Alcot Johnson

7 Nov 1888 - 21 Mar 1965

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Alcot Johnson

7 Nov 1888 - 21 Mar 1965
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Grave site information of Alcot Johnson (7 Nov 1888 - 21 Mar 1965) at Larkin Sunset Gardens in Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Alcot Johnson

Born:
Died:

Larkin Sunset Gardens

1702 E 10600 S
Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah
United States
Transcriber

scuddsl

July 24, 2013
Photographer

Carolyn

June 26, 2013

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J. G. Henry Johnson Obituary

Contributor: scuddsl Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

J.G. Henry Johnson, age 79, passed away February 18, 1994. He was born November 21, 1914, in Mörkhult, Osby, Kristianstad Sweden to Ammy Olofsson and Algot Johnson. He immigrated with his parents to America in 1925 and was educated in the Salt Lake City Schools, and later became a Naturalized Citizen of the United States. He Married June Howe June 21, 1937 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. He was the proud patriarch of four generations. He is survived by his wife; one daughter, Peggy Ann Johnson Sorensen; five grandchildren, Mrs. Theodore Dimas (Kjerstine Marie), Severin L. Sorensen, III (his wife Shelley Pumphrey), Henry L. Sorensen (his wife JoLynn Leggat), Mrs. Mark Bolliger (Katharine June), and Algot L Sorensen (his wife Maria Tassainer); nine great grandchildren; a brother Erik G. Johnson; and two sisters, Mrs. Jess Nelson (Esther), and Mrs. Tom Lewis (Mildred). Henry Johnson was an active member of the LDS Church and served the Church in various callings throughout his life. He was an LDS Church Building Supervisor in Scandinavia (1962-1965), a Jordan River Temple Worker, a Bishop of the Union 4th Ward, a High Priest Group Leader in the Cottonwood 2nd Ward, a Counselor in the Bishopric in the Kamas Ward, a High Counselor in the East Jordan Stake, a Bishop of the Union Four Ward, a Elders Quorum President in the Cottonwood Ward, and a member of the High Priest Quorum of the Highland Park Ward at the time of his death. Henry was a builder by trade, having worked many years as a carpenter, craftsman, and general contractor. As a contractor he built many churches, schools, seminaries, office buildings and warehouses. Among the many schools he built were Westland and Terra Linda Elementary Schools in Jordan District, Circleville Elementary, Lindon Elementary, Midway Elementary, and Salt Lake County Softball Complex located on 13th East and 4300 South. His buildings and works survive him and are present throughout the intermountain area. Upon retirement, Henry took up the hobby of wood turning and created beautiful lamps, rolling pins, and candlesticks made of exotic woods from around the world. He proudly displayed his wares at craft shows held throughout the community. He entered some of his beautiful work in the State Fair where he won first place. In his earlier years Henry was civically involved and organized and served as President of the Cottonwood Lions Club. He and June also were members of the Bonneville Knife and Fork Club in Salt Lake City. Funeral Services will be held Tuesday, February 22nd at 12 noon in the Union 12 Ward Chapel, 7784 South 20900 East, where friends may call Monday, 6-8 pm and Tuesday 10:45 - 11:45 am prior to the services. Interment, Larkin Sunset Gardens, under the direction of Larkin Mortuary. In lieu of flowers family suggests contributions to Primary Children's Medical Center.

Conversion Story of Algot and Ammy Johnson

Contributor: scuddsl Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Historical Background: In spring of 1918 the world was in commotion. In March 1918, the Germans had launched an offensive trying to seize control of the western front in Europe. Also the first cases of the Spanish Influenza began to be recorded, which over the next two years claimed the lives of millions of people. As told by Algot Johnson I was brought up in a home where honesty and religion stood very high. Our family belonged to the Lutheran Church, the state church of Sweden. I had a strong belief in God and was ready to defend my religion whenever occasion arose, although not always with success because I knew very little about God and his teachings. Some of the teachings of the Lutheran Church were hard for me to agree with such as their belief that little children who died without baptism were going to hell. We had some very good friends, Nils and Selma Jonsson. We didn’t see each other very often, but when we did, we seemed to feel a close bond with them. One Sunday, in the spring of 1918, we decided to visit them and we were heartily welcomed. We were seated on their veranda when Nils made an observation, “It will be wonderful when there will be peace on the earth.” I responded by saying “That time will never come.” Nils countered by saying, “Yes it will, we will have a thousand years of peace.” This was something I had heard nothing about. “I will show you something,” he said, and then he went into the house and came back with a book in his handing. He held it so I could read the title Mormons Bok. (The Book of Mormon). As I read the name of the book, a strange thing happened to me! I felt as though a sword had gone through my body. If affected me to the point that I could not talk or anything for a few minutes. I had never seen nor heard that name before. Nils then began to tell me he had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I had heard of that church and been warned that it was evil. I thought Nils had been led astray, and out of my love and friendship for him, I was determined to correct him, but fast. We got into a good but friendly discussion. I could feel that he had the upper hand which I accounted to my lack of knowledge of the Bible. I determined to study the Bible so I could put him straight before it was too late. Coming home, I found my Bible and began to study so I could find strong arguments to prove the falseness of the Book of Mormon. Nils and Selma invited us to visit them again, and so we did. We began our discussion in a friendly manner, and I attempted to show Nils proof from the Bible that his religion was wrong. I began to list my objections, and he offered explanations as to the way he saw it. I could see that he was right, although, at the time, I was not willing to admit it. Our discussions caused me to wonder if it was possible to prove that the Lutheran Church was right. I started asking some of my friends and relatives, but I didn’t dare ask my Father and Mother. To my great surprise, I found none of those I spoke with could give me the proof that was acceptable to my way of thinking or was in harmony with the Bible. To my greater amazement, I found that Mormonism, as it was called, seemed to be a perfect harmony with the Bible. As I studied both books, I came across the answer to a question that I had had about the welfare of those who died before they had a chance to learn of God. I read in Matthew 19:14 “But Jesus said, suffer the little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven.” The Lutheran Church believed that if a man did not say Lord, Lord in this life, regardless of how little chance he had had to learn about God, he was going to hell, never to return. The Mormon belief in salvation for the dead appealed to me. This became the turning point in my study. Up until this time, I had been reading the Bible with the intent to find something wrong with Mormonism, but from that point on, I began studying the Book of Mormon to find out what good it contained. One day my friend, Nils, asked me if I would go with him to a meeting. A conference was going to be held in Malmö. I agreed to go, and then I realized that I had committed myself, once I gave my word, I would never break it. The time came for the conference, and I went along. I was very impressed by the missionaries. I watched their actions and character, and I found them worthy of their name, missionaries of Jesus Christ. As I listened to them speak, a wonderful spirit filled the room. I felt like we were he listeners on the day of Pentecost. I did not have to ask them what I needed to do; they had explained it very clearly to me in their message. When the meeting was over, I found a quiet corner where no one could see me, and I poured out my soul in prayer to my Heavenly Father. I asked Him what I should do. I got the feeling that there was only one way to go. I prayed for forgiveness for the wrongs I had committed and pleaded for protection from my errors. I went to the missionary who spoke about baptism and asked him if I could be baptized a member of the Church. I did not know how they would baptize me, nor was I aware that I might need special clothing. I only knew that I wanted to be baptized. My friend, Nils Jonsson, must have known I might have a change of heart. He happened to bring along a set of white clothes for me to use to be baptized in. I was baptized in the Ocean by John Johnson from Rigby, Idaho, on 2- November 1918. I was confirmed the same day by A.P Anderson, Swedish Mission President. I was now a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. As I travel home the next day, I began to worry, “What would my wife say?” We both had been studying the Book of Mormon together, but we had never spoken about getting baptized. After I told her what had happened, she said in a quiet voice, “Are you sure it is right?” What a relief, she was not mad at me, and together we continued to study. The next spring, Ammy asked for baptism. President A.P. Anderson baptized her on 30 May 1919, and she was confirmed the same day by S.P; Nilsson, from Smithfield, Utah. What a blessing that we were both united in our faith, however, our family and relatives were not supportive of our decision.

Algot Johnson

Contributor: scuddsl Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Algot and Ammy Johnsons Conversion Story. As told by Algot Johnson Historical Background: In spring of 1918 the world was in commotion. In March 1918, the Germans had launched an offensive trying to seize control of the western front in Europe. Also the first cases of the Spanish Influenza began to be recorded, which over the next two years claimed the lives of millions of people. I was brought up in a home where honesty and religion stood very high. Our family belonged to the Lutheran Church, the state church of Sweden. I had a strong belief in God and was ready to defend my religion whenever occasion arose, although not always with success because I knew very little about God and his teachings. Some of the teachings of the Lutheran Church were hard for me to agree with such as their belief that little children who died without baptism were going to hell. We had some very good friends, Nils and Selma Jonsson. We didn’t see each other very often, but when we did, we seemed to feel a close bond with them. One Sunday, in the spring of 1918, we decided to visit them and we were heartily welcomed. We were seated on their veranda when Nils made an observation, “It will be wonderful when there will be peace on the earth.” I responded by saying “That time will never come.” Nils countered by saying, “Yes it will, we will have a thousand years of peace.” This was something I had heard nothing about. “I will show you something,” he said, and then he went into the house and came back with a book in his handing. He held it so I could read the title Mormons Bok. (The Book of Mormon). As I read the name of the book, a strange thing happened to me! I felt as though a sword had gone through my body. If affected me to the point that I could not talk or anything for a few minutes. I had never seen nor heard that name before. Nils then began to tell me he had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I had heard of that church and been warned that it was evil. I thought Nils had been led astray, and out of my love and friendship for him, I was determined to correct him, but fast. We got into a good but friendly discussion. I could feel that he had the upper hand which I accounted to my lack of knowledge of the Bible. I determined to study the Bible so I could put him straight before it was too late. Coming home, I found my Bible and began to study so I could find strong arguments to prove the falseness of the Book of Mormon. Nils and Selma invited us to visit them again, and so we did. We began our discussion in a friendly manner, and I attempted to show Nils proof from the Bible that his religion was wrong. I began to list my objections, and he offered explanations as to the way he saw it. I could see that he was right, although, at the time, I was not willing to admit it. Our discussions caused me to wonder if it was possible to prove that the Lutheran Church was right. I started asking some of my friends and relatives, but I didn’t dare ask my Father and Mother. To my great surprise, I found none of those I spoke with could give me the proof that was acceptable to my way of thinking or was in harmony with the Bible. To my greater amazement, I found that Mormonism, as it was called, seemed to be a perfect harmony with the Bible. As I studied both books, I came across the answer to a question that I had had about the welfare of those who died before they had a chance to learn of God. I read in Matthew 19:14 “But Jesus said, suffer the little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven.” The Lutheran Church believed that if a man did not say Lord, Lord in this life, regardless of how little chance he had had to learn about God, he was going to hell, never to return. The Mormon belief in salvation for the dead appealed to me. This became the turning point in my study. Up until this time, I had been reading the Bible with the intent to find something wrong with Mormonism, but from that point on, I began studying the Book of Mormon to find out what good it contained. One day my friend, Nils, asked me if I would go with him to a meeting. A conference was going to be held in Malmö. I agreed to go, and then I realized that I had committed myself, once I gave my word, I would never break it. The time came for the conference, and I went along. I was very impressed by the missionaries. I watched their actions and character, and I found them worthy of their name, missionaries of Jesus Christ. As I listened to them speak, a wonderful spirit filled the room. I felt like we were he listeners on the day of Pentecost. I did not have to ask them what I needed to do; they had explained it very clearly to me in their message. When the meeting was over, I found a quiet corner where no one could see me, and I poured out my soul in prayer to my Heavenly Father. I asked Him what I should do. I got the feeling that there was only one way to go. I prayed for forgiveness for the wrongs I had committed and pleaded for protection from my errors. I went to the missionary who spoke about baptism and asked him if I could be baptized a member of the Church. I did not know how they would baptize me, nor was I aware that I might need special clothing. I only knew that I wanted to be baptized. My friend, Nils Jonsson, must have known I might have a change of heart. He happened to bring along a set of white clothes for me to use to be baptized in. I was baptized in the Ocean by John Johnson from Rigby, Idaho, on 2- November 1918. I was confirmed the same day by A.P Anderson, Swedish Mission President. I was now a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. As I travel home the next day, I began to worry, “What would my wife say?” We both had been studying the Book of Mormon together, but we had never spoken about getting baptized. After I told her what had happened, she said in a quiet voice, “Are you sure it is right?” What a relief, she was not mad at me, and together we continued to study. The next spring, Ammy asked for baptism. President A.P. Anderson baptized her on 30 May 1919, and she was confirmed the same day by S.P; Nilsson, from Smithfield, Utah. What a blessing that we were both united in our faith, however, our family and relatives were not supportive of our decision.

Life timeline of Alcot Johnson

1888
Alcot Johnson was born on 7 Nov 1888
Alcot Johnson was 10 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
Alcot Johnson was 15 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Alcot Johnson was 26 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Alcot Johnson was 32 years old when The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women's suffrage in America. The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
Alcot Johnson was 51 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Alcot Johnson was 53 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany invades the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa. Nazi Germany is the common English name for Germany between 1933 and 1945, when Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party (NSDAP) controlled the country through a dictatorship. Under Hitler's rule, Germany was transformed into a totalitarian state that controlled nearly all aspects of life via the Gleichschaltung legal process. The official name of the state was Deutsches Reich until 1943 and Großdeutsches Reich from 1943 to 1945. Nazi Germany is also known as the Third Reich, from German Drittes Reich, meaning "Third Realm" or "Third Empire", the first two being the Holy Roman Empire and the German Empire. The Nazi regime ended after the Allied Powers defeated Germany in May 1945, ending World War II in Europe.
Alcot Johnson was 67 years old when Disneyland Hotel opens to the public in Anaheim, California. The Disneyland Hotel is a resort hotel located at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, owned by the Walt Disney Company and operated through its Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division. Opened on October 5, 1955, as a motor inn owned and operated by Jack Wrather under an agreement with Walt Disney, the hotel was the first to officially bear the Disney name. Under Wrather's ownership, the hotel underwent several expansions and renovations over the years before being acquired by Disney in 1988. The hotel was downsized to its present capacity in 1999 as part of the Disneyland Resort expansion.
Alcot Johnson died on 21 Mar 1965 at the age of 76
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Grave record for Alcot Johnson (7 Nov 1888 - 21 Mar 1965), BillionGraves Record 4541257 Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

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