Arthur H. Anderson

19 Feb 1886 - 6 Dec 1956

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Arthur H. Anderson

19 Feb 1886 - 6 Dec 1956
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Grave site information of Arthur H. Anderson (19 Feb 1886 - 6 Dec 1956) at Monticello City Cemetery in Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Arthur H. Anderson

Born:
Died:

Monticello City Cemetery

Monticello Cemetery Rd
Monticello, San Juan, Utah
United States
Transcriber

kevsha

July 11, 2014
Photographer

insulatedquilter

July 10, 2014

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Memories

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Arthur Homer Anderson (written by wife, Margaret Sophia)

Contributor: kevsha Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

Born: Ephraim, Sanpete, utah 19 Feb 1886 Started school when five years of age because they had to have enough children to get a teacher in the school. He was the oldest child not attending school so he was allowed to start early. He told his daughter of one memory he had when they were living out in an area called Mannasa, he was all dressed up ready to go to the big Fourth of July celebration. Instead of waiting, he went to the neighbors to visit. When he looked up he saw his folks going over the logs through the swamps. Yelling for them to wait, he took off on the run...after them across the logs. Through his tears he couldn't see his footsteps clearly, so he soon fell over his head into the mire. Needless to say, he was thoroughly spanked, then bathed. They took him to Grandmother Peterson's house, where his clothes were washed and ironed before going on to the celebration. Arthur left his Mother's home about the time he was twelve years of age to work for board, room and clothes. His first employment was herding sheep on the West Mountains by Maple Canyon. His employer at one time, promised to come and get him for the turning on of electric lights in Ephraim. He waited and waited on the appointed day, but the employer had forgotten his promise. Later in life he told how disappointed he was when no one came. He laid in his tent watching the lights go on through tear-dimmed eyes. When the employer did remember him and returned to the mountain, he was no where to be found. He had left and failed to return for a whole week during which the owner had to remain with the sheep. During the time of the searching for polygamist's husbands and families, the family of Maria petrea Anderson was sent by her husband to live in Spanish Fork and Mount Pleasant. For a long time they lived with the parents of the older wife's parents, the Jensens. He says he was a big boy before he knew they weren't really his grandparents. His memories of the life of a child in polygamy were mostly normal happy childhood memories. he remembers how hard they all had to work, and that he seldom saw his Father. He was so busy with his civic and Church calling. But he remembered no bitterness or trouble between the wives.

Memories of Father by Loraine

Contributor: kevsha Created: 2 years ago Updated: 2 years ago

I remember nothing but feelings of love and happiness in my early life. Perhaps I remember some events well because of the emotions shown at the time by mother and father who I loved very much. The home of my youth was very modest- but comfortable. It contained two rooms and was situated on one end of my Grandfather's lot. It was heated by a large cast-iron cook stove in the kitchen and a pot-bellied Franklin Heater in the room which served as both living and bedroom. Father would haul wood from the nearby hills each summer and fall to satisfy their voracious appetites. Mother never did have a cook stove except of this variety, but we did eventually own a beautiful Heatrola for the living room in the larger home we purchased from Uncle Jude and Aunt Ruth Bailey when they moved to California to seek their fortune. I don't remember when this happened, but it must have been about 1923 or 24. Father, or Dad as we called him , I felt sure was the most handsome man alive. He was medium height [about 5'9"] blonde and blue-eyed and very strong. He loved all sports and was very good at them. I remember well watching him participate in basketball, run a foot race, play first base on a baseball team or referee a wrestling match. He also had a short-fused temper when upset. How well I remember him picking up one boxer -- or wrestler [ I don't remember which] spinning him over his head and throwing him out of the ring for using profanity. He wasn't above using some strong language himself when working with his team etc., but it was not permitted at a sporting event. Most of all I remember Dad's industry. He could do almost anything well and loved to work. He was a pattern for me to follow both in working and building things. I learned to love the same things by his example as well as those of my Grandmother Bailey. And could he DANCE! Even up to the time I was married and left home, I preferred a waltz with my Dad to one with any young man. Rumor had it-- he had once won a prize at Saltair for waltzing. In fact he was still going dancing just before his last illness and death in 1956. The family home where we spent most of our childhood and where our family grew from two children to four with the addition of Margaret Marie in 1924 and Jack N. in 1926 was three blocks East of our first home. I do remember we were there when Grandfather Bailey died in July of 1925. My cousin, Keith came tearing around the house as Mother was trying to put us down for a nap. I remember we were sleeping on the back porch where we had escaped for the hot summer nights. Later in life that back porch became an added room to be combined with our old kitchen for Grandmother to use when she came to live with us. Dad added on a new kitchen to the North for Mother at that time and also converted a portion of our front porch into a new bedroom for Margaret and I. This new kitchen had cabinets "clear to the ceiling" and a sink with water on a countertop. This was years later-- about 1936. There was still only an icebox on the East porch for refrigeration. But we had ICE, a luxury most folks had to buy thanks to some more of Dad's industry and the big icehouse out back in the clump of oak trees growing on part of our property. That was also the year of the "inside bathroom and shower"-- very archaic by today's standards. But after years of the "little house outback" it was a real luxury! Our floors were never covered by carpet--linoleum was used everywhere. Mother had her first sofa when I started to date at about 15 or 16. It proved to be small comfort in the cold Monticello winters being too far from the Heatrola in the Front Room or the fireplace in the dining room. We would still pull up straight chairs to be nearer to our source of comfort after coming in from the weather. Another vivid memory was the year of my first grade which I spent in a little one-room school which held 18 students who were in first through eighth grades and one teacher. This was in a coal-mining community just out of Price called Sweets. We lived that winter in a tenthouse with a wooden floor. That winter was a memorable Christmas. I had never seen such a wonder as coming over the hill from the South of Price and seeing their main street lighted up for the holidays. Never had I beheld or even dreamed of such a sight. We were taken to the J.C. Penney Store where we could select the gift we wanted the most from Santa. My sister and I chose dolls. How wonderful it was to see that Santa had known the exact one we wanted when Christmas morning came. It was even more wonderful because we had found an apartment in Price and had just moved and he found us there. Our family had now grown by the addition of a sister, Margaret and soon to be followed by a second brother, Jack N. The next years were happy carefree ones for us as children. With a move back to our home in Monticello, we were surrounded by loving parents and grandparents, uncles and aunts and a bevy of cousins besides neighbors who really were all of this small community which boasted a top population of 500 people. Happy for us, but hard for our parents. The great depression had come, crops failed (The farms they owned and had homesteaded were both dry farms and this was the era of the great dust bowl.) Crop failures and drought resulted in their loss. Dad was able to salvage only our little home as all his savings were lost in the bank failures. But he had a strong work ethic and a good strong team of horses, a couple of riding horses, some pigs and a flock of chickens, a milk cow and room for pasture and a garden. Each year he would travel over the intermountain states shearing sheep wherever he could find work. He took any odd jobs building bridges, houses barns and even little outhouses in the back under a government work project. We would have to shoulder the work at home whenever Dad was away. I remember weeding garden, milking cows, making soap, feed chickens, taking cows to pasture on my horse, named Cricket who was coal black. When it was haying time I preferred riding the derrick horse to helping in the house. A special memory was the unloading of the sacks of our last wheat crop from the farm into the granary. We were allowed to be inside as men would dump the golden treasure. and it was great fun to feel the grain build up around us and then to slide down the resulting hill. It was a most wonderful mountain and not cold at all. Poor, but not feeling it-- everyone was in the same situation.

Life timeline of Arthur H. Anderson

1886
Arthur H. Anderson was born on 19 Feb 1886
Arthur H. Anderson was 10 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
Arthur H. Anderson was 23 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Arthur H. Anderson was 26 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Arthur H. Anderson was 44 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Arthur H. Anderson was 54 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Arthur H. Anderson was 56 years old when World War II: The Imperial Japanese Navy made a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, intending to neutralize the United States Pacific Fleet from influencing the war Japan was planning to wage in Southeast Asia. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Arthur H. Anderson died on 6 Dec 1956 at the age of 70
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Arthur H. Anderson (19 Feb 1886 - 6 Dec 1956), BillionGraves Record 9306618 Monticello, San Juan, Utah, United States

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