Barnard H Greenwood

9 Sep 1849 - 27 May 1905

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Barnard H Greenwood

9 Sep 1849 - 27 May 1905
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BIOGRAPHY: Barnard Hartley Greenwood Orson F. Whitney, History of Utah, Vol. 4, p.413 BIOGRAPHY: Barnard H. Greenwood, of Inverury, Sevier County, has been a resident of Utah since 1852. He was born near Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois, September 9, 1849, his parents, William Greenwood and Ann Hart

Life Information

Barnard H Greenwood

Born:
Died:

Central Valley Cemetery

920-926 100 S
Monroe, Sevier, Utah
United States

Epitaph

In Loving Remembrance, Inverury, Sevier Co., Utah
Transcriber

Ted L Jensen

November 22, 2014
Photographer

Ted L Jensen

November 21, 2014

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Biography Barnard Hartley Greenwood

Contributor: Ted L Jensen Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

BIOGRAPHY: Barnard Hartley Greenwood Orson F. Whitney, History of Utah, Vol. 4, p.413 BIOGRAPHY: Barnard H. Greenwood, of Inverury, Sevier County, has been a resident of Utah since 1852. He was born near Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois, September 9, 1849, his parents, William Greenwood and Ann Hartley Greenwood, having emigrated from Europe about two years previously. They remained in Illinois until the fall of 1851, when they moved West, remaining through the winter at Council Bluffs, and continuing on to Utah the next season. They lived at American Fork a short time, and then settled at Cedar City, on account of the prospective development of iron and coal mines in that vicinity. Their hopes in that respect not being realized, they removed north in the spring of 1856, and were among the first settlers of Beaver City. It was there that the boy Barnard began to develop the sterling qualities for which he is now known. From eight years of age until manhood he was engaged in farming, canyon work, care of stock, and in guarding persons and property from the Indian raids of those early years. From 1864 until 1872 he served in the cavalry of the Utah militia, under Captain John Hunt, Major James Low and others, often acting as escort to various officials passing through Southern Utah. In April, 1866, he accompanied Captain Daniel Thompson's ox-team train to the Missouri river, returning with a company of emigrants. This was before Barnard was seventeen. He drove four yoke of cattle and brought fourteen persons, with seven hundred and fifty pounds of Church freight, reaching Salt Lake City in October of the same year. All the way from Baker's Canyon he encountered severe storms, the snow in places being two feet deep. Shortly after his return he with others went across the mountains into Circle Valley, to assist the settlers who were obliged to vacate their homes on the Sevier river, owing to the raids of the Indian chief Blackhawk and his hostile band. In 1867 he worked on the new meeting house at Beaver, and hauled lumber for the construction of the Cove Creek fort in Millard County. On account of the unsettled condition of Southern Utah the cause of education was slow of development, and the public duties of young Greenwood prevented him from receiving much schooling. His parents were short of means, and the family had increased until it now numbered eleven children. In 1868 Barnard was engaged in logging and steam saw-milling, and spent the greater part of three years in that business and in freighting and wood contracting about the mines, both in Utah and Eastern Nevada. On December 19, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss Eunice Howd, daughter of Simeon Howd, the pioneer settler of Beaver. She is the mother of nine children, most of them living. In January, 1873, Mr. Greenwood with three others was called on a mission of exploration in Arizona. The party, in charge of Bishop L. W. Roundy, proceeded with wagons as far as Lee's ferry on the Colorado river, and thence with pack animals. In the San Francisco mountains they encountered severe snow storms, and had to guard their animals from the thieving Apaches. They visited the friendly Moquis and Navajos, examined the valley of the Little Colorado and other localities, and returned in about two months and made their report. On the return trip Mr. Greenwood and William Flake took a cut-off from Upper Kanab towards Beaver, but not allowing for the severity of [p.414] the winter, and getting into the high mountains toward Panguitch, where the snow was deep and crusted and their horses became lame, they finally had to "take the back track." Sliding down a steep mountain they dropped into Long Valley, and thence following down the Rio Virgen by way of Rockville and Toquerville, reached home a week after the rest of the party. Their absence had caused alarm, and when they arrived a company was being organized to search for them. Two days later, March 11, 1873, Mr. Greenwood's first child was born–a son named Hartley. The father farmed through the summer and towards winter worked at the Mountain Queen mine, near the eastern boundary of Nevada. He earned three hundred and fifty dollars, but did not receive his pay. In the spring of 1874 the United Order was organized at Beaver, taking in the major part of the people. Mr. Greenwood put in his property and labored at plowing, seeding and fencing farms on South Creek. Under his direction a pasture and a slaughter house were established. The Order lasted but six months, and upon its dissolution Mr. Greenwood turned his capital stock into the Co-operative Herd. In 1875 he engaged with Simeon Howd to furnish bark for the Co-operative Tannery, receiving his pay in leather. While seeking an exchange of grain for leather in Sevier County, he decided to try his fortune as a farmer in that land of Indian raids and other hardships. He secured some land at Central, five miles south of Richfield, put up a log house, and about the 1st of February, 1876, moved his family to his new home. There a reasonable degree of prosperity has crowned his energetic and steadfast efforts to build up that section of the country. At the time of the reorganization of Sevier Stake–July 15, 1877–Barnard H. Greenwood was ordained a High Priest and set apart as first counselor to Bishop William A. Stewart of Inverury Ward, comprising the settlements of Central and Annbella. About the same time he took charge of the Sunday schools as superintendent. In May, 1882, a vacancy occurred in the Bishopric, caused by the resignation of Bishop James Sellers, and Elder Greenwood was chosen to succeed him. He was set apart on the 10th of June, by Francis M. Lyman and John Henry Smith. This office he continues to hold. In November, 1883, he was appointed by the county court a selectman of Sevier County, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Joseph S. Horne. He was elected to the same office in 1884, and continued to hold it until 1890. Among his services as selectman may be mentioned the rebuilding of the Clear Creek canyon road and the construction of several bridges across the Sevier river. He often officiated as water commissioner, to divide the waters of that stream to the various canals, in times of scarcity. His business associations are numerous. He is a prominent stockholder and director in the Elsinore Roller Mill Company; president of the Central Co-operative Mercantile Institution; and vice-president of the Richfield Creamery Company. He has been prominently interested in the planning and management of the Sevier Valley Canal Company, laboring long and faithfully for its success, and is now vice-president of that concern and a heavy stockholder therein. He also holds stock in the Elsinore Canal Company, is a director of the Richfield Canal Company, and is interested in a reservoir at Cove Creek. BIOGRAPHY: Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church�, p.364 INVERURY WARD, South Sevier Stake, Sevier Co., Utah, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in the Central Precinct, including the village of Inverury, which is situated on a level stretch of country lying below the Richfield Canal, and west of the Sevier River, five miles south of Richfield and five miles north of Monroe. Barnard was Bishop of the Inverury Ward in 1882. Greenwood, Barnard Hartley LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 4, p.625 Greenwood, Barnard Hartley, Bishop of the Inverury Ward, South Sevier Stake, Utah, from 1882 to 1905, was born Sept. 21, 1849, a son of William Greenwood and Ann Hartley. He was baptized when about 15 years old, emigrated to Utah in 1852, was ordained a High Priest by Albert K. Thurber, and ordained a Bishop Jan. 10, 1882, by John Henry Smith. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.900 GREENWOOD, BARNARD HARTLEY (son of William Greenwood and Ann Hartley). Born Sept. 9, 1849, at Warsaw, Ill. Came to Utah July, 1852. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.900 Marrie d Eunice Howd Dec. 19, 1871, Beaver City, Utah (daughter of Simeon F. Howd and Lucinda Morgan–former pioneer July 24, 1847, and latter Sept. 1847). She was born Aug. 8, 1852, at Beaver City. Their children: Hartley b. March 13, 1873, m. Bertha Hawley; Rachel b. June 6, 1875, m. Wing Ence; Amelia b. Feb. 7, 1878, and Adelia b. Feb. 7, 1878, d. infants; Carlos B. b. Oct. 31, 1879, m. Esther Stevenson; William Simeon b. Feb. 18, 1882, m. Stena Christensen; Ernest Morgan b. March 4, 1884, m. Florence Reese; Ray Howd b. June 8, 1886, m. Hazel Gray; Lester Duane b. May 3, 1888; Raleigh Vern b. Dec. 6, 1890; Rhoda Lucinda b. March 5, 1895. Family home Inverury, Utah. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.900 High priest; bishop Inverury ward 1882-1906. Sevier county selectman 1883-90; representative two terms in state legislature, 1896-99. Director in Elsinore Roller Mills Co., Sevier Valley Canal Co. and Richfield Canal Co. Died June 27, 1906.

1920 Biography as written in "Utah Since Statehood"

Contributor: Ted L Jensen Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

WILLIAM SIMEON GREENWOOD William Simeon Greenwood, serving for the second term as county sheriff of Sevier County and making his home at Richfield, was born at Central, Sevier county, in 1882. His parents were Barnard H. and Eunice (Howd) Greenwood. The father crossed the plains more than a half century ago, his father having been one of the sixteen path- finders who preceded Brigham Young's party. Barnard H. Greenwood was a popular and progressive citizen who served his county as representative in the state legislature for several terms and gave thoughtful and earnest consideration to vital questions that came up for settlement. He also served as a bishop of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for thirty-three years. His wife, Eunice Howd was among those who pushed a handcart across the plains in the early days of the territory. Barnard H. Greenwood had seven sons, all of whom are sterling citizens and have become men of prominence in the county and state. Three of the number is now bishops of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and one is principal of the Kamma high school, while still another is a successful physician and William S. of this review is now capably serving in public office. In the graded schools of Central, William Simeon Greenwood began his education, which he continued in the Murdock Academy at Beaver. He afterward became a farmer and he still plants and cultivates his farm of ninety-eight acres in Sevier County, care- fully developing his fields, from which he annually gathers rich harvests. In politics he has always been a democrat and has been a recognized leader in its local circles, his opinions carrying weight in its councils. In 1918 he was president of the war draft board and he esteems as his greatest achievement his work in absolutely stamping out the illicit liquor traffic of Sevier County. In 1916 he was elected to the office of sheriff and so capably and promptly discharged his duties that in 1918 he was re Elected for a second term, so that he is now the incumbent in the office. Mr. Greenwood has been married twice. He first wedded Christina Christensen, a daughter of Mads Christensen. She passed away in 1911, leaving two children, Ardella and Bert Howd. Two years later Mr. Greenwood was married to Miss Lucille Calloway, a daughter of George and Refina (Nelson) Calloway, both representatives of old and prominent families of southern Utah, connected with this section of the state from pioneer times. The father of George Calloway was a Kentuckian, one of the earliest residents of the state. He was a grandnephew of Martin Van Buren, president of the United States. While he followed many vocations throughout his active life, his early years were devoted to mining. Mr. and Mrs. Greenwood have two interesting children, William S., Jr., and Ann Lucille. Mr. Greenwood is a consistent member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in the work of which he has taken an active and helpful interest and in which he is now an elder as well as a teacher. He is also an active member of the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association. No man in Sevier County has a larger number of warm friends than Mr. Greenwood. He is fearless in the performance of his duties and it is said of him that his record is absolutely clean and above reproach. His life has been as an open book and the name of Greenwood has never suffered at his hands. Source: "Utah Since Statehood", Noble Warrum; Chicago :: S.J. Clarke Pub. Co.,1920 Contributed and transcribed by Wayne Cheeseman Copied with permission on 5/18/2014 from: http://genealogytrails.com/utah/sevier/bios/bios_g.html

Barnard Hartley Greenwood

Contributor: Ted L Jensen Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Ancestral File #: 24XL-7W !SOURCE: * copies of family records obtained from Carey Lynn Greenwood Schmidt. *Ancestral File lists b-9 Sep 1849, Warsaw, Hancock, Illinois. d-27 May 1905 Central, Sevier, Utah b ur-30 May 1905, Central, Sevier, Utah m-19 Dec 1871, Beaver, Beaver, Utah (AFN:24XL-7W)[Ives2.ged] BIOGRAPHY: Barnard Hartley Greenwood Orson F. Whitney, History of Utah, Vol. 4, p.413 BIOGRAPHY: Barnard H. Greenwood, of Inverury, Sevier County, has been a resident of Utah since 1852. He was born near Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois, September 9, 1849, his parents, William Greenwood and Ann Hartley Greenwood, having emigrated from Europe about two years previously. They remained in Illinois until the fall of 1851, when they moved West, remaining through the winter at Council Bluffs, and continuing on to Utah the next season. They lived at American Fork a short time, and then settled at Cedar City, on account of the prospective development of iron and coal mines in that vicinity. Their hopes in that respect not being realized, they removed north in the spring of 1856, and were among the first settlers of Beaver City. It was there that the boy Barnard began to develop the sterling qualities for which he is now known. From eight years of age until manhood he was engaged in farming, canyon work, care of stock, and in guarding persons and property from the Indian raids of those early years. From 1864 until 1872 he served in the cavalry of the Utah militia, under Captain John Hunt, Major James Low and others, often acting as escort to various officials passing through Southern Utah. In April, 1866, he accompanied Captain Daniel Thompson's ox-team train to the Missouri river, returning with a company of emigrants. This was before Barnard was seventeen. He drove four yoke of cattle and brought fourteen persons, with seven hundred and fifty pounds of Church freight, reaching Salt Lake City in October of the same year. All the way from Baker's Canyon he encountered severe storms, the snow in places being two feet deep. Shortly after his return he with others went across the mountains into Circle Valley, to assist the settlers who were obliged to vacate their homes on the Sevier river, owing to the raids of the Indian chief Blackhawk and his hostile band. In 1867 he worked on the new meeting house at Beaver, and hauled lumber for the construction of the Cove Creek fort in Millard County. On account of the unsettled condition of Southern Utah the cause of education was slow of development, and the public duties of young Greenwood prevented him from receiving much schooling. His parents were short of means, and the family had increased until it now numbered eleven children. In 1868 Barnard was engaged in logging and steam saw-milling, and spent the greater part of three years in that business and in freighting and wood contracting about the mines, both in Utah and Eastern Nevada. On December 19, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss Eunice Howd, daughter of Simeon Howd, the pioneer settler of Beaver. She is the mother of nine children, most of them living. In January, 1873, Mr. Greenwood with three others was called on a mission of exploration in Arizona. The party, in charge of Bishop L. W. Roundy, proceeded with wagons as far as Lee's ferry on the Colorado river, and thence with pack animals. In the San Francisco mountains they encountered severe snow storms, and had to guard their animals from the thieving Apaches. They visited the friendly Moquis and Navajos, examined the valley of the Little Colorado and other localities, and returned in about two months and made their report. On the return trip Mr. Greenwood and William Flake took a cut-off from Upper Kanab towards Beaver, but not allowing for the severity of [p.414] the winter, and getting into the high mountains toward Panguitch, where the snow was deep and crusted and their horses became lame, they finally had to "take the back track." Sliding down a steep mountain they dropped into Long Valley, and thence following down the Rio Virgen by way of Rockville and Toquerville, reached home a week after the rest of the party. Their absence had caused alarm, and when they arrived a company was being organized to search for them. Two days later, March 11, 1873, Mr. Greenwood Sources: Title: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, Publication: LDS Family History Suite - CD Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Title: Ancestral File (R) On the Internet Publication: Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998 Repository: Name: Family History Library Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA Author: Orson F. Whitney Title: History of Utah Publication: LDS Family History Suite - CD

My Great Great Grandfather

Contributor: Ted L Jensen Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Ancestral File #: 24XL-7W !SOURCE: * copies of family records obtained from Carey Lynn Greenwood Schmidt. *Ancestral File lists b-9 Sep 1849, Warsaw, Hancock, Illinois. d-27 May 1905 Central, Sevier, Utah b ur-30 May 1905, Central, Sevier, Utah m-19 Dec 1871, Beaver, Beaver, Utah (AFN:24XL-7W)[Ives2.ged] BIOGRAPHY: Barnard Hartley Greenwood Orson F. Whitney, History of Utah, Vol. 4, p.413 BIOGRAPHY: Barnard H. Greenwood, of Inverury, Sevier County, has been a resident of Utah since 1852. He was born near Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois, September 9, 1849, his parents, William Greenwood and Ann Hartley Greenwood, having emigrated from Europe about two years previously. They remained in Illinois until the fall of 1851, when they moved West, remaining through the winter at Council Bluffs, and continuing on to Utah the next season. They lived at American Fork a short time, and then settled at Cedar City, on account of the prospective development of iron and coal mines in that vicinity. Their hopes in that respect not being realized, they removed north in the spring of 1856, and were among the first settlers of Beaver City. It was there that the boy Barnard began to develop the sterling qualities for which he is now known. From eight years of age until manhood he was engaged in farming, canyon work, care of stock, and in guarding persons and property from the Indian raids of those early years. From 1864 until 1872 he served in the cavalry of the Utah militia, under Captain John Hunt, Major James Low and others, often acting as escort to various officials passing through Southern Utah. In April, 1866, he accompanied Captain Daniel Thompson's ox-team train to the Missouri river, returning with a company of emigrants. This was before Barnard was seventeen. He drove four yoke of cattle and brought fourteen persons, with seven hundred and fifty pounds of Church freight, reaching Salt Lake City in October of the same year. All the way from Baker's Canyon he encountered severe storms, the snow in places being two feet deep. Shortly after his return he with others went across the mountains into Circle Valley, to assist the settlers who were obliged to vacate their homes on the Sevier river, owing to the raids of the Indian chief Blackhawk and his hostile band. In 1867 he worked on the new meeting house at Beaver, and hauled lumber for the construction of the Cove Creek fort in Millard County. On account of the unsettled condition of Southern Utah the cause of education was slow of development, and the public duties of young Greenwood prevented him from receiving much schooling. His parents were short of means, and the family had increased until it now numbered eleven children. In 1868 Barnard was engaged in logging and steam saw-milling, and spent the greater part of three years in that business and in freighting and wood contracting about the mines, both in Utah and Eastern Nevada. On December 19, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss Eunice Howd, daughter of Simeon Howd, the pioneer settler of Beaver. She is the mother of nine children, most of them living. In January, 1873, Mr. Greenwood with three others was called on a mission of exploration in Arizona. The party, in charge of Bishop L. W. Roundy, proceeded with wagons as far as Lee's ferry on the Colorado river, and thence with pack animals. In the San Francisco mountains they encountered severe snow storms, and had to guard their animals from the thieving Apaches. They visited the friendly Moquis and Navajos, examined the valley of the Little Colorado and other localities, and returned in about two months and made their report. On the return trip Mr. Greenwood and William Flake took a cut-off from Upper Kanab towards Beaver, but not allowing for the severity of [p.414] the winter, and getting into the high mountains toward Panguitch, where the snow was deep and crusted and their horses became lame, they finally had to "take the back track." Sliding down a steep mountain they dropped into Long Valley, and thence following down the Rio Virgen by way of Rockville and Toquerville, reached home a week after the rest of the party. Their absence had caused alarm, and when they arrived a company was being organized to search for them. Two days later, March 11, 1873, Mr. Greenwood Sources: Title: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, Publication: LDS Family History Suite - CD Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Title: Ancestral File (R) On the Internet Publication: Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998 Repository: Name: Family History Library Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA Author: Orson F. Whitney Title: History of Utah Publication: LDS Family History Suite - CD

Life timeline of Barnard H Greenwood

1849
Barnard H Greenwood was born on 9 Sep 1849
Barnard H Greenwood was 10 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Barnard H Greenwood was 13 years old when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring the freedom of all slaves in Confederate territory by January 1, 1863. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Barnard H Greenwood was 28 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Barnard H Greenwood was 34 years old when Krakatoa begins to erupt; the volcano explodes three months later, killing more than 36,000 people. Krakatoa, or Krakatau, is a volcanic island situated in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in the Indonesian province of Lampung. The name is also used for the surrounding island group comprising the remnants of a much larger island of three volcanic peaks which was obliterated in a cataclysmic 1883 eruption.
Barnard H Greenwood was 42 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Barnard H Greenwood died on 27 May 1905 at the age of 55
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Barnard H Greenwood (9 Sep 1849 - 27 May 1905), BillionGraves Record 11644267 Monroe, Sevier, Utah, United States

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