Avondale Mower

1 Apr 1911 - 14 Mar 1969

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Avondale Mower

1 Apr 1911 - 14 Mar 1969
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(Compiled by Marilyn Lougee) Avondale was born about 1:00 A.M. on the morning of the 1st day of April 1911. His mother, Lovenia, had been sick for about 24 hours before he was born. She had spent most of the time she was carrying him, not able to do much but lay around. She was unable to do much wor
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Life Information

Avondale Mower

Born:
Died:

Memorial Mountain View Mortuary and Cemetery

3115 E Bengal Blvd
Cottonwood Heights, Salt Lake, Utah
United States
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finnsh

June 20, 2012
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finnsh

June 14, 2012

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AVONDALE MOWER

Contributor: finnsh Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

(Compiled by Marilyn Lougee) Avondale was born about 1:00 A.M. on the morning of the 1st day of April 1911. His mother, Lovenia, had been sick for about 24 hours before he was born. She had spent most of the time she was carrying him, not able to do much but lay around. She was unable to do much work at all and for about half of the time she was not able to be out of bed and had to stay off her feet entirely. They got along just fine. Lovenia's Aunt Maggie Sanderson took care of her and the baby. She was the doctor and nurse. Lovenia's mother was with her most of the time for 24 hours before he was born and until he was born and then the rest of Saturday. On Sunday Lovenia was left alone with Elton (10 years) and Melvin (4 years) while all the rest went to Sunday School. Laura Winder, the girl they had paid her way from England to Utah, was there to help with the work. Lovenia was much longer getting her strength back this time. It was almost a month before she could do much more than just take care of the baby. The baby, Avondale, looked at first like he might have red hair but it got darker as he grew older so it was not so red. But as soon as he got old enough to be out in the sunshine, he began to show freckles. He had thinner skin than the other children had. He was more like his mother in that way. She had always had some freckles and her skin was always quite thin and tender. When just a small child - about as soon as he was able to get around by himself as he learned to walk - he went outside where they had a well by the house. Lovenia was busy washing and someone had drawn up a bucket of water for her. They left it sitting inside of the well. Avondale got hold of the handle of the windless and jiggled it back and forth until the bucket fell off the place where it had been sitting. It fell back down into the well and the windless went around and around. It caught Avondale in the mouth and tore one side of his mouth out. They took him to a doctor and had several stitches put in to hold it in place until it could heal up. But the inside was so ragged there was nothing to hold to and would come right out but it did heal up quite good. It left a bad scar on his mouth so it was not the right shape that it should have been and was very rough on the inside of his mouth. It was his sister, Mae's job to look after Avondale and he got so he would cry for her if she got out of his sight for a little while. Sometimes she would run around the house to get out of his sight and he would run after her, crying as hard as he could like something had about half killed him. So she was a lot like her mother in the fact that she was the baby tender because she was the oldest girl and could be depended on the best. When he was about five years old, he caught the small pox from his father. They never knew where his father had caught it because they didn't seem to be any around town but he had a very bad case of it. The rest of the family had been vaccinated for it so they would not get it but Avondale's vaccination did not take, so he came down with it just as his father was getting over it and they were getting things cleaned up so that the children could go back to school. So they cleaned and fumigated all of the house but one room. Avondale and his mother went into this room and lived alone for about six weeks. He just had a few pocks on him and a little fever for a few days before the pocks came out on him. But they had to stay in quarantine just the same so the rest of the children could go to school. Avondale was four years younger than Melvin and as a young boy played a lot by himself. He could amuse himself for hours with a few blocks of wood. He would tie them together with strings and some nails in the end of the blocks and play they were a train. This was before there were any toy trains to be bought. As he grew older, he learned to play some games with the other children and then he would sit for hours playing some kind of a game all by himself. When the game of Rook became such a popular game, he learned to play it about as soon as the others did. The older children made a set of Rook cards for themselves out of the backs of the wallpaper books and they wrote the numbers on them with crayons. They wanted to have a set they could play with and not have to pay the price of buying one. Avondale would sit for hours and play the game by himself while the others were not around to play with him. He was always content to play by himself if the others were busy with chores, in school or somewhere else. When Avondale was 8 1/2 years old, he and his mother had to move to a house by themselves. It was the 10 December 1919. They moved into the north part of town - one block west of where her mother was living. So his being able to play by himself was good because now he did not have the others to play with. As he grew older, he liked to get out and be with other boys and would spend a lot of his time with the neighbor boys. His mother did not always know where he was. She was busy working to make a living for them. He could usually be found about a block away at the home of N. B. Pritchett where there were boys about his age or younger. Sometimes his mother and he would go to live with other people. She would work for them and he would go to school from where they were living. When she had to go out of town to work for a few weeks, he would stay with her mother. He spent a lot of time on the old farm that had been his Grandfather Rigby's where his Uncle Thomas Rigby was living. On the farm Avondale helped with the cows and the chores. Uncle Thomas did not have boys old enough to help much. Avondale herded cows for a summer or two. But mostly he and his mother lived together in their own little home where he went to school 6 blocks away while she went to her work at different places around town to earn a living for the two of them. She would help women with their work and their homes, washing, taking care of their children, and their homes for them. She made about $300.00 a year that way. With the garden she raised, chickens, milk, eggs, and etc., they got along just fine. The most trouble they had was that she could not be at home enough and he had too much time to play around with the other boys so that she did not always know where he was. He didn't get into much trouble and was generally playing with the neighbor boys. In 1921, his schoolteacher, Dora Day Rowlenson came to live with them for a while and he generally went to school with her. He enjoyed having her there in their home. Later that fall his mother left him with her mother while she went up North about 10 miles and worked for Swen O. Nielson on his farm for two weeks. She made $15.00 to help them out. Mr. Nielson's wife had to go to Provo where they were making a new home, and the fall work on the farm was not finished. That fall Avondale's mother began writing to a man in Duchesne, Utah. She thought about marrying again so that Avondale would have a father to teach him some responsibility and give him some chores to do. As it was the only chores he had were to help in the garden, milk the cow twice a day and see that there was water in the tub for the cow to drink. At Thanksgiving time, Charles Giles came to visit them and seemed to be taken with what he saw. He asked her to marry him and got her promise to make the arrangements before winter set in. She quit her jobs where she was working for other women, sold her calf, got her brother Thomas to take her cows and care for them, sold some of the chickens and ate some and gave the rest to her brother, William. She gave him $10.00 to buy feed for them for the winter. She bought Avondale all the clothes he would need for the rest of that winter for school and to keep him warm and dry. She got her mother to take care of Avondale for the rest of the winter so he could finish his school year there. She took most of the food that she had put away for winter up to her mother's to help with his food until after school was out the next spring. She was not sure of the living conditions of the place where she would be moving to and the availability of getting him to school. So she thought it would be best if he stay in Fairview for the rest of the school year. Avondale got along fine with his Grandmother and was quite a help to her. He got in the wood and coal and did some of the chores. Especially when Uncle Rone got so sick and died on Feb. 14, 1922. His Grandmother was left a widow again having buried two husbands. The next year as soon as they could, Lovenia and Charles Giles went back to Fairview to get Avondale. His sister, Mae had moved from her father's home in with her mother and Daddy Giles. She came with them to Fairview. It took they 4 or 5 days to get there because the going was so rough on the colts that were following their mothers. Their feet got so sore that they had to be put into the wagon one day. So the family stayed in Fairview a few weeks while the feet of the colts healed up. They stayed in Lovenia's home and let the colts run in her lots. It took them 4 days to get back to Indian Canyon where their new home was. They camped out along the way. Besides having Avondale with them, they brought more of Lovenia's things -her boiler and more of her dishes and cooking utensils. By the time they arrived back home, they had been gone a month. Avondale's father, Silas, had moved to Roosevelt with the other children after the divorce. His brother, Elton had been over to see them but had to return home before they arrived back from Fairview. They had not seen him in over two years so they felt bad about missing him. Melvin had been over before they left for Fairview. He had brought Mae with him and she had stayed. When Avondale got to the farm where his mother had been living, he seemed really taken with it. He liked the hills around it, the horses, and having the use of a gun to go hunting with. He could use it whenever he wanted to. There were plenty of guns around as Charles Giles had several different kinds. Avondale got along fine with his mother's new husband. He took up with him while they were at Fairview before the two of them had gotten married. And they became quite good chums - riding around the hills together - hunting horses. Charles was Daddy to Avondale right from the first. They always got along very well together and worked side by side on the farm. Avondale took the name of Giles for many years. Until he was grown up and decided that Mower was his real name. He rode a horse back and forth down to school for a while that next fall. He then had to stay in town for the coldest part of the winter. He stayed a while the next fall with John W. Mounton while his mother, sister and step father went back to Fairview for a visit. They were gone a month. Avondale was sure glad to have them back so he could go home. He did chores and lived with Marie Baum most of the winter and went to school from her place. He stayed one winter with Prices and went to school with Cliff Price when it got too cold for him to ride back and forth. In the fall of 1924, they moved to town for the winter. They had taken a little eight-year-old girl, Wanda Smith, to care for that winter. Her father had been sent to Prison and had asked Charles Giles to take care of his little girl for him until he could get out. They moved into her father's house in town so that the two children could go to school during the winter. They bought Avondale a nice new gray suit with two pairs of pants for his 12th birthday on 1 April 1923. That spring he had been living in town with Marie Baum and wanted to go to Sunday School and be ordained a Deacon so he could help pass the Sacrament. But he had to wait for about a year, as they could not find his name or get his recommend so he could be a member of the Duchesne Ward from Fairview. They kept asking for one Avondale Giles instead of Avondale Mower and there was not such a person on the records in Salt Lake City. When they ask for Avondale Mower, they got it all right. So he was ordained a Deacon on 1 March 1925 by Bishop James M. Mickelson. He begged then to be ordained a Deacon as Avondale Giles. The Bishop said he would see what could be done about it but the name he was born under was on the certificate when they made it out. But he went by the name of Avondale Giles most of the time while he went to school at Duchesne. Most of the people thought he was Daddy Giles' boy. One day he was on the farm working and someone came and ask who he was. He said he was Charles Giles' boy. The other person said, "The hell you are! So am I." It was Douglas Giles from Heber City, Utah -Daddy Giles' only son. As he grew older, he never liked the name of Avondale. It is so different from most names and it seemed as though no one ever got it just right so he was called all kinds of nicknames. Some called him "Ave", "Dale", "Avon", and others. When they heard his name at one place that he went to work for, they said, "Cottontail" and that was what he went by there. He always signed his name A. Mower whenever he could. Avondale was baptized at Fairview, Sanpete County, Utah on 25 May 1919 by Nels Peter Nielson and confirmed the same day by Bishop Hans P. Madison. He was ordained a Teacher 2 October 1928 at Duchesne, Duchesne County, Utah by Jesse W. Clement and a Priest 25 March 1934 at Duchesne, Duchesne, Utah by Patriarch John W. Mounton. He was always a very good boy and one whom anyone could depend on to do what ever he was ask to do or what ever he had promised that he would do. He would work just as well when no one was around or if they were right there watching him. He would do the work just the same -he did not spend a lot of his time leaning on the shovel handle like a lot of people would do or sitting around when he should have been working to earn the money he was being paid. He was able to just finish the 10th grade in school, as that was all that they taught at Duchesne at that time. They couldn't send him some place else so he had to stop going about the year of 1928 and never finished High School. It was just a year or two after that they started a four year high school there but by that time, Avondale was trying to get a little work to support himself and also help his folks. It was about that time that Daddy Giles' was getting so he couldn't work much so Avondale was helping all he could on the farm with the work there. His mother and Charles Giles' bought a home in Duchesne the spring of 1925 where they were spending most of their time. Avondale tried to run the farm all by himself for a few years. He lived up there alone raising turkeys and chickens. But the coyotes would get them in the fall or someone would steal them. One fall someone took a truck and loaded up all of his turkeys and hauled them away after he had spent the summer raising them. So he didn't make much off the farm while he lived there alone. But for 5 or 6 years all that was taken off the farm by them, was from Avondale's work even though he was pretty young. It was the depression time and most of the jobs were given to men who were married and had a family to support. Avondale was not able to get much work. He worked for Clarence Baum for $1.00 a day and his board and those few dollars were used at the store to buy a few groceries for his mother. Avondale usually worked enough for the City of Duchesne each year to pay for their water for the year. He did this by helping clean out the ditches and worked at other things for the city such as helping the Marshall. Other wise they would not been able to pay for their water both irrigation and for the house. He also helped Lewis Jones haul his hay each summer for a few years and made a little money that way. They tried to rent the farm out several different times to different people but it never worked out that they made any thing from it - in fact they lost a lot of things by doing that. Mae, his sister, had married Claude Holmes and they had moved to California for her health and to see if he could get work there. In 1930 they came back for a visit and when they left for California again on August 10, 1930, they took Avondale with them. They thought that he could help Claude with his painting if he couldn't find any other work. They tried to find a house at Jackson, California but had to go nine miles out before they found one. They lived in a Tourist Camp at Ione where there was a school for their oldest child, Harold as he was old enough to go. Following are letters that Avondale wrote to his mother from California and other places that he went for work. Ione, California August 12, 1930 Dear Daddy and Mother, We came here to Ione yesterday from Jackson about 9 miles away and we are living in a tourist cabin. There are not any other campers here by us so the man who owns the cabins is letting us use two of the cabins. Harold and I sleep in one while we live in the other one; and Mae and Claude use it for their bedroom. There are black walnut trees all around the place with green walnuts on that will be ripe about in September but the ground is still covered with them from last year. We can have all we want to eat. There are also black raspberries all along the fence that are ripe now. And an orange tree that is covered with ripe and green oranges. The people here do not even pick them - just let them go to waste. They told us we could have them if we wanted them. The only thing I am afraid of, I might get sick eating so much of them. I weigh 142 lbs. now and only weighed 135 just before I left Duchesne. Has my books came yet that I sent for? If they have, will you please send them to me here at Ione? We have just one room in our cabin but we have Shellen Gas, water, lights on the inside of them and a toilet and shower bath outside for $12.00 a month. The deer season opens here on the 15 Sept. and lasts until the 15th of Oct. and you can kill two bucks. So I am sure glad that I brought my rifle along as they say there are sure a lot of deer around here. The hunting license is $2.00 here - the same as it is there in Utah but you have to put a tag on the horns of the deer of each one you kill. And tell where you killed it and what time of day it was when you killed it. Claude went over to Jackson this morning to start to work and Mae is washing. The nights are so cool here that you want an extra quilt on from what we had in Utah. But the days are sure warm enough. Not a cloud in the sky anywhere. But it isn't much warmer though. Well, I guess I had better help Mae with the washing so will close. With lots of love, Avondale August 27, 1930 Dear Mother and Daddy, Claude and I have been painting a house in Jackson for six days - made $61.00 and we have had quite a bit of other work. Made $10.00 this forenoon varnishing some woodwork in a pool hall. I am getting to be quite a painter, Interior Decorator. Stockton is about the size of Salt Lake City. There is a channel comes up for the ocean on the coast 160 miles away, to Stockton that ships come up into Stockton. It is only ten feet above sea level. So I have seen my first ship and was down to sea level for the first time too. I was sure surprised to hear that Old Kit got killed after all this long time. What is Emmet Sexton doing now? You said Daddy Giles was going to start putting up the hay before long. I wish I was there to help him. Yell at him to not work to hard. I am glad he has a good paycheck coming. I killed a large rattlesnake just out of town the other day and say the deer are thick around here. I was sure surprised to hear that Melvin and May have a baby boy. But couldn't they have of found a better name than Gail for it? Gail Reed. I guess Lewis Jones was quite put out to hear that I was in California, wasn't he? Does anyone else ever ask for me? Well, it is getting dark so will have to close. Take good care of yourselves. With Lots of Love, Avondale Ione, California Sept. 22, 1930 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure was glad to hear from you but real sorry to hear that Dad's leg is causing him so much trouble where he hit it with that back of the ax breaking up wood. I have a finger that is about the same way. Maybe Mae has told you about it. I did not want to worry you about it at the time I hurt it but it is all healed up now except that it feels like it is about half dead. I was playing with a hatchet throwing it up and catching it when it came down. When it turned over and hit my finger the last time and cut it to the bone. It sure was a lucky cut though as it missed the joint in my finger and was in the fleshy part next to my knuckle on the palm side. I think that it will be all right in time. I did not know that Matilda Davis Brewer and her husband were back. Isn't Mr. Morris Thompson herding sheep now? What did Morris say when you told him I was down here in California? How much grain does Daddy think there will be on the farm? I wish that I were there to help with the thrashing and put up the hay. I am glad that Sexton's are through with the farm. Tell Daddy that I will send him my rifle to shoot old lady (Blossom) Mills Robertson Fowler with if he wants it. I believe that Young’s will starve to death if they have to do their own farming and I am afraid that Delphi Averett's guy will wish that he was back in Gusher if he lives with her very long. Has Gerald given up his job and thinks he can do better hauling wood? If he does, he is crazy. I was sure sorry to hear that your washer had wore out on you so you did not have any washer to use but guess it was about wore out. You say that you wish that I could have had some more schooling. You do not wish it any more than I do. But it would not be any different if I was there because you folks do not have any too much to live on as it is and I could not earn enough to put me through school this winter and buy my own clothes too and go to school at the same time. So you see it is quite impossible for me to think about going to school any more. I think that I will get along all right though. There have been quite a lot of deer killed around here but I have not been out yet as we have been busy painting a house here in Ione and wall papering four rooms in it. So have been quite busy. We went to the Free Methodists Church here last Sunday for Sunday School and I did not like it one bit. But the Preacher and his wife are quite pleasant people. They have called on us a couple of times so I guess we will go again next Sunday. Well, it is getting dark, so I guess I had better close. With love, Avondale October 28, 1930 Dear Folks, Will try and answer your letter, which I received a while back. Was sure glad to hear from you and that you had such a good time at Salt Lake City for conference. How is Letha and Gerald now? Sure sorry about their baby girl, Lucille. Where was she buried? Have they moved back to Duchesne yet? How is Matilda Davis' baby by now? Sorry to hear about it being so sick too. Where are they living? Where were they living while they were in California? I never did see her husband, Ted Brewer so do not know how he would be on the farm. Maybe neither he nor Gerald will be living there if I come home next spring - if I happen to come back home then. It seems like the trashing was done rather early this year wasn't it? Last year we did not thrash until the 28 or 29th of September didn't we? There was not as much wheat either, 72 bushels last year. But I guess you will have enough to keep you until next year. I am getting to be quite a painter. That is what they call me here - is the painter. I have been painting a 9 room new home all by my lonesome for the last ten days and I have it about 2/3 done now. Claude is still painting on the Bank Building here at Ione. He has two days more before he will be finished. Claude put in a bid on it for $300.00 but the other painter here, a Mr. Picksly, got it for $283.00. But though it was more than he wanted to do all alone so me and Claude went in with him on it and we was to split it three ways but there was some more work throwed in totaling $511.50. And then Claude got this 9-room house for $130.00. So I am painting the house and Claude and Mr. Picksly are finishing the bank building for half and half after their expenses are paid out of it. Paint, oil, etc. All paint, calsomine oil, etc. are bought by the builders of the house that I am painting. I guess it is getting sort of chilly there by now, isn't it? It has been chilly here at nights too. Froze some melon vines around here the other night, froze some corn, squash, and beans etc. in Jackson about two weeks ago which is about 2,225 feet high. Ione is only about 1000 feet lower than Jackson is. SUNNY CALIFORNIA isn't so nice and warm at nights as I thought it would be. And it froze ice on Claude's mother's water bucket one night a while back at Jackson. Is Melvin going to haul you some wood for the winter? He had better. It will not hurt one bit to haul you folks what little wood you will need. If him and Elton would come over to Duchesne, they could haul all the wood you would need in a couple of days. Tell them I said so. Well I must close for this time, With Love, Avondale November 9, 1930 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you so soon. You must be feeling fine. I hope so anyway. How is Melvin and May and little Melvin? I have not heard from them. When the baby was born, I sent them a card and a rattle for the baby and told them to write to me but they have not yet. How is Elton and Ethel? And what is Elton doing? We sure have been having fine weather here. A little rain and fog yesterday but it soon cleared off again. Is it freezing ice there yet? I bet that I will miss the skating this winter -not seeing enough ice or any snow, some of the people here have never seen enough ice to skate on, let alone know how to skate. We sure have been busy going from one job to another one. We have finished the new house up at Plymouth at that ranch and have started painting another house up there for some people just a short ways from the one we just finished painting - a two coat job for $75.00 and they furnished all the paint. It is a house about like the one Funks live in only a porch on both sides. We are painting it white with yellow trimming. Sure does look nice. The one we just finished was white with green trimming. But we painted it inside and out for $150.00 and they furnished all paint, oil and etc. I am getting so I can paint as good as Claude can - only it takes me a little longer to lay it out. When I come back home, I am sure going to fix up your house nice for you. Why not? I am a painter now - at least the people around here call me Painter. With a little white lead, varnish, calcomine, etc., you would not know your own home when I get through with it. How did Daddy come out with his grain up to Leo Bennions? Where are the other three cows that you are not milking and the mules and my horse? I hope everything is all right. Maud has not run off any more, has she? Mae and Claude have been buying quite a few things lately. They have got a radio, new electric washing machine, new table and chairs, a new gas heater, a new mattress for their bed, two pair of new blankets - one for their bed and one pair for Harold's and my bed. Well, I guess I will have to close - not having much news to write about. The only thing that is wrong with me, I have not found me a girl yet. Well, take care of yourselves. With love, Avondale Ione, California Nov. 29, 1930 Dear Mother and Daddy, Will try and answer your ever welcome letter. Sure glad to hear that you are all feeling better. Maybe you will not be feeling quite so good now after your turkey dinner for Thanksgiving. Or didn't you have any turkey? Sorry that Daddy did not get any young turkeys back. We had a very nice dinner for Thanksgiving. Claude's mother, Mrs. Green and Mr. Green were over here for dinner. Then we all went up to the airport and watched a fellow do double and triple parachute jumps from an airplane. I guess you had a little snow for Thanksgiving, didn't you? How cold has it been? We have been having nice weather here. A little rain - just enough to start the grass a growing all over the hills. They are getting quite green. Reminds me of spring here now when the grass begins to look so green. Well, I am getting bigger every day. I weigh 154 lbs. now. Not so bad is it? I was in a doctor’s office with Claude painting some signs. The Doctor had some scales and charts there. I am 68 inches tall and at the age of 20, should weigh 141 lbs. So I guess that I am not under weight at the age of 20 years. I expect to go to 160 lbs. by spring when I will be 20 - if I can keep on getting three squares a day until then. Harold is sure doing fine in school. He has learned to spell and write his full name. He says he is going to be a sign writer before very long. We have sure been busy. We do not have to look for work. It just piles in by the buckets full. So we have some work ahead of us most all the time. Sure keeps us going to keep it all done up as fast as it comes in. I went to a town about 10 miles away today and got a laundry truck to put signs on it. I will take it back to them tomorrow afternoon. On Monday morning, we will start painting and papering a house. Claude will get $7.00 a day and I will get $5.00 a day. The job will last about two weeks. Then we will have a $76.00 contract job tinting and wall papering the inside of another house that will last about a week. By that time there will be more to do. I wish that I had been there to see Glen Holfelt. How long did he stay there? Didn't Melvin and May get the rattle and card that I sent when their baby, Gail was born? Tell Daddy that he had better wear my big heavy coat. I will not need it down here. I guess it would just about fit me now. Well, I am running out of paper so will close. Take good care of yourselves With Love, Avondale Dec. 12, 1930 Dear Mother and All, Sure glad to hear from you again. NO, I did not get very much money from that job as we did not stay there very long. There was another old painter that had been doing the job but took sick so they hired us for just a few days until that guy could get back on the job again. We did not know any one else had the job when I wrote to you about it but I will try and send you a 5 spot as soon as I can. We do not have much to spare, paying payments on the radio and washing machine and buying Christmas things. I am sure sorry about Daddy being sick. That is the first spell he has had in the winter months isn't it? I bought me a pair of house slippers the other day down in Stockton at Montgomery Ward and Co. and when I got home and tried them on; they are size 6 1/2 but a little too tight. So I am sending them there for Daddy to have to use to wear around the house. Along with his Christmas presents, I bought those Gem razor blades at a store here in Ione. And some Gillette blades for his razor at Montgomery Ward and Co. before I got your letter or I would have went and got some more Gem blades for him. I hope he will like these as well as he did those I sent before. I guess if I was there, I couldn't get a job on the road to take his place as I am not married, could I? Yes, it will soon be Christmas and I think you had better just send some post cards this year and let your kiddies send you some presents for a change. A card or letter will do me all right - do nicely this year as you need things much more than I do. I have a full set of clothes - all I need now. I have 4 pairs of pants, 8 or 9 shirts, 2 pair of shoes, 10 or 11 pairs of socks, underwear a plenty, etc. So I am pretty well fixed for this winter. I guess it is getting pretty cold there now, isn't it? We sure have been having fine weather lately; warm and nice. Down towards the coast, it has been quite foggy and cold. The other day we went down to Stockton. The sun was shining bright and warm when we left home but before we got there, we ran into fog so thick that cars had to turn their lights on to see at all. You know Stockton is only 10 feet above sea level although it is 100 miles from the seacoast. There is a channel that comes right into the center of the city of Stockton that large ships come up to Stockton from the ocean. There is where I saw my first large ships. How cold has it been there by now? I sure would like to go skating for once this winter. Melvin isn't using my traps is he? I had to pay him $5.00 for those 6 or 7 traps that I got from him and I do not like having him take them out and lose them as I expect to use them myself next winter and trap. What is Clyde Jenson doing down in Arizona? The grass cannot be any greener down there than it is out here as it is much greener now than it was in August when we came down here. Ha Ha Ha. Well, I guess that I better close for this time, as there is not much new to write about around here that you would be interested in. The buzzing flies are bothering me so much that I cannot think. Well, take good care of yourselves. With Love, Avondale Dec. 28, 1930 Dear Mother and Daddy, I received your Christmas card and letter just before Christmas. I hope that you got my package all right. The handkerchiefs you sent me are pretty. How do you like the box of blue stationary I sent to you? I did not know what to send you but thought you could use some more stationary. How does Daddy like the razor blades and socks? Does the house slippers fit? I bought them for myself down at Stockton. They are size 6 1/2 but when I tried them on after we got home, I found out they were to tight for me across the top of the foot so I thought I would send them to Daddy, as his foot is so small. I thought they would fit him better. I sent Letha a pair of stockings; Kenneth and Dean each a little car, Grandmother Rigby Turpin a big box of candy; Claude a belt, Mae a new purse, Lorraine a toy telephone, and Harold a big top. I hop that you had a good time and a nice Christmas and here's hoping you have a very Happy New Year. Mae and Claude have bought them another car. A second-hand one. They went to Stockton to pay the last payment on their Hudson and then traded it in on a $350.00 Graham Page car. They have been paying $20.00 a month on the Hudson and then only got something like $66.00 for it on the 1928 Graham Page - second-hand. It's a nice car though - a 4 door sedan. But I think it was kind of a poor way to do business. As for myself, I blew myself for a new hat. Mrs. Green, Claude's mother, gave me a nice pair of socks. We are sure having nice weather here but the coldest the people around here has seen it for a good many years. Just think it is about 30 above zero for this time of year. It has been freezing a little ice the last two or three nights but the days are sure nice and warm. I go around with my shirtsleeves rolled up all the time. Mae and Claude are sure mad about Gerald and Letha moving into their house without even writing and asking if they could or to see about it. Mae sure is feeling bad - her new stove and sewing machine being used by someone else and her going without. She did not like it a bit. Well, I must close. I am sending that $5.00 I promised you a while back. With love, Avondale January 16, 1931 Dear Mother and All, How are you all feeling and how is everything by now? Sure glad that you had a good Christmas. Claude's half-brother, Pat Dunn just got out of the Preston School the other day. I guess you knew that he got in some trouble with some older boys last February stealing some turkeys or something. And he has been in the Reform School at Preston for boys here at Ione ever since then. The Preston Reform School is for boys only under the age of 18. The Reform School for the girls is down in the lower part of California somewhere. Pat is just 17 now. I have went over to Jackson and stayed with him for two or three times. You know his mother, Mrs. Green, is in the laundry business. She sure does a lot of laundering. She has a mangle to iron most all of the clothes with and she can turn out a lot of clothes in a day. I run it some of the time for her when I am over there towels, pillow cases, flat pieces that are not to large for me to handle easy. This town is sure a dead one. If it was not for the Preston School here, I believe it would dry up and blow away. Just about every man that lives here works up there at the Preston School. And some of the most trusted boys work in the fields; plant the gardens and take care of the orchards; and others work in the machine shops learning different trades. The school is just out of town on a hill and they own all the land around here. Claude and Sis are going to try and get a house in Jackson just as soon as they can. Mae is getting kind of tired of living in a tent all the time. They have not said much about Letha and Gerald lately living in their house. I guess they know that it will not do them much good now that they are already living there in their house for this winter. No, we have not got much work now. Claude has a little sign work is about all for the winter months. I was in hopes of getting a job driving a milk truck for a man in Jackson that get milk from over here at Ione. He promised to give me the next chance at it but has still got the same man driving for him. So I guess he thinks that he will be all right. What's all the news there around home? Hasn't anyone been getting married or moving away or have they all starved to death? I am sorry that I am not there to do the chores for you this winter. How cold has it been there? We are sure having fine weather; a little rain and a little fog but for the most part it has been bright and warm. Take good care of yourselves. With lots of love, Avondale February 9, 1931 Dear Mother and All, I will try and answer your letter, which I was sure glad to get. This is the first day that I have been here in Ione since the day that I got your letter. I have been over at Jackson staying at Mrs. Greens helping her with her laundry. Mae got a letter from you today and I got one from Grandmother Rigby Turpin a while back thanking me for the box of candy that I sent her for Christmas. She also sent a letter from Opal and Thorval to me. How much is Melvin going to pay you for the roan cow? I am glad that they are getting alone all right. What is Elton doing? I am glad that you are having such good luck with your water works this winter. You must not have any neighbors coming over after dark to freeze it up for you this winter. Isn't there any one living in Mrs. Shields place this winter to come after water? How is Fay Shields and her husband getting along? Where do they live? At Heber City? I would not mind being home to skate on some of that thick ice that Dad has been helping put up for Leo Bennion. I have not seen any snow or ice since last winter except what can be seen on the mountain peaks of the Sierra Nevada Mountains east of here or a little ice we get with the milk each night from the ice plant at Jackson. I do not know if I will be coming back home in the spring or not. If I get hold of a good job other than painting, I think I would stay here. But if I did not, I might be home. There is not much work here now. Claude has a little sign work all the time; enough to keep them alive and keep up some of their payments on the things they have bought. I cannot kick about the way Claude treats me. Whether I do any work or not, he always hands me a $1.00 now and then for my spending money. I guess we will be going over to San Andreas to fix up a couple of houses in a few days now. I do not know for sure yet just when. At least I hope so for more reasons than one. I went over there a few days ago with Pat. He went over to see his girl and while he was seeing his girl, I found one for me too. Well I am getting to the end of my paper so I guess I will have to close. With love to all, Avondale March 4, 1931 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sorry not to have answered your letter before this but it seems like I just cannot get around to it. Just about the only time that I write is when I write to you and we have been pretty busy lately. We got that job in San Andreas painting the inside of two houses. It took us both about three days to the two small houses. We made $50.00 - not so bad. We took our bedding and went over there and stayed until we finished them. We thought that was cheaper than driving back and forth every morning and night. There was a stove, table, bed, and mattress there so we had it pretty good. Then the other day a fellow in Jackson had us go down to Davis - that's a town 14 miles west of Sacramento and paint the inside of a 6 room house there. One coat - floors and all. Sacramento is 40 miles Northwest of here. The country down that way is sure pretty. The trees and bushes are all in bloom and everybody's lawns are green. There is also a channel coming up there from the ocean at San Francisco like there is at Stockton with large ships and boats coming up and down it - freight back and forth to the ocean at San Francisco. Well it has been some time now since we have had any rain. The weather is sure fine; just like summer. I am now wearing my B.V.D.'s and feel like taking them off and going without any underclothes on. If someone wants my Ford and will give you $10, $15, or $20.00 for it, you ought to sell it and get rid of it. Maybe Daddy could trade it off for something. I guess it is a big nuisance around there, isn't it? How is the weather there now? Is it still freezing ice? I see the papers say that the roads over the mountains into Nevada are open now so people can travel over. Mae, Claude and the kiddies went up to the snow line a week or so ago. I was not home at the time or I would have went with them. I have not seen any snow all winter. I am glad that Daddy liked his socks that I sent to him. I will try and get some more sometime. How are the razor blades holding out? Let me know when they are most gone and I will send him some more. I will try and write sooner next time. With love, Avondale March 15, 1931 Dear Daddy and Mother, I got your letter last night and as I was already writing, I thought I might as well write to you too. Yes, Fay Shields Brown wrote to me a week ago. She seems to be getting along all right with her husband. She did not say much about him; only that he was a pretty nice sort and has curly hair and he weighs 170 lbs. She always was crazy about fellows that had curly hair. I guess Ken Casper and Fatt Davis will be pretty good boys for a while now, won't they? How long will they stay in the pen? We went down to Stockton the other day to stock up on groceries and look for a house to move into but kind of changed our minds about the house as we did not think that we could find much work down that way. So do not think we will move down there. As there are so many unemployed men around town. There is a house at Sutter Creek that is three miles North of Jackson with 5 or 6 rooms and a bathroom for $15.00 a month. But Sis don't like Sutter Creek though as it is down in a hole. You have to shift your car into low gear to go down into the town and use second or low gear to get back out again. But the town is on a main highway going into Sacramento Valley. But it lies down in a canyon but it is a pretty good sized valley around. But not as large as Jackson is. Both of them are in Amador Co. and Amador City, the county seat is just another 3 miles from Sutter Creek. Well, we have got quite a lot of sign work to do and some more to touch up a bit. I have been working for a fellow that owns the ground we are living on for the last few days doing a little of everything from chopping wood to painting. I think that we can do a lot better when we can get moved into a house and have a telephone in the house so people can call us up when they have some work they want us to do for them. Well, I cannot think of much news to write about so will close. Answer soon. With love, Avondale Sutter Creek, California April 15, 1931 Dear Mother and Daddy, I will try and answer your letter today, as this is the first day we have not been busy for quite a while. You will notice that my letter is addressed from Sutter Creek now. We have a nice 6 room house here at Sutter Creek with a bathroom and tub, a pantry, and two clothes closets, a back and front porches for $15.00 a month. We have been working in a town 20 miles away at Valley Springs South of here for the last week or so painting a restaurant for $80.00. There was a little extra work that we done too getting $90.00 in all. Claude drew $30.00 before we started; then our board, gas and oil, so we did not have much left. There was a hotel burned down in Jackson a while back. One man, an Italian, was burned up in the hotel. Two others jumped out of an upstairs window into a creek and was burnt and skinned up quite a bit. Well, I just made 75 cents now. A man came and wanted me to paint a Shell Gas Pump. It took me 3/4 of an hour - every little bit helps. Mae's stove and other things are here. Claude and I went over to Ione this morning and got them. Mae has not said much about them so I guess that they are all right. But I do not pay much attention to what they say about such things any more so as not to cause any more trouble about it. Did you listen to the Dobbsey Birthday Party program over the radio the morning of April 1st? He said something about a Happy Birthday to Avondale Mower and for him to look in his suitcase for a surprise. Claude and Sis got me a nice white shirt for my birthday and put it in my suitcase. As it was April fools too, Harold and Lorraine got a bunch of angleworms and mud and wrapped them up in a sack and put them in the suitcase too with the shirt. I hope Daddy had a nice trip to Provo and that he got his leg fixed up alright so it will not bother him any more (where he hit it with the back of an axe a while back while I was away at Melvin's). Mae and Claude are talking about going back home for a trip this fall and bringing you and Daddy back with us for the winter. How would you like that? Pat Dunn, Claude's half brother is going to get married sometime in May. I do not think that he is quite 18 yet, but he says that he is going to get married. He is the one that spent about one year in the Preston Reform School. Claude and all of his folks do not want him to get married to the girl as they knew more about her than Pat does and he has never went out with any other girl in his life and she goes to every dance there is within 20 miles of her home at San Andreas and been having a good time. And he does not dance at all. So I am afraid they will not get along very well. With Love, Avondale Sutter Creek May 13, 1931 Dear Mother and All, I will try and get your letter answered today as I am not doing anything which is the way it is most all of the time lately. I have been trying to get a job around here on the road or in the mines and like that but there are a dozen men standing around every little job there is trying to get work. Claude and Mae are expecting me to go around to every house in town and ask them if they do not want any painting done. I wish now that I had my Ford here. I believe that I would go back home. I know that I could get a little work there once in a while. If Painter Brown is leaving, there ought to be quite a bit of work of painting around Duchesne. I got your letter about my Life Insurance Co. and also one from the company but I do not see as I need to have it changed right away as it would be more expense because its only about a month until I will have to send them another payment. No I do not think that I will be getting married for a while yet anyway. Pat Dunn and his girl have changed their minds about getting married on the 6th of May. At least Pat did. He has kind a woke up to the fact that she is not true to him; always going out to dances and different things with other fellows when ever he was not around. Most all of the girls around here (these mining towns) are Italians and Mexicans. I have only met one Mormon girl since I have been down here In California. The fishing season opened here on the first day of May. Claude, Sis, and the kids, Pat and I went fishing last Sunday. We had quite a nice time. We took a nice lunch a long; had a gallon of ice cream. We went up in the mountains and stayed all day. Claude caught 7 trout, Pat caught 20, and I got 15. We have strawberries about every other day now and there are lots of ripe cherries on now too. I hope that Gerald and Daddy can get some water on the ranch; enough this spring to soak up the ground a little bit so it will not all dry up and die out. It is getting pretty hot down here. We went down to Stockton the other day and while we were gone, a little 9-year-old boy got into our house and turned everything upside down. I had 50 pennies in a can that he took. He swiped Sis's bottle of ink and a box that had some very important papers in and Claude's pocket cards with his name on them. We got the bottle of ink and about a third of the cards and his mother gave me 50 cents for the pennies he took; but did not get any of the important papers back. Well, this is about all that I can think of right now. So will close with love, Avondale Sutter Creek, Calif. June 9, 1931 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you. I have been going to write for the last week but have not got around to it. We have been quite busy. Working steady for quite a while. But Claude is going to work in Jackson in a day or two at Days Pay and I think that I will go to San Francisco with Pat and Jack Dunn, Claude's half brothers. (We'll go) to see if we can find a job down there. Today I am expecting them a long any minute now. I do not know for sure whether there will be room enough for me or not as they are going with another man but I think there will be. We went a fishing last Sunday up in the mountains where we could see snow around on the North hillside. That is the closest I have been to snow since I came down here. The elevation was 8,500 feet. Almost as high as Indian Canyon. We caught some fine trout - 10 or 12 inches long. The longest one was 13 inches. The Italians have a big celebration every year on the 7 June and as we did not care much about going to it, we went fishing instead by ourselves. How is Letha and Gerald getting along? I hope they are doing all right. We have been having a little stormy weather lately and there hasn't been any fires now for some time around very close here. But you cannot never tell when one will start up. I have been going in swimming about every night so that I have not been noticing the heat much lately. Well, I guess that I had better pack up a few things and be ready to go - if I am going when they come. So will close - With lots of love, Avondale June 25, 1931 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to hear from you and know that everything is all right with you. No, I did not find any work in San Francisco but I had a good time while I was down there. Went out to the beach three times, went through the zoo and through the Golden Gate Park and also up on the Twin Peaks. The Twin Peaks are a couple of hills that stick up in the edge of San Francisco for about 1,000 feet. There is a good paved highway going up it and goes around the top of both of them. From the top, you can see all over San Francisco, Oakland, The Bay, and Golden Gate; also the ocean and coast. We went over on the ferry across the bay. It is only about three miles across from Oakland to San Francisco but down below the bay it gets wider, 18 miles was that we came back. To go across on the ferryboats, you have to pay 60 cents for the car and 5 cents a piece for the passengers. And to go over the Bridge, you have to pay 60 cents for the car and ten cents a piece for each passenger in the car. San Francisco is sure a funny city. The streets run in all directions. Some comes into the middle of the city and have 5 and sometimes 6 streets coming together with St. cars running in all directions. We sure had a good time looking the city over. We could not find any work. We stayed down there for 6 days then came back home here. Claude, Mae, the kids and I went fishing last Sunday again up to Silver Lake - 52 miles from here. We got a boat for 25 cents an hour and went fishing on the lake. But we only caught two fish. They were nice trout though. One was 14 inches long and the other one was 11 inches long. I had me a new suit coming for $15.95 with a nice shirt. I got them yesterday and I like it fine for that much money. The fellow that I got it from is the studio man that Mae has been helping take pictures with. And he started selling suits as a sideline. He let me keep the $4.00 commission that he was supposed to get. Sis has not heard one word about her sewing machine yet. Well it is pretty hot today so I will close for this time and go in swimming. With lots of love, Avondale July 16. 1031 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to hear from you again but very sorry to hear that Daddy has not been feeling so very good. I guess that I will have to come home and help you look after the things. Thorval and Opal - in Los Angeles - are about 500 miles from here so I guess we will not get to see them unless they happen to come back this way on their return trip back home. This is about the quickest way to get into salt Lake City. We are only about a couple hours drive from the Nevada State Line. Last Saturday we went a fishing again and we sure had good luck. There were six of us men and we caught some over 200 fish. You are only allowed to catch 25 fish in one day a piece but there was three cars of us and we eat about half of the fish while we were up there. We went up Saturday night and fished Sunday morning and came back home Sunday afternoon. There was Claude's mother and his stepfather - Mr. & Mrs. Green, and two of Claude's half brothers, Pat and Jack and his sister, Maude & her husband, Glen Walker and their two boys, besides ourselves. So you see there was quite a crowd of us. Pat and I went together. Pat caught about 50 and I caught 40 in three hours. Claude and Mr. Green went together and came back after 4 hours with 12 fish Mr. Green - 5 and Claude - 7. Glen and Jack was gone about 5 hours and came back and said that they couldn't catch any but Jack had 53 in his basket and Glen had 56 in his. Pat and I put our leaders in a cup of water on Saturday night to soak up and the next morning we had to put the cup on the fire to melt the ice so we could get them out to go fishing. And during the day, the women all got sun burned; that's pretty good isn't? We were up about 8,000 feet and could see snow around on the peaks and down here at Sutter Creek; it has been pretty hot - around 100 and 104. There has been several fires around. One was over by San Andreas that burnt for 3 or 4 days at the rate of about 1 square mile an hour - some fire, was not it? There was a little boy 12 years old that went fishing with his father and got lost. Maybe you heard about it over the radio. They have been hunting for him for about two weeks and cannot find hide nor hair of him anywhere. They have airplanes trying to find him - flying around over the place and some dogs trying to trail him and over 100 men hunting for him through the hills but cannot find his clothes or his bones or his fishing pole. They have dragged the stream and hunted all over the hills. Had an airplane throwing out bills and kept fires burning at night and cannot find a trace of him. It is believed that he got on some road and was picked up and took to some town and left or was kidnapped by someone. Claude and I have been painting on a new 5, 10, & 15-cent store at Jackson for 5 days making $80.00 but have not got it yet. We also have $90.00 coming from the state road. Claude and Sis are getting kind of worried about their payments on their things that are due. But I guess that we will get the money in a few days. Well, Claude is painting some signs so I guess I had better help him, so I will close. With love, Avondale August 12, 1931 Dear Mother and Dad, I guess you have begun to think that I was never going to write to you again, haven't you? I am sure sorry about Daddy being as bad as he is. You ought to both of you come to California for a year. How about it? Don't you think that you could come if Claude would come after you? I have been trying to buy me a car for the last month. But cannot seem to be able to find one around here that's worth what they want for them. We are going down to Stockton tomorrow and I think that I can find one down there. I have been figuring on coming home this fall and help you out a bit but I do not know what I could do towards making any money. In the wintertime, I couldn't paint and we have all kinds of work around here now. We have just finished a $190.00 job yesterday in the Grammar School building at Jackson. It took us 13 days and cost us about $30.00; and Claude has just had his car all overhauled costing about $75.00 and we are going to paint the garage to pay it. Every person in the State of California that owns a car or drives one has to have an operator's license. If you are over 21 years old, it does not cost you anything to get one. But if you are not 21, you have to have your parents sign it for you before a notary republic. That will cost you about 50 cents so I am sending you my application and $1.00. You will have to sign it before a notary republic and have him stamp it and then send it to S. W. Mower, Father Mower and have him sign it or else let Daddy Giles forge his name and send it back to me before I can get an operation license or can drive a car. After I get it back, I will have to take it back to the speed cop that I took my tests from and have him O.K. it and then send it to the state capitol at Sacramento, California and then they will send me my license. That's quite a bit to have to go through but it is the only way. So I will close for this time. Hoping to hear from you soon. With lots of love, Avondale August 31, 1931 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to hear from you and to hear that Daddy is some better. I guess it will not be so very long now until we see you. If we can get a little more money. You and Daddy ought to have been here a while back. We had a real feast. For about a week, Pat Dunn and I went fishing on Saturday, stayed Saturday night and Sunday morning. Caught 42 nice trout. We caught some over 50 but we did not have a basket so we would put 5 or 6 fish here and there along the creek in little puddles and then pick them up when we came back down the stream to camp. But it was not so easy to find them again. When we were coming back home on Sunday, about sundown, we saw three deer - two bucks and a doe. We had my rifle along, so we got one of the bucks. A nice one with three pointers on one side and two on the other. There are a whole lot of smaller deer here than they are back in Utah. I carried this one up the side of the mountain alone after it was cleaned so you can tell that they are not very large ones here. The ones on the coast are smaller than that. The season opens here in 15 days and I am going to try and get one or two if we are not to busy. We have been painting a car for the last couple of days. It sure looks nice - blue and black with bluff trimming. I suppose Sis told you about Bert being here now with his two little boys. He is staying with his mother in Jackson helping her with the laundry. I suppose that I will not have any single friends when I get back home again, if I ever do. They will all be married off. Where is Glen Holdfelts now or do you know? Did Cliff Price and Ruth Shelton get married? Well, I will close for this time hoping to see you again soon. With lots of love, Avondale This is the last letter recorded before Claude went to Duchesne and brought Avondale's, Mother and Daddy Giles to live in California for the winter. Avondale stayed in California while Claude was gone to keep hold down the jobs they had and to stay with Mae and the children. He worked there all that winter. He got enough money for what he really needed and the rest went into the family to help with the expenses. That winter Mae got sick and died on 20 December 1931 - just eight weeks to the day when their older brother, Elton, had died in Utah. Their mother was very glad to have Avondale with her when Mae died. He drove her to the hospital and supported her through it all, as they were the only family that could be there. That winter Avondale continued to go fishing and hunting and reading books that he got from the library. He missed his sister for he had lived with them for a year and a half, helping her around the house as much as anyone else had so he missed her a lot. They stayed on in Sutter Creek until April when they packed their things and moved back to Utah. Avondale left on a Saturday morning with all his things in his blue Ford that he had bought for $10.00 and fixed up. He left 24 hours before the rest left so that if he had any kind of trouble, they would overtake him and help him. But they never saw him all the way. Claude brought his two children to stay with their grandmother and he planned to go back to California to live with his mother. Avondale was in Duchesne when they arrived. Gerald and Letha were living on the farm. Avondale got busy and worked with Gerald that spring putting in crops and trying to raise something that would take care of them the next winter. But the water gave out again. The crops that were raised did not pay much. About all they got was some grain and hay but not enough to amount to very much. Avondale took his Mother and Daddy Giles over to visit with Melvin and May. They went to the ranch where they lived but no one was home. They found some bread and milk to eat and went on to Fort Duchesne where May's family lived to see if they were there. When they arrived there, they found that their children had whooping cough. So Claude's two children could not play with them. Claude had come from California to see his kiddies and when he went back, he talked Avondale into going back with him to keep him company and to work. He said he had plenty of work for both of them. Avondale hadn't found work around Duchesne to make some money so he decided to go back and try it there again with Claude. They took some rooms and tried to do for themselves but did not make much of a go of it in Jackson. Later they went back to Sutter Creek and boarded with some white people for the next winter. Jackson, California July 28, 1932 Dear Mother and Daddy, Just a line to let you know that we arrived back here all right and that we had a good trip. We got here at Jackson Monday night. I was going to write yesterday but we were busy moving and getting straightened around. We have moved into a room in the California Hotel. It is quite a large room about 15 by 15 with two big windows and an outside door on the ground floor; with water right in the room for $6.00 a month and a place to put the ladders and different things in the back. We stopped in Winnemucca, Nevada on Sunday night and Claude made $5.00 painting a sign for the Tourist Camp on Monday morning in about three hours. If we had not stopped and made that, we would have run out of money before we got here. And we have made $4.00 today painting a sign for the Safeway Store. And I guess we will paper a room in the Globe Hotel tomorrow. I will send you some money as soon as I can get enough. Claude wants to know if Lillian Robinson has wrote to you yet? Mrs. Green feels kind of sore about Claude and I taking a room downtown and not boarding with her but we do not care. We feel better where we are. Has Gerald and Cliff got the hay all up yet? I wish I could of stayed there long enough to of helped put it up. Well, I guess you will be going down to the U.B.I.C. before very long. I hope that you have a good time. Tell Daddy to take good care of himself and not get sick again. It is sure very hot here. If it would rain once in a while, it would not be bad. But I guess we will get enough rain this winter and be wishing for it to stop. Well, I can't think of anything else to write about, so will close for this time. With love, Avondale and Claude August 2, 1932 Dear Mother and All, Just a line to let you know that we are still getting along fine. We have moved again since I wrote before. We received your letter today and was sure glad to hear from you and that you are all right. We have a nice house on the Arganott Hill by the Parret Service Station. We have 4 rooms and a pantry and bath. Claude had a lot of paper and a little paint so I went to work and fixed up the kitchen and the front room nice; papered the walls and painted all of the woodwork. I wish that I could have fixed up your front room before I left. I guess we will come back the first thing in the spring anyway to see you all. So maybe we can do it then for you. Hope we will be able to fix it up for you. We have not got much work right now; only a few sign jobs. But it don't take so much for us two to live on. So I am sending you a couple of dollars now ($2.00) and as soon as we get a little more work, I will send you some more. Has Dad got any money from Shorty Lee yet? Or the other load of wood? I am going to write him a letter and tell him to settle with Dad. Claude's Mother don't like it a little bit because we don't live there with her and pay her $1.00 a piece for board and room. We have a nice little house here for $11.00 a month with lights and water paid. We can go where we want to and do as we please. So why live with her? Claude has still got the Post Office Box 334 in Sutter Creek so you can send our mail there. I did not know that when I wrote you before. Well, we have got to go to Sutter Creek to see abut a job so will close and send this off while we are there. With love, Avondale and Claude. Sutter Creek, California August 10, 1932 Dear Mother and All, Just a line to let you know that we are O.K. and we hope you are all the same. I am sending you $5.00 to give to Roy Shonion on the radio and will try and send you some more as soon as I can. I guess that you got that $2.00 I sent the other day. I would like to send you some more but cannot right now as we haven't got hardly any work. We have got three big jobs coming up but do not know for sure whether we will get them or not. You will want to get a receipt from Roy for the $5.00. We will try and send you some money every month and you can give it to him. We got three crates of Strawberries for 75 cents a crate this morning and Lilly is down here bottling them up for us. She says to tell you hello for her. I wish that you could have 4 or 5 crates. They are sure nice at that price. Maud found Lorraine's pink slip in with her things. I will send it to you and Mrs. Green has a few things of Emma's that she wants to send to Lorraine too. I saw Lee Russel the other day. He has been living in Volcano for the last 6 years. When I told him that you and Dad had been living in Sutter Creek last winter, he sure felt bad because he didn't get to see you. He says that he is going back home for a visit before long. Bert got a job in the Organot Mine this morning and so has Jack and Rich. So they are all working now except Pat. And he isn't doing anything. Well, this is about all that I can think of for this time so will close. Take good care of yourselves. With love, Avondale September 2, 1932 Dear Mother and All, Just a line to let you know that we are getting along just fine. Claude bought some things for the children the other day and we sent them with the slip of Lorraine's and a couple of shirts and some things that Mrs. Green had for Lorraine. Write and tell us how the s**** fit and the other things fit. Send them back and we can exchange them if they are not all right for them. We are having a little more work now than we have had so I will send you $5.00. I have been working for Ed Libby the last few days and we have another job to start on Monday. So I can send you some more money when we get through with it. There is not much news to tell you about. Jack ran into a cow last night and broke it's leg so he bought her for $30.00. She was dry and just rolling fat. We killed it and dressed it on the side of the road. Mrs. Green says she is going to make a lot of mince meat out of it and can the rest. But Jack says he is going to try and sell some of it. He sold the head to a Mexican for $1.50 while we were skinning it. It has sure been hot weather here lately. It was 115 yesterday. Claude and Lilly have sort of fell out and I hope they stay that way for I do not like her a heck of a lot. I had to use that $5.00 I was going to send to you, Mother, so had to wait until I could get another one. It is sure hard to save any money around here. We have our rent to pay and the payments on the spray gun each month. And by the time we buy our eats, we do not have much left. I will send you some as often as I can. Well, I cannot think of anything else to write about so will close for this time. Write soon and let us know how things fit the children and take care of yourselves. With lot of love, Avondale. Sutter Creek, Calif. September 22, 1932 Dear Mother and All, Just a line to let you know that we are still O.K. and have got quite a bit of work. We started working on the Italian picnic grounds and dance hall yesterday. We got the contract for $90.00 and they furnish all of the material. I am sending you $10.00 to help you out a little. And I guess you had better give Roy Schonian $5.00 of it on the radio and I will send you some more as soon as we finish this dance hall. Claude wants me to write a letter to his kiddies for him and send each of them a $1.00. He went down to Jackson last night and had a rose tattooed on each of his shoulders with Etta Mae through one of the flowers and Harold and Lorraine's names through the other one. Well, deer season opened here on the 15 Sept. so myself and 4 other fellows went hunting. And we got three deer between us - 1 two pointer and two three pointers. They were sure fat and good eating. I wish you and Dad could have had some of it. We had a wreck when we were coming back home. A fellow that was drunk ran into us. They will not have his trial until next month but I guess he will get about 1 year to 10 years but I do not know he will. How are the crops? Write and tell me all about everything and everybody. I do not think that Claude or I need any of Lilly's help in managing our affairs; at least I do not. Well, take care of yourselves. I wouldn't mind being there on Labor Day and see the big celebration they are having. Write and tell me all of the news. With Love, Avondale and Claude November 2, 1932 Dear Mother and All, Just a line to let you know that we are still alive and working hard. I have been waiting until we got a payday before I wrote to you. We have been working on three different jobs and finished one yesterday. So I am sending you $10.00. It started to rain today so do not know whether we will have very much work from now on or not. No, there was not anyone hurt in the wreck we had. We were in Dick Green's car, a Dodge Touring car. It was just about ruined. I am glad the kiddies are getting along all right in school. We do not have any cloudbursts in this part of the country. That was away down in the lower part of California that they were having that kind of trouble. I am glad you got all of the crops up? How was the second crop of hay or didn't Gerald cut any of it? Wasn't it good enough to cut? We are now living about three houses down from Onetos Garage with another fellow and his wife who are from down around St. George, Utah. A Mr. & Mrs. Fred Troutmen - just young people with one little boy, a little over a year old. She does all of the cooking and cleaning house. He works in the Old Eureka Mine. We pay half of the rent $7.50 a month; and half of the grocery bill and they pay half. That way it's cheaper all the way around for us all. They are sure nice people. Easy to get along with. We have a big house with six rooms for $15.00 a month. I guess if we do not have much work, I will have to go out and get some meat and have Mrs. Troutman make some mince meat for us. I sure wish you could all be here with us this winter. Well, I will have to close for this time. Take good care of yourselves and write soon. With Love, Avondale and Claude Sutter Creek, California November 15, 1932 Dear Mother and All, Sure glad to hear that you are all O.K. and feeling fine. We have got the trunk shipped to you at last and Lorraine's baby buggy and her rocking chair. We had them shipped to Douglas Gile's at Heber City. I guess you can get Earl Jenson to haul them out to Duchesne for you. They will be there in three or four days. They left here yesterday. I guess it's getting pretty cold there by now isn't it? I sure wish that you all could be here again for this winter with us. But the way things are looking around here I do not believe we are going to have so very much work this winter. How much is there left to pay on the radio? If we get another pretty good sized job this fall maybe I can send you enough to finish paying for it this fall. I am sending you $5.00 and a coat for Lorraine. It is one that Mrs. Green gave to Claude. If it will be too big for her this winter, let us know and we will get her another one for her to have to wear to school. I bet that Gerald makes a lot of money this winter hauling wood with the Thompsons. I wonder why he has to have someone always with him. If he is afraid to work alone. He sure will not make anything working with them. Where are they living now for this winter? Well, it looks like more rain again this morning. So I do not suppose we will be getting much more outside work this fall. I got a letter from Truman Mitchell the other day. He says he is driving the school bus from Antelope to Duchesne and he is staying at Antelope this winter. Well, I have told you about all I can think of for this time, so will close. With love, Avondale December 16, 1932 Dear Mother and All, I suppose that you think I am awful mean for not writing a little more often. But we have been trying for the last two weeks to finish up a job here in town so that I could send you a little more money so you could have some for Christmas. But it has been snowing and raining about every other day and as it is outside work, we didn't know whether we were going to be able to get it finished before Christmas or not. But we have had quite nice weather the last couple of days so we finished it up and I am sending you $20.00 and I guess it will come in plenty handy. And you do not want to worry about Christmas presents for us either out of it. You need the money that you have bad enough without spending it for us anything. Claude has been saying for the last couple of months that he wished he had the 22 rifle to shoot rabbits with. Lilly got hers quite a while back. She has moved about 150 miles further North. I wonder if you could send it to him. You can take it apart and wrap it up. I do not think that it would take more than about 50 cents to send it to him; if you will, please. I wish that we had a can of honey from Melvin's. A little good honey would taste pretty good, I believe. How is he getting along anyway this winter? I hope that they are making out all right. That spray of mine there is a $43.00 outfit and is in good shape. If you can get $25.00 out of it, sell it and use the money yourselves. It ought to be worth that much, if it is worth anything. To bad about Pete Belt getting hurt - his leg broken. I guess Madson's car won't be much good now after that. I wonder if you would get those Taxidermist books of mine and send them to me, please. Well, it is raining again, so I do not suppose we will get much more outside work now until spring. I haven't been able to get any of Uncle Sam's sheep yet this winter so far but I think I will go out and try it tomorrow. There isn't much else to do. How is Daddy feeling by now? I hope he isn't getting out around in that cold weather to much and getting cold so he will be sick again. Coats like that one of mine that I paid $14.00 for there, only costs about $5.00 here now. I wish I could get one for him but there is so darn many things to spend money for that I do not know if I could make it or not now. Well, I will have to quit for this time. Wishing you all a very Happy Christmas. With Love, Avondale and Claude January 2, 1933 Dear Mother and All, Sure glad to hear from you and hope you all had a nice Christmas. We received the gun and books all right. And Claude has been going jack rabbit hunting every time he gets a few hours that we do not work and so we have nothing else to do. It has been kind of stormy all day so I went hunting this morning and saw two does and a buck. I shot twice at the buck and missed him both times. I guess it has been so long since I have shot one that I have forgot how to shoot. I hope that I Have better luck next time I go hunting. Yes, we are still living with Mr. and Mrs. Troutman. We get along just fine. Hazel (Mrs. Troutman) is a good clean cook and she has got the best baby. He gets out of bed and comes into the kitchen by himself of a morning. He cannot talk yet but tell him to sing and he will start singing or tell him to dance and he will start hopping around the room. Pat has gone into the rabbit business. He has a bunch of rabbits and is going to try and sell the young ones to the store and restaurants. Jan. 4: Well, I will try and finish this letter tonight and get it sent off. I cannot think of a great deal to write about except that I went hunting again yesterday and ran on to one buck deer and shot it. I had to hit him twice as I busted a hind leg the first shot. He is sure nice eating - poor but not very old - a two pointer. I think I will fix the horns the way I did those last winter and send them home to match the others. We are having pretty good weather lately. A little foggy at night but just like summer in the daytime. I wish we had a little more work to do. I guess it won't be long now until the spring work starts and then we will be plenty busy. I will try and send you a little money next time that I write if I can earn any. Write soon and often. With love, Avondale January 23, 1933 Dear Mother and All, It is snowing here this morning so I thought I had better stay home today for a change and write some letters. I got a letter from Melvin and May the other day. They say that they are all O.K. and that Melvin is trying to get a job in the mines over there. I got a letter and card from Grandma Rigby - sent just after Christmas. She said she had been feeling quite good this winter. She sent me $1.00 bill for Christmas present. I sent her a box of candy for her Christmas present. We had a big fire here too, just after Christmas. It started in back of the Jackson Cleaners and before they could stop it, it had burnt out the Jackson Cleaners, the Purity Store, The Amadora Hotel, the Plumbing Shop, by Podestos Garage and a Barbershop. The Podestos Garage has a big brick wall running the full length of their building and that is all that stopped it from burning clear down the street - taking it all. If there had been any wind at all, it would more than likely burnt the full length of main street. It started about 2 A.M. O'clock at night and they had the fire department from Sutter Creek over there and then they did not get it under control until morning. Vosses Plumbing Shop and the Amador Hotel was burnt clear to the ground. There was not anything left that was any good. So they just piled it up and finished burning all that was left. The Hoboes sure had a feast from the Purity store. There was an awful lot of canned stuff that was just smoked up and they packed it away in sack fulls until about noon next day. They will be building most of it back up again and I think we will get a job there helping. I hope so anyway. It has been raining for about a week and snowed about 6 inches last night. We sure have got a lot of work coming up for spring but that does not do us any good right now. I am sending you $2.00. I guess that will help out a little bit. About another month and I guess we will have quite a bit of work. I hope that Melvin gets a job out that way. I will close for this time. Write soon. With Love, Avondale February 23, 1933 Dear Mother and All, Sure glad to hear from you and learn that you are all O.K. and getting along all right. I am sending you $5.00. I guess you will need it bad enough. You can tell that **** schoolteacher that if that spray of mine wouldn't work it was because he did not know how to use it or because he broke it. Because it was all right the last time it was used and that was after I took it back to Duchesne. I hooked it up to see and it hadn't got hurt on the trip there any. It is worth $25.00 if it is worth a cent. It is sure nice here now. The hills are all green and it feels like spring then the sun is shining but it looks a little like rain tonight. We have not much work now but we have several jobs coming up later on that we expect to get. We got the Purity Store and the Jackson Cleaners job finished up but we did not make hardly anything off of them for fixing up their places after the fire. I think you must have Jackson City twisted around. There is not any corners on that side of the street until you get to the end of Main Street. The fire was on the west side of the Main Street about half way down. We almost had a fire here where we live last night. We were all setting down eating supper and a little boy came up and knocked on the door. Fred gets up and goes to the door to see what he wanted and he tells Fred the house was on fire. We all rushed outside and sure enough there was a place on the roof where a spark from the chimney had lit and was just starting to burn. It only took one bucket of water to put it out but it wouldn't of been long on them old dry shingles until it would of took the fire department to have put it out. If the schoolteacher has wrecked that paint spray of mine, you better tell him to give you about $15.00 and he can keep it. Well, I will close for this time, hoping you are all keeping well. With Love, Avondale March 25, 1933 Dear Mother and All, I am sorry that I have not written before this but I just couldn't seem to get around to it sooner. I have been thinking that I could send you a little money and I have finely got hold of $5.00 to send you. We have not got much work and that means not much money. I have been rushing the Organote Mine and the old Eureka Mine the last few days. Claude is engaged to be married in June so I guess that he will be taking care of Harold and Lorraine after that. We are living at Mrs. Green's again now - moved over today on Claude's birthday. No, the flowers are not blooming on the hills yet. Only a few little blue and yellow ones. The California poppies are growing but are not starting to bloom yet - another two or three weeks though the hills will be covered with them. About three weeks after the time we went hoe last spring is when the most flowers are in bloom along the last of April. No, I do not think that I will be home this spring. If I can get a job at all in one of the mines, I will work there all summer and next winter. Then I will be able to send you a little money once in a while then. I think that Daddy had ought to let some one run the farm that will do something with it. Bert Holmes has been working in the mine for about six months and he has built himself a little home and has it all paid for now - with chickens and a radio. If I get on to work, I think I will rent a little house this fall and have you and Daddy come here again for the winter months and live with me. Well, I can't think of much more to write so will close for this time and I will promise to write sooner next time. Mrs. Green says to tell you hello for her. With Love, Avondale April 4, 1933 Mr. and Mrs. Giles and my children, I am sending you $5.00. I wish that I could send you some more. Well, I and Avondale are both well. Do hope you are all the same. I have been wanting to see you all so bad. Well, Dear Ones, Daddy is thinking of getting you another Mamma. So I can have you both with me. I am lonesome without you. What do you think about it? If you think it is all right let me know in your next letter. Work has been slow but is getting better now and if you want to come back home, I will let you know when I am coming after you. It is getting warmer here now. Mother and all the folks are all up and going and the woman I am going to marry – that I am getting – says she would love the children and wants to see you both. We all send our best regards and love to all, Your Papa, Claude Holmes Harold, you write to your Daddy, as I like to hear from you. With a big kiss, Daddy April 27, 1933 Dear Mother and All, The last time that I wrote you, I promised that I would write sooner next time but it seems that I just cannot make up my mind to write. Pat says to tell you all hello. Well, I guess Harold and Lorraine isn't going to have a stepmother for a while at least. Claude's marriage fell through. She wrote him a letter and says that she did not want to get married so if he wants to get married, he will have to find someone else. He is getting so he runs around at nights all the time now. To Sacramento or Stockton, or to some dance around here somewhere - getting no sleep and spending his money for nothing. And not tending to his business. He collects the money and then spends it and I get nothing for my work. I have got $2.00 that I am sending to you. The way things are turning out, it's about up to me to find another job or to go into the business for myself. And I have not got the money to buy brushes, ladders, or anything else with. So do not know what I will do. The State of California is putting on a bunch of the unemployed men in the Forest Reserve at $30.00 a month and their board, room, and clothes. I have half a notion to get me a job there for this summer. And then get a job in the mine next winter. The earthquake didn't both us around here; in fact it was not even felt. It was about 500 miles from here. Bert is married and he has got his two boys with him. He built his house over by the watering trough in the old campground. We painted it a while back and it looks pretty nice. I still get my mail at Sutter Creek. With Love, Avondale Jackson, California April 28, 1933 Mr. and Mrs. Giles and my Kiddies Dear Folks, I will say that we are all well and hope you are all the same. Avondale wrote to you yesterday and told you all the news so I am saying that there is not going to be any wedding as I think it is the best. I would love to see you all and t will not be long until when I will come back. I have a little work at present. Mother, I sent you $5.00 in my last letter, did you get it? I am also sending $5.00 in this. My mother and all send you their best regards. It has been real cold here of nights. Mother, I would like for you all to come back to California this fall in time for the kiddies to get in school. So you think the matter over and let me know, as it is lonesome without the children. So hoping to hear from you soon, I remain your true son and Daddy, Claude Holmes. May 13, 1933 Dear Mother and All, Just a line to let you know that I am still alive and O.K. and wish you a lot of joy and happiness for Mother's Day. I am sorry that I didn't write to you sooner but I did not know that tomorrow was Mother's Day until today. So I am writing now and sending you a $1.00 bill for you to buy you a present with for yourself. There isn't much news to write about. I have been doing a little wall papering and painting and fishing - the season opened the 1 May but it has been storming so much lately that we couldn't catch very many. Pat and I are going again tomorrow and see if we cannot catch a few. It has been raining the last two weeks like it does in the wintertime. Mrs. Green gave me a flower that she made so I am sending it to you. How is Daddy getting along? I hope his ear is better by now. I think that Melvin will be better off working for steady pay than farming anyway. Well, I can't think of much to write about so I will close. I want to get up early in the morning and go fishing; so take good care of yourselves and write soon. With Love, Avondale The following letter was written by his mother to Avondale: Duchesne, Utah May 22, 1933 Dear Son, Avondale, Sure very glad to hear from you. Thanks very much for the $1.00 to get me a Mother's Day present. I will get me a new housedress with it. (She got a very pretty Alice Blue Print) I did not get out to Sunday School or anywhere for Mother's Day. I stayed with Letha and her new baby boy Saturday night and Sunday morning. And for the last 5 days and nights. Alfred John was born Saturday morning at 12:30, May 13. She got along just fine. Gerald has only had work part of the time so he has kept house part of the time with my help - doing the washings, etc. And Edna Mae cannot walk yet. She is not very quick about walking although she is just 17 months. Melvin and May were over yesterday. Got here just after we got up. They left home about 6 A.M. They are getting along all right. He is still working in the mine. It is about the dirtiest and hardest there is to be found if I am any judge. His hair, eyes and ears are never clean but he wants to get some of his debts paid off. He has got him a car or a bug I guess you would call it. It has good tires and a good engine but it is a harried looker. It can go though and that is the main thing for him, I guess. He has been riding a horse to work all the time so that will be better than a horse. We sure have had lovely weather here since the stormy spell was over and everything is sure growing fine. But not quite as early as it was last year. It was just a year ago yesterday since we went over to Roosevelt and took some lilac blooms over for Elton's grave and they are not out yet here now. Silas W. Mower and family and Ethel and LaVee happened along the next morning after Letha's baby was born on their way to Provo for a few days. I was there at Letha's and I reminded S.W. that he had not even saw Lorraine since Mae died and we came back to Utah. Not since before the last time they left for California and the first time you went with them that summer. He said, "Haven't I?" So they called down to the home on their way back home and wanted Harold to go home with them and stay for a while. Daddy was not so well. He had a dizzy spell the day before so I told him that we needed Harold to help take care of the chores for a while as I was helping Letha part of the time. Ethel promised to come and stay a while with us this summer. She is living with one of her sisters at Vernal. They have a little home together and are raising a little garden to help out with their living for this summer and next winter - to have some things to bottle for winter. Well, take care of yourself and write soon. If Claude comes back this summer will you be coming back with him for the summer? With Love and Best Wishes, Mother Jackson, California June 1, 1933 Dear Mother and All, Just a line to let you know that we are still alive and well and hope you are all the same. The country around here is sure getting dead. The Depression is just hitting this part of the State this spring. We have not had hardly any work at all this spring. When last year there was all kinds of work. We had all we could manage to do. I do not think that either Claude or I could get back home if we wanted too. No work - no money. Last summer Mr. and Mrs. Green were making from $60.00 to $80.00 a week. They got their home and furniture paid for. It is a good thing that they did because this spring the best they have made is $18.00 one week. Claude and I pay them $20.00 a month apiece and that takes about all we earn. We get our board, room and laundry done so we do not have much other expenses to pay. We fixed up Mae's grave the other day. Hauled dirt and planted a lawn inside of the cement frame with flowers in each corner. The lawn has not started to grow yet. It will look nice when it does. How is Letha and her baby boy? I hope they are getting along all right. I was wondering if I could get a job in the mine with Melvin if I were there? How is Daddy Giles' ear? I hope it is better. And how is the ranch coming? Well I will close - hoping to hear from you soon. With Love, Avondale Before his Mother received the above letter, both Avondale and Claude came back to Utah. They had packed all they could pack into Claude's car with their bedding stacked on the top of it. They had come to spend the summer in Duchesne and to see if they could find work around there. They made a bedroom out of the back room at his Mother's house. Claude went to Roosevelt and stayed some of the time with his father in law, S. W. Mower and did some painting around there. Avondale got work for Clarence Baum herding sheep and working in the Flateright Mine up the Strawberry River. He spent most of the time alone - batching it by cooking for himself. When he was not up there, he helped on the Baum farm. Something happened between the two - Avondale and Claude - for they never got along after that very well. Claude would try to get Avondale to go to some of his parties with him but he was not enthused over it. They did make some beer that summer which his Mother said, "I did not like the idea but was not much that I could do about it." They all went to Fort Duchesne for the U.B.I.C. They took their bedding and food and whatever else they needed and stayed over night. Lovenia and Daddy Giles and the two children slept on the porch of No. 9 where Mr. and Mrs. Campbell Litster (Melvin's wife's parents) lived. The others went to the campground. Avondale didn't take to parties and dancing much. He always liked to go to the picture shows whenever he was in town. He gave his mother all he could of his earnings to help take care of the family. Claude was spending all his money on parties and girls. Avondale did get a bit upset because he was helping support Claude's children more than their father was. Claude married Merle Lewis on 27 Oct. 1933 and they moved in to live with Lovenia and Daddy Giles for a while. She was just 20 (born 15 June 1913) and he was 32 years old. It made it very hard on Lovenia to have another person living in their home. It made it very crowded to find places to sleep. Avondale had been sleeping in the same bed with Claude and now he had to move into Harold's bed with him, which was just a 3/4 size bed. Avondale was working up Strawberry River most of the time but when he was home, it was crowded. This living arrangement went on until it got too cold for Claude and his wife in the back room and they moved out to live with her sister. Around Christmas time Claude got a house for his family and wanted his children to move in with them. After they moved out, Avondale fixed up the bedroom the way he had it before when there was only the three of them living there. He and Claude had some words over some of their things. Claude wanted to take the washer he had given to Lovenia to help pay for her taking care of the children. His mother never knew what the trouble was between Avondale and Claude but they were never good friends again. Avondale stayed around Duchesne during the years 1934 and 1935 getting what work he could and helping to support his mother and Daddy Giles as well as himself. In 1934, Daddy Giles had a stroke and had to be taken care of completely. That winter Avondale got a team of horses and hauled them their winter wood. He was around most of that winter helping them and working at different jobs. He spent some of the winter helping the Pully boys at their sawmill up Indian Canyon. He was there in the middle of the winter as he went down to Price and got them all some clothes for Christmas 1934. He got his mother a pair of nice silk **** and a pink blanket that she used to put on the foot of her bed when it was extra cold. Avondale and Clifford Price did some work along towards spring up in the timber. The family was getting pretty bad off along towards spring and that was when Avondale went to the unemployment office and heard about the C.C.C. Camps. On April 20, 1935, Avondale went down to the Bridgeland C.C.C. Camp. He worked here until the 15 July 1935 when he was honorable discharged at Bridgeland, Utah. He was in C.C.C. Camp 1968 at Camp DBR-11, Bridgeland, Utah working on canal construction. His performance was excellent. The project superintendent, Mr. E. W. Hooper of 352 Milton Ave. Salt Lake City, Utah made the following estimate of Avondale Mower as a workman: "While a member of the CCC, he worked on bank trimming crew and as a stone mason's helper on construction. All of his foremen give him the very highest recommendation possible. He has an excellent character and a cheerful pleasing personality." F/S FWD, 7-16-35 to F.C. at Fort Douglas, Utah for settlement. Selecting Agency notified of termination of allotment, July 16, 1935, (signed) John B. Cannon, Captain, Commanding CCC Camp 1968. But he did not like the CCC Camp. He didn't like the work and he didn't like the discipline. He wished he could get out some how and had ask his mother to see if she could get him out. But she had no way to do it. While he was at the camp, he received letters from California from Claude's brother, Pat, asking him to come back to California. Then he received this letter from California: Jackson, California June 30, 1935 Dear Avondale, Pat asked me if I would write to you. He said to tell you he wouldn't be able to go out there after you in the short leave the Boss said he could have but Glen and Maud, their two boys, Mother and Daddy and I are going to come back there. We are leaving on Thursday, July 11th. Please be at home at your mother's house. Before then as we will stop a few days there and then go on taking you with us if your ready. Pat said if you didn't come back with us, he was going to go out there and drag you back. You will come back with Mother, Daddy and myself to California won't you? Mother wants to visit her brothers that she hasn't seen since 35 or 25 years ago. Last time I went out with Claude, Lilly, Maude and her two kids. And OH, I was going to ride so many horses and all I rode was one old flea bitten horse; so have a horse so I can ride one this time. I haven't learned to drive a car yet. Mother and Glen (he has a new Pontiac now) are going to let me learn to drive their cars. Can't think of any more to write to you about. Be sure and be ready when we come. How do you like CCC Camps? Your Friend, Emma Burns They came about the time they said they would. They stopped off at Bridgeland to see about getting Avondale discharged. They had to promise that she would furnish work for him - whatever Mrs. Green did, she got him discharged. They visited for a few days and then stopped back in Duchesne for overnight. The next day they left for California taking Avondale with them. Avondale had come home the night after he got his discharge. They had given him all the clothes he had been wearing while there, pants, coat, and things that he never used again. But he was very tickled to get out of the CCC and find some other kind of work to do. He did not care for Army life - too independent. His Certificate of Discharge from Civilian Conservation Corps read: "To All Whom It May Concern: This is to certify that Avondale Mower CC9-93848, a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps who was enrolled on April 20, 1935 at Bridgeland, Utah is hereby discharged there from, by reason of employment else where. Avondale Mower was born in Fairview in the State of Utah. He was 24 years old when he was enrolled. By occupation he was a Painter. He had blue eyes, brown hair, medium complexion. Was 5 feet 9 inches in height. His color was white. Given under my hand at Bridgeland, Utah, this 15 day of July 1935." (Signed by John B. Cannon, Captain - Commanding CCC Co. 1968) Lovenia received this notice of his discharge about one month later with $2.00 that was still coming to him. Most of his paycheck had been sent to her to help his family out. He was only allowed just so much of his pay. Jackson, California July 23, 1935 Dear Mother and Dad, I thought I better get busy and let you know that we got here O.K. last night. And we sure had a swell trip. We went up through Idaho and Oregon coming back. Stayed three nights with Mrs. Green's sister in Idaho and then came on through Oregon and straight down through California. We just got here yesterday. We stopped at Heber the first night. Then in Salt Lake City; then we stopped 2 nights at Caldwell, Idaho; the next at Klamath Falls, Oregon. We got in there quite late in the evening and left early the next morning so didn't have any time to look up Rowland Rigby. I drove 520 miles the day we left Idaho so I was quite tired. Then we stopped one more night at Bert Holmes' place in Vallejo, California down by Oakland, California and then on to Jackson, California. Things have changed around here since I was here. They are building new roads and new buildings all the time. I haven't tried to get a job yet but I am pretty sure to get one in a few days. Pat is working every day - got a good job in the mine. And everyone else seems to be busy so I don't think it will be long until I have a job too. Pat says to tell you and Dad both hello for him. Mrs. Green has been grinding horseradish today. She got two big quarts out of what she brought back with her. We thought it would be taken away from us at the State Line when they searched us and the car but they did not find it. She was glad. Glen and Maude left us at Salt Lake City and came right on home through Nevada. They had quite a lot of trouble with their new car and we never even had a flat tire. Well, I will have to quit. I do not know any news to tell you about. Write soon and take care of yourselves. With Love, Avondale Jackson, California August 22, 1935 Dear Mother and Dad, Sorry I haven't answered your letter any sooner but it seems like I just can't get my mind on writing letters. I have been working since the 6th of August getting $4.00 a day - 6 days a week. Sure is some different working in a big mine than in that little Gilsonite Mine up the Strawberry River for Clarence Baum. Everything is so nice and safe - big 16 X 16 timbers over us all the time, plenty of nice cold water to drink and a big air hose for each man. And I don't work any harder here than I did in the CCC Camp. We get paid twice a month on the 10th and 25th. I won't be able to send you any money this payday but I am sending you my bill that Clarence Baum still owes me. Maybe you can get a coupon book or something from him - $12.50. I work day shift from the 10th to 25th each month and night shift from the 25th until the 10th again. Pat is on steady day shift. On the night shift, I go to work at 4:30 P.M. and get off at 1 A.M. in the morning. We are all feeling fine here and hope you are the same. Mr. & Mrs. Green, Pat and Emma say to tell you both Hello for them. Well, there are some big strikes but they are all about over now. Don't hear much about them any more. But there is still a few Union guys that try to raise heck once in a while and can't. Pat and I have been fishing two or three times and caught a nice mess of fish. Wish you could of had some of them. Well, I can't think of much to write about so will close. Write soon and tell me all the news. With Love, Avondale September 24, 1935 Dear Mother and Dad, Sorry I haven't answered your letter sooner but I haven't been home hardly and since the 1 Sept. We were all laid off on the last day of August. They are repairing the shaft at the mine. They said it would be along about 30 days before we can go back to work. Pat and I and another fellow went fishing over past Mono Lake Southeast from here right after we were laid off. There is sure some pretty country over that way. When we came back, we went around through the edge of Nevada by Carson City and then down past Silver Lake. The deer season opened here on the 16th Sept. So we have been hunting every since. I got one two pointer the first day and that is all we have got except one small one to eat while we were hunting. They are having quite a lot of trouble down in the valleys getting fruit pickers. Pat and I are going down and try it for a while. The fruit will only last for about 3 weeks and by then the mine will be opened again and running again - at least we hope so. Thought I would be able to send you some money but can't this time. Mrs. Green is doing quite a lot of washing. Mr. Green has been cutting wood for 3 weeks. They sure have a lot of wood. With Love, Avondale Jackson, California November 16, 1935 Dear Mother and Dad, Sorry I haven't been a little more careful about writing to you. I was going to write a month ago but I got a job and thought I would wait until I could send you some money. I and another fellow went up North about 130 miles and got us a job helping harvest rice. We got $2.50 a day and our board - working with a thrashing machine. They harvest rice just like they do any other grain - cut it with a binder and shock it up in the field and then thrash it with a thrashing machine and put it into 100 lbs. sacks. We never thrashed less than 550 sacks a day and one day we thrashed 934 sacks - 100 lbs sacks. That is a lot of rice, isn't it? We got 8 1/2 days work that was just on one farm of 200 acres. Then I just got back to Jackson and got another job at a little mine 15 miles east of Sutter Creek - Amadore Co. I was dumping buckets working on top. It was a good job. I didn't have very much to do and got $2.50 a day and my board. We worked every other Sunday there so I just got back to Jackson today. I guess I will go back to work in the mine here at Jackson, the Kennedy Mine tonight at $4.00 a shift. Pat went to work this morning. I picked you some holly berries while I was up in the mountains and Mrs. Green has got some Christmas cards to sell so I am sending a box to you. Don't know if you have bought any yet or not. I am also sending you $10.00 and I guess it will be the 10th Dec. before I will have another payday. The Kennedy Mine pays twice a month - 10th and 25th. They pay on the 25 for what you have worked up till the 15 and on the 10 for what we do up until the last of each month. They hold back the last 10 days. I think you would be wise in buying what little milk and butter you will use this winter than to spend $35.00 or $40.00 for hay for the cow and then have to take care of her - milk and feed her. Well, we are all well here and hope you are both the same. I guess I better close for this time and get my duds together for work. Well, write soon and tell me all the news and take care of yourself. With Love, Avondale Lovenia didn't save any other letters for 1935 but she was sure that Avondale had sent them something at Christmas time because he always did. Usually it was clothes – dresses and shirts. Jackson, California January 13, 1936 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you again and know that you are both getting along all right. Sorry that you had not been felling so well lately. Hope that you had a good time and visit at Grandmothers for the Thanksgiving holidays. I had the day off for Christmas - that is the only day we have off in each year except Sundays and sometimes we have to work on Sundays. Yesterday is the first day I have had off a Sunday. You ask me if I was working several hundred feet under ground. It is just 5,200 feet straight down; 3,600 feet below sea level. About one mile and half from the top to the end of the mine. That is where I am working. Right in the bottom of the mine. That is the best place there is to work - better air and not so hot. It is awful hot about the middle way down of the mine - 3,700 and 3,900 and 4,000 feet. There is two mines in one. The main shaft is 4,600 feet deep. We get off there and walk about 200 yards through a tunnel; then we have another big hoist and shaft that goes down another 600 feet and they are going to put it down another 200 feet. It is quite like riding in an elevator in a big building to go down and up in the main shaft. It only takes 5 minutes to go down or up. It has been raining steady ever since the new year. Hasn't hardly stopped and is still raining today. I am sending you $15.00; have been waiting until payday before writing to you. Jack Dunn and his wife came up from Los Angeles yesterday. I haven't seen him for nearly 3 years. He looks just the same. He said to tell you both hello for him. Well, I will have to close. It is about time for me to go to work. I am working night shift now for two weeks starting today. I go to work at 4 P.M. so I will have to wait until tomorrow to mail this. Take good care of yourselves. As Ever, Avondale February 15, 1936 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to hear from you. Sorry you have not been feeling so well. Hope you are both feeling well now. We have all been about sick here with bad colds. There is sure a lot of flu around here. About all the schools are closed. Have been for the last two weeks. They will start again on Monday. I had a real bad cold for about a week but all right again now. Have a better job now too. $4.50 a day. I go to work at 7:00 A.M.; come up on top at 11:00 A.M. to eat my lunch and don't go back down until 12:30. Then I am through at 3:00 P.M. - steady day shift - no more working at nights. We sure have been having nice spring weather here – up until Sunday - then it started raining and hasn't stopped yet. This will be about the last good rain we will have this winter. I haven't heard if it is snowing in the mountains or not. There haven't been but very little snow so far this winter. I am sending you $15.00. I will try and send you some more often after this. We were laid off form the 1st of September until the 15th November and run up quite a few bills. But will have them all paid off next payday. Then everything will be better. Pat says to tell you both hello for him. No, Jack and his wife only stayed about a week; then went back to Los Angeles. Well, I can't think of any more to write about so will close. Write soon and tell me all the news and take good care of yourselves. With Love, Avondale Lovenia started having spells where she hemorrhaged from her stomach at this time. The first one was in November 1935 and again in January 1936. A Dr. Cline told her that her trouble was ulcers in her intestines and he put her on a diet. Jackson, California March 13, 1936 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to hear from you and learn you were feeling better and I hope that you both stay that way. We are all feeling fine here except Pat. He has been troubled with rheumatism a lot lately. He has got another job with a raise in wages. The same time I did and has been tending skip ever since. Working in the shaft every day where it is wet. Water dripping on him all the time. He went to the doctor to see if he couldn't do something for his rheumatism and found out that he had sugar in his blood besides. To bad about Edna Shelton's husband getting killed. I knew him quite well while at the C.C.C. Camps. I suppose she will get quite a bit of compensation. How is Dorothy and her husband getting along? Has Gerald and Letha found a farm yet? I don't think he is hardly able to take care of a farm, do you? I am sure satisfied with my job. I haven't had to work any Sundays for a long time now. I only have to work 5 or 6 hours and I am practically my own boss - get my $4.50 every day and I am home by 3:30 P.M. every day. We have been having spring weather lately for sure. The sun is up now by 6:30 A.M. All the Almond Nut trees have been in bloom for two weeks and the peach trees are all blossomed now. So are the flowers like that one of yours in the back of your house that blooms before the leaves is out with the yellow flowers. Lots of wild flowers out too now but no California poppies yet. Green grass everywhere about 14 inches high; haven't seen any snow or fog at all this winter - plenty of rain though. I am sending you $10.00 this time. Will send it a little oftener now. Take care of yourselves and write soon and tell me all the news. With Lots of Love, Avondale March 31, 1936 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to hear from you and learn that you are both all right. We have been having quite a bit of storms again lately - it was hailing a little while ago and we had some snow last week; only stayed on for a couple of hours. The only snow we have had this winter. Well, I will be another year older in the morning, April 1. It seems like they are rolling around pretty fast. 25 years old. I will be an old man. HA HA. I am sending you $10.00 to buy some garden seeds with. I might be home this summer and want something to eat. I am still working every day but getting tired of it. I have a good job though so will more than likely stay till they fire me. The mine is 5,340 feet now and getting deeper every day. I do not know yet how much farther they are going. Well, write soon and tell me all the news. And take care of yourselves. With Love, Avondale April 17, 1936 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to hear from you and learn that you are getting along all right. We are sure having summer weather here now. Almost to hot to sleep. The nights are so warm you can't get to sleep till after 10:30 P.M. Hope you haven't had more snow than you will need for summer water. It looks like our rains are all over until next fall. No, Pat isn't feeling much better. He doesn't feel a bit good; doesn't look well either. But we are still working every day. Would like to stick it out for another 10 or 11 months or a year. Could be pretty well fixed then. I have a little money in the bank and thinking of buying a new suit and a car. Won't for a couple more pay days though. I can't make up my mind whether I want a suit or not. I am afraid I would only wear the pants anyway. Write soon With love, Avondale. (Sent $10.00) Jackson, California May 12, 1936 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to get your letter and learn you were still getting along all right. Pat and I bought a car last payday for $35.00 to go to work and fishing in. And I got me a new fishing outfit. We have been out fishing several times already. Caught a few nice messes of fish - wish you could of had some of them. I got a letter from Earl Jenson the other day. Wanted to buy that old Ford of mine. I told him he would have to see daddy about it. Whatever he wanted to do with it was all right with me. I don't suppose I will ever use it again. It has sure been hot here lately. The grass on the hills has all dried up. I guess we will be having fires again before very long. I got me two new pairs of pants and several new shirts so guess I won't buy a suit until fall. Pat and I are going over to Angles Camp to the Jumping Frog Jubilee next Saturday. I have never been to one of them yet. They are held every year. Well, I can't think of any more to write so will close. Take good care of yourselves and write soon and tell me all the news. (He sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale May 25, 1936 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to hear from you. Sorry that Daddy hasn't been feeling so well. Mrs. Green hasn't been feeling well for the last week. She is about all in. Bert and his wife were up a while back. They live down by Oakland, California at Vallejo. Bert Holmes works in the shipyards. I am sending you $10.00. You didn't say whether you got that last money I sent or not. Let me know every time so I will know that you are receiving what I send to you. I didn't go to the Jumping Frog at Angles Camp. There was so many people and cars that you couldn't see anything. So Pat and I went fishing instead. Pat bought him a new Ford V8 today for $700.00. I am glad it is him instead of me that has got it to pay for. Well, I can't think of any more to write so will close for this time. Write soon and tell me all the news and take care of yourselves. With Love, Avondale June 26, 1936 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to hear from you and learn you were still well and getting along all right. It sure has been hot here lately - 90 and 100 every day. Pat and I have been going fishing about every other day or night after work - get away from a little of the heat for a while. No, Claude Holmes has not wrote to me and he don't need to because I am afraid I would not answer his letter if he did. The last time I seen him I meant just what I said to him - that if I never saw him again, it would be plenty soon enough and I haven't changed in the least since then. Bert Holmes and wife are up visiting today. I guess they will stay until Sunday. Well, Bert is going to town and wants me to go with him, so will close. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale Mrs. Green was Claude and Bert Holmes's and Pat and Jack Dunn's mother. Avondale lived with her while he worked in the Kennedy Mining and Milling Company at Jackson, California with W.A. Sinclair, Superintendent. The mine was just across a gulch if they could have gone straight from the Green's house to work but they had to go around by the road which made it several blocks to go to work. July 13, 1936 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you. Glad you are both feeling fairly well. We are having quite warm weather here too – 90 to 100 every day. There are so many grass fires that make it a lot hotter. I didn't go any place for the 4th of July. Stayed at home. They never have celebrations here for the 4th in Jackson. Too many foreigners. The businessmen are all too stingy to spend any money and the Italians had their regular once a year – two-day celebration at their Picnic Grounds in June. Nobody has wrote to me about that old age business. I hate to think of you on Relief but I guess you know best. Daddy is entitled to it as well as a lot of others now he is not able to work any more to help support himself and keep the home going. Pat and I are still working every day - 7 days a week now. I guess the 4th is the last day we will get off until Christmas unless the mine shuts down in two or three months. They are just about to run out of ore where they are working. Pat smashed his little finger a while back; laid off one day. It has been pretty painful working like it was. We have had several large fires lately around close; burning several thousand acres of grazing land. Sure makes it hotter than it would have been. The folks are all well. They say to tell you Hello for them. Hope you both stay well. Will close for this time. Write soon and tell me all the news. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale July 31, 1936 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you and learn that you are both all right and this hot summer weather isn't getting you down. Sure has been hot here - 100 and 101 most every day. We haven't had any rain for so long, I have about forgot what it would look like. I go fishing 2 or 3 times a week to get away from some of this heat. I guess we are going to lose Pat. He has everything planned to get married the 15th of August. He is marrying quite a nice girl almost as old as he is. She is about half Spanish; lives up above Pine Grove. Pat is out hunting for a house to live in now. I guess he really means it but houses are not very easy to find. 5 or 6 new ones being built all the time but still can't find any to rent. I am sending $10.00 to buy them peaches with. I sure wish I had some of your vegetables down here. I don't think much of California vegetables. They haven't got any flavor or taste to them. Mrs. Green just got her a new Flamo Stove today - $135.00. I am glad it's her that has got it to pay for and not me. She bought a new frigerater about a month ago and she will be paying for them the rest of her life. Well, I can't think of anything else to write you about so will close. Take good care of yourselves and write soon and tell me all the news. With Love, Avondale August 22, 1936 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you and learn you are both O.K. It has been quite a bit cooler here lately. Sure a relief from the hot weather we have had. It is 90 most of the time now. Yes, Pat is a married man now. Him and his girl and another fellow and his girl went to Reno together. All four of them was married on the 15 August. Pat is living at Amador City, 8 miles North of Jackson. Quite a ways to come to work every morning. Yes, you can do as you please with my old Ford. I won't ever use it again. Pat and I have both got us a car now. Pat bought him a new Ford roadster and I have a 1931 Chrysler Coupe. That old Ford of mine ought to be worth about $25.00 to anyone that has any use for it. The motor is in good shape. I think the Pink Slip is in that small dresser drawer down in that box where I keep my things. It is two good to be torn up for a trailer but suit yourself. One of the Pope boys from Park City, Mrs. Green's relation, came here the other day. Guess he is going to stay for a while and see if he can find work. He has been working in the mines at Park City. I don't know whether my job is going to last all winter or not. I am still working every day. Sundays and all. But they are just about to run out of Ore, so I might be home this fall. But I do not think so. Well, take good care of yourselves and write soon. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale Lovenia sold the Ford car for 4 big loads of wood and $20.00 to Bob Marchel. September 15, 1936 Dear Mother and Dad, Sure glad to get your letter. I thought maybe you had forgotten me. It has been quite a while since you wrote. It has been a lot cooler here lately. I have to wear a coat to work now. The days are getting so short – no rain yet though. Things are looking a little better at the mine now; so guess I will have a job for a while yet. Deer season opens in the morning. I would sure like to go hunting for a few days but it is just like pulling teeth to get a day off since the 4th of July. So I do not know whether I will get to go or not this year. Everet Pope, Mrs. Green's nephew, is having a hard time finding a job. Works a few days on the new theater they are building here in Jackson and has been building some cupboards in the kitchen for Mrs. Green. Well write soon and tell me all the news and take care of yourselves. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale October 10, 1936 Dear Mother and Daddy, I will try and get your letter answered today. I have been going to write every day for the last week but never got around to it. Have been out hunting quite a bit lately. Haven't got any deer yet though. They are going to put on a new cable at the mine tomorrow so I have the day off. And I am going hunting again and see if I cannot get a buck this time. We sure have been having pretty weather lately here. No rain at all yet and the days and nights are just like July - plenty warm. Richard Green was up from Los Angeles last week. Stayed a few days then went back. Pat and his wife are getting along just fine. They have moved to Mockeley Hill to live now. They have a new house and everything furnished new for $20.00 a month. Pat is waiting to go hunting so will close. Take good care of yourselves. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale November 16, 1936 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you. Got your letter and hope Daddy keeps feeling better. I sure was surprised to see Melvin the other day. Just came up out of the mine, and there he was. He stayed two nights. Wish he could have stayed longer. He says he sure likes California. And says he is coming back out here. I suppose he stopped and told you all about his trip. I haven't heard from him yet. I gave him $10.00 for you if he didn't need it for his trip back home. Well, we haven't had much storms yet. Melvin came out here in our first one this fall and we haven't had any since then. But it made the ground wet so the nights have been chilly since then. I am sending you another $10.00. I had better send it to you while I can. I might not have a job after the first of the new year the way things look now. But cannot tell. Still working every day. Haven't had a day off since in September. Well, take care of yourselves and write soon and tell me all the news. With Love, Avondale Melvin and three other men started out that fall to see if they couldn't find some work. They had been working at the mines by Roosevelt and Fort Duchesne but they were either closing down or laying off some of their workers. They had been out to the mines in Carbon County but was not successful so they just kept on going and ended up in California. The other men bought the gas and Melvin furnished the car for their trip. He took his trailer so as to have a way to carry their bedding with them. There were three other men with him and they wanted to go to Grass Valley. He took them there and then went to see Avondale. On his way home, he stopped to see his mother, Lovenia, in Duchesne. He took her a picture of the men and the mine where Avondale worked. It was taken on March 5, 1936. December 5, 1936 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you and glad Daddy is feeling better. We sure have been having lovely weather - not a sign of rain since Melvin was here. A little cloudy today though - may rain tonight. Well, I am still working every day. I do not know how much longer though. May last until the first of February if I have good luck. I can get another job all right; that isn't worrying me. But I won't get as good for a long time. I sure hate to see it quit. I am afraid that Letha and Gerald will have more kids than she can count before long if they are not careful. How many is that for them now? I have not heard from Melvin or Glen Holfelt either. Pat is building him a new house, a small one; says he can pay for it with the money he is paying rent with. Well, write soon and tell me all the news. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale January 1, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, I will try and see if I cannot get your letter answered now the holidays are over. Sure hope you have had a very Merry Christmas. I spent mine in San Francisco, California. I only had one day off so I drove down through Stockton to Oakland Thursday night. I ate supper and got a shave, then went to a show I wanted to see. Then went over to San Francisco. I was just driving off the new bridge at 9:30 the next morning. I drove all over the city; went out to the beach; then through the zoo; and the Golden Gate Park. I saw the new Golden Gate Bridge too. It isn't quite finished yet. Then I went out and took a look at the ship that wrecked in the fog a while back. You can walk within 100 yards of it. I guess they will just leave it there. It is piled up on the rocks pretty bad. Coming back, I went through Vallejo and Sacramento. Vallejo is where Bert Holmes and his wife live. I didn't stop because they were in Jackson for Christmas. The new Bay Bridge is sure pretty at night - yellow fog lights all the way over. It is 6 lanes wide - 3 cars can travel both ways - then it has another road underneath for trucks, buses, etc. Sure is high - the ships go under it. We had a very nice day for Christmas. Though we had lots of rain before and after - lots of snow in the mountains. Pat is building his new house at Pine Grove - 9 miles East of Jackson. They had 9 inches of snow there yesterday and rain here. He has his house just about finished now. I got a letter from Melvin a while back and another one from Glen Holfelt. Melvin says he is going to come down here next spring. Wants to know if we could not start painting together but I don't think I want any more partners in business. No telling where I will be by that time - by next spring - may be home. I will be lucky if I hold my job another 30 days. They laid off some more men yesterday. There isn't many of us left now. Well, write soon and tell me all the news and take care of yourselves. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale January 16, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you but sorry to hear Daddy hasn't been feeling so well lately. Hope he is better by now. Yes, I got your present O.K. - Sure was nice. I forgot Ethel this Christmas - didn't know her address. I haven't heard from Letha and Gerald yet. Hope they are all getting along all right. I don't think that I will be going anywhere this winter. I just got a better job and received a raise in wages of 50 cents on the 10 Jan. - $5.00 a day now - so I guess they are going to keep me working as long as the mine runs anyway. Pat quit the mine the other day; got in a fight with one of the bosses and quit after he had give the boss a good trimming which he deserved. Pat has gone up to Grass Valley now to look for work - to get another job. We have sure been having plenty of rain and cold weather lately. Been 18 above zero - the coldest I ever saw it here. We haven't had near as much rain this year as we had last year at this time but there was 2 inches of snow once but didn't last long. Soon melted off. Well, I can't think of much to write. I haven't hardly been away from the place since I wrote you last so will close for this time. Take care of yourselves. Write soon. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale February 4, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you. We have sure been having some stormy weather here lately. It has been raining all day today and don't look like it is going to stop. We have quite a flood in the creek back of the house that goes right through Jackson town. It is higher than it has been this year but not so high as it was last year - just would go under the bridge in town last year. Sorry to hear of Douglas Giles losing his job by the store burning down; right now in the middle of the winter for him. Pat has been out of work for a month now. His wife was awful sick for about a week and Pat had a touch of flu too. They have both moved up to Grass Valley now. Pat thinks he can get work there. About 5 feet of snow on the level at one mine he went to just out of Grass Valley a couple of miles. Haven't heard from him for a few days now. Don't know whether he has got a job yet or not. We have been getting lots of snow in the mountains. The deer are all starving in bunches of 50 to 150. They have been trying to clear the roads to get hay up to the deer but it just keeps snowing and the snow gets deeper. It is 4 feet deep just 20 miles above Jackson. So there must be plenty away up higher. I have been doing a lot of reading the stormy weather - nothing else to do. I bought 6 books of Zane Gray stories. I will send them to you in a few days. Well, this is the last piece of writing paper I have, so will close. Take care of yourselves and write soon. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale February 27, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, I will try and see if I cannot get your letter answered. I have been going to write for the last week but can't make up my mind to set down and write letters. I got a letter from glen Holfelt about Christmas time and I haven't answered it yet. And I owe Pat and his wife a letter too but I think I will drive up and see them next Saturday - my long change. I am working three shifts now; get off work next Saturday at 2:30 P.M. and don't have to be back to work until 10:30 Sunday night - graveyard shift. We sure have been having nice weather till the last few days. Looks like it will rain again tonight. Sorry to hear Daddy has not been feeling so well. Hope he is better by now. I sent those books the other day. Hope you got them all right. Sure glad you have got you a typewriter and like it so well. You have been wanting one long enough. There has sure been a lot of flu around here this winter. Several people have died. One man from the mine died. I have never even had a cold. Sure been feeling fine. I have even quit smoking - what do you think about that? (Lovenia said "But it didn't last long.") I went down to Sacramento yesterday. Didn't see anyone I knew though so didn't stay long. The grain fields down in the valley are green - the grain is up 6 or 8 inches. Things are starting to grow now. The last two weeks of sunshine has sure turned everything green. It has been so cold and stormy all winter that the grass couldn't get started any sooner. Mr. Green is building him another chicken coop - going to get a bunch of small chicks in a few days. He has got 60 old ones now and has been getting 30 and 40 eggs a day all winter. They even laid while they were molding. Well, I can't think of any more to write about so will close. Hope you are both feeling well and getting along all right. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale April 10, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you and learn you are both better. Hope you stay feeling better. We sure have been having spring weather. Everything is sure pretty now. The fruit trees have all been in blossom for a couple of weeks and the wild flowers are starting to bloom. I haven't seen any California poppies out yet. I am still working every day. Haven't had a day off since Christmas Day but I do not know how much longer it will last. I received your card and the present for my birthday. Sure was pretty. What are Melvin and May going to do this spring? Are they still figuring on moving down to California this spring? Pat quit the mine in Grass Valley where he was working and is now working with a bunch of men on a big canal up in the hills. He is getting $4.00 a day. That is better than working in the mine for $5.00 a day. Well, I will close for this time. Take care of yourselves and write soon and tell me all the news. Is there any work of any kind there now? (Sent $10.00) As Ever, Avondale April 27, 1937 Dear Daddy and Mother, Sure glad to hear from you and learn you were still getting along all right. I am still working every day and it is getting tiresome. I have only had three days off since last 4th July and I guess the next 4th July will be my next day off. I have been in hope of getting a lay off. When I started working here there were 200 men working; now there are less than 40 men working. There was three of us skip tenders; one for each 8 hours of the day. One of them broke his heel the other day so that just leaves two of us now. And he will be in the hospital for 4 or 5 months so I guess I will have to quit in order to take a vacation. I made over $1,600.00 in 1936. The more I make, the less I have it seems like. If I do come home this summer, it will be two months yet before I come. And if there is no work there, I won't stay only a month or so. I guess Melvin has decided not to leave Roosevelt, hasn't he? This is a bad time to be moving around. Too many strikes going on at different places. We are having winter again here now. It has been raining steady for two days and don't look like it will ever stop. Fishing season opens on the 1 May. I would sure like to go. Pat and his brother-in-law are going for 3 or 4 days. I guess Pat will be a Pappy next fall sometime. They are expecting a family. No, Pat will not have work much longer maybe another month. Then he will be out of a job again. But he has his own house so that helps some; no rent to pay. Well, I can't think of any more to write about so will close. Take good care of yourselves and write soon and tell me all the news. (Sent $15.00) With Love, Avondale May 11, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear you are still getting along all right. I have finely made up my mind to quit my job here unless they raise my wages by the first of July. They have me working two weeks day shift then two weeks graveyard shift. Now I do not like it at all. All the white men have quit now and gone where the pay is better. The graveyard shift, I work 10:30 P.M. at night until 6:30 in the morning. Then I try to sleep in the daytime and that is a hard thing to do in the summer time. So I will be home the first part of July. I have bought me another car since Melvin was here last fall. Not a new one but a nice car. I had to pay $300.00 and my old car for it since January. So that is why I haven't enough money to quit my job now. I only have $75.00 left to pay on it then I don't care. Jobs are not hard to find now days. Pat has him a good steady job now starting today, May 11, 1937. Just out of town 8 or 10 miles from Jackson - $120.00 a month and a nice house to live in with water and lights. And after the first year, he gets more than $150.00 a month, his house, water and lights go with the job. All he has to do is walk along a canal bank for 2 1/2 miles and back home again every day except Wednesday. He has ever Wednesday off but he can't leave any other day. No, the folks do not know where Claude Holmes lives. He never writes to them. Bert and wife was up the other day; stayed over night. Then went back to their home at Vallejo, California. He has been working in the shipyards down there. I went fishing on the 1 May and sprained my big toe before I got back to the creek. So I caught two fish and came home. It is all right now. Think I will go try it again Sunday. I work day shift until Saturday then go on graveyard Sunday night again. So will have all day Sunday. Well I will have to close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourselves. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale June 3, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you but sorry to hear Daddy isn't feeling so well. I am still getting along just the same. It is getting awful tiresome though. I will sure be glad when I can quit. You will have to send me the name of number of your washer before I can see about a wringer for your washer. We are sure having some hot weather. It is almost too hot to sleep days now or nights either. Mr. Green is not feeling so well this spring. He has hay fever so bad and this hot weather too has just about got him down. I never broke my big toe the last time I went fishing but I never caught any fish either. We was to early where we went. The snow was 5 or 6 feet deep along the banks of the creek. Mrs. Green has got two babies to take care of now. One about 2 1/2 years and the other one about 3 months old. She sure has her hands full trying to do a little laundering too. Ruth Green graduates tomorrow night. She is going to try and find a job for the summer and go to college next winter. Well, I guess I will only be writing about one more letter before I come home. I am planning on quitting July 10; then go fishing for a few days. Ought to be home about the 20 July so will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourselves. With Love, Avondale June 22, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to get your letter but sorry to hear that Daddy hasn't been feeling well. I have been trying to decide whether I should quit my job and come home or not. If I should, I would be out of a job and not have a cent coming in to help with at all. And I don't know what good I could do there to help. My job is safe for another year anyhow and I can at least send you a few $ once in a while. I get my $5.00 a day, 7 days a week, whether I do any work or not. It's the best job I will ever have. Just like a pension. What do you think? We have sure been having some funny summer weather this year; cool and cloudy one day and hot the next. We had about 24 hours rain the other day. June should be one of the hottest months down here. Pat and wife sure like their job. They are expecting a baby about October some time. Mr. Green is working at Silver Lake for a few days and Ruth Green is through school and has a job in an ice cream parlor. I have not been to Stockton lately. Will try and go down next week and see about a wringer for your washer. Well, tonight is the big fight. The first Championship fight in two years. [Heavy weight boxing championship - Joe Louis wins?] I was in the C.C.C. Camps the last fight. I will try and get this letter mailed before it starts as I did not want to miss it. So will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourselves. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale July 13, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you and glad to hear that Daddy was a lot better. We sure have been having some hot weather lately. I am working night shift and it was 106 one day while I was trying to sleep in the day time. So did not get much sleep. I went down to Stockton Saturday to see about that wringer for your washer. Found it will cost about half as much as a new washing machine. If you can get by until I come home, I will get you anew washer. I think I will stick with my job for another winter and be home early next spring. I can have a little to show for my two years of work by then. Pat has not been feeling any to well the last few days. His appendix has been bothering him. I don't know whether he will have an operation or not. His wife has not been feeling so well lately either. It is a good thing he has a steady job and doesn't have to do any hard work. Ruth Green is working now here in Jackson; has a job in the paper office in Jackson. She is planning on going back to school again next winter. Rich Green and wife came down from Grass Valley last night. He has quit his job up there. I do not know what he is going to do now. Well, it is about time to go to work so will close. Take care of yourselves and write soon. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale July 31, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you and glad to hear that Daddy is feeling so much better. Pat is feeling fine again. Never had to have an operation. Well, I didn't do much celebration on the 4th July, the first day I have had off since Christmas. They don't do much here on the 4th July. I went up and stayed with Pat and wife. They couldn't get away. There is a big gold rush celebration in Sutter Creek on the 14-15 of August. They are going to have quite a big time, I guess. I went over to Carson City and Reno, Nevada with a friend Monday after work. Didn't get back till almost the next morning. Reno is sure a lively place. We were in a gambling house that has over 200 people working there every day. It was sure some place. You can't imagine the money they take in there. Their hired help get paid $5.00 or $6.00 a day. I am working day shift now until the 21 August. Maybe it will be some cooler by then when I have to go on graveyard shift again. I have been fishing quite a bit lately in the evenings. I have caught some very nice ones too. Pat is getting quite a menagerie up at his place. He has a few pheasants, ducks, pigeons, rabbits, dogs, cats, canaries, and pigs. He is going to get some chickens and a cow now. The wild deer get into his garden almost every night. No, I am not getting sweet on Ruth Green not too sweet anyway. She is a nice girl though. She is a year older than Emma, 18 now. She is working 5 days a week for the Jackson paper. Well, I can't think of any more to write so will close for this time and try to write sooner next time. Take care of yourselves and write soon and tell me all the news. (Sent $15.00) With Love, Avondale August 13, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you and glad to hear you are getting along all right. We have sure been having some hot weather here lately. Been 105 and 106. I sure hope it has cooled off some before the 21 Aug. when I have to try and do my sleeping in the daytime. Saturday and Sunday is the Big Gold Rush Days Celebration in Sutter Creek. I think I will get Sunday off work as everyone else is going to be off work - that will make two days in 1937 so far that I haven't worked. I can't decide whether to go to the celebration or go up in the mountains fishing. Ruth has almost decided to go to Los Angeles to college this winter. She isn't sure yet. Well, Pat will be Daddy before long and he is sure proud of the fact. He has always been crazy about babies. Well, I can't think of any more to write, so will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourselves. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale September 3, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you and learn you are getting along all right. I wish I had been there for the celebration. I am still working every day but do not know whether my job will last all winter or not. There is more talk of the mine closing down. I don't know if it will or not yet. But I hope not. I would like to keep on working until next May. Then I could have a little money saved up. Well, dove season opens in the morning. And Deer season opens the morning of the 16 Sept. I sure hope I can get one or two this year as I didn't get to go hunting last year. There are quite a few around Pat's place. I think I could get one up there. School started here yesterday. Emma is going here and Ruth is going to go to Los Angeles, California. Well, I can't think of any more to write about this time so will close. Write soon and take care of yourselves. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale September 28, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, I have been going to write for some time but have been to busy hunting most of the time when I haven't been working. I have saw lots of does and fawns but no buck yet. We haven't had any rains yet but it sure looks and feels like it today. It is about time we had a little rain. Everything is so dry and dusty. I found an orchard the other day up in the hills where I was hunting. No road or trail to it at all. With fruit laying all over the ground, going to waste; apples, pears, grapes, plums, prunes, black walnuts, almond nuts, and peaches. I picked a big sack of almond nuts and brought them home. They are sure fine. I told Pat where it was so he could go get some of it. Ruth Green is keeping house part time for a family for $15.00 a month and her board and room and going to school in Los Angeles. Rich Green is living and working in Sutter Creek. Well, I can't think of anything more to write so will close. Write soon and take care of yourselves. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale October 18, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you but sorry to hear you haven't been feeling so well. Hope you are both better now. Well, deer season is over here and I didn't get one. I saw lots of does and fawns but no buck. Pat didn't get one either this year. I wish I was home now. I would try it again. Maybe I would have better luck. Ruth was home for the weekend Saturday and Sunday from Los Angeles. Says she was sure home sick for the first couple of weeks but likes it fine now. It looks like Pat and Edith's baby will be a Nov. baby if they don't hurry up. The doctor told her to be ready to go to the hospital anytime now. They gave a shower for her a while back. Sure got plenty of baby things enough for triplets. Well I have to go to work at 10:00 and it is 9:30 now so will close for this time. Take care of yourselves and write soon. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale October 28, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you. Sorry to hear of Daddy's sickness. Sure hope he is feeling better now. No, I didn't get a deer this year. Only had one day off to go hunting and didn't have any luck. Maybe I got to many last year - only 4 last year. Yes, I am still working at the same job for 12 months now- averaged about 1 Sunday a month off. I got a letter from Glen Holfelt the other day. He is in Salt Lake City. Says he is out of work now because of the strikes lately and wants to know how work is around here. I sure would like to see him once again. I haven't seen him for about 7 years now. We have been having a lot of grass fires lately. The sky is smoky all the time. Has burnt pretty close to several towns around here but none close to Jackson. Mr. Green has been having about more work than he can do lately – odd jobs – 3 or 4 days work each. He has gone to Sacramento now to help a man build brick chimneys for a few days. Well, I will close for this time - 5:30 comes awful early every morning. Take good care of yourselves and write soon. (Sent $15.00) With Love, Avondale Avondale was sending the money home in green backs. His next letter never reached Lovenia. There was $10.00 in it. She said, "... but somebody got away with that one letter and the money it had in it. Never did know anything about who would do a thing like that. But some people will even steal from the U.S. Mail." Jackson, California December 1, 1937 Dear Mother and Daddy, I haven't heard from you for so long, I thought I had better write and see what was the matter. Whether you were feeling well or what was the matter or hadn't received my last letter. I wrote about the first week in November and haven't heard from you yet. Everybody is feeling fine here. Pat and Edith's baby is more than a month old now and getting along just fine. We sure have been having fine weather but had lots of rain a while back. The coldest weather we have had is 39 above zero. If it doesn't get any colder than that, it will be fine. There are sure a lot of pretty red berries this fall in the mountains. I will pick some and send to you. I think I will go down to Sacramento Saturday and buy me a new suit for my Christmas. What would you like me to send to you? Write soon and let me know how you are and if you received that last letter. There was $10.00 in it for you. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale Avondale sent his mother some lovely holly berries and a bathrobe for Christmas. The bathrobe was blue quilted silk that she really appreciated on cold mornings. She didn't know how she could get a long without it. January 14, 1938 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you and learn that you are getting along all right. Glad that you got your teeth out all right so now you might feel better. I am going to have some more work done on my teeth as soon as I can. It has been two years now since I had anything done to my teeth and several are getting bad again. I will try and see if I cannot get a letter wrote to you now the holidays are over. I got your package all right. It was sure nice but I never received a card from anyone - only you. Hope you like the bathrobe. I got quite a few presents from the folks around here. A nice shaving set, socks, handkerchiefs, a new razor, two boxes of stationary, and two ties. Pat was operated on for appendicitis Jan. 5, 1938. He is coming home today from the hospital. It had been bothering him for quite a while but hadn't got real bad. Will cost about $300.00. We have sure been having nice weather this winter - about 30 above has been the coldest - mostly 35 and 40 above. There are only about 8 inches of snow in the mountains yet. There was about 8 feet last year at this time. There will have to be some storms before long or it will sure be very dry next year. Yes, I will be home about the first part of May but don't know for how long I will stay if there is no work for me to do unless I work for $1.00 a day for Clarence Baum again and not get half of that time. Did he ever pay you that last few $ that he was owing? Well, I will have to quit for this time. Hope you stay well and get along all right. Write soon. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale January 29, 1938 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you. Hope that you are getting along all right. That you are feeling better by now and that Daddy is better too. Well, Pat went back to work at his job last Tuesday. He was in the hospital 10 days and off his job just three weeks. 21 days is awful quick to be back working but he hasn't anything much to do - no heavy lifting. He drew $25.00 a week all the time he was layed off. Well, we have sure been having a fine winter this year. Just like spring most all the time. But it rained all day yesterday. A warm rain - 40 above. They have to go almost 30 miles up in the hills to find enough snow for their sports this year. I will be going down to Sacramento again after the first of Feb. sometime. I will try to find Ruel Rigby. You better keep what money you can get a hold of for your own use. I will try and give him some when I see him. Well, I can't think of any more to write this time so will close. Take good care of yourselves. (Sent $15.00) With Love, Avondale February 15, 1938 Dear Mother and Daddy, Sure glad to hear from you. We have sure been having some storms here. Rained every day for about 20 days. I have almost forgotten what the sun looks like. The wind blew terrible hard for a day or so. They say it was not a hurricane but there are sure a lot of buildings and trees blown over - blowed a garage down and the roof and big whistle off the engine room at the mine. But never done any damage to the house here. The snow in the mountains has broken all records. It is more than 20 feet deep now in some of the places. I did not get to see Ruel Rigby. The lady at 1716 Q St. said that he had been gone a long time and she didn't know where he had gone. Everyone here is well. Hope you are the same. I am still working in the mine. What is Gerald going to do in Duchesne? Are they still there? Is Melvin still working in the mine? Mrs. Green got word that her brother was killed in the mine there. How did it happen? Wondered if you knew, as they didn't say. Well I will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourselves. (Sent $10.00) With Love, Avondale Lovenia said that the reason Avondale didn't find Ruel Rigby was that he was living in Placerville. It was during all that rainy weather and he took sick. He was never really well the rest of his life. Gerald and Letha had moved back to Duchesne. The following letter Lovenia had written and sent to Jackson, California dated Feb. 21st. But Avondale had left there by the time the letter arrived. There was a fire broke out in the mine and they had to close it down to put the fire out. It took about two weeks to put it out so Avondale left. He drove down through California, to Las Vegas, saw the Boulder Dam and on back to Utah, coming up through Sanpete Valley and was in Duchesne before his mother knew he had left Jackson. Duchesne, Utah February 21, 1938 Dear Son, Sure glad to hear from you again and learn that you was O.K. Had wondered if the awful storm had been bad enough to stop the work in the mine with floods or something. Glad that all was as well with you there in Jackson as it was; with no more damage done. You was out of the worst though. The lower valleys and the higher places got the worst of the storm. I would think that hard of a wind would be called a hurricane - something new for those parts - to have very much wind. We have been having a few snow storms and a little colder weather while the those parts and other parts of the country was having such bad storms. Floods and all kind of weather and troubles. It has not been zero weather here yet this year. The snow that came melted about as fast as it fell until the ground was never covered. Looks like we are living in about the best part of the U.S.A. Today it is just like spring and the plants are starting to grow before this last stormy spell. We surely will not be having much very cold weather this late in the spring. I sent an account of Roy Cambell's death to you. I heard it over the radio and have saw it in the papers - 4 different places - all spelled Cambell so did not think about it being Mrs. Green's brother until Letha and Gerald went over to Roosevelt to see the folks there the Sunday he was buried. And they told her it was Mrs. Green's brother. They sent word to Claude but he didn't come. You know I thought their name was Camel not Cambell so did not think about it being their relation. When I first heard about it over the radio, I thought it was in the mine that Melvin was working in until the next morning when the paper cam and saw differently so was quite relieved to know different. Although it was bad for the ones that it had happened to. They said that the two older boys was both married but all was living to their father's home in the same part of town that S.W. Mower is living as he said they was neighbors of his. But Mary was not well so they did not go to the funeral. Yes, Melvin is still working in the same mine as ever and by the way, they have another baby boy, born on Abraham Lincoln's birthday - 12 Feb. 1938. They named him Charles Richard. They was getting along all right when Letha was over there. May's mother was there taken care of them. That makes 5 children they have got. The same as I had - three boys and two girls - making 15 grandchildren I have now. Gerald is trying to do some freighting into Salt Lake City. He is gathering up old iron and copper to sell in the city. He is making a trip out this week then he has his saw but has not sawed very much wood this winter. They are living mostly on the Social Security money he receives every week from the work he did last year. He gets about $10.00 a week and if he makes a few dollars a week, it is deducted from that so he would not get so much that week. He will be getting that for 16 weeks so the winter will be over by that time. He wants to do some gardening - raise what they need to eat. I expect that he will help me a lot with my garden spot this summer. Raise their potatoes and some things for both of us so that I will not have so much to do. I was not able to keep the weeds down last summer and can not say that I will be any abler to do as much next summer. Will have to be more free to do the work and feel better than I have this winter if I am able to even take care of my flowers and keep the weeds out of them. It looks like I will have to have Daddy took outside to the mental hospital. Douglas does not intend to do anything about helping me take care of him. So there is nothing else for me to do as it is getting more than I can stand. More than I am able to do alone and try to do anything else. He needs to have a man around to wait on him. Most all the time he resents me having to do for him; so makes it hard for me to do anything for him. He does not want to have to depend on some woman (and that is all I am to him any more) to help him and he is not able to for himself, to dress or undress, button his suspenders or unbutton them without my help every time he goes out to the toilet or things like that. Monroe Giles and wife was down for the first time since he has got like he is. They said if Douglas was not going to do anything about helping me take care of him, they said I ought to load him into a car and take him into Heber City and let them have a turn at what I was having so they would understand what I was having to go through. Then they would be glad to have him sent to the State Mental where they are prepared to take care of people that are unable to care for themselves. But they would take his old age pension to help care for him with so that I would not have that to help pay expenses with but if I was alone, would not take so very much for just me. So do not know what to do. I am sure in need of some change or I will be giving out on the job before he doesn't. Then someone would have to take over the job. But looks like as long as I am able at all, I can just keep on staying here and waiting on him like a little baby. Well, I will have to stop for this time or I never will get this letter finished and off on the mail. Sure hope that you continue to get along all right and nothing happens to you. Was that fire there anywhere close to where you was working in the mines close by? I heard about it over the radio about a fire in the mines at Jackson, California. With Love, Mother Avondale arrived home at Duchesne about the first of March. Letha was at her mother's doing her washing. The house was full of tubs and dirty clothes so Avondale didn't bring in his things out of the car. He only stayed about 4 days and then left again. Lovenia thinks that he was very surprised to find his Daddy Giles like he was because he hadn't received the letter she had written about it. She asked Avondale what she should do about it but he always evaded her question and never did tell her what he thought. She got to wondering if it was because Daddy Giles recognized Avondale and was so pleased to have him around and seemed so much better when he was there. She wondered if Avondale thought she was exaggerating how bad it had been for her. He was always better when a man was around. Lovenia looked pretty bad without her teeth and Daddy Giles' mind was going so Avondale did not stay there long. Kellogg, Idaho March 8, 1938 Dear Mother, Just a line to let you know I am all right and still traveling looking for work. Thought I could find some work here but jobs are not so easy to find. Lots of mines around here but they are not hiring any men. I have been into Spokane, Washington twice and back to see men about jobs but no success yet. I am leaving for Seattle, Washington today. Will write when I get settled. Avondale He had arrived in Kellogg, Idaho March 7, 1938 and he left Duchesne on March 4th. She was surprised at the next letter and where it came from. Kennecott, Alaska April 20, 1938 Dear Mother, I am ashamed of myself for not writing sooner but I have been jumping around so much lately that I didn't know where I was going to stop and I don't know yet. I may be 500 miles from here when you get this letter. But I sure have had a lovely trip though. I sailed from Seattle on March 12 and stopped at every town on the coast of Alaska. It took us 5 days to get to Cordova. I was going on to Seward but changed my mind. I stopped over in Cordova 6 days then flew for 200 miles to get up here. They have to use skis on the planes here. There is no dry ground. They only have two seasons - July and winter. It has been snowing for the last three days. I have been working every since I arrived here for the Kennecott Copper Co. I am getting $5.50 a day and a chance to stay as long as I want to. Don't have to do much work here. They call it the old man's home. But I have to work hard to keep warm. The mine is on top of a mountain and you have to ride in a bucket up the side of the mountain on a tramway for 4 1/2 miles to get here and part of that is across two canyons. And you have to go down the same way. The nearest town is Cordova on the coast, 200 miles away. There are no roads here. The Company has a railroad but there is only about 3 months that it can be run. There is a glacier down in the valley where the tramway starts. It runs back into the hills almost 175 miles and is about that wide in places. I have a chance for another job for a big oil company guaranteed three months work at $6.50 a day and board. That is good wages but don't last long. I don't know whether I will take it or not. It won't start until about the first of May. If I take that job, I will be about 500 miles from here so I will write again when I find out what I am going to do. In the meantime, I am working every day and getting along fine. They sure feed good up here. The airplanes bring fresh groceries into the main camp three times a week when the weather permits. They are only charging $1.40 a day for board. There are lots of mountain sheep and goats around here but no moose. I am going hunting one of these days. Glad that I brought my gun along. There is no season on any game up here and you can fish any time of the year. There are lots of trout in the creek that comes from out of the glaciers but it is too far away. Well, I will close for this time and write again in a few days when I find out what I am going to do about another job or if I still stay here for the summer and work at this mine. It is a good place to work. (Sent $15.00) With Love Avondale May 16, 1938 Dear Mother, I will try and write to you a letter tonight. I put it off for so long now that I guess you think it is about time I was writing. It takes so long to get something done up here. I sent for a money order down to the main camp where the Post Office is on payday, the 10th, and I just got it tonight. So have been waiting to write for it. I have only been down off the mountain once since coming here two months ago now. I went down to the dentist and had my teeth fixed. They were not in as bad shape as I thought they were. Just one cavity and had my upper wisdom teeth pulled. Had them filled two years ago and they was bad aging now so had them pulled out. They only lasted me about 5 years all together. There is sure not much to do up here. Can't even go for a walk. The snow is so awful deep and it's going slow. It may be gone by the 4th July. The tram does not run only during working hours so can't use it to go any place in. I haven't saw a lady or an automobile since I came up here. I left my car in Seattle in storage. We have everything that we want - nice steam heated rooms, three hot meals a day and lunch in the evening if we want it, inside toilets and bathroom, card room, gymnasium, library, and plenty of white scenery. It never goes more than three days without snowing some more. This is sure a good place to work. The bosses never say a word whether you are doing enough work or not. No one ever gets fired; old miners that are to old to work anywhere else have a regular home here. People call it the old man's home. There is no place to go to spend any money so there is no reason why a fellow can't save money while working up here. I expect to have at least $1,000.00 one year from now if I can stick it out that long. Well, there is not news to write about up here so will close for this time. Write soon and tell me all the news. (Sent $20.00) With Love Avondale P.S. I decided not to take that other job. It would have lasted about three months and I would have to have been out in a lot of rain and mosquitoes. The days are sure getting long up here. Doesn't get clear dark until 11:00 P.M. at night and it is good and clear daylight at 2:00 A.M. in the morning. June 18, 1938 Dear Mother, Sure glad to hear from you but don't see why you should worry about me so much. I can take care of myself pretty well. I sent a card from Kellogg, Idaho, one from Seattle, and another one from Ketchikan, and then from Kennecott. But didn't know but what I would be leaving here any time. I received a letter from Emma Burns from Jackson. She said you had written there and was worrying about me. Sure glad to hear that you can start to enjoy life again and that Daddy is being taken care of. Glad to hear that you have your new teeth. Hope they are good. Who is going to pay the extra $10.00 for Daddy's care, you or Douglas? Looks like he could do a little something to help take care of his own father. When I have been doing so much all these years to help his father and you. I am sending you $25.00. Hope it is enough. If not let me know. I got one order before payday and the other one afterwards. I see that the time keeper forget to put Mrs. on the first one. Yes, I am wearing plenty of warm clothes. The upper levels in the mine is all frozen ground - never thaws out so you have to wear plenty of clothes. I wear heavy underwear and socks, two pair of pants, two heavy wool shirts and a coat. Of course, I take my coat off while I work. The bunk houses are all steam heated. You can regulate the heat to suit yourself. I am sure glad that I didn't go back to Jackson, California. I had a good job there and could have got it back again anytime but it was so hot and wet. I was getting rheumatism pretty bad. Another year there and I would maybe be crippled up for life; it hasn't bothered me for a couple of weeks now. Sure seems good. We have been having a fine summer weather up here; started snowing the night of the 6th June and hasn't stopped yet. I was in hopes the snow would be gone by the 4th of July but there is no chance now. I would like to get out and hike around a little once in a while but there is too much snow. Lots of new slides across the canyon. I happened to see a big one start and watched it pile up in the bottom of the canyon. It is awful dangerous to be walking though. Plenty of daylight - looks like it would go faster than it does. Hasn't been clear dark for a month now and the sun is only down about two hours then comes back up again. Sure is funny. Well, I can't think of any more to write about. The news we get up here is a week old or more except what we got over the radio and it won't work most of the time so will close for this time. Write soon and take good care of yourself. With Love, Avondale 20 July 1938 Dear Mother, Sure glad to hear from you again and learn you are feeling better and getting along all right. I and another fellow took a hike down into the valley on the 4th July. Caught a nice mess of fish, saw a bear (lots of bears in this country), then spent the rest of the day climbing back up again to the camp. Some 4th? The camp is 5,000 feet higher than the valley is so was some climb to get back up. There is no soil for anything to grow in except moss. The mountains are two high and steep - sure pretty down in the valley though. Rains down there when it snows up here. It has snowed three days straight, 5, 6, 7, July - 18 inches new snow. Looks more like January instead of July. No this is the only mine of the Kennecott Copper Corporation that didn't close down. It costs about 1/2 million dollars to open the railroad every summer. There is some talk of closing down about the last train out this fall. They are running short of ore and cannot find enough to run another whole year so looks like I will be going out to the States this fall sometime. I got another job on the 14th - the same kind of a job I had in the mines there at Jackson, California and an 80-cent raise in wages. It was sure a surprise to me. They transferred the other skip tender to one of the other shafts and gave me his job as I had had experience in California. I am getting $6.30 per day here and I only got $5.00 there at Jackson and this is 100% better place to work - cool and dry instead of hot and wet. Sure sorry to hear about Ruel Rigby being so poorly. That damp air in California must of not been good for him. I would never live close to the coast - too much fog and damp air. Sure glad to hear that your radio is working so good. Wish I had one up here but it wouldn't be much good. California stations is about all we can get and they are 4,000 miles away. Well, there is no news to write so will close. Write soon and take care of yourself. (Sent $20.00) With Love, Avondale Kennecott, Alaska August 16, 1938 Dear Mother, Sure glad to hear from you but sure sorry to hear of your grief. Sure seems terrible to think of Daddy Giles going but he is a hundred times better off after he has been sick so long and not able to do for himself. I am sending you $50.00. I guess it will come in mighty handy. It seems like it takes forever to get a money order up here. I am still working every day. Like my new job just fine. My next check will be about the biggest one I ever made in one month - $195.00 but I am afraid it will not last much longer; about two more months. We had a week of summer the first part of August and most everyone caught cold including myself but all are better now. It is snowing again all day today. I guess the sunshine doesn't agree with us up here so we all ought to be better again now winter has come again so soon. Well, there is no news to write about so will close for this time. Sure hope that you are making out all right. Take care of yourself and write soon. With lots of Love, Avondale Lovenia received the above letter while she was in the hospital in Roosevelt. Melvin had gone to Duchesne and brought her over to Roosevelt. She was "taken" sick while there and had to go to the hospital. Letha had written to Avondale to tell him about their Mother being so sick. Melvin put the $50.00 in the bank in Roosevelt for her. September 16, 1938 Dear Folks, I received your letter yesterday and was sure shocked to learn of Mother's sickness. I sure hope she is much better long before this reaches you. I am still working every day and expect to work until the 1 November or longer. Don't know just what I will do then. I will either have to go back to Seattle and get my car or sell it, which I have in storage there. I should have sold it before I came up here. I would have been money ahead but didn't know just where I was going or when I would be back again. This has sure been a terrible summer. Last winter's snow didn't quite all melt away - a few spots here and there and now everything is white again this morning. Been snowing again all day. I will sure be glad to get down off this mountain again. It will soon be six months that I have been up here now. Well, there is absolutely nothing to write about so will close. Sure hope that Mother is much better by now. Love, Avondale September 26, 1938 Dear Mother, I was certainly glad to hear from you again and learn you were better again. Letha's letter sort of scart me. I knew there was something wrong as soon as I received her letter. I sure hope you are much better and will be all right again now. I should have written last week so it could leave Cordova on Saturday's boat but I haven't been feeling so well myself for a while. Had another cold and sore throat. All right again now though. Still working every day. I sent you $30.00 in Letha's letter. Hope you got it all right. Well, I have about another 30 days to work here and then I will be out of a job again but will have $700.00 so I am not worrying any. Don't know just yet what I will do after I get to Seattle. I have a friend working Shelan, Washington. I may get work there. If not I will be home for Thanksgiving. I don't think I would worry about the mowing machine and harrow. They are not worth much. Hardly anything and I guess Jack Taylor needs them about as bad as anyone does. He did keep some cattle for us for a while so guess he should keep them for the feed the cattle had. Well, we have two feet of new snow here today. Sure looks like winter up here all right. No snow at all down in the valley - everything is green and nice yet down there. It will soon be six months since I came up here and there never has been a day that I couldn't look out of the window and see snow somewhere. I will sure be lad when October is gone. Everyone gets their fare paid back to Cordova when they close down. If it wasn't for that, I believe I would leave now instead of waiting another month. Well, I can't think of any more to write so will close. Sure hope you are well again by now. Write soon and take care of yourself. With Love, Avondale Lovenia said that she must have lost the next letter, which told about his coming back from Alaska. He said they tore all the mine fixtures out, engines, railroad and everything that could be moved was hauled down to Cordova by their railroad before winter set in. Avondale spent his last week or so helping them move and tear everything down before the snow got too deep. The men came out with the last load as far as the railroad went and then they had to take a ship to go the rest of the way back to Seattle. Avondale got his car in Seattle and was home in Duchesne the first part of November. He stayed there for a few weeks and then went back into California. When he returned from Alaska, he brought 7 - 100 dollar bills with him that he had saved over the $170.00 he had sent to his mother and his living expenses. He placed $400.00 of it in Postal Savings at the Post Office in Duchesne. He had $100.00 that he was going to give to Melvin for a loan on buying a house that was being sold in Roosevelt - but didn't buy. Avondale left Duchesne and went back to California and visited around for a couple of weeks and looked around for a job. Bishop, California December 15, 1938 Dear Mother, I have been having a swell time visiting all my old friends around Jackson. Haven't tried to find a job yet. Just came over here yesterday. I expect to get a job here in the next few days. The fellow that does the hiring promised to put me on as soon as there is an opening. They are paying $5.00 a day, eight days a week. They work 7 days a week and get time and a half for Saturday and Sunday because of the 44 hour a week law that was passed. It has been raining here all day today and snowing up in the hills. I guess there will be plenty of snow up at the mines this winter as it is 11,000 feet high. But it is a nice place to work - everything is heated with electricity - something like where I was working in Alaska. I sure hope you are feeling well and taking good care of yourself. How are all the folks? Write soon and tell me all the news. (Sent $10.00) Love, Avondale There was a lovely Christmas greeting card "To MY MOTHER", came with this letter. It said: "I wish that everyone might have a Mother just like you, So altogether Loveable, So Dear and Sweet, and True. I wish that on this Christmas Day, I could, some how Express, My Love for you, and show you how I wish you Happiness. Avondale Bear Valley, California January 11, 1939 Dear Mother, I received your letter of December 30, 1938 all right. Sure glad to hear from you. I suppose your other letter is in Jackson. I haven't received it yet. I only stayed in Jackson about a week; then went over to Bishop. Stayed there about two weeks but couldn't get work and it cost too much to live there. Most of the mines there had closed down for the winter. So I came back over here. It is about 100 miles South of Jackson. I am not working yet but have hope of going to work very soon. I spent a very quiet Christmas and New Years among strangers. So not much to do to pass time. Tell Letha and Gerald thanks for the Christmas Card. I sent you a nice brown dress from Jackson that was bought at Stockton, California. I hope you received it all right. You didn't say in the letter I got. Sure hope it was the right size and color - was plenty big. Sure sorry to hear that Melvin isn't getting much work now. I still have my $400.00 in the Post Office there in Duchesne. I guess I could let him have $100.00 of it if he cannot get it anywhere else. I didn't want to draw it out if I could help it. Wanted to leave it there for hard times. Let me know how he makes out and how is Letha and Gerald getting along? Sure having lovely weather here. The grass is sure growing pretty and green everywhere for this time of year. Not much rain yet this winter but plenty of time yet for it this winter before spring comes. I am trying to get a job at three different places here. I am sure of one of them but they won't be ready for another 15 days. They are putting in a new mill. I hope to get work at one of the other places before that. Everyone is well and getting along all right in Jackson when I was there. I could of went back to my old job there at the Kennedy Mine. They have never put anyone else in my place at my old job since the fire they had about a year ago. But I don't want to work there if I can help it. It is too deep and wet. It is down 5,700 feet now. No, I haven't had anything done to my tonsils and adenoids yet. I want to get back to work again first. Well, I can't think of any more to write so will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourself. (Sent $15.00) With Love, Avondale Bear Valley February 8, 1939 Dear Mother, I will try and answer your letter but I do not know what I am going to write about. This is sure a dead place. Bear Valley only has a population of about 100 - mostly all single men - working in the mines. Very few families here. Merced is the nearest large town. It is 50 miles west, down in the valley. Maripona is only 12 miles - has a population of about 500. I do go over there to a show about twice a week. That is about all there is to do for pass time. I am still out of work but haven't given up hope yet. This is a bad time of year to be out of a job. I have signed up for the State Unemployment Insurance here. But it will be a couple of weeks yet before I can get any of it. I have made quite a bit of money in the State of California and have been paying into it so I should get some of it back again now that I am unable to find work. I received your letter that you sent to me at Jackson all right; also May and Melvin's card and the letter from Alaska. I have been going to go over to Jackson and stay for a few days for pass time but the weather has been so sloppy and wet lately. So thought I better wait until it cleared up again. Snowed about 4 inches last night and looks quite stormy today. How is Melvin and May getting along now? Hope Melvin has more work to do now than when you wrote about them last time. How does Letha and Gerald like the house they moved into for the winter? Hope it is better than the other one was and how are they getting along? Well, I will have to close for this time. It is about time for my supper. I am paying $35.00 per month for board and room. The meals are sure fine - family style - a certain time each day for each meal. Take good care of yourself and write soon and tell me all the news. (Sent $10.00.) With Love, Avondale March 5, 1939 Dear Mother, I will try and answer your letter today as it is Sunday and I don't have to work today. Yes, I finely got a job here in the mine at $5.20 per day. I do not like the work so well but I guess it will have to do for a couple of months anyway till something else turns up. I wrote to the Kennecott Copper Corp. in New York about going down to South America - about working for them down there but they haven't answered me yet. So don't know whether I will get to go or not. There has been quite a bit of trouble down that way. Their President was killed the other day and then that big earthquake shook things up a lot. I sold the car I had while in Jackson so if I should decide to go anywhere, I won't have to bother with selling it when spring comes. I have another old wreck to run around in. I got it and $300.00 for my Ford. The Ford was getting in bad shape. Would have cost me $125.00 to have it fixed up again and I can get another one in better shape than it was for $350.00. So I didn't do so bad. I am sending you $10.00. Let me know if you get it all right. I signed up for the California Unemployment Insurance and the second week they sent me word from Sacramento, California that I could get $132.00 at $15.00 per week and the day before I was to go sign up for my first week of $15.00, I got a job. So had to go to work instead. I have put quite a bit of money into that here in California besides my Social Security. I don't suppose I will get another chance to get any of it back again. I should of signed up for it as soon as I got back here into California again. But thought I could find work a lot sooner than I did. We are sure having wonderful weather here. Hardly any storms this winter. I saw some Almond Nut trees all blossomed out the last day of February. So I guess spring is here. Well, I will close for this time. Take care of yourself and write soon. With Lots of Love, Avondale March 26, 1939 Dear Mother, I received your most welcome letter a few days ago and was sure glad to hear from you and learn that you was feeling all right and getting along O.K. even if you can't get any money from Clarence Baum. I am sending you $20.00. Guess it will come in quite handy. I suppose we will have to take Baum into court yet if he doesn't pay up soon. I don't know yet just what I will do this summer. I don't know whether I want to go to South America or not. I am going to stay here though until about the first of May. I don't like my job here but it is better than nothing until then. There is a new mining company starting up in Bishop. They worked all last summer building a tramline and rails, etc. but didn't get any buildings built. So shut down for the winter last winter. It is away up high in the mountains close to Mt. Whitney and will be something like where I worked in Alaska. There is a fellow here that worked there and he's going back as soon as some of the snow up there in the mountains goes. I think maybe I will go with him. He says it is a fine outfit to work for and they pay $5.00 per day and board. That is as good as $6.00 a day anywhere else. If I get a good job there, I could work steady for years - maybe that would be better than chasing around or going to South America. If I decide to go there, I will come home for a visit first. Well, I cannot think of anymore to write except that it has been raining for the last 24 hours. Sure doing a lot of good for the farmers. Write soon and tell me all the news and take good care of yourself. And tell the folks hello for me. With Lots of Love, Avondale Bear Valley April 23, 1939 Dear Mother, Sure glad to hear from you and learn you are getting along all right. I am still working every day and getting along fine. I took a trip last Saturday and Sunday and went up to the Yosemite Park with some friends from Jackson who was over to see me. We sure had a swell time. It is sure pretty up there. Lots of high water falls and big trees. They have the road built through one that is 26 feet through it. We stopped the car in it and took a lot of pictures. Sure hope they turn out good. I am sending you $25.00. Guess you can use it all right. How are Letha and Gerald and Melvin and May getting along? All right, I hope. We have been having some hot weather here lately - been 90 several times. A little cooler today though. Sure is pretty here now. Wild flowers everywhere. Well, I can't think of any more to write so will close for this time. Write soon and be sure and take care of yourself. Love, Avondale Lovenia received a lovely Mother's Day card from Avondale for Mother's Day in May that read: With Love to the Dearest of Mothers, MY OWN, MOTHER O MINE, Avondale. May 12, 1939 Dear Mother, I received your welcome letter O.K. and was sure glad to learn you were getting along all right and feeling better. I have been over to Jackson for the last 8 days visiting old friends and having a grand time. I had to go over and sign some papers and things about selling my Ford I sold last fall. Have it all settled now - paid in full. And I am leaving here in the morning so don't write until you hear from me again. It is a little too early for that work in Bishop so I am going up into Oregon for a week or so and see if I can get work in some sawmill or box factory. That is what I started to do last spring but went up into Alaska instead. I would like to get out of working the mines if possible but if I cannot find the kind of work I want, I will come back and go over to Bishop. So don't write till you hear from me again and please don't worry about me. I am sending you $20.00. With lots of Love, Avondale Bishop, California May 25, 1939 Dear Mother, I will see if I can get a letter written to you today as I have nothing else to do and that is about the only time I can make up my mind to write. Yes, I am back in Bishop again. I don't know how long I will stay here. But I am trying to get a job here. There will be lots of work here this summer but it is a little early yet. Quite a bit of snow up high in the mountains yet. And they are slow getting started but I think that I will get me another job soon. Sure hope you are getting along all right. I have had quite a trip since I wrote last time. I went back over to Jackson, then to San Francisco, and stayed for two days. A girl friend of mine was in an accident and got both legs broke and one arm almost cut off. She is in the hospital there. She is getting along all right; just fine now. The car she was riding in ran into a big truck. From there I went up the Redwood Highway into Oregon and seen a fellow I knew at Klamath Falls, Oregon. He is working at a big sawmill there. I could have got a job there but I would have to wait until my turn came. Maybe anywhere from two months to six months. He was three months getting on his job and $100.00 per month is the best most of them make. So I came back here to Bishop. If I get the job I am trying to get, I will make $35.00 a week and my board but I do not know yet. How are all the folks getting along? All right I hope. Do you know where Truman Mitchell is now? Is he on the farm with the other boys? He was going to go to South America with me this spring but he hasn't written to me for a couple of months. Was wondering if he was still around Duchesne. Well, I want to see a man this evening before it gets to late so will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourself. (Sent $15.00) Lots of Love, Avondale Greenville, California June 16, 1939 Dear Mother, I received your letter all right and was sure glad to learn you were getting along all right and was having a trip yourself; and getting to see some of the folks. Hope you had a nice trip. It seems like that is about all I have been doing lately is travel. I have been all over California and part of Oregon and part of Nevada looking for work. And I am still out of a job. I am getting along fine though; seeing a lot of pretty country and it isn't costing but a very little either. I have been getting $15.00 a week unemployment Compensation since I first came to Bishop. And I have a lot more coming to me. I can get $132.00 all together from California. Then about $250.00 from the money that I made while in Alaska last summer. So I am in no hurry to start to work again. I would like to find a good job while I am at it and not work in mines for a while anyway. There are lots of sawmills here but they want experienced men so I don't know. I have half a promise of a job next week but nothing certain. I am getting pretty tired of doing nothing so if I don't get this job, I may go south a ways and russell myself a job in another mine. I can draw this unemployment Compensation this winter if I should happen to be out of work. No, I don't think Emma will be getting married for a while yet anyway. The boy she is going with hasn't a penny to his name and no job. She gets some funny ideas; that is the third fellow she was going to marry in the last year that I know about. Mrs. Green don't like him at all. Well, I can't think of any more to write so will close. Write soon. I always leave a forwarding address so I get my mail all right. Your letters follow me all over the country about 6 counties but I get it all right. I may still be here. I don't know yet. This is an awful pretty country. I am sending you $15.00. Hope you get it O.K. Write soon. Lots of Love, Avondale Berry Creek, California July 11, 1939 Dear Mother, I will try and answer your most welcome letter today so I can mail it when I go to town tomorrow. I am working again and don't have much time to go anywhere. I got tired of running around so went to work in another mine. I couldn't find anything else to do. I have a pretty good job though but it doesn't pay much. Just $4.50 per day and $1.25 a day for board and room out of that. It is a nice job for the summer up in the mountains 50 miles from Oroville. And it is about 5,000 feet elevation. Lots of fish in the creeks here as no one comes in here much to fish. The nearest town is Quincy, 30 miles one way and Berry Creek, 30 miles the other way - all rough mountain roads. So I don't go to town very often. I guess I can stick it out until fall. Work is so scarce that a fellow is lucky to have a job at all. Sure glad to hear you had a nice trip and saw most of the folks. How is Melvin and May getting along now? Hope he is getting a little work. Too bad he couldn't get any unemployment Compensation. I got $75.00 all together - 5 checks. But I would rather work in the mine during the summer and draw that in the wintertime if I have to. I may come home this winter when the snow gets deep up here. It doesn't matter where a person is to draw the compensation but you have to draw what you have coming in the state you are living in first before any other state. How are Letha and Gerald getting along? All right I hope. Duchesne won't be much but service stations before long if they keep on building more each year. No, I don't believe that I would sell the poles and fencing off from the ranch. It would make the place worth a whole lot less and you couldn't get anything for that stuff either. Sure hope your cold is better by now. I have been feeling well enough but awful lonesome this spring for some reason or other. Among strangers all the time and it seems like I pick the most isolated places there is to work in. If there was any work at all around Duchesne, I believe I would come home. Well, it is about time for me to go to work so will close for this time. I am working at night from 7 P.M. until 3:30 A.M. Write soon and tell me all the news and take care of yourself. With lots of Love, Avondale Address: Mr. A. Mower, Berry Creek, California % Robinson Mine (sent $25.00) August 22, 1939 Dear Mother, I will try and answer your letter I received on the 20 August and see if I cannot write a little more this time than I did last time. We sure get our mail quick for being such of an out-of-the-way place. I see your letter was post marked on the 18 August and I received it on the 20th. They have a truck driver here that comes up from Oroville every two days and brings our groceries and mail so we get most everything we want. I have been working night shift for two weeks now but I change on the 25 and work day shift for a while. I have been working from 7 P.M. until 3:30 A.M., sleeping until noon then going prospecting in the afternoon with a friend of mine. He has done lots of prospecting and we have found quite a bit of gold. We are planning on working here until the hot weather is over and then leaving and work for ourselves this winter. This place is awful wet and cold underground and I am being bothered with rheumatism again. This company doesn't pay very good wages and will close down for the winter as soon as it starts to snow. So we will be leaving in about another month or so. We can do about as good by ourselves and be down out of the snow. It is sure nice up here for the summer though. I do not have any trouble sleeping until noon. It gets pretty warm in the afternoon though. I was sure goad to hear you had been having some nice trips and was feeling so well and that Letha was all right again. What are they naming their baby girl? I would sure like to come home this fall but don't think so. Glad that you have go some new water pipes and now have plenty of water. What is the matter with Gerald putting it on into the house in the back room for you before winter sets in? It wouldn't be much of a job for him to do. Yes, we had two bad forest fires here but not so very close. They were put out by the C.C.C. kids before they did much damage. We had a fire here in camp a few days ago. In the deasel building that makes our electricity but we put it out before it hurt any of the machinery. Sure sorry to hear that Grandmother Rigby Turpin hasn't been feeling well. Hope she is much better by now. I don't know whether you can read this or not. I haven't got a table to write on so I am laying on my bed wring. You didn't say if you received the $25.00 I sent in my last letter or not. Sure hope so. Well, I will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourself. (Sent $15.00) Lots of Love, Avondale Oroville September 19, 1939 Dear Mother, I will see if I can get your letter answered this morning. I quit working at the Robinson Mine the last of August and have been out in the hills prospecting since then. Just came to town last night. Sure been having a swell time. Fishing quite a bit and we have found quite a lot of gold. I have sure got a swell partner. We both pay half the expenses so it doesn't cost us hardly anything to live fine; about $6.00 per week. Sure beats working in the mine. There isn't water yet - very much- but will be soon. Wish you could see the gold we have. About $40.00 since the last of August. ` There was quite a bit of excitement here in town last night. We had a big thunderstorm and three fires. Don't know just what burnt yet. I haven't heard yet this morning. It is sure hot here. I will be glad when I get back up in the hills where it is a little cooler. Well, my partner says he has what groceries we need for a couple of weeks more and is ready to go; so will close for this time. Write soon. Address: Oroville, California General Delivery. (Sent $10.00) Lots of Love, Avondale October 15, 1939 Dearest Mother, I will try and get a letter written to you this morning as I am going in to Oroville, California tomorrow. I am drawing up on my unemployment compensation now and have to go in to sign up every Monday now that I am not working for somebody else anymore. So I am going to get all I can now from what I have paid in. I have paid plenty into it. And now is a good chance to get some of it back again. Last week I signed up for the last that I can get on the work I done in California before I went up to Alaska. Now tomorrow I will have to file in a new claim and it sure is going to be a long time before I get my first check as it will have to go to Sacramento then on up to Alaska and back to Sacramento before it is sent to me. And if it doesn't make good connections with the boats going up there and back again, it may take a month to get up there and back. But I will be setting pretty for about 4 months when they do start coming in $15.00 a week all winter; won't be bad at all. I have just been figuring up how much I made while I was up there. I made $1,213.60 in the 7 months I worked and I should get about $260.00 back again that I paid in from my wages. Well, I and my partner are sure getting along fine. He is sure a swell fellow. There isn't many fellows that I would have teamed up with. He is a good clean fellow; good natured; a good worker and a good cook. We are sure living good; have everything we want to eat and we sleep about 10 hours every night. We have a good tent and stove; two beds and a nice radio. We are not making much money but we make enough to pay all of our expenses without working too hard and we have found two good places where we can do pretty good later on. But there is no water there yet but will be plenty when it starts to rain later on for winter. Well, I see your birthday has come and gone again without me remembering it in time to write to you but it seems like I can't remember birthdays at all until after they have passed. I know you will understand and I will try and not let it happen again. We have been so busy since we left the Robinson Mine that the time has sure flew; doesn't seem like a month and a half at all since we have been up here on our own. Sure glad to hear you have been taking another trip and getting to go see Grandmother Rigby Turpin. But sorry to hear Melvin isn't working. To bad he can't get his unemployment compensation. It sure comes in handy. What is he planning on doing now? Well, I will have to close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourself. Post Office Box 1343, Oroville, California. Love and best wishes to you, Mother. (Sent $15.00) Avondale Jackson, California November 22, 1939 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter written to you this morning. I have been going to write to you every day for the last two weeks but have kept putting it off as I have been jumping around quite a bit lately and have finely ended up here at Pat and Edith's place. I and the fellow I was prospecting with decided we wasn't making enough money for what work we was doing so we have quit prospecting. I may try to find another job before long. I don't know yet. Right now I am doing a little prospecting and trapping here at Pat's place. They want me to stay with them all winter. I may do that as I have caught 6 raccoons, 2 fox and a skunk since I set my traps. Besides my unemployment compensation, I ought to get along all right for a while. Well, tomorrow is "Thanksgiven" so they say here in California. It seems sort of funny, coming a week earlier this year. But I guess it is all right. We are all invited over to Pie Grove at Edith's folk's place for dinner tomorrow. Sure hope you have a nice Thanksgiven Day. I would like to be home but don't suppose I will this winter. How is Melvin getting along? Sure hope he gets the mail route all right he is trying to get. What is Gerald doing now? Hope he is getting plenty of work. Well, I can't think of any more to write about so will close for this time. Wishing you a very nice Thanksgiven. (Sent $20.00) With lots of Love, Avondale Avondale spent that winter in California with his friend, Pat Dunn and Pat's wife, Edith. He did some trapping and prospecting and lived on his unemployment compensation. He sent money to his mother all winter and a nice blue dress for Christmas. She said, "It was a very lovely dress that I still wear for my best dress." His mother wrote this about Avondale at the end of the Year 1939: "I am very thankful for my youngest son, Avondale who has been sending me some money for over (the) six years now that he has worked in California, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, and Alaska. He has come home a few times in that time but was unable to find work here in Utah or around Duchesne so would go away again where he could find some work. Mostly working in gold mines or copper mines in those states where there are lots of mines. Do not know just what I should have done if I had not had him to help take care of us as he helped support us long before Daddy Giles died - when he was getting unable to support himself or me either. So Avondale has been a very great blessing to me and I do appreciate all that he has done for me and him very much and feel that I have been greatly blessed very much in bringing him into the world - for having the pleasure of having such a son. If he should have married and had a family of his own, he would have been like all the rest of the young men now days. He would have had all he could manage to look after his own family but as he has never married (has not seemed to have found anyone that he cared to settle down with for the rest of his life), as long as he has been making as much money as he has, that it has been alright for him to help me a little. What I need to keep my home going and have some money to pay taxes, water and electricity and the many things that it takes to keep a home going if only for just one - it takes something. So this ends the year 1939 and Avondale seems to be getting along all right. He and Pat always did get along very well together. So he spent about 6 months living there with them - doing some trapping and prospecting until spring came." Jackson, California January 16, 1940 Dear Mother, I received your Christmas card and the cake all right. The cake was sure good and I was very glad to hear from you and glad that you like the dress. I hope that it fits better than the one that I sent to you a year ago. Sure hope that you had a nice Christmas. We sure did. Pat and family couldn't leave the job on Christmas Day. It wasn't his day off so all the folks around here, came up to Pat's for dinner. We have sure been having lots of rain for a while. Rained every day for 12 days but we are having nice weather again now. The nights are still a little cool though but the days are just like spring. I have been doing pretty good with my traps lately. Getting quite a lot of different animals. Besides my $16.00 every week. Even saving up a little money. My unemployment compensation will last until the middle of March and then I think I will come home for a few days anyway. But don't know where I will work this summer. I can get work in the mines here most any time I want to go to work. But I would rather not work in a mine if I can help it. So don't be surprised if I drive in any time after February is gone. Well, I will close for this time. Write soon. (Sent $15.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale February 23, 1940 Dear Mother, I will see if I cannot get this letter written to you this evening. I have been putting it off for two weeks now. Something always comes up every time I have started to write - company or something. We have been having real nice weather for a while. The grass is sure growing; even the wild flowers are starting to bloom. I seen several poppies the other day and all the almond nut trees are in bloom. They are sure pretty. But we are having rain again yesterday and today. We sure have had a lovely winter; not a flake of snow all winter. Not as much as there should be in the mountains. Pat's wife, Edith, was operated on about two weeks ago. She had a large lump in her breast, which she let go too long and it turned into a cancer. She had it removed and now another is growing fast. She will have to have her whole breast removed and all her muscles in one side scraped in the next few months. Emma Burns has one also - a small one about as big as a peanut. She went to the Ione Hospital yesterday to have it removed before it turned into cancer. I haven't been into town today so don't know how she is making out. Well, I sent my last unemployment claim in Wednesday on my work in Alaska but I still have 5 $16.00 checks coming. When I get the last one, I will be home for a couple of weeks visit before I start looking for work for the summer. I can get about $200.00 from California for the work I did in 1939. Next Wednesday I will file a new claim on California. The roads should be in good shape over the mountains by the last of March. There isn't much snow up there this year. I don't know just yet what I will do this summer. I am thinking of going back up into Alaska or Canada for this summer. I did pretty well up there two years ago. Should do better this summer with the Wars going on especially in Canada. I can always get work in the mines here in Jackson most any time. But I would rather not work in these mines any more than I can help or any more if I can help it. Find work somewhere else. It is too wet and hot being down so deep. I received your Christmas card and letter on Wednesday - Postmarked Dec. 20, 1939. Just where it has been all this time - about two months since you mailed it at Duchesne. Well, I will close for this time. (Sent $20.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale April 7, 1940 Dear Mother, I guess you have been looking for me home for the last two or three weeks when you didn't hear from me again for so long. But it has been such stormy weather lately that I didn't want to start out in it. I was going to come home two weeks ago but it started to rain and didn't quit for 10 days. We sure had some floods down in the valleys. I guess you heard about it on the radio. There is lots of snow now in the mountains. And the roads are not in too good shape yet. And now I have busted my car. So don't know whether I will get home this spring or not. I think I better find me a job somewhere and get me another car before I try to make the trip back home; so I would have a car that would carry me home anyway. Well, my birthday has come and gone now again. It seems like they come around pretty fast. I have to stop and think half of the time before I can remember just how old I am getting to be or how old I really am. Edith made me a real cream cake and Maud and Glen Walker came over and we played cards in the evening. So had quite an enjoyable birthday. Edith was operated on again the middle of March and had another tumor removed from the same place as before. They removed the whole breast this time and all the tissue so she hadn't ought to have any more trouble now. She is getting along just fine; almost well again. Emma is all well now. Her's hadn't developed enough to be so bad when she had it removed. Well, I don't know what more there is to write about. I am sending you $25.00. Let me know how you are getting along. I can send you more money if you are in need of more. I still have $200.00 in the Post Office there in Duchesne. I am afraid if I came home this spring, I will have to spend it on another car to come home with so I had better get a job and go to work again. I wrote a friend of mine that I knew up in Alaska. He is working in the automobile shops in Detroit, Michigan. I told him to write to me at Duchesne as I thought I would be home by now. I wish you would send me his letter when it comes there. Well, I will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourself. With Lots of Love, Avondale Chelan, Washington April 26, 1940 Dear Mother, I guess you will be surprised to learn I am away up here in Washington instead of in California. But here I am. There is a swell place to work here if I can get hired. I will work here all summer and come home for next winter. If not I may be home yet this spring. I hope I can get hired. Please do not worry about me. I will be all right. I will write more as soon as I find out if I am going to stay here for the summer or not. (Sent $15.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale Holden, Washington May 17, 1940 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter written to you tonight. I have been going to write for a week now but didn't hardly feel like it. I have been working here for 12 days now and have been so stiff and sore that I couldn't hardly wiggle around. That's what I get for not doing anything all winter. I had almost forgotten what it was like to work for a living again. I was pretty sure I could get work here; that is why I came up here. Several of the fellows I knew up in Alaska are working here; even one of my old bosses. I didn't have any trouble at all getting a job. Sure a beautiful country up here. Quite a lot of snow up on the hills yet but there is none here in the valley where the town is. It is 60 miles from Chelan. 50 of it is on a boat on the Chelan Lake. Then ten miles up the valley from the Lake Chelan. Sure is a nice place to spend the summer. The Howe Sound Company that I am working for has sure a nice camp here. There are 400 men working here now and a lot of them have their own houses and their families are here so there is quite a town. There are 6 bunkhouses with 26 rooms in each - making 156 rooms - with 2 men to each room; making 312 men in them and they are sure nice rooms. Hot and cold water, two big closets, and nice beds with all bedding furnished; sheets changed every week. I am making pretty good money here too and we get time and half for over time; 42 hours per week; so I get $8.25 for working on Sundays. That is pretty good wages. Have to work pretty hard though to make that much money. There is a real nice recreation hall and they have a library here too and picture show three times a week so there is plenty of amusement here also. Lots of deer, bear, elk and wild goats and some mighty nice fishing but we have no way of cooking them; they will not let anyone in their kitchens. Well, I will close for this time. Take care of yourself. Write soon. (Sent $20.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale Holden, Washington June 14, 1940 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter written to you this evening. I am still working every day and like my work fine so far. Yes, I am working in another mine. The lumber camps up here don't pay near as good wages as the mines do and lots harder work. We sure have been having lovely weather up here. Sure is a beautiful country. There are snow covered mountains sticking up all around the town; makes a person think they are living down in a hole. They say the snow doesn't all melt on some of the mountains in all summer. Well, it will soon be the 4th July again. I don't know yet what I will do on the 4 July. I may go into Seattle and get me another car or I may stay here and work. If I get me another car and come home this fall, I will need to work every day I can. They pay us time and half for all over the 42 hours per week and I have worked every day but one Sunday now in six weeks; so I am doing pretty good. Sure glad to hear from you; that you have been traveling around a bit and not staying home all the time. I am planning on coming home for a couple of weeks or so this winter; maybe for Thanksgiven or Christmas. I do not believe that I would like to stay here this winter. The snow gets awful deep and the winters are very long. I have been reading quite a lot of books and seeing three shows a week since I have been up here. Besides I have my own radio that I bought last fall when I was prospecting. So I get all the news. I just now heard that the French are just about to give up and let the Germans have France but the English say they are going to keep on fighting. Looks like we may have to go over there yet to help win the war. Well, I can't think of any more to write this time so will close. Write soon and take care of yourself. (Sent $15.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale July 2, 1940 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter written to you today before I go to work. I haven't much time so will have to make it short as I go to work at 5:30 P.M. We are having the 3 - 4 - and 5 off; so this is the last day I will have to work until the 6th July. Those that want can stay and work the 3 and 5. I don't know of any place or anywhere I want to go that would take three days so guess I will work on the 3 and 5 and go up for a hike up to a lake a few miles from here on the 4 July. We are sure having lovely weather here but there is still a little snow on the mountains yet. The nights are sure nice to sleep. This is sure a nice place to spend the summer - nice rooms, first class food, and all the fresh milk we can drink three times a day. I just received a post card from Reno, Nevada today. Emma Burns was married to a fellow by the name of Gaylord White. She was 20 years old on the 9 of June. Times sure does slip by fast and she was married 1 July 1940. Well, it is almost time for me to go to work. So will close for this time. Write soon. (Sent $20.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale July 17, 1940 Dear Mother, I received your letter O.K. and was sure glad to hear you are all right and had a good time on the 4th July. I stayed here and worked. It takes two days to go to Chelan and back again; 60 miles, 40 of it on Lake Chelan. There are no roads so I had to leave my car in Chelan. I sure do miss it. This place is something like where I was in Alaska. When you want to go anywhere, you have to take a week or so off work. I do not like it as well as I did; so I may be home for Labor Day. I lost my radio on the 4 July. I sent it in to Chelan to have it fixed and the fellow let it get stolen from him so he says. I sure do miss it. I paid $27.75 for it last fall so didn't get much use out of it for my money. Excuse this paper. I ran out of writing paper and it is to late to get any more tonight so this will have to do for this time. There is lots of work up here now. They can't get enough men in the apple orchards around Chelan and Wenatchee and quite a few men from here have quit their jobs here and gone to work in the navy yards in Seattle, Washington. So there must be plenty of work for those that want to work. I know that I could get another job in no time at all. Well, this is all the paper I have so I had better quit. Write soon. (Sent $15.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale Holden, Washington August 9, 1940 Dear Mother, I will write you this one more letter from here and then no more as I am going to leave here in a few days. So don't write, as I will be home in a week or two. I have had a good job here - getting $6.00 a day for a while but it is finished now and I am back where I started three months ago - using a pick and shovel. I wanted to come home for Labor Day anyway. So I am leaving in a few days. I don't know, as I will like that hot weather you say you have been having. We haven't really had one hot day up here this summer. There is still snow on some of the mountains right close to here. So guess it keeps the weather cool. Well, I will have to hurry if I get this letter in the Post Office before they lock it up for the night. Please do not worry about me as I will be home in a few more days. (Sent $20.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale This was the last letter Avondale wrote from that place. He soon left that job and went home for the winter and tried to find work around Duchesne but didn't have much success. He arrived home on a Sunday morning the latter part of August just as his Mother was about ready to go to Sunday School. He had stopped in Heber City for the night and came on the next morning. He had spent two or three days around Ogden. He had driven his old car that far and had looked around and bought him another car to come the rest of the way. He had trouble with the one he bought before he had gone many miles and had to have something done to it before he could come on any further. The car seemed to have some part that was not working as it should. The bearings would get something the matter with them and burn out on him. They made several trips over to Roosevelt to see Melvin and family. One time they went to Roosevelt, as they were going home, something seemed to go wrong with the car and he could hardly make it back home and then had to have some new parts bought before he could use it again. The first day he was home, they went to Roosevelt and brought back Melvin's trailer wagon so he could haul his mother some wood for her winter use. So he spent a week or so getting up her wood and then took the trailer full of wood back to Melvin. Lovenia's hours had a leak every time it rained much so Avondale got some roof paint and tried to put enough on it to stop the leaking. It helped some but could not seem to find the place that was the worst so it still leaked when it rained very hard the next winter. He hauled enough wood to last her the winter and chopped it all up and stacked it up in the garage where she put her wood and coal. It was real handy for her and she did not have to go out in the stormy weather to get her wood. It was always dry and not far to carry it into the house. After Avondale had been at home for a while, he thought he better see if he could find a job in some other part of the country. So one day he headed for the South thinking he might find work in Arizona for the winter months for a change. He left in September to hunt for work. He did quite a bit of traveling around. He went one way and came back another way. He went out through Salt Lake City and down through Nephi on Highway 91; on down through the State of Utah, into Nevada, and then on into Arizona and clear through that state into Colorado on his way back home. He was not able to find any work down that way. He didn't like the looks of that part of the country as well as he had expected to. It was too dry; He had been used to country with so much water that this really looked dry. He wrote: Miami, Arizona September 21, 1940 Dear Mother, I arrived here this morning fine and dandy. The car still runs all right so I guess I will keep it for a while longer. I haven't had time to find out if I can get work here or not. There are two big mines here just on the edge of this town and they work about 1500 men. So I should be able to get a job. I have talked with some men here but they don't work in the mines. So don't know much about the work but I will find out on Monday morning. I am sure disappointed with Arizona. I knew there was lots of desert but I didn't think it was all desert. I have only seen one creek with water in so far on my trip except the Colorado River. If I can't get work here, I do not know just what I will do. Maybe go back to Duchesne and try and get work in the coalmine out at Carbon County or draw my unemployment money the rest of the winter. I went into Salt Lake City and they told me the office at Price had never sent my application into the office at Salt Lake City. That is they weren't sure but would write to Price and find out and send me word at Duchesne with application blanks to sign for the entire time I was out of work. One for every Monday that I was home but I should have now three checks coming for the first three weeks that I went over to Price to see about. I was wondering if you could not sign my name to them that they send from Salt Lake City - one for the week ending Aug. 17-25 and Sept. 1 if the Price office didn't send them in and one for each week - Sept. 8 - 15 and 22. That's $90.00 that is worth trying to get. Then on the 30 Sept. you could send another one that would make $105.00. If you sent them to me, I would just have to sign my name to them and send them back to Duchesne to you so they would be sent in from Duchesne. Don't write to me here until you hear from me again. I do not know just where I might be. Maybe back in Duchesne. Lots of Love, Avondale Avondale was back in Duchesne a few days after he had written the above letter. He was not able to find any work and there were so many men waiting around for months. He came back by way of Price. He had gone through the Petrified Forest National Monument in Arizona and saw some of the petrified trees. They were all under fences and guards for fear some people might take a piece of one for a souvenir. They had rules and regulations. It is unlawful to injure, destroy, or appropriate specimens of petrified wood of any size what-so-ever found within the Monument Boundaries or to deface, injure, disturb or mark any ruins, relics, pictures or other works of Primitive or prehistoric men, government property or natural formations in any manner and violators will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. Penalty up to $500.00 fine or six months imprisonment or both. At first glance it may seem that this law pertaining to the Petrified wood is quite drastic because the fragments and chips are so abundant within the Monument but it should be remembered that there are more than 1,000,000 visitors annually and that it is most important that the reserved area be kept intact so as to be enjoyed by future generations. He stayed around Duchesne for a few days and then started right out again to see if could find some kind of a job for the winter. Mill City, Nevada October 11, 1940 Dear Mother, It didn't take long for me to find a job when I got to the right place. I ask for a job here yesterday morning and they put me right to work. I worked from 6:00 P.M. last night until 2:30 this morning A.M. Then I changed and worked day shift on Monday morning. It isn't the best place to work in the world but it isn't a bad place. I am getting $4.90 a day with time and a half on Saturday and Sundays. This is sure desert looking country around here. Lots of mountains but there isn't any trees of any kind on them. Just sagebrush. Mill City is about half way between Winnemucca and Lovelock, Nevada and the mine where I am working is 9 miles from Mill City, Nevada; across the desert valley it doesn't look to be more than 2 miles; distance is sure very deceiving around here. Well, I don't know what more I can write so will close. Write soon - address: Mill City, Nevada in % Tungston Mine. (Sent $10.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale October 21, 1940 Dear Mother, I received your letter all right and 5 others that you had sent to me that had come to Duchesne for me since I had left. But do not send any more to me here until you hear from me again. One of the letters you sent to me had five $15.00 checks in it from California for those first five weeks that I went into Salt Lake City the second time to see about; so I guess I will get the other three O.K. I should have 8 $15.00 checks all together. I do not know yet but I think I am going to find a better place than this to work for the winter. The work is all right and I have one of the finest bosses I ever did have but the mine itself is too dangerous to suit me. It is the most dangerous mine I ever have worked in and I am going to leave and find a better place to work in. I do not like to take two many chances. So don't send me any more mail until you hear from me again. No, I haven't found those fellows from Alaska yet but I am going to keep trying. They are in the State of Nevada somewhere; so will keep on looking. Perhaps I will find a better job if I can find some of them. I'll write again soon and let you know where I am at. (Sent $20.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale Elko, Nevada November 6, 1940 Dear Mother, I better write and let you know where I am at by now. I left Mill City, Nevada the next day after I wrote to you last. But I am working again here now. Have been working for the last 7 days. That place that I was working at (Mill City, Nevada) was too dangerous for me to work in. It had caved in twice while I was working there and only one way to get out at. So I quit but I am working again here at the Rip Van Winkle Mine - 40 miles north of Elko, Nevada. It is a much better place to work than it was at Mill City. We work 11 days; then off three. So I may be home about Thanksgiven. I can easy get home and back here to work again in the three days I have off. We sure have been having lots of stormy weather here for the last two weeks. It snowed several times here at the mine but it is all gone again now. It might get pretty hard to get in and out here this winter but I have a better car now. I sold my old car that I got on my way home from Holden, Washington. And got me a Ford coup. It is in first class shape so I won't have to spend a lot of money on repair bills for this one like I did on that other one. I am working night shift now and it is about time to go to work. Write soon and send me any mail that is there for me. Address: Avondale Mower, Rip Van Winkle Mine, Elko, Nevada. (Sent $15.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale Elko, Nevada % Rip Van Winkle Mine November 25, 1940 Dear Mother, I received the letter you sent me all right and was sure glad to hear from you and that you had been doing a little traveling and visiting with your mother if only for a day or two. I am still working here at Elko. This isn't such a bad place to work but I can't save any money here as we only work 11 days; then off three; then work 11 days again. I am getting $5.00 a day but where you work that way, you don't get any time and half work and your board goes on just the same. I am off now - Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday. One month from now I will be off the 22, 23, 24 December and Christmas day the 25th. I do not know how many days we will have for Christmas holidays yet but will have four days anyway so I will be home then for a day or so. It has sure been stormy and cold here. We have had zero weather several times and three nights back, it was 12 below zero. Sure was very cold. This place is 40 miles from the nearest town, Elko, Nevada. So a person don't want to run around much in this kind of weather. I am going into town this morning so will mail this letter in town while I am there. I don't know what more I can write about so will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourself. (Sent $20.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale December 11, 1940 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter written to you in a hurry as I am going into town in a few minutes. I am still working but I don't know for just how long it will last. The company laid off about 35 men here the other day and only kept about a dozen of us on. We may be laid off too before very long. I don't know for sure but I will be home for Christmas Day anyway as my three days off come at Christmas time. They sent me a questioner for the Draft and I have filled it out. I told them that I sent you $360.00 a year and that you depended on me for support. So if they write you, you will know what to tell them. It turned off colder again here. It was 4 below zero this morning when I got up and 5 below yesterday morning. Well, I will close. Hope you are well and getting along all right. Write soon. (Sent $15.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale It was right after this letter was written that the mine closed down for the winter and Avondale was out of a job again. He went up into Washington where he had worked before but couldn't get a job there so he went home to Duchesne. He filed for unemployment compensation and spent several weeks at the mines in Carbon County hoping to get a job. But didn't. So he spent about six months around Duchesne. He made one trip up into Oregon and Washington looking for work but came back and settled down to spending the winter there. He went trapping with Howard Mitchell for a while. They did pretty good trapping skunks and some muskrats. They went around to different parts of the country. They spent some time up at Neola where they got mostly skunks around the old house that had been vacated where the skunks made their homes under the old floors of the houses. With what he made and the unemployment checks, they had about $15.00 a week to live on. So they got along all right. Lovenia had fruit and vegetables canned and all they had to buy was meat, eggs, butter and milk. It was a good thing that he was around home when March came as Lovenia had a bad sick spell. The ulcer in the outlet to her stomach had started to bleed again and she hemorrhaged from her intestines. She had to be waited on for quite some time. Letha and Gerald had just had a new baby girl (JoAnn). Lovenia had been helping out there when she took sick. The doctor, Doctor Murray, wanted Gerald to do some wallpapering to help pay the doctor bill. Gerald got Avondale to help him as he didn't know much about wallpapering and Avondale had done quite a bit of this type of work while living in California. So they got Avondale's things ready that he had used before. Avondale was quite tickled to be doing something once more after 3 months off. After that job, he did quite a lot of wallpapering, painting, and calcumining for different people around town. He was earning a little but spent most of it on groceries and medicine for his mother. He worked for Dr. Murray doing most all the work to pay for her doctor bill. The doctor had been to see her a few times and told her what to eat and to stay in bed so the sore in my side would heal up better and to not eat anything that would irritate it. So she lived on milk. Avondale fixed his own meals. He would take his mother a can of Sego Milk, some water to mix with it and glasses so she would have some milk with her medicine while he was away working. Mrs. Ida Tanner came every morning and cleaned up the house and fixed up the bed and did things that Lovenia needed. Avondale painted and wallpapered one room for her. She was getting a house ready to live in that had been hauled down to her from off the Blue Bench after her own home had burnt down. It helped her to have Avondale do that work for her to pay her for waiting on Lovenia for several days. So some of his jobs did not bring in money but did help get the bills paid and it gave him something to do. Lovenia said, "I was sure glad that he was having some work to do. So he would not be so uneasy around the house having nothing to do to keep him busy but read and play cards by himself for pass time. So he was will to go to bed most of the evenings and get his rest so he could get up and go to work in time in the mornings." Lovenia's mother was also sick at this time. They received word on a post card on Monday 24 March that her mother had passed away on the 22nd of March at about 11:00 P.M. They were not prepared for news like that and it was a big shock. She wanted to go out to her mother's funeral. Avondale didn't say he wouldn't take her but he didn't want to. He thought she was too sick to travel that far. He would just put her off. So they never went to the funeral. She said he would have taken her if she had insisted but she was too weak and sick to go anywhere. She received a check for $240.00 from her mother's estate. Her mother had sold all her property and put the money in the bank. It was divided among her 7 boys and Lovenia. Avondale took Lovenia to Roosevelt on April 4th so that she could go to a bank and get her money from the check. They hesitated for a while until they found out it was her inheritance. Mr. Jordan, the Bank President, then gave her $100.00 of it if she would leave the rest in the bank for a while. She had decided to take $100.00 and fix up her home. She wanted to put new shingles on the south side where it leaked so bad when it rained; finish up the back room to use for a kitchen. Then she would have room for another bed without it being in her bedroom. This back room had been a catch all for everything for 20 years. It had been built during the 1st World War when things were so expensive that it could not be finished. It had just the outside walls and some boards for lining on the inside; no windows and not much of any doors in it. It had been started to be made into the kitchen but never finished. The dining room was used as the kitchen all these years. Avondale went to Salt Lake City on April 6th with Gerald to see what he could do about buying some of the material they would need to get started. He brought back part of the shingles; enough wall board to line the walls, pipes to put the water into the house, a sink, and things to fix it with, some paint and other things that he would need to start fixing up her home. He worked on the home the rest of April and all of May when he wasn't working for someone else. Sometimes he would just get started when someone would come and ask him to do some wallpapering. He would stop what he was doing and go and do their job; then come home and work all evening on the house. Gerald and Avondale had started to do this work on April 8, 1941. Avondale started on the roof while Gerald started with the doors and windows. That is about all the help that Avondale had. He did most all the rest by himself. It took just about a month before he had the roof, walls, and floor so that things could be moved into it. Avondale wallpapered Lovenia's bedroom and went over all the paint; painted and calcumined the old kitchen, painted the floor and the old bed. So everything was quite nice looking. He had the Granite Furniture Company bring a new Kelvinator Refrigerator on the 28 May. So now that had that room finished up. It had a bed, dresser, her sewing machine, one bookcase and the refrigerator. He went over the paint in the other rooms; put up curtain rods, put screens in the windows, put new glass in windows that had been broken for years, and finished up a lot of little jobs around the place. He took Lovenia to Salt Lake City to get a new rug for the kitchen, some knobs and handles for the cabinet that he built around the sink and some cloth for curtains. All this time Avondale was drawing his unemployment checks of $15.00 a week. Most of it he used for the house and food. He had just enough left to last him for a while until he could find work to earn more money. Avondale left on 2 June 1941 with Howard Mitchell. They went to Reno, Nevada in Avondale's car. At Reno, Howard took the bus into Los Angeles. He was going to Wake Island to get work. Avondale went into the Northern part of California. He was not able to find the work he wanted so he went back into Nevada. Silver Peak, Nevada June 7, 1941 Dear Mother, I took Howard Mitchell into Reno all right so he could get the bus for Oakland, California. He was there Tuesday evening. But I couldn't get a job right away in California; so I came back into Nevada and went right to work here at the Mary Mine at Silver Peak, Nevada. I could have got work in about 10 days or so in the sawmills up there but didn't want to wait that long. This isn't such a bad place to work and they pay pretty good wages. But they take it all away again for board and room. But I will stay here long enough to get a couple of new tires for my car and some new clothes and my teeth fixed. I wish you would send me a Montgomery Ward or Sears sale catalog. Everything is so awfully high here. And send me my radio card that I hook up that little table lamp for the radio with. The lights are so high in my room here that I can't play my radio unless I hold it up in the air. Well, I will close for this time. I haven't written a letter for so long that I have forgotten how to write or spell either. Hope you are able to read it. Write soon and take care of yourself. Address: Avondale Mower, Silver Peak, Nevada, % Mary Mine. (Sent $10.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale June 20, 1941 Dear Mother, I received your letter and the package all right and I am sending for me some new clothes; a hat, a pair of shoes, and a pair of house slippers. Seems good to be working steady again and have what money I want to spend. We get paid here on the 5 and 20th of each month. So I am sending you $15.00 to make that first payment of the Frig. I guess we will have three days off for the 4th July. And they will pay us on the 3rd; so I am going to run down to Los Angeles for a couple of days and buy me some tires there for my car. I will have to buy three new tires or quit running it. I will get my teeth fixed there too. I hope you have the house fixed now so you know where everything is. The next time I come home, we can put a new floor in your bedroom. It will make it a lot warmer and look nicer too. Hope you have got over your cold by now. We have been having cold weather here to. Hasn't been a hot day since I started to work here. This is sure a nice place to work but they sure charge a lot for board and room; $1.69 a day; that's too much. But I am still making $106.00 a month clear; so that isn't so bad after all. Well, do not know what more I can write; so will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourself. With Love, Avondale July 10, 1941 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter written to you today if I can stay awake long enough. I am working night shift since coming back from the 4th July. We had three days off; 4, 5, and 6th. I went over to Bishop, California and then down to Bakersfield, California. There was quite a celebration down there. I bought three new tires for my car. And had my teeth fixed. I was sure lucky to get my teeth fixed, as the dentist was only in his office a couple of hours. Then he went to the celebration. We have been having some weather since the 4 July. But it is not so bad. There is almost always a cool breeze blowing here at the mine. But I almost melted while in Bakersfield. It was 105 and 110 on the 4 and 5. Well, I will close. I have to go nine miles to Silver Peak from here to get a money order. Write soon and tell me all the news. (Sent $20.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale Bishop, California July 18, 1941 Dear Mother, I quit my job at Silver Peak because they were just about to close down and I wasn't making much money there anyway. The board and room was so high. But I have a chance to go to work for the government here at Bishop, California. I will make $219.00 a month and only $37.50 a month for board and room. But I have to have a birth certificate. I am sending a letter to Mr. Blackburn in Salt Lake City and a money order for $1.50. If you will get his address from Gerald and mail it to him, he can go right to the capitol building and get it for me. It will only cost about 50 cents if someone goes there for it. I will write again in a few days as soon as I get to working. Write soon. (Sent $10.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale The following letter Lovenia had sent to Avondale at Silver Peak and it had been returned to her because he had left there and had not left a forwarding address. It took a month for it to be returned. Duchesne, Utah July 18, 1941 Dear Son, Sure glad to hear from you and that you got back from your trip safe and sound. So many was killed during the three-day holiday during the 4 July. And it seemed like your letter was so long coming after you had wrote it and sent it on its way. It was 4 or 5 days coming here so much longer than the others had been. Until I began to wonder if you was looking for a job somewhere else while you was on your trip for the 4 July. Thanks, I do not think I would care to go where it was as hot as that. I believe I would just as leave stay here if it does rain most of the time this summer. We are sure having a lot of rain. My garden has not been watered all over either time yet this summer. Just a little along the top once besides what I water with the hose. Seems like with the neighbors watering on both sides of me and the cellar full of water and the cesspool, it keeps it mostly wet all over all the time until it has been to wet most of the time to even get out to do any weeding. So we have not had any hot weather here yet. Been real nice so far. It doesn't look like we was going to have much summer weather. It is raining all day today for the second rainstorm this week. It was 90 on July 6 and has been in the 80 all the rest of the time during this month with a low of 40 and 50. So it is nice sleeping at nights. I have been quite busy keeping the strawberries and cherries picked lately but have just about come to the end of both of them now. Bottled about 30 quarts of cherries mostly for Letha. And have made 30 some pints of strawberry jams or preserves from my strawberry patch for myself besides what has been ate fresh. Have been getting some raspberries too and the apricots will soon be ripe. So looks like I will have all I can use and then some from off my own place this summer. So I will not need to buy any fruit at all. It seems that Kermit Poulson and Ilean Hanson are getting about serious. They have to go some place together about every night. It begins to look like their lovemaking would about interfere with the farm work and her job. They spent the 4th July out to Salt Lake City and she is taking him down home with her for the 24 July celebration. Then the new nurse that is staying with Miss Jennie Edler too. Makes a trip into Salt Lake City or her boy friend comes out here to see her every weekend. So Miss Jennie does not know when she will be all alone or when she will have all of them there. She sure gets tired of their love making all the time but they get their backs up if she says anything about it to them. I sure have made good use of the frigerator while the berries was on and can now make some good ice cream. Come and have some. Gladys Oderkirk got her a new one too out of Khols Store before she knew that I even had one. So now I do not need to worry about her any more coming to borrow mine to store her things in. She says she likes that kind the best; better than she did the Kelvinator but I believe that kind cost more too. It cost about $1.25 more for June's electric lights than what I had been paying for just lights and radio. So that was not so bad as I had expected it might be. But I did not use very much of it for lights just the radio and frigerator for $2.75. I finished up all my painting and varnishing on the 4th July for pass time. Then went to the picture show at night, as there was not much doing around Duchesne. Of course, some went to other places for the celebration. They are going to have some kind of celebration here for the 24 July. The L.D.S. Church is going to have some kind of a celebration for just the socialability and not to ask any money like they generally thing they have too. Then the Stampede will be here this summer on Aug. 17 and 18 this year. So it will be before school starts this year. They are trying to pick a time when the weather will be good and not have a lot of rain like they have been having when they have it on Labor Day. Gerald is still working for the state road for another week or so. I was down to Roosevelt on the 3 July and saw all but Melvin. He was working. May said he and the two boys was going fishing for the 4 July while May and the rest stayed home. Sure glad that you got your teeth fixed. There is a man here now doing some work but he is mostly fixing children's teeth under 12 years of age. It is a good thing to even have someone in here to fix the children's teeth. I do not know much of the news around town if there is any. Did you get the two letters that I sent to you? One from Howard Mitchell and one from Wyoming. Mrs. Mitchell asks about you and the men in Khols Store. I guess it must be plenty hot where Howard has went. Stanely Peterson got his house wallpapered all right but don't know who did the work. I have met his wife. She sure seems like a very nice girl. Miss Jennie is saying she will have to get her house painted this summer before winter comes again and sure wished you was here to do it for her. I guess Gerald will have plenty of time after a while to do it for her. She does not want to have to have some strangers come and do it for her. Thanks a lot for the $10.00. I am always anxious to hear from you and take care of yourself. With Love and Best Wishes from Mother Bishop, California August 13, 1941 Dear Mother, I have finely got settled down again and working so better let you know where I am at. I received my birth certificate all right but didn't get the job I was planning on. The government has a big mine just out of Bishop 23 miles and pays better wages than anywhere I know. But just about the time I started to russel a job there, they started to move some of their machinery and buildings and didn't hire any new men at all. I russeled for three weeks and went broke so had to get a job somewhere else. I am working 40 miles from Bishop at the Black Rock Mine. I was pretty lucky to get a contract job there - the 4 day - I and three other fellows. We should make about $10.00 a day each if everything goes off well. I will have some money for you on the 20 August. That will be my first payday here. Sure sorry that I couldn't send you any money last month but it will not happen again. I will be going into town about once a week so will get my mail in Bishop; so write to me there - General Delivery. With Lots of Love, Avondale August 22, 1941 Dear Mother, Well, I finely got a payday again so better send you some money to make another payment on the frigerator. Sorry I couldn't send you any last month but it won't happen again. I have a pretty fair job now contracting a drift in the Black Rock Mine 35 miles from Bishop. It should last for a couple more months. I have been averaging about $14.00 a day since the 15 August. We get $7.50 per foot. Well, I can't think of much more to write so will close for this time. Write soon. (Sent $25.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale Winnemucca, Nevada September 29, 1941 Dear Mother, I suppose you have began to think I had forgotten you but I haven't. I just haven't been able to find a job. I don't know where all this work is they are talking about so much. I can't seem to find it. I spent ten days in Las Vegas, Nevada. They are building a big magnesium plant there that will cost $63,000.00 and they are going to work 3,000 men on the job. But everything is under the A.F. of L. Union and there is so many men flocked in there that the Union won't take any more new members. There are 1,000 men there out of work now. So I left. I would like to stay out of the mines if I could but I guess I can't. I came up here to get a job in the mine at Mountain City but they are having a strike there so they are not working. So I got a job here at Winnemucca, Nevada driving a truck for a highway construction outfit. But it will only last for about two weeks more then it will be finished. I am going to write to the superintendent of the mine up where I worked in Washington and see if I can't get back up there for the winter and get a job. Well, it looks like I have fell down on the job of paying for the frig. If I could ever get a steady job again, maybe I could get a little money ahead once more. Seems like I haven't had anything but tough luck for the last year. Well, I can't think of any more to write so will close. Write soon to me here and send any mail that I have there. Address: Winnemucca, Nevada - General Delivery. With Lots of Love, Avondale Winnemucca, Nevada October 8, 1941 Dear Mother, I received the letters you sent yesterday and was sure glad to hear from you but sure sorry to hear you had been sick again. Sure hope it does not happen to you again. It seems like we are all having bad luck. I had just been working here for 10 days driving a truck for a construction outfit - putting oiled gravel on the highway just east of here - and I got one of my fingers smashed on Monday 6 October. I am writing this from the Winnemucca Hospital where they brought me. It is the big middle finger on my right hand. None of the other fingers was hurt at all. It doesn't bother me to write this letter except it is kind of awkward to hold the pencil with so much bandage on my middle finger. I do not need to stay here at the hospital if I do not want to but if I stayed in town, I will have to board myself and if I stay here the insurance company has to pay my board and room until the doctor says my finger is well enough to go to work again. And that will not be for two or three weeks. By that time I won't have a job. It will be finished. I will get compensation for all the time I am off work until the doctor says my finger is well but I can't get any compensation until I am released from the doctor. It is sure a nice place here where I am - (there) are fellows like me that have been hurt - none of us sick. We come and go as we like. Set around and read or play cards with the nurses when they are not busy. Doesn't seem like a hospital at all. Sure hope Melvin is better by now. It seems like I haven't had nothing but bad luck all of 1941. I will sure be glad when it is gone. I haven't been able to find a decent job this year. Yes, Howard Mitchell says he can get me a job where is at Wake Island but I cannot go now. I haven't any money and I can't get my compensation if I leave without the doctor releasing me. So I guess I will have to stay where I am at. The job I had wasn't any good. I couldn't get much more than pay my board and room out of what I was getting - everything is so high here. I tore the corner off that 25-cent Air Mail Stamp you wanted me to send back to you but maybe you can paste it back together again. I am writing to Howard too. Maybe he will send another one like it. Well, Mother, I don't know how I am going to get you any money this month. I sure feel bad about it too. Maybe you will have to see if you can't get your widows pension. It would help some. Maybe I can have a little better luck after this and be able to find a decent job that will last a little while. I sure hope so. Well, this is about as long a letter as I ever wrote but can't think of any more to write so will close for this time and promise to write a little more often. It sure has been cold here for a few days - 17 above zero on Sunday night and a little snow around on the higher peaks for a few days. You can tell my hand isn't hurt much as it doesn't bother my writing. Our doctor says I will be here about three weeks. Write soon and take care of yourself. With Lots of Love, Avondale October 13, 1941 Dear Mother, I have been out of work for one week now so I am entitled to compensation. Nevada State Industrial Company sent me a blank form to fill out and they wanted to know my entire history and if I have any dependants. I will get paid at the rate of $72.00 per month and $10.00 extra for each dependant but they have to be entire dependants not partial. So I told them you were entirely dependant on me for your support and that your age was 62 years. I can't seem to remember your age for sure so when they write to you, which they will, tell them the same as I have. I can't work for another week or two so I might as well have that extra money. My finger is getting along fine. It never has hurt much. The doctor took a few stitches in it and bandaged it up. It hasn't hurt so he hasn't bothered it since then. He told me this morning he would let it go for two more days before undoing it. How is Melvin getting along now? I hope he is all right again by now. Sure hope you have been well lately too. We have been having nice weather here, but the nights sure have been chilly. Well, I will close for this time. Write soon and take good care of yourself. With Lots of Love, Avondale October 20, 1941 Dear Mother, I guess this will be my last day in the hospital here at Winnemucca, Nevada. The doctor says my finger is perfectly well again and I will have to leave here in the morning. I will have to go to Carson City, Nevada to get my three weeks compensation, as it will be three weeks in the morning since I was hurt. I sure have been lucky to get to stay here and get my board and room paid for. It isn't many hospitals you can get treated like that when you are not hurt any worse than I was with just one finger hurt so I couldn't work until it was healed up again. I don't know yet just what I will be doing after I get to Carson City, Nevada. The job I had here isn't finished yet but it has been raining for the last two days and they can't do any work at all when it is so wet. I wrote a letter ten days ago up to Holden, Washington to see if I could get a job there for this winter but haven't heard from them yet. They have raised the wages since I was working there last summer - 1940 before coming home a year ago. So I know I could save more than $100.00 a month if I was up there. If I don't hear from them by tomorrow, I may go to Oakland, California and see if I can get to wake Island where Howard Mitchell is as a truck driver or a painter, or miner. So I will write you again in a few days. Don't worry about me and take care of yourself and I will write again soon. With Lots of Love, Avondale October 30, 1941 Dear Mother, Just a line to let you know that I am O.K. and getting along all right. I was under the doctor's care for three weeks in Winnemucca, Nevada and when I went to Carson City Nevada to get my compensation, I told them my finger was still sore and was unable to work. So they gave six weeks compensation at $82.00 per month. That makes $143.00. But my finger isn't sore and I am ready to go to work again if I can find any work to do. I am on my way to Alameda, California and see if I can get over to Wake Island where Howard is. I would like to go over as a painter or truck driver if I can. I wrote to Howard just after I got hurt but didn't get an answer from him before I left Nevada but I had my mail forwarded to Alameda, California so I will stay there for a few days until I hear from him. I haven't heard from Holden, Washington yet either. So don't know just what I will be doing. Write to me at Alameda, California and if I have any mail there, please send it to me there. I will stop in Alameda until I hear from you. Write soon. Address: Alameda, California Gen. Del. With Lots of Love, Avondale Seattle, Washington November 18, 1941 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter off to you today so you will know where I am at. I tried for a week at Alameda, California to get a job at Wake Island where Howard Mitchell is but I couldn't make it. There are so many men trying to get over there for work that it was almost impossible to get an application in. And finely when I did, they told me there was no opening for me over there. So I came up here to Seattle. I thought I could get to Alaska on one of the Defense jobs up there. They are paying 90 cents an hour for laborers and all the over time a person wants - about $7.20 a day is pretty good pay for a common labor. But it is the same thing here as it was in Alameda, California. It took me three days to get them to even look at my application and because I had spent 8 months in Alaska once before, they told me they would take me but then I couldn't pas the doctors examination. Everyone has to be examined by the Navy Doctor and that is the strictest examination there is. There isn't one out of ten that applies for a job that gets it. I don't know WHY they are so awful strict with working men. The doctor wouldn't tell me why I was turned down except for enlarged tonsils; they wouldn't tell me a thing. They are paid by the Navy and don't tell anyone anything only yes or no. So it looks like I don't get a job with any of the defense jobs. They are all the same - awfully strict. There are two more chances here for me to get work in Alaska. I am going to try them tomorrow and if I do not get either one of them, I will go over to Holden, Washington and try and get back in the mine there for the rest of this winter. There is plenty of work to be had but most of it doesn't pay much. So I will write you again in a few days, Mother, and let you know where I am at. (Sent $25.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale Holden, Washington December 3, 1941 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter off to you this evening, if I can stay awake long enough to write it. I am back up here at Holden again. I couldn't get anything I wanted in Seattle and this is about the best place to spend the winter that I knew of; so I came up here. I can save over $100.00 a month up here but it isn't very pleasant hibernating like a bear. I would of went to Alaska if I could have got a job in Seattle and my fare paid up there. I may go up in the spring. I don't know yet. Well, it is sure winter up here today. It has been raining for a couple of days but started to snow last night and hasn't stopped yet. There is about 6 inches I guess now. It gets 10 feet deep here some winters but everything is nice and comfortable - nice steam heated rooms and good board. The company here is sure particular about the doctor’s examination but he didn't say there was a thing wrong with me. He even X-rayed me. Everyone that starts to work here. It looks like if I am able to work in a mine, I would be surely be able or good enough to work outside up in Alaska but those Navy Doctors didn't think so. They are sure awfully particular about who they hire for a common labor. Maybe they won't be quite so fussy next spring. Well, I will have to hurry if I get this off in the Post Office before it closes. (Sent $25.00) Love, Avondale Holden, Washington December 15, 1941 Dear Mother, I received your letter on December 12 and was sure glad to hear you are feeling well and hope you will continue so. And take it easy this winter; and rest up and get some of your strength back. I have been wondering just what I was going to send to you for Christmas this year as there is nothing up here except groceries and working clothes and I don't believe you would want any of them. So I decided I would send you a little extra money and you can buy what you want most. I am sending you $25.00 and the last stamps from Howard Mitchell's letter from Wake Island. I tore one of them again. I hope it was not the same one I tore before. I wrote to Howard about the 4th December. I don't know whether he will get it or not. Has the Mitchell's heard any word from Howard and Wayne yet? Yes, I guess I was lucky not to be over there at Wake Island myself. I tried to get over there but couldn't make it. I am going to stay here until spring anyway. Maybe I can get a little money ahead again. I can save over $100.00 a month up here. It has been snowing again for the last two days and it is sure piling it up. There is over two feet now and still snowing. Some winters it gets 12 to 15 feet deep but they keep all the roads and paths cleaned so it isn't hard to get around. It is quite pretty up here if you like winter scenery. All the big high pine trees covered with snow but it doesn't get cold. There isn't a bit of ice along the edges of the creek. There has only been one day that I haven't worked since I have been up here. That was Sunday the 7 December 1941; change day. When we change shifts from day to night or night to day. I guess we will work about every day now. This mine produces quite a bit of copper. Well, I can't think of any more to write about. There isn't much doing here except work and sleep and eat. So will close. Write soon and take care of yourself. With Lots of Love, Avondale Holden, Washington December 18, 1941 Dear Mother, Well, it is about Christmas time again and I have been trying to get some Christmas cards sent off. I had my roommate here send down to Wenatchee and have his wife get me 10 cards and send them up here to me. But I find I am two cards short of what I wanted to send. So I went over to the store here to see what I could get and all they had is boxes of 10 1-cent cards and they wouldn’t sell them one at a time. They was not fit to send anyway. So I will send you a letter and some pictures. The last ones I took at home of Letha and her babies. I had them developed at Silver Peak, Nevada when I was working there last summer but forgot to sent them sooner. I would like to have sent a card to Howard Mitchell at Wake Island but do not know whether he would get it now or not that Japan has declared war on the U.S.A. and are trying to take Wake Island away from us. Well, it is almost time for me to go to work so will close. Wishing you a Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Hope you are still feeling well. (Sent $25.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale Lovenia wrote: "Japan started bombing the Hawaiian and Wake Islands on 7 December 1941, killing many of them. Wake held out for 14 days but was took over then by ****." Holden, Washington January 8, 1942 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter written to you this morning if I can stay awake long enough. I received your last letter yesterday with my last unemployment check that I should have go last May 1941 before leaving Duchesne and the Christmas Card from Howard and Wayne Mitchell at Wake Island. That is all they wrote. I also received your Christmas card and presents O.K.; the tie is sure nice. We had a white Christmas up here. It snowed steady up until Christmas. There was about 6 feet of snow. Then it turned off clear and cold until yesterday when it started snowing again. It was down to zero a couple of times. That is the coldest it has been up here since 1937 but it has warmed up again now and is snowing. I guess it has been plenty cold over at Butte, Montana and in Kellogg, Idaho. Where is May and Dick Belt now? Are they still at Kellogg, Idaho? And what is Pete Belt doing now since he has got out of the Army? I guess your kitchen won't be any to warm if you get any real cold weather. I will get it plastered and a new floor in your bedroom the next time I come home - about Labor Day. I am making pretty good money up here. I should save quite a bit between now and then. I worked a little over time and made over $12.00 a day twice since New Years. I can't buy any new tires so might as well stay here and work and leave my car in the garage in Chelan where it is now and forget about it. Well, I don't know what more I can write so will close for this time. Write soon and tell me all the news. (Sent $20.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale January 23, 1942 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter written to you today but there isn't much to write about except that it is snowing again. It seems like every time I write to you it is snowing. Then it doesn't snow any more until about the time I write again. There has been an awful lot of snowfall but it has settled down quite a bit so there is just about 4 feet now. Well, I am still working every day. I haven't missed a day yet this year so far. My check for the first half of the month was $112.00. That isn't bad for 15 days work, do you think? That isn't all clear of course. There was $28.00 deducted for my board and room, doctor, union and club fees. No, I haven't bought any bonds yet. I have got $5.00 worth of stamps though but I am going to get about $150.00 worth of bonds right away to pay my income tax next year. I understand that they can be turned in for face value for income taxes. A person can save quite a bit of money that way by buying them now when money is needed so bad to help carry on the war. I am going to try and buy me a little nice farm in the next couple of years if I can. I can have about $1,000.00 by next fall if I stay up here and save all I can. I have $300.00 again now in a saving account in the Miners and Merchants Bank at Chelan, Washington. In case anything should happen to me, you will want to get the money. I am writing the bank today to tell them that you are my beneficiary just in case. Well, I will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourself. Tell Melvin if he wants to come here to work, I will send him money enough to make the trip on the bus and he can leave his car at home. (Sent $20.00) Love, Avondale Holden, Washington February 9, 1942 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter off to you today. I don't have to go to work until 6 P.M. I have been working day shift until yesterday. Now I change to night shift for the next two weeks. That makes it just fine for me. I won't have to get up that hour earlier for two more weeks so I will miss the first two weeks of War Saving Time that started this morning. I am glad to hear that you are getting along all right and have got enough coal to keep you warm until spring comes. We haven't had any cold weather here for about a month now but it has snowed quite a lot. There has been about 15 feet of snowfall but there is only about 5 feet on the ground now. It has thawed and melted so much lately. Well, I have sold my car. There is a fellow working here that has his own boat so he can go down the lake to town whenever he wants to and he wanted a car to keep down there so he wouldn't have to wait for busses to get where he wanted to go. He gave me $200.00 cash for it so I let him have it. I do not know just what I would have done with it for the next two or three years. I was sure lucky to get rid of it for such a good price. I am getting quite a nice saving account now. The bank sent me a card to sign and send to you to sign so it will be a joint saving account. Just in case anything should happen to me, it will be in your name too and you won't have any trouble getting it. There is no use taking any chances. I will sign the top line and you sign the second line and fill out the rest of it. I guess that is the way they want it. Sign with pen and ink. Well, I will close for this time. Hoping you are staying well and write soon. (Sent $20.00) With Lots of Love, Avondale February 25, 1942 Dear Mother, I have been expecting a letter from you every day for the last week as I haven't heard from you since the 1 February and was wondering if you had another sick spell or if you was away visiting or something. Sure hope you are feeling all right and are not feeling bad again this spring like you was when I was home a year ago. There isn't much news to write about from up here except that I sold my car the other day and was sure glad to get rid of it. The way things are about tires these days and all the rest, I was afraid it will be quite a few years before I could buy car tires when I wanted them again. I got a good price for it; almost as much as I paid for it so I think I am quite lucky to sell it. We have all voted for a raise in wages at the mine here. Don't know whether we will get it or not but the Union is sure after them. March 10 is set as the dead line so don't know just what will happen. Whether we will get our raise or strike or what. Hope we get our raise as I have been planning on staying here until fall and getting me that farm I have been wanting. I haven't seen any signs of spring weather up here yet. It snows about every other day but it doesn't amount to much. There is still about three feet of old snow on the ground yet. Well, I will close for this time hoping to hear from you real soon. With Lots of Love, Avondale Holden, Washington March 9, 1942 Dear Mother, I received your letter all right. It was sent to Holden, Utah by mistake. That is why I didn't receive it sooner. I should get another one today as we do not get mail here on Sundays. I am going to leave here tomorrow and find another job as the Union has been trying to get us a raise in wages for a month now and Wednesday is the dead line. The Company says they won't give us our raise so we are going out on a strike Wednesday March 10. I am quitting and leaving tomorrow so that I won't be tied up in the strike and can get me another job and keep working. I would like to work every day that I possibly can for the next couple of years. I can't get that farm of mine if I don't work for it. I believe that I will go over to Kellogg, Idaho and see if I can't find a job there. So don't write until you hear from me again. I will write again in a few days as I do not know for sure just where I will be. I have saved quite a bit of money while I have been up here working and I sold my car. The overtime I have worked - every few days at time and a half pay - has sure helped. I will leave $600.00 in the bank at Chelan, Washington in both your name and mine so it can draw interest. Sure hope I can leave it there until I can buy that farm. Well, take care of yourself, Mother and I will write again in a few days and let you know how I make out finding another job. I am leaving in good standing with the Union so I can come back some other time if I want to. With Lots of Love, Avondale The next letter Lovenia received was from Ketchikan, Alaska. It came about a week later. It was written on a dinner menu from the Alaska Cruise Ship, North Seas for the Northland Transportation Company. It was a menu for Wednesday March 18, 1942 on board S.S. North Sea. Dear Mother, I decided to come to Alaska for this summer. I don't know just what I will do yet. But I am going on to Juneau first. We are docked here at Ketchikan, Alaska now. Sure had a swell trip so far. We are through all the rough waters now. I will write as soon as I get settled. Love, Avondale Juneau, Alaska March 23, 1942 Dear Mother, Just arrived in Juneau, Alaska last evening and we sure had a swell trip. We were five days getting here from Seattle, Washington. I have had several offers of jobs this morning but don't know just which I will take yet. Whether to work here in Juneau or go inland farther. I will write again in a few days. With Lots of Love, Avondale Lovenia wrote: So he had gone up into Alaska again to find work. It sure is far away and leaves me so alone. It would take quite a few days for him to get back again if anything should happen to any of the rest of us. That was where he was when Daddy Giles died just 4 years ago now the 3 August. Sitka, Alaska April 1, 1942 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter off to you this evening. I should of written sooner but have been getting used to my new job. I started to work here at the Naval Base Saturday March 28, 1942 and I am getting along fine. But I am not getting as much money as I thought I would but I have an awful easy job - not much to do. When I came up here to Alaska, I planned on working on the new road - the highway - that is going to be built up here. But I was a little to early for that job so I came over here. I may go back over to Juneau, Alaska about the first of May and get a job on the highway for the summer. But they tell me I can't transfer from one job to another. You have to keep the job they give you and I could make a lot more money than I am getting here. I am making $54.00 a week on the job I have got but it costs me $2.00 a day for board and room. Well, my 31 birthday has come again. Sure seems like it comes pretty often the last few years so that I am getting older faster than I care about but nothing I can do about it; the years will come and go. Jimmy Hatch, Harvey and his wife, Frances Hatch are here. I saw Harvey and Frances over in town the other day or evening and Jimmy has been sick a bed here for a few days now. Quite a few are off work with bad colds and flu. Well, I can't think of much to write - not suppose to write about the weather or the work here. I am working every day and feeling fine. Sure hope you are feeling all right. I am sending a money order for $25.00. I don't know whether the mail is censored or not but I guess you will get it O.K. Write soon and take care of yourself. You had better send your letters by airmail or it will take it forever to get up here. With Lots of Love, Avondale Sitka, Alaska April 21, 1942 Dear Mother, I will try and get your letter answered this evening. I received your letter dated April 10, on April 16th so it takes longer to get mail up here sometimes than it does other times. When I was up here in 1938, there was no airmail from Seattle, Washington. Everything - all ships and mail from the United States - goes to Juneau first. Then back to Sitka. Because Petersburg and Sitka are in the same longitude, only Sitka is further west and not on the mail traveled route. So I didn't really go past Sitka to get here - that is the way you have to travel. Sure glad that you are feeling so well this spring. You wasn't feeling so well a year ago now. Sure hope you don't have to have any more of those sick spells. How is Letha and family getting along by now? Hope they are better. I sure hope you don't do too much digging in the garden this spring and over do it and get down again. I would let the garden go to the devil if I were you. Yes, I wish you would keep that letter to Howard Mitchell for me. I would like to keep it as I may never hear from him again or see him. April 22, 1942 Dear Mother, I didn't get to finish my writing last evening so will see if I can get it finished and out on the mail on tomorrows plane. I am sending you $25.00. Guess you can use it all right. I am earning enough here so I clear $52.00 a week after my board and room and Social Security is taken out. So I think I am doing pretty good. But they say there will be no more Sunday work after this so I will only clear $40.00 a week if I do not work on Sundays. But I sure have a good job - mostly inside work and no hard work at all. What is Melvin doing this spring? Still digging gilsonite I suppose. I don't see why he don't get out and get some decent work now that there is so much work to do around everywhere - so much defense work getting started. I received a letter from Pat and Edith Dunn the other day and a picture of their baby. She is 4 years old now last fall. Everyone seems to be getting along all right down that way. I would like to go back to California this fall for about a month and visit around for a while. Well, Mother, write soon and take care of yourself. With Lots of Love, Avondale Sitka, Alaska May 13, 1942 Dear Mother, I will try and get a letter off to you this evening if I can. Seems like there is always something to do or somewhere to go every evening that I don't get around to writing very often. I am still working every day and like my work just fine. I have about the best job I ever had and it pays the most money I ever made except when I was contracting in the mines a time or two. I only work six days a week now but they give me the same wages I was getting when I worked the seven days. I get a check every Thursday for $68.00 and after my board and room and Social Security is taken out, I have $53.70 clear. That is more than $11.00 a day for 6 days a week. So I think I am doing pretty good. I am taken care of a bunch of oil stoves. Clean them now and then and keep the tanks full of oil. There is no hard work to it. I am getting to be quite an oil stove mechanic. Sure glad to hear that Melvin is doing alright this spring but I don't see why he don't get out of that dirty old mine. I just received a letter from a friend of mine at Holden, Washington where I worked last winter and he has quit there too but he says they settled the strike alright and are paying the men the $1.00 a day more wages starting the first of April. I have been bicycle riding quite a bit lately for past time. There is a store over in town that has a bunch of bicycles for rent at 35 cents an hour. I and another fellow took one each last Sunday and rode six miles to the end of the road and back. There is a nice big creek out there where we fished for a while but didn't have much luck. Next Sunday we are going the other direction for four miles; then hike to an old Indian town where the town of Sitka was before the white men came to this country. I do not know if there is any fishing streams out that way or not but I will know when I come back. I am sending you $25.00. I also sent $25.00 in the last letter. Did you get it all right? Write soon and take care of yourself. With Lots of Love, Avondale Sitka, Alaska May 31, 1942 Dear Mother, I received your letter Thursday, May 28 and was glad to hear that you was feeling so well this spring and getting along all right. I am still working 63 hours a week. That is I am getting salary for nine hours a day but I don't have to work Sundays. I do my Sunday work on Saturday so I can stay home on Sundays or go fishing or something else. I was going to hike to a lake today and do a little fishing but it isn't a very nice day so decided to stay home and write some letters. Last Sunday I rode a bicycle out to the other end of the Island and took a few pictures. And the Sunday before that I hiked to the top of a 4,000 foot peak that is just behind the town and took some nice pictures from on top of it. But haven't been able to get them from the photo shop. I should be able to get them today. They have so much business that it takes about two weeks to get a roll developed after I take them to the shop. Well, I hope everybody is well and working steady. Hope Gerald has been able to get work in the city by now. If Melvin would come up here and stay for a year, he could get out of debt and save quite a bit too. There are lots of married men here working and they seem to get along all right without their wives. So Melvin should be able to do as well. I have saved another $500.00, five hundred dollars since I have been up here and I have only been working here a few days over two months. So Melvin should be able to do as well. There are lots of fellows making over a $100.00 a week clear so Melvin should be able to get out of debt in no time if he would come up here and stay just until fall. I will send him the money to come on if he wants to come. This is so much nicer place to live and work than where he is working now in those gilsonite mines that there is no comparison. Well, Mother, I am going to put another $600.00 in saving account before the end of June so it will start to draw interest the first of July. That will make $1,200.00 towards my farm. I will put it in a joint account for you and me so either of us can draw it out without the consent of the other one like I did the $600.00 I left in the Bank at Chelan, Washington. I think I will write to Melvin and see if he wants to come up here and stay until Christmas anyway. He could clear a $1,000.00 between now and then if he would. But then there is the trouble of getting passage up here. I do not know whether he could buy his fare up here or not. Maybe I better see what the company here has to say about it first. Well, Mother, I have been sort of looking at myself a little closer since I received your letter but I can't see as my skin is any softer. I am not doing any hard work so my hands are not calloused like they would be working in a mine. Other than that I can't see that my skin is any softer. I just ask a couple of other fellows living here with me and they say they don't notice any difference either. So I can't see that Alaska atmosphere makes the skin any softer. Well, Mother, I am sort of over doing this letter today so I had better close. Three pages is quite a record for me. So will close for this time and get it mailed. I am sending you $30.00. Hope you get it all right. It is just a year now since we bought the Fridgaire. How do you like it by now? It is a good thing you got it and the house fixed up when you did. It would be pretty hard to do those things now this spring with things like they are. Well, write soon and take care of yourself. With Lots of Love, Avondale Sitka, Alaska June 19, 1942 Dear Mother, I received your letter the other day and was sure glad to learn you are feeling well and doing a little traveling. I am still working six days a week and get paid for working on Sundays. I do my Sunday work on Saturday and on Mondays and go fishing or hiking on Sundays. I have had two small raises in pay since I started to work here. I am making $12.06 a day now - counting time and a half for over the 48 hours. I weighed myself the other day for the first time since I have been here and I have gained 10 pounds in less than three months. I sure feel fine here. How is Melvin doing now? And how come he quit the gilsonite mine? I didn't think he would ever leave there and find work some place else. Hope he has got a steady job some place else by now. I bought $100.00 ward bonds a week ago yesterday but do not think that I will buy any more as it doesn't make one penny in interest the first year and from 1 year to 1 1/2 years it only makes 50 cents. I bought a $200.00 Postal Savings bond yesterday like I had when I was up here in 1938. One year from this July 1st, it will make me $4.00 interest. I am going to buy another Postal Savings Bond for $200.00 next Thursday - that is my payday. That will make $400.00 in Postal Savings and $100.00 in War Bonds that I have saved in less than three months. I cannot see that it makes much difference whether I buy Postal Savings Bonds or War Bonds; the Government has the use of the money anyway. It should help the War along just as much one way as the other, don't you think? I was wondering, Mother, if you could get down to Roosevelt some way and rent a safe deposit box in the bank there. Then I could send you my bonds and you could have them put away for me so they would be safer than having them with me all the time up here. No, I wasn't thinking of buying any place up here. Southern Oregon is about the nicest country I have found in my travels considering climate and work and everything. That part of the country is where I have had in mind for my farm if and when I buy one. Sure glad to hear you are getting in some coal. Better get all you can handle. It might be hard to get later. Are you getting enough money to live on? I can send you more if you need it. I am sending $25.00 with this letter. Hope you get it all right. Well, I will close for this time. Write soon and take care of yourself. I am sending a picture of me on top of a 4,000 foot mountain. With Lots of Love, Avondale Sitka, Alaska July 10, 1942 Dear Mother, I received your letter of the 29 June O.K. It sure came through fast. It left Duchesne 29 June and I received it a week ago yesterday, July 2. It came in three days. I received a letter from Melvin written in Salt Lake City, Utah the 16 June. He said he was in Salt Lake City, Utah looking for work and would like to come up here in Alaska where I am if he could. He didn't say anything about money to travel on. But I supposed if he wasn't working, he wouldn't have much money so I sent him $150.00 and told him how to get a job up here. I sent it to Roosevelt so that May could send it to him whenever he happened to be. But I guess he had already started up this way by the time I received his letter because he sent it with only a 3-cent stamp postage on it and I was a long time getting it. It would have to travel by boat and be so much longer than by airmail. He sent me a card from Seattle, Washington on the 24 June but only put a 1-cent stamp on it. So he would come right a long on the same boat or ship with it as far as Juneau, Alaska. And by the time I received it, here at Sitka, he was more than likely to be wherever he was going; Anchorage I think is where he was headed for. He said he would be working for the West Construction Company and they have a big job there at Anchorage to do. I am writing to May to tell her if she doesn't need the $150.00 I sent him, she can send it to you and you can buy war bonds with it. You can't buy Postal Savings Bonds for me with it because I can only have one account anywhere. But you could buy them in your own name. Do they have any place in the Post Office to keep such things? I had to carry them around with me before and that isn't so good in case of fire or theft. Maybe it would be better to rent a box in the bank at Roosevelt for them. I will get another $200.00 Postal Savings Bond the next time I write and send them and my bankbook from Chelan, Washington to you. Well, Mother, I am still working at the same job and like it fine. But it won't be so good this winter because the work I do will almost double in the wintertime. Maybe I will come home for Thanksgiven. I will have about $2,000.00 saved up by that time. I will close for this time, Mother. Write soon and don't over do yourself working in the garden. How is next winter's coal? Maybe you had better buy coal instead of bonds with that money I sent Melvin. Write soon. (Sent $45.00) Lots of Love, Avondale Lovenia wrote: All these letters that he has sent to me from Sitka, Alaska have come in air mail envelopes with about half of the envelope covered with the loveliest scenery of places in Alaska surrounded by the map of that part of the U.S.A. showing where different islands are in connection with each other. Some in gold with GREETINGS FROM ALASKA - Paintings from an old Russian city; with the Madonna and Child surrounded with scenery in gold. Some with different flags and emblems with pictures of old Russian churches at Sitka, Alaska. Others had REMEMBER PEARL HARBOR and DO NOT FORGET WAKE, GUAM, MIDWAY AND MANILA; LET'S GO U.S.A.; KEEP `EM FLYING; UNITED STATES ARMY; DEFEND YOUR COUNTRY; ENLIST NOW; WIN THE WAR; BUY DEFENSE STAMPS AND BONDS. The last one had the Seal of the Territory of Alaska with Defend Alaska; with the American and Alaska flags; United States Army and other things printed on them in shinny gold or different colors that was about as shinny. The envelope was about covered all over. With the stamp, 6-cent airmail and my address, there was not much space that something was not on. But all spaced so one did not interfere with the others. Some of the writing paper had pictures of different animals that are to be found up that way printed on them with a big ALASKA on them. So I have enjoyed his letters and envelopes and will save them all for my stamp album. They will make a nice shiny page. This was the end of the record that Lovenia kept for Avondale. She died in 1943 while he and Melvin were still in Alaska working. Avondale was able to come home at that time for a while to get things settled. As far as we know, he never bought his little farm. He spent most of the time in Alaska from that time on. He had a commercial fishing boat and would spend the summers fishing and go to Utah in the wintertime and live with Letha and her family. There is one more letter that can be added to his story: Alitah, Alaska December 2, 1963 Dear Melvin, May & Family, A few lines to wish you a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. And let you know I am still in the same place doing the same work. This is my fifth winter here. I think it will be my last; if I have a good salmon season next summer I won't stay in for the crab canning. Last summer we had a strike so I only got to fish the last four weeks of the salmon season - should of fished 9 weeks. So I didn't do so good and this winter we are only working two and three days a week. Seafood isn't selling so good now. To many fish poison cases around the world. People aren't buying the stuff. We have sure had some rotten weather lately. The coldest I have seen in five winters here -2 with 60-70 mile an hour blizzard. No mail planes for days. Don't know when this will get out. Hope you are having better weather down there and all staying well. Sorry to hear about Lorraine. I am sending the clipping back to you. Love & Best Wishes, Avondale Avondale died in Salt Lake City on March 14, 1969. His obituary read: AVONDALE MOWER Avondale Mower, 57, 130 Mead Ave., died March 13, in a Salt Lake hospital of natural causes. Born April 1, 1911, Fairview, Sanpete County to Silas Willard and Lovenia Ann Rigby Mower. Alaska fisherman, 35 years. Member L.D.S. Church. Survivors: brother, sister, Melvin R. Mower; Mrs. Letha Blackburn, both Salt Lake City. Funeral Monday 11 a.m., Redwood Memorial Estates, where friends call one hour prior to services. Burial, Mountain View Memorial Park. Information for this history came from the journals of Lovenia Ann Rigby Mower Giles. Marilyn Mower Lougee typed it in 1990.

Life timeline of Avondale Mower

1911
Avondale Mower was born on 1 Apr 1911
Avondale Mower was 19 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Avondale Mower was 28 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Avondale Mower was 34 years old when World War II: Nagasaki is devastated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, is dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. Thirty-five thousand people are killed outright, including 23,200-28,200 Japanese war workers, 2,000 Korean forced workers, and 150 Japanese soldiers. Nagasaki is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan. The city's name, 長崎, means "long cape" in Japanese. Nagasaki became a centre of colonial Portuguese and Dutch influence in the 16th through 19th centuries, and the Hidden Christian Sites in the Nagasaki Region have been recognized and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Part of Nagasaki was home to a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War.
Avondale Mower was 42 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Avondale Mower died on 14 Mar 1969 at the age of 57
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Avondale Mower (1 Apr 1911 - 14 Mar 1969), BillionGraves Record 1507855 Cottonwood Heights, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

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