Alexander Adamson

23 Jan 1837 - 25 Jan 1913

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Alexander Adamson

23 Jan 1837 - 25 Jan 1913
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Grave site information of Alexander Adamson (23 Jan 1837 - 25 Jan 1913) at American Fork City Cemetery in American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Alexander Adamson

Born:
Died:

American Fork City Cemetery

601-699 Alpine Hwy
American Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Sgt Utah Ter Militia.....Indian Wars

Military Service

SERGEANT
US ARMY
INDIAN WARS
Transcriber

Simini

July 30, 2011
Transcriber

Soonersports1

July 24, 2011
Transcriber

10131307t@gmail.com

October 22, 2014
Transcriber

lisa

March 18, 2020
Photographer

Nate

July 23, 2011

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Alexander Adamson

Contributor: Soonersports1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

SOURCE CITATION: Title: Ancestral File (TM) Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Publication Information: July 1996 (c), data as of 2 January 1996 Repository Name: Family History Library Address: 35 N West Temple Street Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA Information form a letter to Verda Tucker, 19 march, 1957, from Robert B Burtt, 106 Smith Ave., Sharon. PA The family sailed from London, England 3 June 1864, and arrived in New York 19 Jul 1864. !Information from Scottish Church Records Batch:C119513 Source 1040195, Fiche:6900810 These records state that he was christened on 28 Jan 1837, Information also retrieved from ancestral file ver. 4.17, Oct 12, 1997 by Loraine Darling. From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Deseret News Article About Alexander Adamson's Home

Contributor: Soonersports1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Pioneer homes open to public in American Fork By Justin Ritter, Deseret News Published: Friday, July 23 2010 6:00 p.m. MDT Jason Olson, Deseret News AMERICAN FORK — After months of traveling across the Atlantic Ocean and over the Great Plains, the Adamson family finally had a place to call home. The log house Alexander Adamson built for his family had a full basement and was made of logs that interlocked at the corners of the house. Adamson used mortar to fill in the chinks and insulate his home, where he and his wife, Mary Hutchinson, eventually raised 10 children. Nearly 150 years and one lengthy restoration later, the log home looks much the same as it did when Adamson put the finishing touches on it in 1867. "I'm really thankful that we took the effort to preserve it," said Adamson's great-grandson Robert Hall, of American Fork, as he stood outside the newly finished home at its opening Friday. "It's our heritage, and it ties us together." Adamson's house is one of three log homes in American Fork that were moved to Robinson Park and are now open to the public. While the Proctor house has been a mainstay in the park for decades, the Adamson and Brown log homes were rescued from demolition in 2006 and relocated to the park, becoming an extension of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum there. "We're trying to teach a little about American Fork history and the history of the pioneers," said Dan Adams, a member of the city's historical preservation committee who coordinated the restoration efforts. That history is a vital part of American Fork, he said. Connecting the homes to the families who lived in them and the time period they came from will help visitors understand some of what early settlers when through, he said. "It's a tool for demonstrating … the ingenuity of these early settlers and how that applies to the things that we enjoy today," he said. Hall said he found that perspective while restoring his great-grandfather's log house. "You gain such an appreciation," said Hall, who used antique tools like the ones his predecessor would have had as he worked with an army of volunteers to bring the homes back to their original state — and that was no small task. "We've tried to furnish them according to the era (they were built in)," said Karen Adams, Dan Adams' wife and president of the Utah Timp Valley DUP company. "That's not easy to do." Volunteers had to research the three time periods the houses represented — the 1850s, 1860s and the post-1880 era — and furnish the log houses accordingly with antiques from the DUP museum and other donors. That meant a box stove and canvas window coverings for the Proctor home, built inside the old fort in 1854; a wood window and log rafters for the 1867 Adamson home; and a half-story loft and a sewing machine for the Brown home, built in the 1880s. But it paid off. "Remember the phrase, 'Sleep tight'?" Karen Adams asked a group of children and parents, pointing to a rope bed in the tiny log home where Thomas and Susannah Proctor raised eight children. Swishing back and forth across the floor in a green homespun dress, she showed children everyday relics from the past — an old-fashioned iron, a wooden rocking chair and a straw tick. "They held up pretty good, don't you think?" she asked. The opening of the log homes was just one part of the 50th anniversary celebration of the DUP museum. The festivities included an evening program featuring music and a vignette depicting Myrtle Seastrand, who was the driving force behind building the museum. The log homes and museum are open Monday through Friday, 1–5 p.m., from June through August. e-mail: jritter@desnews.com

DUP AF Book 7 Biographical Sketch of Alexander Adamson

Contributor: Soonersports1 Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Alexander Adamson Pioneer Year 1861 Sailed on the Monarch of the Sea John Murdock Company by Janet Brown, granddaughter Born 23 Jan 1837 at Boreland, Fife, Scotland Married Mary Hutchison 12 Apr 1861 Alexander died in January 1913 Alexander Adamson was born January 23rd 1837, at Boreland, Fife, Scotland. The second child in a family of thirteen children. Seven boys and six girls. His parents were Henry and Margaret Nicholson Adamson. The father was a coal miner and so according to custom, Alex began his work in a mine at the early age of nine. Here it was his duty to push buckets back down the mineshaft that they might be filled. One day while working, his companion was dragged by a bucket and killed. At the age of twelve, he was put in the mine to work on the train, that carried the coal to the surface of the mine or where it could be hoisted up to the ground. He continued this occupation for many years and became very adept at his work. The working hours were long and tedious. There were times when the men didn’t see the sun until Sunday, when all work was stopped. Work consumed so much of Alex’s time that there was little opportunity to get an education. As a boy, he spent six weeks of his time at school and later was able to get a little more night schooling. When a small boy, he climbed up a tree to get a bird’s nest and fell, breaking both of his wrists. When nine years of age, on March 23, 1848, he was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by William McFarland and confirmed by John Currie. On April 12th, 1861 he was married to Mary Hutchison. The marriage was performed by Rev. Stewart. Mary was born in Wemyss, Fife, Scotland on July 26th, 1838. She was the second child of David and Jeanette Crookston Hutchison, who were pioneers of 1851. Little is known of her childhood days. At the age of eleven, she went to work in the cotton mills. Her particular work was to watch the spindles and when the thread broke, she stopped them and tied the thread. She worked at this for a year and then was given a loom upon which she could weave fine table linen, sheeting, and other fabric. She continued at this work until she was twenty-two, at which time she was married. About a month after the marriage, the couple who were both members of the Church, left their native land and started on the trip to the Valley of the Mountains to be with the Saints of God. This voyage across the ocean was made in the ship “Monarch of the Sea”, which sailed from Liverpool May 16, 1861. And arrived in New York, June 19th, 1861. While in mid ocean the Captain of the ship died and was given a seaman’s burial. The body being sewed into a canvas and consigned to the briny deep. About three months later, on September 12, 1861 they arrived in Utah. They came in the John Murdock Company. Soon after their arrival in the valley they moved to American Fork, where they remained until the following spring, when they moved to Moroni in Sanpete County. Here they built a dug out with a dirt roof to serve as a house. It was here that Janet, their first child, was born. It is related that as the Mother and child lay in bed the Mother was startled when she saw a large snake coming through the roof and dangling over the bed. The snake also became frightened and made its exit without harm to anyone. The following summer Alex made adobes and constructed a house with a dirt floor and also roof with a door made of slab. Three other children were born while the family lived in Sanpete. During their stay in Moroni, Alexander worked on his farm and participated in the Black Hawk War, as a guardsman. The family experienced many of the hardships of Pioneer life. Food became very scarce during the time of the grasshopper invasion and at one time they were five days without any bread. It is related that more than once the Father went to work with no food for lunch except a turnip he carried in his pocket. Indian attacks were frequent and, ofttimes, serious. Like most Pioneer women, Mary made the family clothing. She took the wool which her husband sheered from the sheep and cleaned, spun, and wove it. Then, by hand, constructed the clothing. It was in 1869 that the family moved back to American Fork where Alex continued to farm. The family home was built and although remodeled, still stands at 277 North 1st West. Alex Adamson helped construct the “Narrow Gauge” Railroad, which ran up American Fork Canyon. He used his team to haul much of the material used. Snow slides and heavy snowfalls often drove he and other workers out of the canyon for weeks at a time. Alexander and Mary became the parents of eleven children. Namely, Janet (Brown) Margaret (Winn), Henry, Mary Jane (Sykes) Katherine (Hutchison), Alexander, David, Elizabeth Ellen (Karren) Peter, and Thomas. They also raised their niece, Nora, a daughter of Alex's brother, David, who's wife had died. This couple received their endowments in the Manti Temple May 5th, 1897. Alexander died 25 January 1913, and Mary followed 7 June of the same year.

Alexander Adamson

Contributor: Simini Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

SOURCE CITATION: Title: Ancestral File (TM) Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Publication Information: July 1996 (c), data as of 2 January 1996 Repository Name: Family History Library Address: 35 N West Temple Street Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA Information form a letter to Verda Tucker, 19 march, 1957, from Robert B Burtt, 106 Smith Ave., Sharon. PA The family sailed from London, England 3 June 1864, and arrived in New York 19 Jul 1864. !Information from Scottish Church Records Batch:C119513 Source 1040195, Fiche:6900810 These records state that he was christened on 28 Jan 1837, Information also retrieved from ancestral file ver. 4.17, Oct 12, 1997 by Loraine Darling. From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Deseret News Article About Alexander Adamson's Home

Contributor: Simini Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Pioneer homes open to public in American Fork By Justin Ritter, Deseret News Published: Friday, July 23 2010 6:00 p.m. MDT Jason Olson, Deseret News AMERICAN FORK — After months of traveling across the Atlantic Ocean and over the Great Plains, the Adamson family finally had a place to call home. The log house Alexander Adamson built for his family had a full basement and was made of logs that interlocked at the corners of the house. Adamson used mortar to fill in the chinks and insulate his home, where he and his wife, Mary Hutchinson, eventually raised 10 children. Nearly 150 years and one lengthy restoration later, the log home looks much the same as it did when Adamson put the finishing touches on it in 1867. "I'm really thankful that we took the effort to preserve it," said Adamson's great-grandson Robert Hall, of American Fork, as he stood outside the newly finished home at its opening Friday. "It's our heritage, and it ties us together." Adamson's house is one of three log homes in American Fork that were moved to Robinson Park and are now open to the public. While the Proctor house has been a mainstay in the park for decades, the Adamson and Brown log homes were rescued from demolition in 2006 and relocated to the park, becoming an extension of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum there. "We're trying to teach a little about American Fork history and the history of the pioneers," said Dan Adams, a member of the city's historical preservation committee who coordinated the restoration efforts. That history is a vital part of American Fork, he said. Connecting the homes to the families who lived in them and the time period they came from will help visitors understand some of what early settlers when through, he said. "It's a tool for demonstrating … the ingenuity of these early settlers and how that applies to the things that we enjoy today," he said. Hall said he found that perspective while restoring his great-grandfather's log house. "You gain such an appreciation," said Hall, who used antique tools like the ones his predecessor would have had as he worked with an army of volunteers to bring the homes back to their original state — and that was no small task. "We've tried to furnish them according to the era (they were built in)," said Karen Adams, Dan Adams' wife and president of the Utah Timp Valley DUP company. "That's not easy to do." Volunteers had to research the three time periods the houses represented — the 1850s, 1860s and the post-1880 era — and furnish the log houses accordingly with antiques from the DUP museum and other donors. That meant a box stove and canvas window coverings for the Proctor home, built inside the old fort in 1854; a wood window and log rafters for the 1867 Adamson home; and a half-story loft and a sewing machine for the Brown home, built in the 1880s. But it paid off. "Remember the phrase, 'Sleep tight'?" Karen Adams asked a group of children and parents, pointing to a rope bed in the tiny log home where Thomas and Susannah Proctor raised eight children. Swishing back and forth across the floor in a green homespun dress, she showed children everyday relics from the past — an old-fashioned iron, a wooden rocking chair and a straw tick. "They held up pretty good, don't you think?" she asked. The opening of the log homes was just one part of the 50th anniversary celebration of the DUP museum. The festivities included an evening program featuring music and a vignette depicting Myrtle Seastrand, who was the driving force behind building the museum. The log homes and museum are open Monday through Friday, 1–5 p.m., from June through August. e-mail: jritter@desnews.com

DUP AF Book 7 Biographical Sketch of Alexander Adamson

Contributor: Simini Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Alexander Adamson Pioneer Year 1861 Sailed on the Monarch of the Sea John Murdock Company by Janet Brown, granddaughter Born 23 Jan 1837 at Boreland, Fife, Scotland Married Mary Hutchison 12 Apr 1861 Alexander died in January 1913 Alexander Adamson was born January 23rd 1837, at Boreland, Fife, Scotland. The second child in a family of thirteen children. Seven boys and six girls. His parents were Henry and Margaret Nicholson Adamson. The father was a coal miner and so according to custom, Alex began his work in a mine at the early age of nine. Here it was his duty to push buckets back down the mineshaft that they might be filled. One day while working, his companion was dragged by a bucket and killed. At the age of twelve, he was put in the mine to work on the train, that carried the coal to the surface of the mine or where it could be hoisted up to the ground. He continued this occupation for many years and became very adept at his work. The working hours were long and tedious. There were times when the men didn’t see the sun until Sunday, when all work was stopped. Work consumed so much of Alex’s time that there was little opportunity to get an education. As a boy, he spent six weeks of his time at school and later was able to get a little more night schooling. When a small boy, he climbed up a tree to get a bird’s nest and fell, breaking both of his wrists. When nine years of age, on March 23, 1848, he was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by William McFarland and confirmed by John Currie. On April 12th, 1861 he was married to Mary Hutchison. The marriage was performed by Rev. Stewart. Mary was born in Wemyss, Fife, Scotland on July 26th, 1838. She was the second child of David and Jeanette Crookston Hutchison, who were pioneers of 1851. Little is known of her childhood days. At the age of eleven, she went to work in the cotton mills. Her particular work was to watch the spindles and when the thread broke, she stopped them and tied the thread. She worked at this for a year and then was given a loom upon which she could weave fine table linen, sheeting, and other fabric. She continued at this work until she was twenty-two, at which time she was married. About a month after the marriage, the couple who were both members of the Church, left their native land and started on the trip to the Valley of the Mountains to be with the Saints of God. This voyage across the ocean was made in the ship “Monarch of the Sea”, which sailed from Liverpool May 16, 1861. And arrived in New York, June 19th, 1861. While in mid ocean the Captain of the ship died and was given a seaman’s burial. The body being sewed into a canvas and consigned to the briny deep. About three months later, on September 12, 1861 they arrived in Utah. They came in the John Murdock Company. Soon after their arrival in the valley they moved to American Fork, where they remained until the following spring, when they moved to Moroni in Sanpete County. Here they built a dug out with a dirt roof to serve as a house. It was here that Janet, their first child, was born. It is related that as the Mother and child lay in bed the Mother was startled when she saw a large snake coming through the roof and dangling over the bed. The snake also became frightened and made its exit without harm to anyone. The following summer Alex made adobes and constructed a house with a dirt floor and also roof with a door made of slab. Three other children were born while the family lived in Sanpete. During their stay in Moroni, Alexander worked on his farm and participated in the Black Hawk War, as a guardsman. The family experienced many of the hardships of Pioneer life. Food became very scarce during the time of the grasshopper invasion and at one time they were five days without any bread. It is related that more than once the Father went to work with no food for lunch except a turnip he carried in his pocket. Indian attacks were frequent and, ofttimes, serious. Like most Pioneer women, Mary made the family clothing. She took the wool which her husband sheered from the sheep and cleaned, spun, and wove it. Then, by hand, constructed the clothing. It was in 1869 that the family moved back to American Fork where Alex continued to farm. The family home was built and although remodeled, still stands at 277 North 1st West. Alex Adamson helped construct the “Narrow Gauge” Railroad, which ran up American Fork Canyon. He used his team to haul much of the material used. Snow slides and heavy snowfalls often drove he and other workers out of the canyon for weeks at a time. Alexander and Mary became the parents of eleven children. Namely, Janet (Brown) Margaret (Winn), Henry, Mary Jane (Sykes) Katherine (Hutchison), Alexander, David, Elizabeth Ellen (Karren) Peter, and Thomas. They also raised their niece, Nora, a daughter of Alex's brother, David, who's wife had died. This couple received their endowments in the Manti Temple May 5th, 1897. Alexander died 25 January 1913, and Mary followed 7 June of the same year.

Alexander Adamson

Contributor: 10131307t@gmail.com Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

SOURCE CITATION: Title: Ancestral File (TM) Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Publication Information: July 1996 (c), data as of 2 January 1996 Repository Name: Family History Library Address: 35 N West Temple Street Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA Information form a letter to Verda Tucker, 19 march, 1957, from Robert B Burtt, 106 Smith Ave., Sharon. PA The family sailed from London, England 3 June 1864, and arrived in New York 19 Jul 1864. !Information from Scottish Church Records Batch:C119513 Source 1040195, Fiche:6900810 These records state that he was christened on 28 Jan 1837, Information also retrieved from ancestral file ver. 4.17, Oct 12, 1997 by Loraine Darling. From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Deseret News Article About Alexander Adamson's Home

Contributor: 10131307t@gmail.com Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Pioneer homes open to public in American Fork By Justin Ritter, Deseret News Published: Friday, July 23 2010 6:00 p.m. MDT Jason Olson, Deseret News AMERICAN FORK — After months of traveling across the Atlantic Ocean and over the Great Plains, the Adamson family finally had a place to call home. The log house Alexander Adamson built for his family had a full basement and was made of logs that interlocked at the corners of the house. Adamson used mortar to fill in the chinks and insulate his home, where he and his wife, Mary Hutchinson, eventually raised 10 children. Nearly 150 years and one lengthy restoration later, the log home looks much the same as it did when Adamson put the finishing touches on it in 1867. "I'm really thankful that we took the effort to preserve it," said Adamson's great-grandson Robert Hall, of American Fork, as he stood outside the newly finished home at its opening Friday. "It's our heritage, and it ties us together." Adamson's house is one of three log homes in American Fork that were moved to Robinson Park and are now open to the public. While the Proctor house has been a mainstay in the park for decades, the Adamson and Brown log homes were rescued from demolition in 2006 and relocated to the park, becoming an extension of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum there. "We're trying to teach a little about American Fork history and the history of the pioneers," said Dan Adams, a member of the city's historical preservation committee who coordinated the restoration efforts. That history is a vital part of American Fork, he said. Connecting the homes to the families who lived in them and the time period they came from will help visitors understand some of what early settlers when through, he said. "It's a tool for demonstrating … the ingenuity of these early settlers and how that applies to the things that we enjoy today," he said. Hall said he found that perspective while restoring his great-grandfather's log house. "You gain such an appreciation," said Hall, who used antique tools like the ones his predecessor would have had as he worked with an army of volunteers to bring the homes back to their original state — and that was no small task. "We've tried to furnish them according to the era (they were built in)," said Karen Adams, Dan Adams' wife and president of the Utah Timp Valley DUP company. "That's not easy to do." Volunteers had to research the three time periods the houses represented — the 1850s, 1860s and the post-1880 era — and furnish the log houses accordingly with antiques from the DUP museum and other donors. That meant a box stove and canvas window coverings for the Proctor home, built inside the old fort in 1854; a wood window and log rafters for the 1867 Adamson home; and a half-story loft and a sewing machine for the Brown home, built in the 1880s. But it paid off. "Remember the phrase, 'Sleep tight'?" Karen Adams asked a group of children and parents, pointing to a rope bed in the tiny log home where Thomas and Susannah Proctor raised eight children. Swishing back and forth across the floor in a green homespun dress, she showed children everyday relics from the past — an old-fashioned iron, a wooden rocking chair and a straw tick. "They held up pretty good, don't you think?" she asked. The opening of the log homes was just one part of the 50th anniversary celebration of the DUP museum. The festivities included an evening program featuring music and a vignette depicting Myrtle Seastrand, who was the driving force behind building the museum. The log homes and museum are open Monday through Friday, 1–5 p.m., from June through August. e-mail: jritter@desnews.com

DUP AF Book 7 Biographical Sketch of Alexander Adamson

Contributor: 10131307t@gmail.com Created: 3 years ago Updated: 1 year ago

Alexander Adamson Pioneer Year 1861 Sailed on the Monarch of the Sea John Murdock Company by Janet Brown, granddaughter Born 23 Jan 1837 at Boreland, Fife, Scotland Married Mary Hutchison 12 Apr 1861 Alexander died in January 1913 Alexander Adamson was born January 23rd 1837, at Boreland, Fife, Scotland. The second child in a family of thirteen children. Seven boys and six girls. His parents were Henry and Margaret Nicholson Adamson. The father was a coal miner and so according to custom, Alex began his work in a mine at the early age of nine. Here it was his duty to push buckets back down the mineshaft that they might be filled. One day while working, his companion was dragged by a bucket and killed. At the age of twelve, he was put in the mine to work on the train, that carried the coal to the surface of the mine or where it could be hoisted up to the ground. He continued this occupation for many years and became very adept at his work. The working hours were long and tedious. There were times when the men didn’t see the sun until Sunday, when all work was stopped. Work consumed so much of Alex’s time that there was little opportunity to get an education. As a boy, he spent six weeks of his time at school and later was able to get a little more night schooling. When a small boy, he climbed up a tree to get a bird’s nest and fell, breaking both of his wrists. When nine years of age, on March 23, 1848, he was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by William McFarland and confirmed by John Currie. On April 12th, 1861 he was married to Mary Hutchison. The marriage was performed by Rev. Stewart. Mary was born in Wemyss, Fife, Scotland on July 26th, 1838. She was the second child of David and Jeanette Crookston Hutchison, who were pioneers of 1851. Little is known of her childhood days. At the age of eleven, she went to work in the cotton mills. Her particular work was to watch the spindles and when the thread broke, she stopped them and tied the thread. She worked at this for a year and then was given a loom upon which she could weave fine table linen, sheeting, and other fabric. She continued at this work until she was twenty-two, at which time she was married. About a month after the marriage, the couple who were both members of the Church, left their native land and started on the trip to the Valley of the Mountains to be with the Saints of God. This voyage across the ocean was made in the ship “Monarch of the Sea”, which sailed from Liverpool May 16, 1861. And arrived in New York, June 19th, 1861. While in mid ocean the Captain of the ship died and was given a seaman’s burial. The body being sewed into a canvas and consigned to the briny deep. About three months later, on September 12, 1861 they arrived in Utah. They came in the John Murdock Company. Soon after their arrival in the valley they moved to American Fork, where they remained until the following spring, when they moved to Moroni in Sanpete County. Here they built a dug out with a dirt roof to serve as a house. It was here that Janet, their first child, was born. It is related that as the Mother and child lay in bed the Mother was startled when she saw a large snake coming through the roof and dangling over the bed. The snake also became frightened and made its exit without harm to anyone. The following summer Alex made adobes and constructed a house with a dirt floor and also roof with a door made of slab. Three other children were born while the family lived in Sanpete. During their stay in Moroni, Alexander worked on his farm and participated in the Black Hawk War, as a guardsman. The family experienced many of the hardships of Pioneer life. Food became very scarce during the time of the grasshopper invasion and at one time they were five days without any bread. It is related that more than once the Father went to work with no food for lunch except a turnip he carried in his pocket. Indian attacks were frequent and, ofttimes, serious. Like most Pioneer women, Mary made the family clothing. She took the wool which her husband sheered from the sheep and cleaned, spun, and wove it. Then, by hand, constructed the clothing. It was in 1869 that the family moved back to American Fork where Alex continued to farm. The family home was built and although remodeled, still stands at 277 North 1st West. Alex Adamson helped construct the “Narrow Gauge” Railroad, which ran up American Fork Canyon. He used his team to haul much of the material used. Snow slides and heavy snowfalls often drove he and other workers out of the canyon for weeks at a time. Alexander and Mary became the parents of eleven children. Namely, Janet (Brown) Margaret (Winn), Henry, Mary Jane (Sykes) Katherine (Hutchison), Alexander, David, Elizabeth Ellen (Karren) Peter, and Thomas. They also raised their niece, Nora, a daughter of Alex's brother, David, who's wife had died. This couple received their endowments in the Manti Temple May 5th, 1897. Alexander died 25 January 1913, and Mary followed 7 June of the same year.

Alexander Adamson

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

SOURCE CITATION: Title: Ancestral File (TM) Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Publication Information: July 1996 (c), data as of 2 January 1996 Repository Name: Family History Library Address: 35 N West Temple Street Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA Information form a letter to Verda Tucker, 19 march, 1957, from Robert B Burtt, 106 Smith Ave., Sharon. PA The family sailed from London, England 3 June 1864, and arrived in New York 19 Jul 1864. !Information from Scottish Church Records Batch:C119513 Source 1040195, Fiche:6900810 These records state that he was christened on 28 Jan 1837, Information also retrieved from ancestral file ver. 4.17, Oct 12, 1997 by Loraine Darling. From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Deseret News Article About Alexander Adamson's Home

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Pioneer homes open to public in American Fork By Justin Ritter, Deseret News Published: Friday, July 23 2010 6:00 p.m. MDT Jason Olson, Deseret News AMERICAN FORK — After months of traveling across the Atlantic Ocean and over the Great Plains, the Adamson family finally had a place to call home. The log house Alexander Adamson built for his family had a full basement and was made of logs that interlocked at the corners of the house. Adamson used mortar to fill in the chinks and insulate his home, where he and his wife, Mary Hutchinson, eventually raised 10 children. Nearly 150 years and one lengthy restoration later, the log home looks much the same as it did when Adamson put the finishing touches on it in 1867. "I'm really thankful that we took the effort to preserve it," said Adamson's great-grandson Robert Hall, of American Fork, as he stood outside the newly finished home at its opening Friday. "It's our heritage, and it ties us together." Adamson's house is one of three log homes in American Fork that were moved to Robinson Park and are now open to the public. While the Proctor house has been a mainstay in the park for decades, the Adamson and Brown log homes were rescued from demolition in 2006 and relocated to the park, becoming an extension of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum there. "We're trying to teach a little about American Fork history and the history of the pioneers," said Dan Adams, a member of the city's historical preservation committee who coordinated the restoration efforts. That history is a vital part of American Fork, he said. Connecting the homes to the families who lived in them and the time period they came from will help visitors understand some of what early settlers when through, he said. "It's a tool for demonstrating … the ingenuity of these early settlers and how that applies to the things that we enjoy today," he said. Hall said he found that perspective while restoring his great-grandfather's log house. "You gain such an appreciation," said Hall, who used antique tools like the ones his predecessor would have had as he worked with an army of volunteers to bring the homes back to their original state — and that was no small task. "We've tried to furnish them according to the era (they were built in)," said Karen Adams, Dan Adams' wife and president of the Utah Timp Valley DUP company. "That's not easy to do." Volunteers had to research the three time periods the houses represented — the 1850s, 1860s and the post-1880 era — and furnish the log houses accordingly with antiques from the DUP museum and other donors. That meant a box stove and canvas window coverings for the Proctor home, built inside the old fort in 1854; a wood window and log rafters for the 1867 Adamson home; and a half-story loft and a sewing machine for the Brown home, built in the 1880s. But it paid off. "Remember the phrase, 'Sleep tight'?" Karen Adams asked a group of children and parents, pointing to a rope bed in the tiny log home where Thomas and Susannah Proctor raised eight children. Swishing back and forth across the floor in a green homespun dress, she showed children everyday relics from the past — an old-fashioned iron, a wooden rocking chair and a straw tick. "They held up pretty good, don't you think?" she asked. The opening of the log homes was just one part of the 50th anniversary celebration of the DUP museum. The festivities included an evening program featuring music and a vignette depicting Myrtle Seastrand, who was the driving force behind building the museum. The log homes and museum are open Monday through Friday, 1–5 p.m., from June through August. e-mail: jritter@desnews.com

DUP AF Book 7 Biographical Sketch of Alexander Adamson

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Alexander Adamson Pioneer Year 1861 Sailed on the Monarch of the Sea John Murdock Company by Janet Brown, granddaughter Born 23 Jan 1837 at Boreland, Fife, Scotland Married Mary Hutchison 12 Apr 1861 Alexander died in January 1913 Alexander Adamson was born January 23rd 1837, at Boreland, Fife, Scotland. The second child in a family of thirteen children. Seven boys and six girls. His parents were Henry and Margaret Nicholson Adamson. The father was a coal miner and so according to custom, Alex began his work in a mine at the early age of nine. Here it was his duty to push buckets back down the mineshaft that they might be filled. One day while working, his companion was dragged by a bucket and killed. At the age of twelve, he was put in the mine to work on the train, that carried the coal to the surface of the mine or where it could be hoisted up to the ground. He continued this occupation for many years and became very adept at his work. The working hours were long and tedious. There were times when the men didn’t see the sun until Sunday, when all work was stopped. Work consumed so much of Alex’s time that there was little opportunity to get an education. As a boy, he spent six weeks of his time at school and later was able to get a little more night schooling. When a small boy, he climbed up a tree to get a bird’s nest and fell, breaking both of his wrists. When nine years of age, on March 23, 1848, he was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by William McFarland and confirmed by John Currie. On April 12th, 1861 he was married to Mary Hutchison. The marriage was performed by Rev. Stewart. Mary was born in Wemyss, Fife, Scotland on July 26th, 1838. She was the second child of David and Jeanette Crookston Hutchison, who were pioneers of 1851. Little is known of her childhood days. At the age of eleven, she went to work in the cotton mills. Her particular work was to watch the spindles and when the thread broke, she stopped them and tied the thread. She worked at this for a year and then was given a loom upon which she could weave fine table linen, sheeting, and other fabric. She continued at this work until she was twenty-two, at which time she was married. About a month after the marriage, the couple who were both members of the Church, left their native land and started on the trip to the Valley of the Mountains to be with the Saints of God. This voyage across the ocean was made in the ship “Monarch of the Sea”, which sailed from Liverpool May 16, 1861. And arrived in New York, June 19th, 1861. While in mid ocean the Captain of the ship died and was given a seaman’s burial. The body being sewed into a canvas and consigned to the briny deep. About three months later, on September 12, 1861 they arrived in Utah. They came in the John Murdock Company. Soon after their arrival in the valley they moved to American Fork, where they remained until the following spring, when they moved to Moroni in Sanpete County. Here they built a dug out with a dirt roof to serve as a house. It was here that Janet, their first child, was born. It is related that as the Mother and child lay in bed the Mother was startled when she saw a large snake coming through the roof and dangling over the bed. The snake also became frightened and made its exit without harm to anyone. The following summer Alex made adobes and constructed a house with a dirt floor and also roof with a door made of slab. Three other children were born while the family lived in Sanpete. During their stay in Moroni, Alexander worked on his farm and participated in the Black Hawk War, as a guardsman. The family experienced many of the hardships of Pioneer life. Food became very scarce during the time of the grasshopper invasion and at one time they were five days without any bread. It is related that more than once the Father went to work with no food for lunch except a turnip he carried in his pocket. Indian attacks were frequent and, ofttimes, serious. Like most Pioneer women, Mary made the family clothing. She took the wool which her husband sheered from the sheep and cleaned, spun, and wove it. Then, by hand, constructed the clothing. It was in 1869 that the family moved back to American Fork where Alex continued to farm. The family home was built and although remodeled, still stands at 277 North 1st West. Alex Adamson helped construct the “Narrow Gauge” Railroad, which ran up American Fork Canyon. He used his team to haul much of the material used. Snow slides and heavy snowfalls often drove he and other workers out of the canyon for weeks at a time. Alexander and Mary became the parents of eleven children. Namely, Janet (Brown) Margaret (Winn), Henry, Mary Jane (Sykes) Katherine (Hutchison), Alexander, David, Elizabeth Ellen (Karren) Peter, and Thomas. They also raised their niece, Nora, a daughter of Alex's brother, David, who's wife had died. This couple received their endowments in the Manti Temple May 5th, 1897. Alexander died 25 January 1913, and Mary followed 7 June of the same year.

Alexander Adamson

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

SOURCE CITATION: Title: Ancestral File (TM) Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Publication Information: July 1996 (c), data as of 2 January 1996 Repository Name: Family History Library Address: 35 N West Temple Street Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA Information form a letter to Verda Tucker, 19 march, 1957, from Robert B Burtt, 106 Smith Ave., Sharon. PA The family sailed from London, England 3 June 1864, and arrived in New York 19 Jul 1864. !Information from Scottish Church Records Batch:C119513 Source 1040195, Fiche:6900810 These records state that he was christened on 28 Jan 1837, Information also retrieved from ancestral file ver. 4.17, Oct 12, 1997 by Loraine Darling. From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Deseret News Article About Alexander Adamson's Home

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Pioneer homes open to public in American Fork By Justin Ritter, Deseret News Published: Friday, July 23 2010 6:00 p.m. MDT Jason Olson, Deseret News AMERICAN FORK — After months of traveling across the Atlantic Ocean and over the Great Plains, the Adamson family finally had a place to call home. The log house Alexander Adamson built for his family had a full basement and was made of logs that interlocked at the corners of the house. Adamson used mortar to fill in the chinks and insulate his home, where he and his wife, Mary Hutchinson, eventually raised 10 children. Nearly 150 years and one lengthy restoration later, the log home looks much the same as it did when Adamson put the finishing touches on it in 1867. "I'm really thankful that we took the effort to preserve it," said Adamson's great-grandson Robert Hall, of American Fork, as he stood outside the newly finished home at its opening Friday. "It's our heritage, and it ties us together." Adamson's house is one of three log homes in American Fork that were moved to Robinson Park and are now open to the public. While the Proctor house has been a mainstay in the park for decades, the Adamson and Brown log homes were rescued from demolition in 2006 and relocated to the park, becoming an extension of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum there. "We're trying to teach a little about American Fork history and the history of the pioneers," said Dan Adams, a member of the city's historical preservation committee who coordinated the restoration efforts. That history is a vital part of American Fork, he said. Connecting the homes to the families who lived in them and the time period they came from will help visitors understand some of what early settlers when through, he said. "It's a tool for demonstrating … the ingenuity of these early settlers and how that applies to the things that we enjoy today," he said. Hall said he found that perspective while restoring his great-grandfather's log house. "You gain such an appreciation," said Hall, who used antique tools like the ones his predecessor would have had as he worked with an army of volunteers to bring the homes back to their original state — and that was no small task. "We've tried to furnish them according to the era (they were built in)," said Karen Adams, Dan Adams' wife and president of the Utah Timp Valley DUP company. "That's not easy to do." Volunteers had to research the three time periods the houses represented — the 1850s, 1860s and the post-1880 era — and furnish the log houses accordingly with antiques from the DUP museum and other donors. That meant a box stove and canvas window coverings for the Proctor home, built inside the old fort in 1854; a wood window and log rafters for the 1867 Adamson home; and a half-story loft and a sewing machine for the Brown home, built in the 1880s. But it paid off. "Remember the phrase, 'Sleep tight'?" Karen Adams asked a group of children and parents, pointing to a rope bed in the tiny log home where Thomas and Susannah Proctor raised eight children. Swishing back and forth across the floor in a green homespun dress, she showed children everyday relics from the past — an old-fashioned iron, a wooden rocking chair and a straw tick. "They held up pretty good, don't you think?" she asked. The opening of the log homes was just one part of the 50th anniversary celebration of the DUP museum. The festivities included an evening program featuring music and a vignette depicting Myrtle Seastrand, who was the driving force behind building the museum. The log homes and museum are open Monday through Friday, 1–5 p.m., from June through August. e-mail: jritter@desnews.com

DUP AF Book 7 Biographical Sketch of Alexander Adamson

Contributor: lisa Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Alexander Adamson Pioneer Year 1861 Sailed on the Monarch of the Sea John Murdock Company by Janet Brown, granddaughter Born 23 Jan 1837 at Boreland, Fife, Scotland Married Mary Hutchison 12 Apr 1861 Alexander died in January 1913 Alexander Adamson was born January 23rd 1837, at Boreland, Fife, Scotland. The second child in a family of thirteen children. Seven boys and six girls. His parents were Henry and Margaret Nicholson Adamson. The father was a coal miner and so according to custom, Alex began his work in a mine at the early age of nine. Here it was his duty to push buckets back down the mineshaft that they might be filled. One day while working, his companion was dragged by a bucket and killed. At the age of twelve, he was put in the mine to work on the train, that carried the coal to the surface of the mine or where it could be hoisted up to the ground. He continued this occupation for many years and became very adept at his work. The working hours were long and tedious. There were times when the men didn’t see the sun until Sunday, when all work was stopped. Work consumed so much of Alex’s time that there was little opportunity to get an education. As a boy, he spent six weeks of his time at school and later was able to get a little more night schooling. When a small boy, he climbed up a tree to get a bird’s nest and fell, breaking both of his wrists. When nine years of age, on March 23, 1848, he was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by William McFarland and confirmed by John Currie. On April 12th, 1861 he was married to Mary Hutchison. The marriage was performed by Rev. Stewart. Mary was born in Wemyss, Fife, Scotland on July 26th, 1838. She was the second child of David and Jeanette Crookston Hutchison, who were pioneers of 1851. Little is known of her childhood days. At the age of eleven, she went to work in the cotton mills. Her particular work was to watch the spindles and when the thread broke, she stopped them and tied the thread. She worked at this for a year and then was given a loom upon which she could weave fine table linen, sheeting, and other fabric. She continued at this work until she was twenty-two, at which time she was married. About a month after the marriage, the couple who were both members of the Church, left their native land and started on the trip to the Valley of the Mountains to be with the Saints of God. This voyage across the ocean was made in the ship “Monarch of the Sea”, which sailed from Liverpool May 16, 1861. And arrived in New York, June 19th, 1861. While in mid ocean the Captain of the ship died and was given a seaman’s burial. The body being sewed into a canvas and consigned to the briny deep. About three months later, on September 12, 1861 they arrived in Utah. They came in the John Murdock Company. Soon after their arrival in the valley they moved to American Fork, where they remained until the following spring, when they moved to Moroni in Sanpete County. Here they built a dug out with a dirt roof to serve as a house. It was here that Janet, their first child, was born. It is related that as the Mother and child lay in bed the Mother was startled when she saw a large snake coming through the roof and dangling over the bed. The snake also became frightened and made its exit without harm to anyone. The following summer Alex made adobes and constructed a house with a dirt floor and also roof with a door made of slab. Three other children were born while the family lived in Sanpete. During their stay in Moroni, Alexander worked on his farm and participated in the Black Hawk War, as a guardsman. The family experienced many of the hardships of Pioneer life. Food became very scarce during the time of the grasshopper invasion and at one time they were five days without any bread. It is related that more than once the Father went to work with no food for lunch except a turnip he carried in his pocket. Indian attacks were frequent and, ofttimes, serious. Like most Pioneer women, Mary made the family clothing. She took the wool which her husband sheered from the sheep and cleaned, spun, and wove it. Then, by hand, constructed the clothing. It was in 1869 that the family moved back to American Fork where Alex continued to farm. The family home was built and although remodeled, still stands at 277 North 1st West. Alex Adamson helped construct the “Narrow Gauge” Railroad, which ran up American Fork Canyon. He used his team to haul much of the material used. Snow slides and heavy snowfalls often drove he and other workers out of the canyon for weeks at a time. Alexander and Mary became the parents of eleven children. Namely, Janet (Brown) Margaret (Winn), Henry, Mary Jane (Sykes) Katherine (Hutchison), Alexander, David, Elizabeth Ellen (Karren) Peter, and Thomas. They also raised their niece, Nora, a daughter of Alex's brother, David, who's wife had died. This couple received their endowments in the Manti Temple May 5th, 1897. Alexander died 25 January 1913, and Mary followed 7 June of the same year.

Military Service

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Transcription

SERGEANT, US ARMY, INDIAN WARS, UTAH TERRITORY MILITIA

Rank

SERGEANT

Branch

US ARMY

Conflicts

INDIAN WARS

Life timeline of Alexander Adamson

Alexander Adamson was born on 23 Jan 1837
Alexander Adamson was 3 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Alexander Adamson was 23 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Alexander Adamson was 24 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Alexander Adamson was 38 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Alexander Adamson was 51 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
Alexander Adamson was 58 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Alexander Adamson was 67 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Alexander Adamson died on 25 Jan 1913 at the age of 76
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Alexander Adamson (23 Jan 1837 - 25 Jan 1913), BillionGraves Record 35795958 American Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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