Andrew Lindsay

14 Apr 1853 - 15 Apr 1936

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Andrew Lindsay

14 Apr 1853 - 15 Apr 1936
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Grave site information of Andrew Lindsay (14 Apr 1853 - 15 Apr 1936) at Heber City Cemetery in Heber, Wasatch, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Andrew Lindsay

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Heber City Cemetery

Loren Mair Ln
Heber, Wasatch, Utah
United States

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Wm Lindsay Family Immigration

Contributor: Hilljr Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

LINDSAY FAMILY Mormon Immigration Index CD-rom LINDSAY, Christiana <1822> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 40 Origin: Scotland Occ: Widow LINDSAY, Robert <1847> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 15 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, William <1850> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 12 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, James <1852> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 10 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Samuel <1853> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 9 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Andrew <1855> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 7 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Jane <1857> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 5 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Isabella <1859> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 3 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Janet <1862> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: infant Origin: Scotland Note: "Infant" (BMR) (BMR: British Mission Registers, 1849–1885, 1899–1923. Historical Department Archives. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. (FHL films 25690–25695). P. 185) Ship: John J. Boyd Date of Departure: 23 Apr 1862 Port of Departure: Liverpool, England LDS Immigrants: 702 Church Leader: James S. Brown Date of Arrival: 1 Jun 1862 Port of Arrival: New York, New York Source(s): BMR, Book #1047, pp. 87-125 (FHL #025,691); Customs (FHL #175,575) JOHN J. BOYD 1862 A Compilation of General Voyage Notes "DEPARTURE. -- The packet ship John J. Boyd, Captain H. Thomas, sailed on the 23rd instant for New York, with 702 souls of the Saints on board. On Monday afternoon, the 21st instant, Presidents Lyman, Rich, and Cannon visited the vessel, as she lay in the river, organized the company appointing Elder James S. Brown president, and Elders John Lindsay and Joseph C. Rich his counselors, and delivered addresses to the Saints on their duties and the necessity for their living continually so as to enjoy the Holy Spirit, that its influence might sustain them under the changing scenes and varied circumstances incident to the journey they had entered upon. The Spirit of God was poured forth, and a holy influence shed its power upon all on board. Elder James S. Brown, late president of the Nottingham District, Elder Joseph C. Rich, late president of the Derbyshire Conference, Elder R. A. McBride, late traveling elder in the London Conference, who all arrived from Zion on the 27th July, 1860; Elder Charles Welch, late president of Hull Conference, Elder R. Hodgerts, late president of the South Conference, Elder Henry Duce, late traveling elder in the Derbyshire Conference, who arrived on September 18th, 1860; and Elder Edward Pugh, late traveling elder in the Herefordshire Conference, who arrived July 28th, 1861, who have been on missions to these lands, left with this company on their return to their homes in the valleys of the mountains. These brethren have labored diligently in the ministry since their arrival here from Zion, and carry home with them the blessings of the presidency and the prayers of those who have been benefitted by their labors. Elder J. S. Brown has suffered more or less from sickness since his arrival; but, by the assistance of the Holy Spirit, he has been able, in his weakness, to do a good work. Elders John Lindsay, late president of the Lincolnshire Conference, Abraham Orme, late president of the Leicester Conference, Aaron Nelson, president of the Derbyshire Conference previous to Elder J. C. Rich's appointment, Edwin Scott, late traveling elder in the Essex Conference, and Daniel Matheson, late traveling elder in the Bedfordshire Conference, of the native ministry, hailed with much joy the arrival of the period when they were privileged to go to Zion with the gathering Saints. May the blessings of heaven be with all on board, and ere long land them safely on the shores of the land of Joseph, and enable them to reach their mountain home with joy and rejoicing." (Millennial Star 24:18 (May 3, 1862), p.283) "Wed. 23. [Apr. 1862] -- The ship John J. Boyd sailed from Liverpool, England, with 701 Saints, under the direction of James S. Brown; it arrived at New York June 1st." (CC - Church Chronology: A Record of Important Events Pertaining to the History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 2nd ed. Revised and compiled by Andrew Jenson, 1899. (FHL book 289.309 J453c and fiche 6053255; 1914 ed. on film 599327 item 2 and fiche 6051314 p.67) Autobiography of James Lindsay our ancestor . . . I am certain that the reason we were brought to this wonderful land was on account of our parents being such staunch supporters of Mormonism and made their home a gathering place of the elders and converts to the Church. So as the Bible says, "Cast your bread upon the waters, and after many days it will return to you ten fold." [Ecclesiastes 11:1] It proved so in our case. On April 19, we took the train from Glasgow, and from there we traveled by boat to Liverpool, there we were transferred to the sailing ship, John J. Boyd. We sailed out onto the broad Atlantic Ocean, with no other thought in mind but to get to Zion. The trip was practically without incident. After five weeks and four days one morning we sighted land, and I don't think Columbus and his crew were any more pleased than we were. The ship docked at Castle Garden, and we were herded like sheep to street cars, and were put on the train. Talk about rough riding I don't think a trip down Lake Creek Canyon on a wagon load of wood was any worse. At this time, 1862 the North and South were at war and terrible battles were being fought. The railroads were not like they are now, we didn't know at the time why they went so fast over such rough roads. The real reason was, fear of being captured by the Southern Army. Arriving at St. Louis we were transferred to a steamboat and traveled up the Missouri to Omaha. We had to wait here for three weeks for the ox teams to take us on the last part of our thousand mile journey across the plains and mountains to our new home. While waiting for the wagon train, there were some terrible thunder storms, and several men were killed. I must mention at this time, that we were met at the boat by Robert McKnight. He had a basket of scones and butter and buttermilk. It was a blessing from God to us for all we had had for several days was dry bread that dear mother had rationed out to us, and gone without herself. The food brightened us up and also made like long friends of the McKnight family. If this good man had been paid for his medical services that he gave to the pioneers in Heber Valley, his old age could have been more comfortable. His main remedy was herbs. The midwives also gave their time and services with very little compensation. The Church had a store at Florence and w were able to get what we needed for our journey. We waited seven weeks before the wagons came [p.1] to take us to Salt Lake City. It was a strange sight to us when they did come. We had never seen oxen and men driving them with their long whips and shouting, "Whoa, Ha and Gee" at them. We were assigned to John Turner's wagon in Homer Duncan's train to cross the plains. It was a very trying time for everyone traveling day after day in the heat, dust and winds. We did our cooking in skillets over smokey fires and slept in tents with ten to fifteen men, women and children. Flour and bacon was about all the food we had. Usually the water was bad, and sometimes no wood to burn. It was in this way that we moved along at about fifteen miles a day, often resting on Saturday afternoon to wash and clean ourselves up. All day Sunday was spent resting. Prayers were offered night and morning, and often signing and dancing in the evenings. We were two months moving from Florence to Salt Lake and Heber, arriving on September 21, 1862. . . . . . [p.2] (BIB: Lindsay, James. Autobiography ) Diary/Autobiography of William Lindsay older brother of our James Lindsay . . . When the letter came from Liverpool telling us passages for all our family had been secured on the sailing ship John J. Boyd and telling us to sell everything we would not need on the journey and come to Liverpool in site of three days to get on board the ship which would sail April 22, 1862. This letter caused great rejoicing. Brother Sam ran around the house shouting, “Boys this is the best letter ever came to our home.” This was the first ship that season. . . . We received the letter on Thursday and on Saturday the 19th of April, 1862 we left Kiel . . . on the train to Glasgow where we were met by Brother Robert Sam who took us in charge and helped us get our luggage on board a small steamboat bound for Liverpool. It was late in the afternoon when we started on the trip down the River. . . which was a very fine river. We passed where many large ships are built and went out into the open sea. We were on the open deck of the ship and without any shelter along with other passengers. No chance to sleep but being seasick, we could not sleep anyway. This is our first seasick experience. Two of the passengers got into a fight right close by & one called the other a son of a b. . That was the first time I ever heard those words. It was quite windy & the sea was rough & nearly all were seasick. But we landed in Liverpool about ten, next morning & got on board the ship John J. Boyd where there were 700 Mormon emigrants getting assigned to their berths & bunks preparatory to starting on the trip across the Atlantic Ocean, 3,000 miles of water. Of course, there was some bustle & confusion in getting all properly placed. Then the ship was divided into 6 wards & a man was appointed to look after each ward. James S. Brown was president of the company & John G. Lindsay and Joseph C. Rich were his counselors. It was really wonderful to see how soon all got settled down & knew their own places & their rights & privileges on the ship. There was a large double stove or galley where all the cooking had to be done for 700 people, so you may see it was hard to get much cooking done. We sailed from Liverpool on the 22nd of April, 1862 bound for New York & had what was called a fairly good passage over the sea. However, we had one quite hard storm that shook things up some, but no great damage was done. Of course, the ship was being tossed about & was lurching badly. Two women right close to us were very much excited & crying. I could not help smiling although I had to keep a hold of the bunk to keep from being thrown out. I thought it absurd to suppose that a ship with 700 Saints bound for Zion could possibly sink. I even then as a boy of fifteen had faith we would be preserved, which we were & all except one man & child that died & were buried at sea came safely to land at New York on the 4th of June. Captain Thomas seemed to be a very fine gentleman but 2 of the mates were very cruel and tyrannical with the ships crew & stowaways. We saw many fish of different kinds while crossing & nearly all had several sieges of seasickness. Very few escape this sickness. We were landed at Castle Garden, the emigrant home in New York and stayed there 2 days & nights. The sights were beautiful as we came into New York. But the men on guard had hard work to keep sharpers from getting among us emigrants. Leaving New York we were marched through the streets to where the horse cars took us to the Hudson River where we went on a steamboat up to Albany. There we were shut up in a railroad roundhouse until a train came to take us farther on our journey. We went by Niagara Falls & saw that mighty stream foaming white as it tumbled over the precipice. We also passed through Detroit & Chicago & up the Mississippi to Hannibal. [p. 273] Then on the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad to St. Joseph, Missouri. The Civil War was in full swing & there were soldiers guarding the bridge as we were close to the Confederate lines. We had very little food to eat on the journey from New York. The ship’s fare was bad enough but it was better than none and we went hungry most of the 10 days coming to Florence, Nebraska. At St. Joseph we were transferred to a steamboat to go up the Missouri River some 250 miles. We were some 3 days on the boat. Just an open boat, no shelter from the heat or cold but we got some of the scraps left from the boat hands’ table. We had to sleep just any place on the deck and sometimes had to move in the night. Old Robert McKnight was at the landing at Florence to meet us. He had a small basket of scones & a bucket of milk & you may be sure we were glad to see him and relieve him of the scones & milk. . . .Our family were quartered in a small log cabin very likely built by some of the pioneers. While at Florence we got our food supplies from the church stores fared very well. The Montgomery came two weeks later & Mother invited them to share our little cabin. We all lived there 5 weeks longer waiting for the teams to come from Utah to haul our luggage across the plains. While here we were visited by the worst storm of thunder, lightning, winds, & rain that I ever saw. Two men were killed & several injured in that storm. While there I helped to herd a bunch of church cattle on the hills. About the 20th of July Captain Homer Duncan’s oxtrain arrived & we were assigned to John Turner’s wagon. This was a strange & a wonderful sight to us who had never seen oxen hitched to wagons. And the teamsters shouting & cracking their big long ships it sure was all very strange to us at first. As quicky as possible we started on the dreary tramp of 1000 miles. Tents were provided one for every wagon & a man appointed to see that the tents were properly staked down each night & placed in the wagon next morning. An average of 12 persons slept in each tent & had all their belongings in one wagon. Prayers were held in the camp night & morning, all were called together for that purpose at the sound of the bugle & the captain gave counsel & issued orders for the day. Flour & bacon was furnished to everybody but of course every family had to do their own cooking, bake, skillets & frying pans & camp kettles were furnished. Most of the time we could get wood to make the fires. But it was really a great trial for many people to cook their food outdoors in the heat, the wind & the smoke. But each helped the others wherever they could & we got along very nicely considering the peculiar conditions they were placed in. I think we left Florence on the 22nd of July on the wearisome journey. . . . [p.275] . . .I am pleased to say my 13 men women & children all came safely through to Salt Lake City. With it all we had some good times around the campfires when we got so we could talk a little Danish & they could talk a little English. Our oxen stood the journey fairly well some of the oxen got tender footed & had to be shoed. As we came back Green River & the other streams were very low & could be forded easily. We were some 25 days on the way arriving in Salt Lake City near the last of Sept. There we unloaded our emigrants & bid them farewell. Some we left in tears as they were expecting friends to meet them & none had showed at the time we left them but no doubt would later. . . . [p.288] (BIB: Lindsay, William. Autobiography) Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Homer Duncan Company (1862) Departure: 22 July 1862 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 21-24 September 1862 Company Information: About 500 individuals were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha). Christina Howie Lindsay age 39 Elizabeth Lindsay, Andrew, age 9 Isabella, age 2 James, age 13 Jane Blackwood, age 7 Robert, age 17 Samuel, age 11 William, age 15

Andrew Lindsay my Grandpa

Contributor: Hilljr Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

I remember my Grandpa Lindsay and going up to Grandma's place and she would gave me cookies. His hair was semi white and most of the time they lived so far away I didn't get to see him very often. He was kind of a short stocky man. I know a story about him that Aunt Teenie used to tell about him. He used to walk in his sleep and he'd go out of a night and pitch the hay out of the barn so he would have it there in the morning so it was ready and he would go out in his sleep and feed the cows and horses and he thought someone was steeling his hay because he'd go out there the next morning and it was gone. One of the family followed him and discovered the truth.

Andrew Lindsay

Contributor: Hilljr Created: 4 years ago Updated: 4 years ago

Obviously he was dead long before I was born but this is the memory that my Dad, Grant Lindsay, has of him... I remember my Grandpa Lindsay and going up to Grandma's place and she would gave me cookies. His hair was semi white and most of the time they lived so far away I didn't get to see him very often. He was kind of a short stocky man. I know a story about him that Aunt Teenie used to tell about him. He used to walk in his sleep and he'd go out of a night and pitch the hay out of the barn so he would have it there in the morning so it was ready and he would go out in his sleep and feed the cows and horses and he thought someone was steeling his hay because he'd go out there the next morning and it was gone. One of the family followed him and discovered the truth.

Wm Lindsay Family Immigration

Contributor: J Created: 4 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

LINDSAY FAMILY Mormon Immigration Index CD-rom LINDSAY, Christiana <1822> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 40 Origin: Scotland Occ: Widow LINDSAY, Robert <1847> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 15 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, William <1850> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 12 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, James <1852> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 10 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Samuel <1853> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 9 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Andrew <1855> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 7 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Jane <1857> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 5 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Isabella <1859> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: 3 Origin: Scotland LINDSAY, Janet <1862> John J. Boyd 1862 Age: infant Origin: Scotland Note: "Infant" (BMR) (BMR: British Mission Registers, 1849–1885, 1899–1923. Historical Department Archives. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. (FHL films 25690–25695). P. 185) Ship: John J. Boyd Date of Departure: 23 Apr 1862 Port of Departure: Liverpool, England LDS Immigrants: 702 Church Leader: James S. Brown Date of Arrival: 1 Jun 1862 Port of Arrival: New York, New York Source(s): BMR, Book #1047, pp. 87-125 (FHL #025,691); Customs (FHL #175,575) JOHN J. BOYD 1862 A Compilation of General Voyage Notes "DEPARTURE. -- The packet ship John J. Boyd, Captain H. Thomas, sailed on the 23rd instant for New York, with 702 souls of the Saints on board. On Monday afternoon, the 21st instant, Presidents Lyman, Rich, and Cannon visited the vessel, as she lay in the river, organized the company appointing Elder James S. Brown president, and Elders John Lindsay and Joseph C. Rich his counselors, and delivered addresses to the Saints on their duties and the necessity for their living continually so as to enjoy the Holy Spirit, that its influence might sustain them under the changing scenes and varied circumstances incident to the journey they had entered upon. The Spirit of God was poured forth, and a holy influence shed its power upon all on board. Elder James S. Brown, late president of the Nottingham District, Elder Joseph C. Rich, late president of the Derbyshire Conference, Elder R. A. McBride, late traveling elder in the London Conference, who all arrived from Zion on the 27th July, 1860; Elder Charles Welch, late president of Hull Conference, Elder R. Hodgerts, late president of the South Conference, Elder Henry Duce, late traveling elder in the Derbyshire Conference, who arrived on September 18th, 1860; and Elder Edward Pugh, late traveling elder in the Herefordshire Conference, who arrived July 28th, 1861, who have been on missions to these lands, left with this company on their return to their homes in the valleys of the mountains. These brethren have labored diligently in the ministry since their arrival here from Zion, and carry home with them the blessings of the presidency and the prayers of those who have been benefitted by their labors. Elder J. S. Brown has suffered more or less from sickness since his arrival; but, by the assistance of the Holy Spirit, he has been able, in his weakness, to do a good work. Elders John Lindsay, late president of the Lincolnshire Conference, Abraham Orme, late president of the Leicester Conference, Aaron Nelson, president of the Derbyshire Conference previous to Elder J. C. Rich's appointment, Edwin Scott, late traveling elder in the Essex Conference, and Daniel Matheson, late traveling elder in the Bedfordshire Conference, of the native ministry, hailed with much joy the arrival of the period when they were privileged to go to Zion with the gathering Saints. May the blessings of heaven be with all on board, and ere long land them safely on the shores of the land of Joseph, and enable them to reach their mountain home with joy and rejoicing." (Millennial Star 24:18 (May 3, 1862), p.283) "Wed. 23. [Apr. 1862] -- The ship John J. Boyd sailed from Liverpool, England, with 701 Saints, under the direction of James S. Brown; it arrived at New York June 1st." (CC - Church Chronology: A Record of Important Events Pertaining to the History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 2nd ed. Revised and compiled by Andrew Jenson, 1899. (FHL book 289.309 J453c and fiche 6053255; 1914 ed. on film 599327 item 2 and fiche 6051314 p.67) Autobiography of James Lindsay our ancestor . . . I am certain that the reason we were brought to this wonderful land was on account of our parents being such staunch supporters of Mormonism and made their home a gathering place of the elders and converts to the Church. So as the Bible says, "Cast your bread upon the waters, and after many days it will return to you ten fold." [Ecclesiastes 11:1] It proved so in our case. On April 19, we took the train from Glasgow, and from there we traveled by boat to Liverpool, there we were transferred to the sailing ship, John J. Boyd. We sailed out onto the broad Atlantic Ocean, with no other thought in mind but to get to Zion. The trip was practically without incident. After five weeks and four days one morning we sighted land, and I don't think Columbus and his crew were any more pleased than we were. The ship docked at Castle Garden, and we were herded like sheep to street cars, and were put on the train. Talk about rough riding I don't think a trip down Lake Creek Canyon on a wagon load of wood was any worse. At this time, 1862 the North and South were at war and terrible battles were being fought. The railroads were not like they are now, we didn't know at the time why they went so fast over such rough roads. The real reason was, fear of being captured by the Southern Army. Arriving at St. Louis we were transferred to a steamboat and traveled up the Missouri to Omaha. We had to wait here for three weeks for the ox teams to take us on the last part of our thousand mile journey across the plains and mountains to our new home. While waiting for the wagon train, there were some terrible thunder storms, and several men were killed. I must mention at this time, that we were met at the boat by Robert McKnight. He had a basket of scones and butter and buttermilk. It was a blessing from God to us for all we had had for several days was dry bread that dear mother had rationed out to us, and gone without herself. The food brightened us up and also made like long friends of the McKnight family. If this good man had been paid for his medical services that he gave to the pioneers in Heber Valley, his old age could have been more comfortable. His main remedy was herbs. The midwives also gave their time and services with very little compensation. The Church had a store at Florence and w were able to get what we needed for our journey. We waited seven weeks before the wagons came [p.1] to take us to Salt Lake City. It was a strange sight to us when they did come. We had never seen oxen and men driving them with their long whips and shouting, "Whoa, Ha and Gee" at them. We were assigned to John Turner's wagon in Homer Duncan's train to cross the plains. It was a very trying time for everyone traveling day after day in the heat, dust and winds. We did our cooking in skillets over smokey fires and slept in tents with ten to fifteen men, women and children. Flour and bacon was about all the food we had. Usually the water was bad, and sometimes no wood to burn. It was in this way that we moved along at about fifteen miles a day, often resting on Saturday afternoon to wash and clean ourselves up. All day Sunday was spent resting. Prayers were offered night and morning, and often signing and dancing in the evenings. We were two months moving from Florence to Salt Lake and Heber, arriving on September 21, 1862. . . . . . [p.2] (BIB: Lindsay, James. Autobiography ) Diary/Autobiography of William Lindsay older brother of our James Lindsay . . . When the letter came from Liverpool telling us passages for all our family had been secured on the sailing ship John J. Boyd and telling us to sell everything we would not need on the journey and come to Liverpool in site of three days to get on board the ship which would sail April 22, 1862. This letter caused great rejoicing. Brother Sam ran around the house shouting, “Boys this is the best letter ever came to our home.” This was the first ship that season. . . . We received the letter on Thursday and on Saturday the 19th of April, 1862 we left Kiel . . . on the train to Glasgow where we were met by Brother Robert Sam who took us in charge and helped us get our luggage on board a small steamboat bound for Liverpool. It was late in the afternoon when we started on the trip down the River. . . which was a very fine river. We passed where many large ships are built and went out into the open sea. We were on the open deck of the ship and without any shelter along with other passengers. No chance to sleep but being seasick, we could not sleep anyway. This is our first seasick experience. Two of the passengers got into a fight right close by & one called the other a son of a b. . That was the first time I ever heard those words. It was quite windy & the sea was rough & nearly all were seasick. But we landed in Liverpool about ten, next morning & got on board the ship John J. Boyd where there were 700 Mormon emigrants getting assigned to their berths & bunks preparatory to starting on the trip across the Atlantic Ocean, 3,000 miles of water. Of course, there was some bustle & confusion in getting all properly placed. Then the ship was divided into 6 wards & a man was appointed to look after each ward. James S. Brown was president of the company & John G. Lindsay and Joseph C. Rich were his counselors. It was really wonderful to see how soon all got settled down & knew their own places & their rights & privileges on the ship. There was a large double stove or galley where all the cooking had to be done for 700 people, so you may see it was hard to get much cooking done. We sailed from Liverpool on the 22nd of April, 1862 bound for New York & had what was called a fairly good passage over the sea. However, we had one quite hard storm that shook things up some, but no great damage was done. Of course, the ship was being tossed about & was lurching badly. Two women right close to us were very much excited & crying. I could not help smiling although I had to keep a hold of the bunk to keep from being thrown out. I thought it absurd to suppose that a ship with 700 Saints bound for Zion could possibly sink. I even then as a boy of fifteen had faith we would be preserved, which we were & all except one man & child that died & were buried at sea came safely to land at New York on the 4th of June. Captain Thomas seemed to be a very fine gentleman but 2 of the mates were very cruel and tyrannical with the ships crew & stowaways. We saw many fish of different kinds while crossing & nearly all had several sieges of seasickness. Very few escape this sickness. We were landed at Castle Garden, the emigrant home in New York and stayed there 2 days & nights. The sights were beautiful as we came into New York. But the men on guard had hard work to keep sharpers from getting among us emigrants. Leaving New York we were marched through the streets to where the horse cars took us to the Hudson River where we went on a steamboat up to Albany. There we were shut up in a railroad roundhouse until a train came to take us farther on our journey. We went by Niagara Falls & saw that mighty stream foaming white as it tumbled over the precipice. We also passed through Detroit & Chicago & up the Mississippi to Hannibal. [p. 273] Then on the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad to St. Joseph, Missouri. The Civil War was in full swing & there were soldiers guarding the bridge as we were close to the Confederate lines. We had very little food to eat on the journey from New York. The ship’s fare was bad enough but it was better than none and we went hungry most of the 10 days coming to Florence, Nebraska. At St. Joseph we were transferred to a steamboat to go up the Missouri River some 250 miles. We were some 3 days on the boat. Just an open boat, no shelter from the heat or cold but we got some of the scraps left from the boat hands’ table. We had to sleep just any place on the deck and sometimes had to move in the night. Old Robert McKnight was at the landing at Florence to meet us. He had a small basket of scones & a bucket of milk & you may be sure we were glad to see him and relieve him of the scones & milk. . . .Our family were quartered in a small log cabin very likely built by some of the pioneers. While at Florence we got our food supplies from the church stores fared very well. The Montgomery came two weeks later & Mother invited them to share our little cabin. We all lived there 5 weeks longer waiting for the teams to come from Utah to haul our luggage across the plains. While here we were visited by the worst storm of thunder, lightning, winds, & rain that I ever saw. Two men were killed & several injured in that storm. While there I helped to herd a bunch of church cattle on the hills. About the 20th of July Captain Homer Duncan’s oxtrain arrived & we were assigned to John Turner’s wagon. This was a strange & a wonderful sight to us who had never seen oxen hitched to wagons. And the teamsters shouting & cracking their big long ships it sure was all very strange to us at first. As quicky as possible we started on the dreary tramp of 1000 miles. Tents were provided one for every wagon & a man appointed to see that the tents were properly staked down each night & placed in the wagon next morning. An average of 12 persons slept in each tent & had all their belongings in one wagon. Prayers were held in the camp night & morning, all were called together for that purpose at the sound of the bugle & the captain gave counsel & issued orders for the day. Flour & bacon was furnished to everybody but of course every family had to do their own cooking, bake, skillets & frying pans & camp kettles were furnished. Most of the time we could get wood to make the fires. But it was really a great trial for many people to cook their food outdoors in the heat, the wind & the smoke. But each helped the others wherever they could & we got along very nicely considering the peculiar conditions they were placed in. I think we left Florence on the 22nd of July on the wearisome journey. . . . [p.275] . . .I am pleased to say my 13 men women & children all came safely through to Salt Lake City. With it all we had some good times around the campfires when we got so we could talk a little Danish & they could talk a little English. Our oxen stood the journey fairly well some of the oxen got tender footed & had to be shoed. As we came back Green River & the other streams were very low & could be forded easily. We were some 25 days on the way arriving in Salt Lake City near the last of Sept. There we unloaded our emigrants & bid them farewell. Some we left in tears as they were expecting friends to meet them & none had showed at the time we left them but no doubt would later. . . . [p.288] (BIB: Lindsay, William. Autobiography) Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Homer Duncan Company (1862) Departure: 22 July 1862 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 21-24 September 1862 Company Information: About 500 individuals were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha). Christina Howie Lindsay age 39 Elizabeth Lindsay, Andrew, age 9 Isabella, age 2 James, age 13 Jane Blackwood, age 7 Robert, age 17 Samuel, age 11 William, age 15

Andrew Lindsay my Grandpa

Contributor: J Created: 4 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

I remember my Grandpa Lindsay and going up to Grandma's place and she would gave me cookies. His hair was semi white and most of the time they lived so far away I didn't get to see him very often. He was kind of a short stocky man. I know a story about him that Aunt Teenie used to tell about him. He used to walk in his sleep and he'd go out of a night and pitch the hay out of the barn so he would have it there in the morning so it was ready and he would go out in his sleep and feed the cows and horses and he thought someone was steeling his hay because he'd go out there the next morning and it was gone. One of the family followed him and discovered the truth.

Andrew Lindsay

Contributor: J Created: 4 years ago Updated: 8 months ago

Obviously he was dead long before I was born but this is the memory that my Dad, Grant Lindsay, has of him... I remember my Grandpa Lindsay and going up to Grandma's place and she would gave me cookies. His hair was semi white and most of the time they lived so far away I didn't get to see him very often. He was kind of a short stocky man. I know a story about him that Aunt Teenie used to tell about him. He used to walk in his sleep and he'd go out of a night and pitch the hay out of the barn so he would have it there in the morning so it was ready and he would go out in his sleep and feed the cows and horses and he thought someone was steeling his hay because he'd go out there the next morning and it was gone. One of the family followed him and discovered the truth.

Life timeline of Andrew Lindsay

1853
Andrew Lindsay was born on 14 Apr 1853
Andrew Lindsay was 16 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Andrew Lindsay was 22 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Andrew Lindsay was 32 years old when Louis Pasteur successfully tests his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. Louis Pasteur was a French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the "father of microbiology".
Andrew Lindsay was 43 years old when George VI of the United Kingdom (d. 1952) George VI was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952. He was the last Emperor of India and the first Head of the Commonwealth.
Andrew Lindsay was 56 years old when Ford puts the Model T car on the market at a price of US$825. Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom, and a 49% stake in Jiangling Motors of China. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.
Andrew Lindsay was 59 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Andrew Lindsay was 77 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Andrew Lindsay died on 15 Apr 1936 at the age of 83
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Andrew Lindsay (14 Apr 1853 - 15 Apr 1936), BillionGraves Record 6174 Heber, Wasatch, Utah, United States

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