed the New York country side, a single elder from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints knocked on their door. He asked for admittance and keep, since he was a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and was preaching without purse or script. Benjamin and Marabah were touched by the testimony that he bore. Over the next few weeks, by reading the Book of Mormon, they became convinced that his message was true. Since the Elder had moved on, the Bird's grasped at the only link that would tie them to the glorious message that they had received, they subscribed to the Messenger And Advocate . Because the Church was in its very early infancy, having been only 31 months since the Church was organized, the Bird family had no where else to turn for additional information. In the first edition of the Messenger and Advocate printed at Kirtland, Ohio, in October 1834, Oliver Cowdery, then Second Elder in the Church, published the following excerpt: "Mr. Benj. F. Bird, of Southport, Tioga Co., N. Y., writes under date of Nov. 14 (1833) and says: 'I have received your papers almost one year: and because I held the Book of Mormon as sacred as I do the bible, the Methodist (though I had been a regular member almost 37 years) turned me out; but I bless God for it; for though they cast me out Jesus took me in."14 "He further adds, that he does not know as he shall ever have a privilege of uniting with his Church, as he never saw but one elder, whom he solicited to preach twice; that it caused a great stir and noise among the people, & etc."15 "If any of the elders are passing near, would they not do well to call?--We circulate some few papers in that place, the most of which is through the agency of our aged friend of whom we have been speaking, and from whom we acknowledge the receipt of money for the same."16 Before a team of elders could respond to Benjamin's request, he lost his sweetheart Marabah on February 13, 1833, leaving him with a heavy heart.17 She was buried on the family farm. These two had shared 33 years of joy, happiness, and struggle. Some of the older children were married, and the youngest was ten years old; four were still under eighteen years of age. Merabah’s death occurred three years after the church was organized in Fayette, Seneca County, NY, which was not far from Chemung County. Jackson was President and Daniel Webster and Patrick Henry were statesmen of the day. Banking and tariffs were issues troubling the government, railroads were becoming an important means of transportation, and trains looked like little stagecoaches fastened together. From the year 1830 a new era of progress began throughout the world, especially in the United States. The steam engine brought forth steam ships and trains, the printing press was invented, and with improved transportation and communication the time between places was shortened. Inventions began to come forth by the thousands, matches were invented and were distributed all over the country; schools were improved. Books were more readily obtainable, 5 18Stratton, PART V, P. 18. 19Ludy, p. 5. 20Stratton, p. 1. 21Ludy, p. 5. 22Ludy, Diana R. "The Benjamin Freeman Bird Story--Part 2". For the Birds, Issue Number 11, p. 4. 23Nauvoo Ancestors, From notes that Lola Brimhall found in Nauvoo. 24Stratton, p. 1. and everyone had the opportunity of some education. The printing press made it possible for more people to get news, and gave more reason for learning to read. Because books were more plentiful, ideas were more freely exchanged. 18 As Benjamin shared his testimony of the truthfulness of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints with his friends, many mocked, but a few hearts were touched. Benjamin met a woman named Margaret Crane Daley in Chemung County, NY. She was born June 2, 1797, in Caldwell, Essex County, NY,. Margaret was the widow of Thomas B. Daley. After a short courtship they were married on the 25th day of April, 1833. A year later, Margaret bore Benjamin a beautiful daughter whom they named Margaret Jane on April 9, 1834, in Wellsburg, Chemung County, NY.19 Finally in June of 1834, a team of Mormon elders came to the area and having the necessary authority, Benjamin, and several of the married children of Benjamin and Marabah, with their spouses, were baptized.20 In the December, 1836, edition of the Messenger and Advocate, we also find: "The following is a list of the names of ministers of the gospel, belonging to the church of the Latter Day Saints, whose Licenses were recorded the last quarter, in the License Records, in Kirtland, Ohio. By THOMAS BURDICK. Recording Clerk. Kirtland, Dec. 1, 1836. Elder’s names. . . . Benjamine F. Bird. . ." (P. 432; original spelling retained).21 "On June 20, 1837, Benjamin and Margaret Bird had their second child--a son that they named Benjamin F. Bird. He was also born in Wellsburg, Chemung County, NY."22 Shortly after his birth, Benjamin, his unmarried family, and his three married sons with their families, moved to Kirtland, Ohio, as part of the gathering of Israel. Benjamin’s two married daughters remained in New York, and some of their descendants were later in Kansas. "There was a good relationship and feeling between the children of the 2nd wife and those of Meribah Reeves apparently, as the half sister Margaret often expressed a desire to see them and wrote frequently."23 Upon their arrival in Kirtland they found the spiritual condition of the Church to be very gloomy indeed. Several members of the Quorum of the Twelve, including two of the three witnesses, had spoken out against the Prophet. Secret meetings were being held, which finally culminated in Joseph Smith having to escape from Kirtland in the dead of the night in January of 1838. The Bird families were convinced that the Prophet was in the right and that those who had come out in open rebellion against him had "the wagging tongues of apostate devils". Charles Bird represented his father's large family at the meeting of the Council of the Seventies in the attic story of the Kirtland Temple. He pledged the support of the Bird family in what was later to be known as the Kirtland Camp. By commandment from the Lord, this camp of Saints, who were faithful to the Lord's Prophet, took the wearisome trek to Jackson County, Missouri, ending their seven month march by camping at the site of Adam-Ondi-Ahman.24 In 1838, the Benjamin Bird family moved to Far West, Caldwell County, Missouri, to settle with hundreds of other church families in what was then the frontier. Benjamin bought 160 acres and began to build and farm. In January 1839, the Bird families were residing at Far West, Missouri, and were aggrieved participants in the maleficent scenes of murder, rape and pillage which have since proved to be one of the worst persecutions ever imposed upon any people; the so-called Far West War. Benjamin Freeman Bird and his son Charles Bird had signed the affidavit wherein they covenanted with the other inhabitants of Far West to stand by and assist one another "to the utmost of our abilities in removing from the State of Missouri." They bound themselves to the extent of all their available property to be disposed of by a committee for the purpose of providing means for the removal of the poor and destitute from the state. 6 25Smith, Joseph. History of the Church, Deseret News. Salt Lake City, Utah. 1948. Volume: 3, Page 251- 154. 26Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 4-5. 27Clark V. Johnson, ed., Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict, pp. 141- 142: the original spelling and grammar were retained.) 28Stratton, p. 1-2 Their covenant was in vain, and they were ruthlessly driven from Far West. As they left Far West, the Bird families looked back and saw their homes in flames. They left Missouri with only the clothes on their backs in the dead of Winter, with nowhere to go, after having suffered the Far West holocaust.25 In the Aroet Hale Autobiography typescript which is on file at Brigham Young University, we read. "Father had a good team and wagon when we went to Missouri. He lost everything and was helped out of Missouri by one of the brethren by the name of Bird" (p. 6). Since no initial or first name is given, this could well have been Benjamin or Phineas or Charles. At any rate, all three of the Birds assisted others as best they could. Benjamin took his family first to Adams County, Illinois. There on May 13, 1839, Benjamin filed a document with the government asking for redress for property losses because of being driven from Missouri.26 The document declares: "The S[t]ate of Mosura Dr to Benjm F Bird "1838 To money and time Expende in moveing from NY State to mosura $130.00 "to hors and wagon and harnes taken by the mob returne after ten day $20.00 "1839 Damag in the sail of 160 akers of Land $500 "To Damag and not haveing the Libertey that the Laws of the Land garentee to Everey Sivelisd Citiso[n] and being Driven outht of the State by Mob $6000.00 "To Damag money Spent and time Lost in Moving out of the State $100.00 "[Total damages] $6750.00 "I certify the a bove acount to Be Just and true a cording to the Best of my Knowldg "Benjm F. Bird "[Sworn to before C. M. Woods, C.C.C., Adams Col, IL, 13 May 1839.]"27 While at Kirtland and Far West, the Bird families and particularly Charles Bird and his wife Mary Ann Kennedy, became personal close acquaintances with the Prophet Joseph Smith and his wife Emma. They gathered at Nauvoo with the rest of the Saints. In January, 1840, Benjamin purchased the property now known as the Bird- Browning Site on Main Street from the Prophet Joseph Smith for $300. They built a nice two room log cabin with a root cellar, which has been restored by the Church, and dug a well which is now on the south side of the property. In the spring of 1843 they built the two story brick structure. Benjamin and his family lived in the log cabin for three years and in the two story brick structure for a few months. (Later they sold the property to Jonathan Browning, who then added on the first story of the middle section and even later, the gunsmith and blacksmith shops. Browning lived in the brick home approximately two years, then it was occupied by Lucy Mack Smith (1845-1846), the mother of the Prophet Joseph Smith. It was while she was living here that she wrote her autobiography which included the biography of her son. This is one of the most popular histories on the life of the Prophet Joseph even to this day (1980). Subsequent owners are thought to have added the small second story onto the middle section, the kitchen and probably even later individuals with German architectural liking, added the porch onto the back of the original two story living quarters. During that time they enjoyed all the special cultural events that have come to mark the Nauvoo period as being one of the most unique in history. Since converts from all over the world came to Nauvoo and established their homes during those years, there was a great mixing of cultures and arts. Bound by oneness, all being Latter-day Saints, there was a friendly blending of a variety of cultures and a feeling of personal pride and friendliness. These people, who had been persecuted and driven from Ohio and then Missouri, now lived in relative peace. They enjoyed a pronounced zest for life which enabled them to enjoy and appreciate the unique cultural advantages that were theirs. The Bird families traded at the store of the Prophet Joseph Smith and often attended parties and socials at the Mansion House. There were several occasions where Benjamin played a friendly game of croquet with his friends and neighbors which included Joseph, Hyrum, Wilford Woodruff and Heber C. Kimball.28 7 29Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 5. 30Stratton, p .3. 31Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 5. 32Nauvoo Ancestors. Nauvoo Land and Records File. High Priest Records 8. 33Walsh, p. 4. While living in the log cabin, Benjamin and Margaret were blessed with a baby daughter, who being born at this time of relative peace and prosperity, brought a great deal of joy and happiness into their lives. Martha Marie, was born in Nauvoo on June 2, 1840.29 Also at Nauvoo, Benjamin enjoyed the association of several of his children and many of his grandchildren. His sons Phinias, Charles, and James all had their families at Nauvoo, and he still had living at home with him two sons by Maraba and the three children by Margaret.30 In the 1840 census, Benjamin is found in Nauvoo: 1 male and 1 female under age 5 [Benjamin T. and Martha]; 1 female aged 5 to 10 [Margaret]; 1 male aged 20 to 30 [probably Richard or William]; 1 female aged 40 to 50 [Margaret]; and 1 male aged 60 to 70 [Benjamin F.]. A total of 6 were in the household, and 1 other person was "employed" in agriculture. In a special census taken in Nauvoo in 1842. Benjamin and Margaret are listed with their three children--"Margaret J., Benjamin T., and Martha M."--"under 8" years of age. Benjamin received his patriarchal blessing on February 9, 1842, under the hands of Hyrum Smith. (Appendix) He was a member of the Nauvoo Fourth Ward.31 In the fall of 1843, disruptions, both internal and external to the Church, were caused by John C. Bennet and William Law, who were at one time counselors to the Prophet Joseph in the First Presidency. Benjamin with his home on Main Street was in the middle of all the excitement and persecution. Because Benjamin was now 65 years old and had three children at home under the age of 9, he desired to move to a quieter location. As mentioned earlier, he sold the property and the newly built brick home to Jonathen Browning and purchased a large 50 acre farm on the outskirts of Nauvoo near LaCrosse. Benjamin and all of his sons participated in the building of the Nauvoo Temple. Phineas and Richard were called on a Mission to the Wisconsin Pineries. Here Richard served on a Council of Directors under Bishop George Miller (who was called at the death of Bishop Edward Partridge) where he was involved in making a schedule of every man's property and making a general distribution under an order similar to the law of consecration. While on his mission, Richard and Phineas were involved in cutting down pine trees which were then floated down the Mississippi River to Nauvoo, where they ultimately were used in the building of the Temple. According to family history, two of his sons were called on proselyting missions to the eastern states. After the death of the Prophet Joseph, the Birds, along with the other Saints, worked under armed guard to complete the Temple. Most of the Birds received their endowments in the third floor rooms of the Nauvoo Temple. The dressing rooms and chambers for preparatory ordinances were located in the large third story at the front of the building . They were sealed to their spouses in the large rectangular room beneath the gable. In fact Nauvoo Temple records indicate that Charles Bird was an ordained Temple Worker, which means that he worked night and day to assist those Saints who desired to receive their special endowments to do so, before the mob could destroy their Temple or drive them out. In two months (Dec. 10, 1845 to February 5, 1846) Charles assisted more than 5,000 Saints who were endowed in the Nauvoo Temple in the twelve and a half hour ceremony. This included washings and annointings, the endowment and the sealing of families. The ceremony was basically the same as it is today (1980) except that it was acted out on platforms, sheets were hung from the ceiling to make rooms or compartments, and there were several lengthy discussions instructing the candidates about the covenants they were going to make. Benjamin and his sons and their families were present after the martyrdom when Sidney Rigdon claimed that he was to be guardian of the Church. They witnessed President Brigham Young transfigured into the voice, appearance and personality of the Prophet Joseph Smith and felt the Spirit bear witness to their souls that the Twelve should preside. On 7 Jan. 1846, Benjamin was ordained a high priest in the church by John Murdock.32 At a conference on 15 December 1846, Benjamin was sustained a member of the High Council of the Church.33 8 34Stratton, PART V. P. 19. 35Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 5-6. 36Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 5-6. 371860 US Census, Southport, Chemung, New York. Series: M653 Roll: 730 Page: 655. 38Research done by Larry Mace, 8 March 2004. Church Archives Film # 3144, WR f Pt.2, #4 Lake Branch 1848-1851. 39Bennett, Richard E. MORMONS AT THE MISSOURI, 1846-1852 "AND SHOULD WE DIE . . ." University of Oklahoma Press: Norman and London. 1946. p. 217-18.. 40Stratton, p. 3. 41Walsh, p. 4. Benjamin and four of his sons--Charles, James, Richard, and William--decided to leave Nauvoo and move west, following the leadership of Brigham Young. Benjamin’s oldest son Phineas was in Wisconsin cutting timber at that time. He went to Texas and later joined with the Reorganized Latter Day Saints. Benjamin was active in helping the Saints prepare themselves to leave, especially to those who were old or helpless and dependent on others. He was indeed his brother’s keeper, endowed with a great love, tolerance, and sympathy toward the poor and the sick. Benjamin left Nauvoo with Brigham Young in the first company of saints, and traveled with them to a place they named Council Bluffs.34 The Mormon settlement of Winter Quarters was established. He stayed in Winter Quarters at least three years to plant crops and farm in order to supply food for the Saints going through on their way to Utah.35 Evidently Margaret chose to leave Benjamin and to return to New York with their three children because she died in Wellsburg, Chemung County, on March 24, 1865. The three children eventually married and continued living in the Wellsburg area.36 Margaret is listed in the 1860 United States Census in Southport, Chemung, New York with her son Benjamin and daughter Margaret.37 In a church record dated July 17th 1848 the following information is given: “Meeting called to order by Elders George A. Smith and Ezra T. Benson at the house of brother Green for the purpose of reorganizing the branch. Chose father Burd {Benjamin F. Bird} president, Frui Ames Counsyler, Joseph H. Tippets, clerk and also father Burd to act as Bishop for said branch. Meeting closed by sining {singing?} and prayer. {Beneath this entry were the members of the Lake Branch. These names included: Benjame {Benjamin} F. Burd {Bird} and Jane Burd {This was probably not Jane Gully, as her husband died in 1849 on their way to the Salt Lake Valley}. This Church record established several things. First, Benjamin Freeman Bird was chosen as Branch President of the Lake Branch at Winter Quarters at that time and was also temporarily assigned as Bishop over the Branch. Secondly, this establishes that his second wife, Margaret, did not appear to be with him and probably had returned to New York.38 There were many settlements in the Bluffs area. By the end of 1848 there were 40 branches in the area. "A branch president managed local affairs in his area and reported directly to the Pottawattamie High Council." In the list of Mormon Branches/Communities in Western Iowa, 21 December 1848, Benjamin F. Bird is listed as president of the Lake Branch.39 Because several of the Bird's were weavers by trade, Benjamin and his sons and their families were asked to remain at Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters and assist in the outfitting of the emigrant Saints. Many had been driven out of their homes without opportunity to take the necessary clothing and other items that they would need to make the long trek into the wilderness to where they knew not. The Bird family set up a woolen mill of sorts, similar to the one that they had at Nauvoo, and thereby assisted in the emigration of the thousands of homeless Saints.40 After three years at Council Bluffs, Apostle Hyde released them to come to the Salt Lake valley.41 In 1850 the Brethren invited the Bird families to come West. They emigrated with the Milo Andrus Company. There were 206 9 42Stratton, p. 3. 43Information taken from the Record Book of a Great-great-granddaughter - Amy B. Schwendiman - supplied by Mrs. Ben Williams - Idaho Falls. Facts arranged by Nora Lund- Historian of Nibley Park D.U.P. Camp - Jan. 1961. 2. 44Stratton,. P. 3-4. 45Stratton, PART V.P.19. 46Stratton, p. 3-4. 47Ludy, Issue Number 11, p.6. 48Stratton, PART V. P. 20. 49Sons of the Utah Pioneers, Conquerors of the West. 50Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 6 persons and 51 wagons in the Company.42 Benjamin was 72 years of age when he made the trek. He traveled with his son Charles Bird, his wife Mary Ann and 10 children.43 Richard and James and their families were in the same group.. This was the first company of emigrating Saints for the season, leaving Missouri on June 3, 1850.44 They crossed the Missouri River that day, and traveled along the south bank of Salt Creek. The water was high with the spring runoff and when they reached the crossing, the bridge was washed away, so they built a raft and floated the wagons across. Brother Hyde told this company of saints as they left that if they would be faithful and prayerful and keep the name of God Holy that they would reach the Salt Lake Valley without trouble or disaster, and they did.45 They took the pioneer trail over which the year before trains had passed which had been stricken with cholera. As the pioneers moved along they saw the bones of their dead comrades as their bodies had been ripped out of their shallow graves by wolves and other scavengers and scattered over the countryside.46 They made it west in good time--60 days--with only 1 birth and 1 death the whole trip! Benjamin then settled in Salt Lake City.47 Captain Andrus was a brave and spiritual man. When he drove into the Valley he had a large sign on each side of his wagon; one side read "Holiness to the Lord" and the other "Hail to the Governor of Deseret." Members of this company knew most of the people who were in the Salt Lake Valley, so it was a joyous reunion with families and friends.48 They arrived in the Valley on 30 Aug 1850.49 Benjamin's son, William, marched with the Mormon Battalion in the historic trek that has come to be known as the symbol of dedication and patriotism of the Latter-day Saint people. Benjamin married a third time. His new wife’s name was Jane Frilick Gully. Jane had two daughters by her previous marriage to Samuel Gully. Her daughters were Martha, born about 1835 in Alabama and Harriet, born about 1840 in Mississippi. Jane was born in Newburn, North Carolina on May 27, 1798. Most of our records reflect a marriage date in 1852. That is the date that they were sealed to each other in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. In the 1850 census taken in Salt Lake County, Benjamin F. Bird, aged 73, was listed with Jane, aged 55, Harriet Gully aged 10, and Martha Gully aged 15. Benjamin’s occupation was mason.50 10 51Stratton, p. 4. 52Records of S. Mahlon Edwards, PO Box 1373, Logandale NV, 89021. 53Deseret News, Wed, Mar. 26, 1862, p. 304: the original spelling and grammar were retained). 54Ludy, Issue Number 11, p. 6 Soon after arriving in Salt Lake City, Benjamin had the privilege of being present when Apostle George A. Smith called Benjamin’s son James Bird to be the first Bishop of the Provo Second Ward and was also present with Elder Smith ordained him to that office. Because of his advancing age and the trials he had been subjected to for the last 14 years, Benjamin found the peaceful seclusion of the Rocky Mountains particularly delightful. Several of the Bird families were sent to settle in the beautiful area of Springville in Utah County and there Benjamin enjoyed the associations of many of his numerous grandchildren and watched them wax strong in the Gospel.51 He moved to Springville two years after his arrival in Utah, where he is found in a special census taken in Utah in 1856. In the 1860 census, Benjamin F. Bird was still in Springville. He was 82 years of age, and there were 2 in the household. His occupation was shown as broom maker. His real wealth was listed at $150 and his personal wealth as $100. Benjamin died in Springville, Utah. His obituary read, "DIED In Springville City, Utah county, Feb. 20, [1862,] BENJAMIN FREEMAN BIRD, aged 85 [sic] years 1 month and 1 day." After he died his widow, Jane, went to live with Benjamin’s son, James in St. George, Utah. After James died Jane lived with James’ granddaughter, Maribah Ann Bird Woods in Clover Valley, Lincoln, Nevada. She passed away there.52 Obituary “Father Bird was born in Essex county, New Jersey, and had been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints nearly twenty-seven years, having been baptized in Southport Chemung county, New York, in June, 1835. He emigrated to Far West, Mo., in 1838, and after the saints were driven from that State, he settled at Nauvoo, and shared in their persecutions in and ultimate expulsion from Illinois. From Nauvoo he went to the frontiers, and from there he emigrated to Utah, arriving in Great Salt Lake City in 1850, where he resided two years, and then moved to Springville. He was universally respected, and lived and died a saint.--”53 Benjamin was buried in the Springville City Cemetery. His descendants number in the thousands today.54 References Bennett, Richard E. MORMONS AT THE MISSOURI, 1846-1852 "AND SHOULD WE DIE . . ." University of Oklahoma Press: Norman and London. 1946. p. 217-18.. Bird, Miss Florence The Bird Family, (Written in response to a query by Arthamese Denny in June, 1960), p. 1-3. Repository: Chemung County Historical Society, 415 E. Water Street, Elmira, NY 14901, ph. 607.734.4167, Call Number Bird Family file BF05-015. Clark V. Johnson, ed., Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict, pp. 141- 142: the original spelling and grammar were retained. 11 Deseret News, Wed Mar 26, 1862. 1860 US Census, Southport, Chemung, New York. Series: M653 Roll: 730 Page: 655. Family Bible of Benjamin Freeman Bird LDS Temple Records Ludy, Diana R. "The Benjamin Freeman Bird Story". For the Birds, Issue Number 10 Ludy, Diana R. "The Benjamin Freeman Bird Story--Part 2". For the Birds, Issue Number 11 Mace, Larry. Research done 8 March 2004. Church Archives Film # 3144, WR f Pt.2, #4 Lake Branch 1848-1851. Messenger and Advocate, Dec., 1836, p. 45; original spelling and grammar retained. Nauvoo Ancestors, Aug. 2006 Land and Records File Browser CD, Bird, Benjamin Freeman Numerous family histories and family records in the possession of C. Stratton. 4225 Weems Way, Sparks Nevada 89431. (702) 673-9182. RLDS Church History 2:313-315; LDS Church History Sons of the Utah Pioneers, Conquerors of the West. Stake and Ward Records in the possession of Clifford J. Stratton Stratton, Clifford J. PIONEER STORIES. "Benjamin Freeman Bird and Marabah Reeves". Genealogical Department, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. US/CAN 929.273 st 82 p. Schwendiman, Amy Bird. Information taken from the Record Book of a Great-great-granddaughter - Amy B.- supplied by Mrs. Ben Williams - Idaho Falls. Facts arranged by Nora Lund- Historian of Nibley Park D.U.P. Camp - Jan. 1961. 2. The Documentary History of the Church Walsh, Susan. Benjamin Freeman Bird - Biography, 1980. 12 APPENDIX 13 Marriage Record Recd and Recorded the 4th March AD, C. Russell Clark. Freeman Bird to Milly Reeve. I certify that on the twenty second day of February in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and one I married Freeman Bird of Roxbury in the County of Morris and State of Newjersey to Milly Reeve of the same place- dated the fourth day of March AD 1801. Wm Grandin Minister of the Gospel Received and Recorded the 4th March AD 1801. C. Russell Clk 14 New York Genealogical Records, 1675-1920 Record about Benjamin Bird Name: Benjamin Bird Event: Lived Year: 1800 Place: Chenango County: Chenango Province: New York Source: Reel 24, 1800 Federal Census of New York, Microfilm Series M32 Publisher: National Archives, Washington, DC. Additional info: See Family History Library, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Page: 231 New Jersey Census, 1772-1890 Record Name: BENJAMIN BIRD State: NJ County: Morris County Township: Chester Year: 1802 Record Type: June Tax List Page: 002 Database: NJ Early Census Index 15 Ministers of the Gospel Lynn & Pat Sagers - Oct 28, 2006 Categories: Benjamin F. Bird family In the Messenger and Advocate, vol 3, number 3, page 431-432, it states: "The following is a list of the names of Ministers of the Gospel, belonging to the church of the Latter Day Saints, whose Licences [Licenses] were recorded the last Quarter, in the Licence [Licenses] Records, in Kirtland, Ohio. By Thomas Burdick. Recording Clerk. Kirtland, Dec. 1, 1836. Elder's Names. Truman O. Angel, Solomon Angel, Asa Anson, , Ezekiel Barnes, Noah Bulkey, Amos Babcock, Samuel Brown, Jeremy Bartlett, John Badger, Gideon H. Carter, Samuel Conklin, Austin Cowls, Joseph W. Cole, Silas Davis, Jonathan Dunham, Amos B. Fuller, Jonathan H. Hale, Thomas Hayes, Nathaniel Homes, Dana Jacobs, Ozias Kilbourn, Daniel Kent, John Kempton, John Lawson, Richard Mann, Orin Perry, Philip Packard, Gustavus A. Perry, Abram Rose, Carvil Rigdon, Stephen Shumway, Otis Shumway, James C. Snow, Sylvester B. Stoddard, Charles Smith, William W. Spencer, C. W. Stilwell, Alvah L. Tippits, Alvah Tippits, William Willsey, Benj. S. Wilber, Levi B. Wilder, Ira J. Wiles. Priests. Jacob K. Butterfield, H.N. Byington, Elijah B. Gaylord, Samuel Parker, Jeremiah Wilby. Teacher. Joseph Fielding. (page 432)" I found this record while I was doing research on the Perrys - not sure if you already had this piece of information. Pat L. Bird Sagers Patriarchal Blessing The Patriarchal Blessing of Benjamin F. Bird, Son of Jeremiah & Elizabeth Bird, Born in the Township of Rahway, Co. of Essex, & State of New Jersey, the 19th day of January, 1778. Brother Benjamin, I lay my Hands upon your Head, in the Name & by the authority of Jesus Christ, to bless you, which Blessing shall be fulfilled in future, in the Order of God’s providence, according to the Gifts of the Spirit, & Gifts & Callings of God, unto you, agreeable to the Holy Priesthood also, & the right of Lineage, which shall be fulfilled upon your Head, a Portion in time, & the residue of Eternity, for in time you shall be blest with a knowledge of the Mysteries of God, even unto a fulness, if your Faith fail not to sustain you, & preserve your Days upon the Earth, & you shall be blest Temporally & Spiritually, in Basket, & in Store, for a Reward of your Sacrifices wherein you have been sacrificed, unto the restoring of Four Fold, which is the Mind of the Spirit, for the integrity of your Heart, together with the Gifts of the Spirit which is to come in the Order of the Kingdom, by the Priesthood, in its legal authority, according to the Lineage of your Fathers, which seemeth to be in the Lineage of Aaron, to be received according to the Blessings which are sealed upon that Lineage & Priesthood, with all its Light, & Life, & qualifying Powers to prepare you for that which is in future, the same to come to pass, & be fulfilled, unto the fulness of the Covenant made unto Abraham, Issac, & Jacob, & the day shall come when you shall stand forth & bear Testimony of the things of God, according to your authority given you, & the Blessings that shall be Sealed upon you in the House of the Lord, in the day of your anointing, for you shall be blest, & your Posterity after you, with the Holy Priesthood, from Generation to Generation, & your Name shall be perpetuated & held in Honour, as one of the Noble and Honorable in the kingdom of God, whilst the Earth shall stand, & you shall come to your Inheritance in the Resurrection, with your Children, And Fathers House according to the Covenants to your Fathers, still your days shall be lengthened out, & you shall see much of the Salvation of God, & you shall be saved in the Celestial Glory, which Blessings & promise I Seal upon your Head henceforth, & you shall go down to your Grave in Peace, not withstanding the perilous Times that shall exist, to Sleep but for a Moment, to be awaked by the Sounding of the Trump of God, at the resurrection of the Just. These are the Blessings that I Seal upon your Head. Even so, Amen. Given by Hyrum Smith, at Nauvoo, Illinois, February 9th 1842. James Sloan B Clerk Book of Patriarchal Blessings Index, Volume: 4 Page: 246 16 Benjamin Freeman Bird home/property in Nauvoo Dale L. Berge, BYU Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2, p.209 The Jonathan Browning property was acquired by Nauvoo Restoration, Incorporated, from the estate of Charles H. Hudson, who died 11 April, 1968. Mr. Hudson had lived in the Browning house for a few years when he was first married, but when the house he was building on the northwest quarter of Lot 2 was finished, he moved from the Browning house to the new home. This move took place in 1916, after which the Browning house was not reoccupied. Since 1916 the house was used mostly for storage and was allowed to decay. Mr. Hudson married Louise Schoell, who was the daughter of Fred Schoell, owner of the home from 1890 to 1912. Lot 2, Block 118, was originally purchased from Joseph Smith, trustee for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, by Benjamin F. Bird in 1840. After Bird had paid nearly $300 on the lot, he requested a deed for the south half and reverted the north half back to Joseph Smith. However, no record of the deed has been located. Dale L. Berge, BYU Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2, p.209 Jonathan Browning obtained the south half of Lot 2, Block 118, about 1843, the same year that he was baptized into the Mormon Church. He left Nauvoo in 1846 during the Exodus of the Mormons, and sometime thereafter the mother of Joseph Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, temporarily lived in the Browning Nauvoo home and shop. When the trustees of the Church sold the property to Peter Poncin in 1847, records indicate that on the property there was a “good brick house”, “also a good brick blacksmith shop and a small frame barn and a log house.” 6(l) Dale L. Berge, BYU Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2, p.210 During the historic Mormon period from 1839-1846, the northwest quarter of Lot 2, Block 118, was owned by George W. Harris, a watchmaker, while Heber C. Kimball owned the northeast quarter, which he subdivided into three smaller lots. The north half of Lot 3 to the south of Jonathan Browning was owned by Henry G. Sherwood. Shadrach Roundy and others owned the property to the rear of Jonathan’s property. 11/15/95 Printed from the LDS Collectors Library Page 1 9:57:38 PM ©1995 Infobases, Inc. 17 Benjamin Freeman Bird home in Nauvoo before restoration Taken : July 1970. Owner: Ila Peck Picture of Benjamin Freeman Bird home (Browning Home) and taken from a different position than the preceding picture. It is hanging on the wall inside the restored home. 18 Picture of the first cabin of Benjamin Freeman Bird in Nauvoo as restored today. It sits immediately behind the two story home in background which was built later. (Larry Mace: 28 May 2003) 19 Description: First constructed by Benjamin Freeman Bird, the house and property were sold to Jonathan Browning in 1843. The two-story section was built by Benjamin--and probably the 1-story portion seen here, as well as the cabin directly behind the brick home (the cabin is a reconstruction on the original foundation.) Diana Ludy is in the foreground. Date Taken: June 1994. Owner: Diana Ludy. Picture of bed inside restored Bird cabin at Nauvoo. By Larry Mace, 28 May 2003. 20 Picture of interior of Bird cabin as restored today. Notice herbs hung drying near fireplace by Larry Mace 28 May 2003. Picture of eating area of restored Bird cabin in Nauvoo by Larry Mace 28 May 2003. 21 Living room inside restored Bird (Browning) home in Nauvoo. By Larry Mace, 28 May 2003. This is a picture of the upstairs bedroom as it looks today in the restored Bird (Browning) home in Nauvoo. By Larry Mace, 28 May, 2003. 22 This is the fireplace in the upstairs bedroom in the resored Bird home in Nauvoo. By Larry Mace, 28 May, 2003. Benjamin Bird owned 50 acres near Fountain Green, IL, about 30 miles east of Nauvoo, IL. James Bird also owned some of the land in the foreground. By Diana Ludy, 1996. 23 24 25 26 1850 United States Federal Census Record Name: Benjamin Freeman Bird Age: 73 Estimated birth year: abt 1777 Birth place: New York Gender: Male Home in 1850 (City, County, State): Not Stated, Great Salt Lake, Utah Teritory Died In Springville City, Utah County, February 20, Benjamin Freeman Bird, aged 85 years I month and l day. Father Bird was born in Essex County, New Jersey, and has been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints nearly twenty—seven years, having been baptized in Southport, Chemung county, New York, in June, 1835. He emigrated to Far West, Mo. in 183- , and after the saints were driven from that state, settled at Nauvoo, and shared in their persecutions in, and ultimate expulsion from, Illinois. From Nauvoo he went to the frontiers, and from there he emigrated to Utah, arriving in Great Salt Lake City in 1850 where he resided two years, and then moved to Springville. He was universally respected, and lived and died a Saint Utah Cemetery Inventory Record Name: Benjamin Freeman Bird Birth Date: 19 January 1778 Birth Place: Essexcounty,newjers Death Date: 20 February 1862 Death Place: Springville Burial Date: 0 0 0 Cemetery: Springville City Cemetery Source: Sexton / Grant Grave Location: Blk. 59 Lot 1 Pos. 1

LIFE SKETCH OF KELSEY BIRD

Contributor: Becky Created: 1 year ago Updated: 8 months ago

Kelsey Bird was born January 11, 1837 at Hector, Tompkin Co., New York, to Charles and Mary Ann Kennedy. Kelsey was born just a few months after his parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, they being baptized in August 18, 1836. Six children were born in New York. One account claims another son, James, was born in Pennsylvania. Another son was born in 1839 at Far West. He died the same day. Bradford K, was born January 26, 1840 in Clayton, Adam Co., Illinois. They took an active part in the church and in the development of the community. Charles received his endownment in the Nauvoo Temple January 2, 1846. Charles Bird and his father, Benjamin Freeman Bird, were merchants in New York and in New Jersey. Charles and Benjamin were religious men as evidenced by their writings, etc., such as wills and legal documents. They were fairly well educated and had considerable wealth. These men heard the gospel and joined the church in its very early days. Benjamin Freeman was baptized in 1835, only five years after the organization of the church. These families were well-to-do. Their sacrifice and devotion to their new found faith places them in that unselfish group of pioneers who were responsible for the rapid growth of the church. Benjamin Freeman Bird was born January 19, 1778, the son of Jeremiah F. Bird., who was born about 1748, both in Rahway, Essex Co., New Jersey. Benjamin married Meribah Reeves, who was born May 8, 1784 in Essex Co., New Jersey. Charles was born September 19, 1803, in Flanders, Morris Co., New Jersey. Mary Ann Kennedy was born December 7, 1807, in Barrington , Massachusetts. These families moved west with the early church members. After the death of the Prophet when permanent plans were being made to move west, the Bird families were in Brigham Young's group and came with him as far as Council Bluffs. Charles was put in charge of a group by President Brigham Young to remain at Council Bluffs and raise corn and wheat for the companies who would arrive the following year. Here they served for three years, 1847 to 1850. They left from the Missouri River June 3, 1850 with the Milo Andrus Company. It consisted of 206 persons, 51 wagons, 9 horses, 6 mules, 184 oxen, 122 cows, 44 sheep, 6 yearlings, 19 dogs, 1 pig and 2 ducks. Thomas Steed wrote in his diary, "We crossed the Missouri River and traveled along the south side. At Salt Creek the streams were so high that the bridges were washed away. We built rafts and floated our wagons across. Sickness and death was before us and behind us. Brother Hyde told us the day our company was organized that if we would be faithful and keep the name of God sacred, we should be blessed with health and protected on our journey. One birth and one death occurred on the journey, so we entered Salt Lake Valley with the same number of persons as we left Council Bluffs With." Captain Andrus wrote, "we have passed the graves of hundreds, yet God has preserved us, for which we feel thankful. Peace and union prevail in our mist," They arrived in Salt Lake City August 3, 1850. Kelsey was about 13 1/2 years old at this time. They settled in Cottonwood, where Charles was bishop for many years. On the 15th day of February, 1853 Charles married his second wife, Sarah Ann Dunsdon. Under assignment from Brigham Young, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his son Richard were sent to Springville, Charles and his family to Mendon, Cache Co., Utah, and James and William into Idaho. Charles took up land in Mendon and built himself a home for his wife Mary Ann and their 14 children, and Sarah Ann and their 11 children. Mary Ann died October 1 1867, leaving the care of her younger children to Sarah Ann. Charles was a prominent man in Cache Co., being educated and having some wealth, which he generously shared with the church and community. He died at Mendon September 29, 1884. Sarah Ann lived until her family was raised, her death date being December 5, 1899. Kelsey spent his early manhood in Mendon. At the age of about twenty-five he married Eliza Jane Perry, age 16,in the old endowment house on May 18, 1861. She was the daughter of Orren Alonzo Perry and Mary Ann Hoops. They made their home in Mendon. Where he, Kelsey, farmed. He was very successful, having sheep, cattle and horses. He accumulated the best farm equipment t be had at that time. On December 6, 1861 a little daughter (Mary Ann) was born, who died at birth. On the 28th of October 1862 a little son was born, and he also died at birth (named Charles Alonzo). The a little girl was born on the 16th of October 1863. They named her Eliza Jane. On the 20th of January, 1865 Kelsey Charles Arrived. On the 23rd of February, 1867 Kelsey took a second wife, Ann Muir. They were Married in the old endowment house. She was the daughter of Walter Muir and Mary Ross. She was born May 7, 1848 in Crofthead, Reafsewshire, Scotland. It was in Scotland that they joined the church. It was not to be the father's privilege to come to Utah. He died in Scotland on August 15, 1860, just a short time after joining the church. Mary said her greatest desire since joining the church was to raise her children in the fear of the Lord and to raise them to be a credit to the church. So leaving her comfortable home and many of her dear ones, three of whom were buried in Scotland, she, with a family of five (three boys and two girls) set sail from Liverpool in the sailing ship "Art Wright", May 28, 1866. Two of her children had emigrated to America previously. She arrived in New York July 6, 1866. Leaving here, they crossed the river in a down pour of rain in an open cattle boat, which was flat surfaced with just a chain around the outside. This was just at the close of the Civil War, when means of travel was very difficult. Landing at New Haven, they boarded the train, reaching Montreal. They continued from here, still traveling by train, until they reached the banks of the Missouri July 22nd. After five days of travel across the plains, they were visited by a band of five hundred Pawnee Indian warriors who told them if they would give them flour, meat, etc., that they could travel over their lands unmolested and that they could use their wood for fires and the oxen could feed on their grass. Two or three oxen had to be given to the Indians for meat. The rest of the journey across the plains began July 25, 1866 with ox teams. Mary Muir walked nearly all the way, arriving in Salt Lake City in October, 1866. They remained in Salt Lake City only for a few days, then traveled northward to Mendon, Cache Co., Utah. Here Mary remained until her death, earning her living by caring for the sick. The final destination of Mary Ross Muir in Mendon provides the setting for her daughter, Annie Muir, and Kelsey Bird to meet and marry. As was stated earlier, she became the second wife. Eliza Jane and Ann became good friends. Their love for each other lasted through out their lives, and they loved each other's children. Ann's children called Eliza Jane 'Aunt Jane' and Eliza Jane's children call Ann 'Aunt Annie'. On November 7,1867 Alonzo William was born to Eliza Jane. Then on March 10,1868 Kelsey Walter was born to Annie. The next two babies were born with in two days of each other. Maribah, a little girl, was born to Annie July 23, 1870 and Lewis Richard was born to Eliza Jane July 25, 1870. On December 30, 1871 Moses George Albert was born to Annie. On March 19, 1873 Sarah Ann was born to Eliza Jane . On March 7, 1874 Annie presented her husband with twin boys, Peter Alma and James Alvin. On December 28, 1875 another little girl, Agnes Betsy, came to Annie. Soon after this Kelsey, with nine other families, was sent to Vermillion in Sevier, Co., Utah by Brigham Young. Some of the other men were Peter Gotfredson, Dastrup, and Cudddabacks. Their trip to Vermillion was slow and tedious because of their stock and farm equipment, nine small children, household furnishings and food supplies. They brought cows. horses and sheep, chickens and pigs. they could not travel many miles each day and water was a necessity at the camp. One of their camps was at Salt Lake Creek, south of Levan. When they made camp at night, the children would her the stock after the day's journey. They arrived in Vermillion in the early spring of 1875. Of course the crops would be the first consideration. Kelsey put the first plow in the Vermillion Canal. That was their only source of water, and it is still a main water source. After planting as much ground as they could get cleared for the first year's crop and getting sufficient water onto the land for irrigation, the next concern was a permanent home. Kelsey hauled logs from the canyon and built on the east side of the Sevier River. He planted the trees that still grow by the Black Knowels. He also made corrals and planted a garden. The garden then belonged to the women. While at Vermillion Kelsey took Kelsey Walter, who was between 9 and 10 years old (and maybe other sons??) with a team and wagon to Manti to work on the temple. He donated three weeks with his team getting rocks out and hauling them. On August 6, 1876 a little girl was born to Eliza Jane. They named her Rosetta. She was Eliza Jane's last baby. She was never well after that. Annie gave birth to John Henry in February(either 24th or 28th), 1878. Later, both families lived in Gooseberry --- about 1879. Kelsey was very superior physically and had great ambition. He was always a good provider. He was a stern man and demanded obedience from his children. He was appointed and set apart as presiding elder of the Gooseberry Branch of Salina Ward on January 21, 1883 by Bishop Jens Jensen. Eliza Jane was appointed president of the Wheat Association and also treasurer of the Relief Society, being set apart the same day, also by Bishop Jensen. At one time Eliza Jane's two oldest girls, then in their teens, wanted new dresses for some particular occasion. Without asking, Annie loaded some wheat on the wagon and took it to Salina, sold it, and bought material for the dresses. Then she and Eliza Jane made the dresses. Kelsey, with the aid of a George Gates, built a good sized house -- two large rooms on each side with loft bedrooms and a lean-to-kitchen on each side. Each family had one side of the house., giving them at least three bedrooms each and their lean-to kitchens. There was a large fireplace in each part of the house. On February 27, 1880 Joseph Smith Bird was born. On June 20, 1882 a little boy, Mart Andrew, was born; he died the same day. (Annie's children) On November 11, 1884 Annie presented her husband with the second set of twin boys --- David Mormon and Brigham Abraham. Hyrum Leroy arrived December 29, 1886 and two years later on October 14, 1888 Mary Ann was born. Ettia Frances is listed on the family group sheet, but no date is given. (This made 14 children for Annie and 8 for Eliza Jane) The authorities of the land were after Kelsey for having two wives. So he took Eliza Jane and her family, some sheep and cattle and went to Benjamin, Utah Co., Utah and started over again. He left Annie and her family in Gooseberry. But he was taken to court, nevertheless. On Tuesday, October 22, 1889 (On Martha Jane Smith's birth date) in the 1st district court at Provo, Utah, Kelsey Bird of Benjamin, Utah was sentenced by Judge Blackburn to six months imprisonment and $300.00 fine for unlawful cohabitation. Monday, April 21, 1890 Kelsey Bird of Benjamin was discharged from the penitentiary. (copied from the church Chronology by Martha Jane Smith, May 20, 1953, at Price, Utah.) Then, on February, 20 1900 Eliza Jane died. Alonzo and his wife, Martha Abigail, said that as they sat with her that night they heard voices speak above her bed. The following is a copy of a newspaper clipping found in the family Bible: Benjamin, Utah -- Death and burial of Eliza Jane Perry Bird. Special correspondence, Benjamin, Utah Co., Utah, February 20th, of 1900. today we buried our beloved Sister Eliza Jane Perry Bird, wife of brother Kelsey Bird, who died of dropsy. She was born March 10, 1845. The funeral was held in the meeting house and was well attended. President Ann Bingham in behalf of the Relief Society bore testimony to the faithful labors of Mrs. Bird in that organization until her health became so bad that she could not attend to the same. Bishop A.J.B. Stewart, Bishop Arglye of Lake Shore, and a number of othes made addresses ulogistic of the sterling character of the deceased. Kelsey Bird was ordained a High Priest July 11, 1903 by Charles Breverton. I In his declining years, his son Alonzo W. Bird and family moved to Benjamin in order to take care of him. He had a large family, most of whom were boys. These active, energetic boys climbed the trees, picked the fruit, scattered the chickens, etc. These actions bothered their grandfather so much that Alonzo moved his family to another farm some distance away. Martha Jane, the oldest daughter, used to walk to grandpa's every day to care for him. He gave her two pretty vases, a glass plate with the picture of the temple on it and a turine. These items she valued very much. When Alonzo and family moved to Idaho, Grandfather Kelsey sold his place and went to live with Lewis R. Bird. Later he went to Mendon to see his sisters and died at their place in Mendon on the 29th of April, 1909. Lewis took him from Mendon to Benjamin for burial. Written by Martha Jane Bird Smith copied by Donna (Dee) Bird

Benjamin Fessman Bird and Marabah Reeves

Contributor: Becky Created: 1 year ago Updated: 8 months ago

(In the winter of 1832, Benjamin Freeman Bird and his wife Marabah reeves lived in a comfortable home in Southport, New York with eight of their none living children. As the snow blanketed the New York country side, a single Elder from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints knocked on their door. He asked for admittance and keep. since he was a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and was preaching without purse of script, Benjamin and Marabah were touched by the testimony that he bore. Over the next few weeks, by reading the Book of Mormon, they became convinced that his message was true. Since the Elder had moved on, the Bird's grasped at the only link that would tie the to the glorious message that they had received, they subscribed to the Star. Because the Church was in its very early infancy, having been only 31 months since the church was organized, the Bird Family had no where else to turn for additional information. In the first addition of the Messenger And Advocate printed at Kirtland, Ohio in October 1834: "Mr. Benj. F. Bird of Southport, Tioga C., N. Y., writes under date of Nov. 14 (1833) and says: "I have received your papers almost one year: and because I Held the Book of Mormon as sacred as I do the Bible, The Methodist ( though I had been a regular member almost 37 years,) turned me out but I bless god for it: for though they cast me out Jesus took me in." "He further adds, that he dose not know as he shall ever have a privilege of uniting with his church, as he never saw but on elder, whom he solicited to preach twice: that it caused a great stir and noise among the people. "If any of the elders are passing near, would they not do well to Call? we circulate some few papers in that place, the most of which is trough the agency of our aged friend of whom we have been speaking, and from whom we acknowledge the receipt of money for the same." before a team of Elders could respond to Benjamin's request, he lost his sweetheart Marabah in the winter of 1833, leaving him with a heavy heart and the responsibility of raising eight children. As he shared his testimony of the truthfulness of the Church of Jesus Christ with his friends, many mocked, but a few hearts were touched. One who came to know by the spirit that Benjamin's testimony was true, was a women named Margaret Crain. After a short courtship; they were married on the 25th day of April, 1933 A year later, Margaret bore Benjamin a beautiful daughter whom they named Margaret Jane. Finally in June of 1834, a team of morman elders came to the area and having the necessary authority, Benjamin, his wife Margaret and several of the married children of Benjamin and Marabah, with their sposes were baptized.

Life timeline of Benjamin Freeman Bird

Benjamin Freeman Bird was born on 19 Jan 1778
Benjamin Freeman Bird was 26 years old when Napoleon Bonaparte is proclaimed Emperor of the French by the French Senate. Napoléon Bonaparte was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars. He was Emperor of the French from 1804 until 1814 and again briefly in 1815 during the Hundred Days. Napoleon dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815. He is considered one of the greatest commanders in history, and his wars and campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide. Napoleon's political and cultural legacy has endured as one of the most celebrated and controversial leaders in human history.
Benjamin Freeman Bird was 41 years old when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds Singapore. Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles, FRS was a British statesman, Lieutenant-Governor of British Java (1811–1815) and Governor-General of Bencoolen (1817–1822), best known for his founding of Singapore and the British Malaya.
Benjamin Freeman Bird was 48 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Benjamin Freeman Bird was 54 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Benjamin Freeman Bird was 62 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Benjamin Freeman Bird was 82 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Benjamin Freeman Bird died on 20 Feb 1862 at the age of 84
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Benjamin Freeman Bird (19 Jan 1778 - 20 Feb 1862), BillionGraves Record 642958 Springville, Utah, Utah, United States

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