Albert Enstrom

18 May 1872 - 16 Feb 1895

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Albert Enstrom

18 May 1872 - 16 Feb 1895
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Grave site information of Albert Enstrom (18 May 1872 - 16 Feb 1895) at Benjamin Cemetery in Benjamin, Utah, Utah, United States from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Albert Enstrom

Born:
Died:

Benjamin Cemetery

8435 S 3200 W
Benjamin, Utah, Utah
United States
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Brian

December 7, 2019
Photographer

Kody

June 1, 2011

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The truth is stranger than fiction--a true story

Contributor: denis_ashton Created: 1 year ago Updated: 5 days ago

I had a call from Lynette Wheeler in the spring of 1985. She said, Delila, we would like you and Allen to represent a Pioneer couple on the float that our ward is making for the 24th of July. I told her, “Yes, we will be glad to.” The pioneer bonnet that I wore on that occasion brought back memories. Let me turn time back more than fifty years, when I was a young girl. My mother asked me, “Lilie, will you take a pie down to Mrs. Hayes?” My first reaction was that I didn’t want to, but I knew better than to refuse her. So I said I would, having done it many times. But I thought, “Why doesn’t mother have swell friends instead of having old lady?” Now swell, at that time to me, meant something special, somebody to give us social status. Mrs. Hayes, as I remember her now, was a large raw-boned woman. Her gray hair was pulled tightly back from her face and braided in the back. She wore a gray linsey-woolsey dress reaching to her ankles, with long sleeves, high neckline, with a lace ruffle at the neck and cuffs. She wore an oval broach at her throat. She always wore a long white gathered front apron. She operated a millinery shop situated above Palmer’s Market on Spanish Fork Main Street, a covered stairway led up to her place of business. Prior to this, she had shops at Silver City, Eureka and in Benjamin, in part of her frame home. She also had several cats. She was very talented in her chosen profession. At that time, it was fashionable for young women to wear hats. One lady told me of the hats that Mrs. Hayes had made for her and her sisters. Her hat was orchid georgette or crepe de chine with forget me nots flowers for trim. She dearly loved this hat. My mother was truly a good friend of Mrs. Hayes. In appreciation for her friendship, she would pick up mother’s hand and kiss it. Her only other friend was an elderly gentleman, whom after the death of her husband, she eventually married. At one time, my aunt chastized mother, “Annie, there’s been talk about you befriending Mrs. Hayes. You must realize that your own reputation is at stake.” But that didn’t bother mother, who told us, “She doesn’t even know her. You be kind to Mrs. Hayes. She has had a sad life.” Mrs. Hayes was a guest in our home for dinner. We didn’t have a car, so she would have had to walk nearly six blocks to our home. My sister remembers on that occasion, she wore a pretty pink dress, not the latest style, but she was neat and clean, pleasant and so appreciative. When her health wouldn’t permit her to work in the shop, she gave mother a large box, about four foot square, of all types of hats. We took our little red wagon to bring the big box of hats home. She also gave us several oleander plants in large containers. In this box were six of these pioneer type bonnets, which we loaned out and eventually lost all but one, which I still have. I added flowers across the front and sewed ribbon so it could be tied under the chin. This is the hat I wore in the parade. Mrs. Hayes was born in Malime (Possibly Malmo) Sweden Feb. 12 1847. Her parents were Andrew and Anna Hanson. They were converted to the L.D.S. faith and emigrated to America. They crossed the plains in a handcart company. Mrs. Hayes maiden hame was Caroline. Yes, she had a sad life. Let me relate it to you. On Feb 16, 1895 three young men of Lake Shore were murdered at the Hayes ranch near Pelican Point, and their bodies were found on the west side of the lake in April. All three had been shot. The men were Albert Enstrom, (who sometimes went by the name of Hayes), Andrew Johnson and Alfred Nelson. In December Harry Hayes, who was the stepfather of young Entrom, was indicted for the killing of his stepson. He was found guilty in January and in April was sentenced to hang June 19, 1896. However, shortly before the sentence was to be carried out, Hayes received a postponement of the sentence. In October, he asked for a new trial, but it was refused and a new execution date was set for January 22, 1897. At this time, Hayes presented a application for a pardon to the Board of Pardons. In the absence of a motive stronger than hatred of his stepson, Hayes was generally believed to be guilty. However, no positive evidence was found. The fidelity of his wife, throughout was a barrier. She helped his alibi in many places, particularly against the testimony that he was seen going to Pelican Point in February when he swore he had been at home in Eureka. The big flaw in the prosecution of Hayes was the failure of the state to explain the missing horses, wagon, harness and other things which were stolen at the time of the murders. Newly elected sheriff, George A. Storrs took an interest in the missing property almost from the moment he was inducted into office. On trips through Utah County, he made inquires about the case, searching for a clue. His efforts led him to Mapleton to George F. Wright (alias James G. Weeks, alias C. T. Case). Four months after the murders, the Weeks moved to Pondtown (Salem) Utah, where the sheriff issued a warrent for the arrest of Wright for stealing cattle from the Dunton ranch. Wright posted bond, absconded, and Utah knew him no more. The following month, Mrs. Wright sold the household items and went to New York to her mother. The following February, she heard from Wright. He wrote her from Pueblo, Colorado asking her to meet him in St. Louis. She never met him and he never wrote again. Having abandoned his wife, Wright could except no further shielding from her. Mrs. Wright, no longer motivated by fear of her husband, told the whole story, took an oath it was true, and it is now, part of the record in the form of an affidavit. There is no question in the minds of the Utah County authorities that Wright, the man of many aliases, committed the Pelican Point murders. Harry Hayes died August 9, 1911. He was born Sept 19, 1854. The inscription on his headstone reads—Him shall the score and wrath of man pursue with deadly aim; and malice, envy, spite and lies shall desecrate his name. But truth shall conquer at the last. For round and round we run. And ever the right comes uppermost. And ever is justice done. The other headstones in Benjamin Cemetery read—Albert S. Enstrom, age 23 years. Andrew Johnson, Age 20 years 20 days old and Alfred Nelson age 17 years—said to be massacred Feb 16, 1895 with the inscription, “Cursed is the man and void of laws and right, unworthy property unworthy light. Unfit for public or private care. Whose lust is murder, and whose horrid joy is theft. After her husbands death, Caroline Hanson, Enstrom Hayes married Llewellyn M Jones who was later found dead in his rooming house on 24 March, 1935. Mrs. Hayes Jones, became of ill health, went to live with a nephew, Orin Porter Tyrrell in Spanish Fork, Utah. The Tyrrell’s had a large gray cat and Caroline would wrap it in her long scarf, cuddle it in her arms murmuring, “My baby! My Baby! as she rocked in her rocking chair. Mrs. Caroline Hanson Enstrom Hayes Jones died February 3, 1936 shortly before her 89th birthday. She lies buried in the Benjamin Cemetery in an unmarked grave.

About the Death of Andrew Johnson Jr. - Selia's son

Contributor: Brian Created: 5 days ago Updated: 5 days ago

Individual Summary 29 August 2014 Name: Andrew JOHNSON Jr.1–4 Sex: Male Father: Andrew JOHNSON ( - ) Mother: Cecilia (Selia) "Silly" HANSON (ANDERSDOTTER) (1857-1935) Individual Facts Birth 29 Jan 1875 1 Death 15 Feb 1895 (age 20) was shot and found in the Utah Lake, Pelican Point, Utah, Utah, United States5–8 Burial 1895 (about age 20) Benjamin Cemetery, Benjamin, Utah, Utah, United States9 Notes Notes: Andrew JOHNSON Jr. Death (15 February 1895): Andrew Johnson's death date came from the Allen Family Bible held by Margaret Allen Hutchings, now in possession of Joan Hutchings Carpenter. Bible shows death date as Feb 16 1895. Taken from Benjamin Cemetery: In memory of Andrew Johnson, aged 20 years and 20 days said to be massacred February 16, 1895. Andrew, along with two of his cousins (Albert Enstrom and Alfred Nelson), were all shot and buried under 14 or 15 inches of ice in Utah Lake in February 1895. A hole was dug through the ice and their bodies were put into the lake through this hole. In the spring their bodies were found floating along the west shores of Utah Lake in Pelican Point, Utah, Utah, United States. These murders were never solved. Their murderer was never found. Burial (1895): From Benjamin Historic Sites Homecoming, June 8, 1996: Andrew Johnson is buried in Benjamin Utah, Utah, Benjamin Cemetery Born: 27 Jan 1875 Died: 16 Feb 1895 -- "Said to have been massacred". Parents: Cecelia (Selia) Hanson Johnson Allen Tyrrell Below: It also lists another boy, Alfred Nelson, who was murdered the same day as Andrew Johnson and Albert Enstrom who were cousins. It is believed that Alfred Nelson is also a cousin; but no one is sure. Note from Benjamin Historic Sites Homecoming, June 8, 1996: Alfred Nelson is buried in Lot: 146 in the Benjamin Utah Cemetery. Born: 1878 Died 16 Feb 1895 -- Age 17. Said to have been massacred. No parents listed General: Note from Jim and Alice Allen: Selia Hanson Allen Tyrrell Wooten German had a son named Andrew Johnson, born 29 Jan 1875. Not known if married. Her son Andrew Johnson, along with 2 cousins were murdered in Pelican Point, Utah, Utah, on Feb 16, 1895. Andrew Johnson was the son of Selia Hanson Allen, and nephew of John Hanson. Excerpts From Newspaper Article - Provo City, Utah, Monday April 22, 1895: The bodies of Johnson and Nelson were found at about 3 o'clock on Saturday Afternoon. The lake (Utah Lake) had become entirely too rough, for the fishermen who were dragging it, to manage their boats upon it and they had given over work for the day. A party consisting of H. T. Hayes, stepfather of Enstrom; John A. Hanson, Uncle of Enstrom and Johnson; (Mrs. Hayes and Johnson's mother, Mrs. Tyrrell are sisters); Mr. Tyrrell, stepfather of Johnson; and S. C. Peterson, Uncle of Nelson, walked on down the shore of the lake about a mile farther south than the point at which Enstrom's body was found, and they came upon the bodies of Johnson and Nelson. Mr. Tyrrell at once carried the news to Lehi. Description of Andrew Johnson: 20 years old; height 5 feet 10 inches; light complexion; very large nose; wore No. 9 shoes; weight about 190 pounds, wore a canvas overcoat with gray gadber fur collar. Description of Albert Enstrom (Hayes): 23 years old; was athletic and capable of defending himself; was born 18 May 1872 and died on 16 Feb 1895; was the son of Caroline Hanson and Sven Nielsen Enstrom. May have had a brother or brothers living in Arizona. Description of Alfred Nelson: 18 years old, about 5 feet high; very dark complexion; weight about 130 pounds, short, stubby nose; very prominent cheek bones; wore No. 7 shoes; had on a pair of corduroy pants. Note from Jim and Alice: Andrew Johnson and Albert Enstrom lived in the Lake Shore--Benjamin area. Alfred was also living with the two boys when they were murdered. Note from Aunt Alice: Alfred Nelson, his Dad was Lars Nelson and his mother was Johanna Jacobson; and I think they lived in Provo or the neighborhood with the other two boys. PELICAN POINT CASE: Daily Enquirere, Provo, Utah -- Apr - Dec 1895 -- 25 Feb - Mar 27, Apr 1 1896, 2 Jan 1897. The Deseret Evening News, Salt Lake City, Utah - Mar 1896 - Apr 1899 - D45 The Evening Dispatch, Provo, Ut. -- 23 Apr 1895. The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah - Mar 1896 - Jan-May 1899 SA37 - Mar 1930. Inscription Taken From The Tombstone In Benjamin Cemetery: In memory of Andrew Johnson, aged 20 years, and 20 days, said to be massacred February 16, 1895. Alfred Nielsen or Alfred Nelson, Albert Enstrom and Andrew Johnson were murdered on or about 16 Feb 1895. They had lived in the Benjamin-Lake Shore area. Murdered at a cabin at Pelican Point on Utah Lake. Caroline and Harry Hayes lived in Eureka. Alfred Nelson was a nephew of Lars Peterson, and had emigrated to this country two years earlier (1893) before being murdered. Information obtained from records and research in possession of Joan Hutchings Carpenter - Research done by Jim and Alice Allen. The following article was given to James E. Allen by Reva Tyrrell Andreason some years ago. The newspaper was quite yellowed with age. PELICAN POINT MURDERS - March 11, 1930 - Pelican Point: The story of a hole in the wall and how it figured in the solution of one of the More gruesome murders in the annuls of the west. The reaction upon the average mentality to a shocking murder is usually a hysteria which interferes with an orderly, sane, intelligent investigation. This hysteria is manifest by confusion in the minds of investigators who feel obligated to listen, to probe and to eliminate or substantiate, as the case may be. Very often in attempting to find tangible clues, to establish motives, and to find evidence which will point indubitable to the murder, the obvious is overlooked. The murderer is busy with his alibi, always fearing he may have left some telltale track which, when found, will open a plain trail toward him. The instinct of self preservation is so strong in all humans, murderers included, that if the memory recalls some slight misstep, some trace that has not been blotted out, the guilty person will fashion a way of "covering up," thus, further safeguarding his liberty. Three boys, Albert E. Enstrom, ANDREW JOHNSON and Alfred Nielsen were asleep in a little cabin, a plain shack at the edge of the Lake. The boys were cousins. They had been taking care of the little ranch, running cattle, hauling ice from the Lake Point and otherwise keeping themselves busy. The last that had been seen of any of them was on 14 February 1895. The winter held that region in its frosty grip. There was plenty of ice on the Lake, and if the boys did not appear at Lehi, or any other communities, for several weeks, no concern was felt in those days, when travel was so slow. A reporter for the Tribune spent most of the night riding in a buggy from Salt Lake to the scene of the murder. It was not to be wondered at that remote place like Pelican Point remained unvisited for weeks at a time. Along in April, after the ice on the lake had broken up and the weather cleared, a sheepherder walking along the shores of Pelican Point found the body of Enstrom floating face down in the water. He spread the alarm and Sheriff Brown, a squad of deputies, City Marshall Karrens of Lehi and others went to investigate. It was known that Enstrom's cousins had been with him. Now they were gone. A pool of blood was found in the little cabin. A bullet hole was found in the board wall near the bed. The first suspicion was directed at the two cousins. Reconstructing the scene as the three boys slept in the cabin, it was regarded likely that Enstrom would sleep in the double bed, near which was found the bullet hole in the wall. This did not escape the eye of Marshall Karrens. BODIES OF TWO OTHER VICTIMS DISCOVERED LATER: The utter absence of motive on the part of the cousins soon dissipated any suspicion toward them, and the lake was dragged for days. It appeared to the sheriff and others that not only Enstrom had been killed, but his two cousins as well. Harry Hayes, a stepfather of Enstrom, had been found. Hayes found the bodies of the other two in the lake. He was left in lonely vigil to guard them while the officer hurried to Lehi for wagons. While the inquest was being held at Lehi, it was discovered that the horses, wagon and harness used by the boys had disappeared. The lake was dragged again. The hand of suspicion pointed first to one and then another. Neighbors recalled there had been a land feud between Hayes who claimed the little ranch, the Slades and the Cederstroms. The boys had gone to court to testify in the case, but there had come a postponement and they returned to the ranch. ILL FEELING EXISTED BETWEEN WARRING FACTIONS Between the warring factions in the feud there was ill feeling. Hayes did not oppose the growing suspicion against Oliver Slade, yet he did nothing to strengthen it. Feeling was at fever heat in Utah County. The coroner's inquest went into secret sessions. The press was barred. A dozen motives sprang logically to the mind, the fact was never overlooked that in the land feud fences had been torn down, violence threatened, some men were known to have been armed. All of a sudden the inquest was over, nothing developed from it, and the farmers of Utah County went about their work, as spring advanced, they were puzzled over the failure to penetrate the mystery. PIECE OF PAPER PASTED OVER BULLET HOLE IN WALL During the summer Marshall Karrens, of Lehi, received an anonymous letter. It called to him, "The bullet hole in the wall". He went to Pelican Point Cabin to investigate. There he found Hayes and his family and some others, at work on the little ranch, all living in the cabin where, months before, the tragedy had occurred. The discerning eye of the Marshall noticed, as he examined the interior of the cabin, that a piece of paper had been pasted over the bullet hole in the wall. There could be two explanations of this, it might be the women in the household wanted to erase all trace of the tragedy, merely to eliminate a constant reminder. The other theory related to the superstition that the murderer always returns to the scene of the crime. What for? Had anyone noticed the bullet mark? Could the size of the bullet be determined by the hole in the board? What did the writer of the anonymous letter try to convey when he called attention to the paper? He must have been in the house after the hole was concealed. He might be one of the household. CRIME RECONSTRUCTION TAKES FORM, PIECE BY PIECE Piece by piece, the crime was being reconstructed. The circumstantial evidence was being woven into the pattern. The search for the horses and wagon was without result, but a piece of harness was found in the corral, buried, and later used by Hayes. Towards fall, the picture was almost complete, the bits of evidence fitted into a mosaic, which needed only a clear motive to make it perfect. Joseph Barnes recalled having played cards with the three boys at the cabin, recollected that Enstrom said, "If Hayes comes, we will have to hang him." The significance of that was to become apparent later. Olaf Cederstrom had written a letter to Hayes about the stock not being cared for during these weeks when the bodies of the boys were floating in the icy waters of the lake. Hayes wouldn't go to the ranch, but Mrs. Hayes went. Neighbors thought this significant. The late E. A. Wedgewood was brought to aid Sheriff Brown. The boys had been slain in February, their bodies found in April, and it was now December. The case was built up, piece by piece, into a circumstantial fabric, with the motive so weak it was never thoroughly accepted. Early in December Hayes was indicted for murder by the Utah County Grand Jury. In the absence of the motive, stronger than hatred of his stepson, Hayes was generally believed to be guilty. No positive evidence was found but some of his statements, which remained unshaken for months, were proven false. The fidelity of his wife throughout the investigation was a barrier. She helped his alibi in many places, particularly against the testimony that he was seen going to Pelican Point in February, when he swore he had been at home. CASE AS FINALLY PRESENTED IN PROSECUTION OF HAYES The case finally presented in prosecution of Hayes was substantially this: He had gone to the cabin from Eureka on the night of 16 Feb 1895, stealthy opened the door. In the dim light he discerned two bodies on the double bed. He knew he would have to tackle them first and did. He shot them both just as Enstrom, the stepson for whom he was seeking, ran out the door. Hayes killed him as he ran. Then he lugged all three bodies to the lake and dumped them through the ice. Hayes maintained his innocence, but a jury convicted him and the Supreme Court affirmed the judgment of the Utah County Court. Hayes was sentenced to be shot. The late O. W. Powers entered the case as attorney for Hayes. As the date for his execution approached, nearly two years after the murder, preparations were made to set up a tent, with five holes in it, at Point of the Mountain. PARDON BOARD COMMUTES SENTENCE TO LIFE IMPRISONMENT Utah and Juab County residents signed a petition to the State Board of Pardons for commutations. There was a lingering doubt that the circumstantial evidence was strong enough to justify capital punishment. The preparation for the shooting of Hayes went on, until the Pardon Board commuted his sentence for life imprisonment. There are those old timers around the shores of Utah Lake who still believe Hayes might never have been indicted for the murder had he not put an obvious paper patch over the bullet hole in the cabin where he committed the murder. When Harry Hayes escaped the gallows at Point of the Mountain, the mystery of the triple murder at Pelican Point appeared to have been solved for all time. Hayes was accounted. George A. Storrs, who had only a few weeks before assumed his new duties as sheriff of Utah County, borrowed a gallows from Salt Lake and purchased a brand new rope from St. Louis. Had he carried out the order of the court sending Hayes to eternity, there might have been no thought of pursuing the matter further, but while there is life there is always hope. It had been the strangest of murder mysteries, and ranks with the great murder mysteries of all times. It had been observed that very often the obvious has been overlooked in the mad hysterical reaction which first attends a shocking crime. In the hysteria that followed the Pelican Point Murders, wherein three boys were shot to death, the most vital of all clues was overlooked entirely in the attempt to substantiate a circumstantial theory as to the guilt of Harry Hayes. STATE FAILS TO FIND MOTIVE FOR CRIME As had been said, the motive established by the state was weak. The threats Hayes had made upon his step son's life were not, in truth, any more than a habitual manner of speaking on the part of Hayes. When he menaced the boys by saying, "If you don't do this or that, I'll kill you", it was merely his way of frightening the lad. Had the character of Hayes been better understood, the proper psychological reaction to these repeated statements would have been advantageous to the convicted man in his trial. In relating the story of the murders at Pelican Point, the first chapter was closed when Hayes escaped the gallows through a commutation of sentence by the Pardons Board. The murders had occurred in Jan 1895, the bodies of the three boys found in the lake in April; Hayes indicted for murder in December of the same year, tried the next year, and after an appeal to the Supreme Court availed nothing, was sentenced to be executed on January 22, 1897, almost two years after the murders. The respite came while preparations for the hanging went on, and Hayes went to prison protesting his innocence. FAILURE TO LOCATE MISSING WAGON HURTS CASE The big flaw in the prosecution of Hayes was the failure of the State to explain the missing horses, wagon, harness, and other things which were stolen at the time of the murder. Why would Hayes steal this property which was mostly his own, unless he wanted the police to believe the motive was robbery? In the absence of a definite motive on his part, the ruse did not seem consistent. If the State had invested him with a competent motive, it might easily have been shown that he stole his own property to fool the law. Sheriff Storrs took an interest in the missing property almost from the moment he was inducted into office. Always, on trips through Utah County, he made inquires and always he had his eyes open for the horses, the wagon, the harness, the household things that had disappeared. The new county attorney was S. A. King, then a young lawyer, and now a practicing attorney in Salt Lake. Storrs and King got hold of an idea and followed it through. Suspicion fastened upon Chris Peterson from Payson, and Sheriff Storrs took him to Pelican Point, slept with him in the death cabin and tried to wring a confession from him. But Peterson stuck to his alibi and it was unshaken. He was eliminated. Into southern Utah the trail led, into Idaho, but always Storrs was met with the same baffling report. He was on the point of abandoning the chase, when he met Tom Williams of Provo. Williams knew a man named G. Weeks who had been arrested as a cattle thief. He jumped his bond and disappeared. Williams told of Mrs. Weeks selling off all her property at Mapleton, preparatory to moving away. That was seven months after the murder, and two years before Storrs met Williams. Sheriff Storrs grasped at this tiny lead. He traced the articles that had been purchased by persons in the little communities around Utah Lake. At Milton H. Smith's house in Payson he found certain articles, at Harvey Perry's in Mapleton he found the harness. MOTHER SCREAMS WHEN SHE SEES QUILT Mrs. Hayes, wife of the man in jail was sent for. She screamed when she saw a quilt which she knew her son had in the Pelican Point cabin. Mrs. Celia Tyrrell, mother of Andrew Johnson, another of the murder victims, was similarly affected when she identified another article as having belonged to her son. Her son's gun was found. One thing after another had been sold by Mrs. Weeks, and for two years she had been absent from the little cabin in Mapleton. Weeks having jumped his bond, after arrest as a cattle thief, Sheriff Storrs started a search for him which later became nationwide, involving officers of a dozen states and bringing in old W. A. Pinkerton himself and the resources of his detective agency. By this time, rewards were issued for the arrest of Weeks. When the trail led to Rangely, Colorado, Storrs obtained a requisition for Weeks for cattle rustling, and followed. He went by wagon across Uintah, ostensibly to arrest Chris Madsen, who had shot the Sheriff's brother, Charles A. Storrs, at Richfield. When Storrs reached Rangely, the trail led to Freshwater where he sought the sheriff. The Sheriff had gone to arrest C. T. Case, who was wanted for the murder of W. D. Crampton in January 1896. The Colorado sheriff lost his man in Chicago. Storrs encountered a striking thing in Colorado. The man Weeks, whom he sought, was none other than C. T. Case. The only line on him led toward Jonnie McCain, a sweetheart at Kolomo, Ind., whom he had promised to marry. The wedding was to be in September 1897, but Case wrote her he intended to commit suicide, and she never saw him again. WRIGHT ABANDONS WIFE IN NEW YORK TOWN The trail led on to Governor, N. Y., and Sam King wrote to the sheriff at Governor to inquire about Jennie M. Wright. The only reaction to this was a reply that Jennie's husband was George H. Wright, that he had abandoned his wife, and she had not seen him for a year. Storrs worked quietly, effectively. He found that William Beckstead, of South Jordan, had traded a wagon to Case. The Beckstead wagon was found to have been sold by Mrs. Weeks to Harrold Tweede of Mapleton. Both wagons were identified and the chain had another link. There are so many sheriffs and detectives mixed up in this case, wrote William Allen Pinkerton from Chicago, where Case had abandoned his baggage with imminence of arrest. He dubbed Case as a forger, swindler and matrimonial shark. It was in February 1898, after Hayes had served a year in prison, that Mrs. Weeks wrote a letter to a friend in Mapleton inquiring about the Pelican Point murder. Sheriff Storrs dictated the reply and many replies thereafter during the correspondence. From February to October the correspondence went on, and then the sheriff at Governor interviewed Mrs. Wright. Mrs. Wright was the missing Mrs. Weeks and she told of the shooting of one of the Hayes horses and the hiding of him near the Dunyan Ranch. Storrs began to see the end of the long, long trail. Before he went east, he drifted up into Oregon but the trail was fruitless. In January 1899, Storrs caught a train for New York and returned with Mrs. Wright - alias Mrs. Weeks. MRS. WRIGHT TELLS LIFE STORY The story of Mrs. Wright is vital to the solution of the Pelican Point murder. She had married George H. Wright at Alma, Mich., and came with him to Salt Lake in 1890. Her husband had plenty of money. He had been a mining man, a lawyer and what-not. He set up a home on 9th street; walked out at night a great deal, telling his wife he couldn't sleep. He returned around daylight, usually. The house on 9th South was traded for a ranch at North Point. Wright built a big corral and now and then came home with cows and horses and sometimes sheep. The cattle were killed and dressed and the meat peddled by Wright. His wife helped him dress the beef. She suspected he was stealing cattle, but she was afraid and said nothing. Later on, he confessed to her, and still she remained silent. In December 1894, Wright was summoned before the Grand Jury, which was investigating sheep and cattle thefts. He disappeared from North Point when Deputy Marshalls went there to search the house. His wife aided his escape. He spent New Year's Eve with his wife, but disappeared again and was gone until March 1895. This time he had a wagon and team and some other articles. He and his wife packed all their belongings and abandoned the North Point Ranch. They traveled southward to the Beckstead Ranch at South Jordan. The wagon was traded to Beckstead, and Wright borrowed two horses. Reaching the cabin of Tom Williams at Mapleton, which Wright had leased, he forced his wife to adopt the alias of Weeks, and he became known as James G. Weeks. WRIGHT TURNS PALE WHEN HE HEARS OF DISCOVERY Tom Williams and Greg Metcalf came over for dinner along in April. They told of finding three bodies at Pelican Point. Wright turned pale. It made him ill for two weeks. The Tribune had carried a description of the missing articles from the Hayes cabin. Among them was a duck coat. Mrs. Wright, now alias Weeks, now remembered the duck coat her husband had brought to North Point, and she knew the solution to the mystery of the Pelican Point Murders. In May the Weeks moved to Pond Town. That was four months after the murders on Pelican Point. In August Mrs. Wright had a birthday. It was celebrated by the sheriff, who came to her house and arrested Wright for stealing cattle from the Dunyon Ranch. Wright gave bond, absconded, and Utah knew him no more. The following month Mrs. Wright sold the household belongings and went to New York to her mother. The following February she heard from Wright, alias Weeks, and alias Case. He wrote from Pueblo, Colo., asking her to meet him in St. Louis. But he never wrote again and she remained at home at Governor. There is no question in the minds of the Utah County authority that Wright, the man of many aliases, committed the Pelican Point murders. He is over 70 now if he is still alive. He is a very much wanted man, had been for years, and his appearance in Utah, even now, would be welcome. HAYES WIFE WAITS WHILE HE IS IN PRISON Having abandoned his wife, who was held to him for years through fear, Wright could expect no further from her. Mrs. Wright, no longer motivated by fear of her husband, told the whole story, took an oath it was true and it is now part of the record in the form of an affidavit. Hayes was released from the state prison in May 1899, and while the same "finis" could not be written across the last entry relating to the Pelican Point murders, as appeared there when he cheated the gallows. The true solution of the mystery was obvious from the beginning. When Hayes was released from the penitentiary, he returned to Eureka, where his faithful wife had a millinery shop. He died several years ago. George Wright returned to the vicinity of the crime, leaving a trail which was picked up by the new sheriff, and the young county attorney. Storrs afterwards became warden of the State Penitentiary, and now resides in Los Angeles. The records of the Utah County Courts show that Wright, alias "Weeks", alias "Case", is wanted for murder. His confession would add an epilogue to one of the most sensational murders, and man hunts, in the annals of the west. Note: Andrew Johnson was the son of Celia Hanson Allen Tyrrell Albert Enstrom was the son of Carolina Hanson Enstrom Jones Alford Nielsen was a nephew of Lars C. Peterson and John Hanson The above article was given to James E. Allen by Reva Tyrrell Andreason some years ago. The newspaper was quite yellowed with age. Reva Tyrrell was a niece to Andrew Johnson's mother. James E. Allen was a grandson of Andrew Johnson's mother. Also in my possession is a copy of a book called "Murder in any Degree" an account of two unsolved murders in Utah County, by Delila Williams an d LaNora Allred. Part of it is the story of Andrew Johnson's murder at Pelican Point on Feb. 16 1895. This story says that Andrew Johnson shares the grave in Benjamin, Utah with his cousin, Alfred (who was also killed that day). On the other side of Alfred's grave marker is written: " In memory of Andrew Johnson, age 20 years and 20 days, said to be massacred Feb 16, 1895." Aunt Alice Allen found the following information about Alfred Nielson or Nelson: 17-18 years of age, 5 ft high, very dark complexion, weight about 130 lbs, short, stubby nose, very prominent. Preparer: Joan Hutchings Carpenter jcjoanifer@gmail.com Endnotes 1. Information obtained from records and research of Jim and Alice Allen; now in possession of Joan Hutchings Carpenter. 2. Delila Williams and La Nora Allred's book: Murder in any Degree -- An account of three unsolved murders in Utah County, Murder in Any Degree. 3. Compiled by Diane R. Parkinson - May 1996, A History and Genealogical Record of the Benjamin, Utah Cenetery (The Utah Va, History of Benjamin Cemetery. 4. Siblings - Arlene Stubbs Dillingham and Eldon Stubbs. 5. From research by Jim and Alice Allen - Now in possession of Joan Hutchings Carpenter. 6. Newspaper - Butte, Montana posted May 1, 1952, Daily Herald (Provo). 7. James Stephen & Mary Jane Matson Allen Family Bible Records, (n.p.: n.p., n.d.); privately held by Now in possession of Joan Hutchings Carpenter, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]. 8. Headstone in the Springville City Cemetery, Springville, Utah, Utah, United States. 9. TOMBSTONE, Benjamin Cemetary.

The truth is stranger than fiction--a true story

Contributor: Brian Created: 5 days ago Updated: 5 days ago

I had a call from Lynette Wheeler in the spring of 1985. She said, Delila, we would like you and Allen to represent a Pioneer couple on the float that our ward is making for the 24th of July. I told her, “Yes, we will be glad to.” The pioneer bonnet that I wore on that occasion brought back memories. Let me turn time back more than fifty years, when I was a young girl. My mother asked me, “Lilie, will you take a pie down to Mrs. Hayes?” My first reaction was that I didn’t want to, but I knew better than to refuse her. So I said I would, having done it many times. But I thought, “Why doesn’t mother have swell friends instead of having old lady?” Now swell, at that time to me, meant something special, somebody to give us social status. Mrs. Hayes, as I remember her now, was a large raw-boned woman. Her gray hair was pulled tightly back from her face and braided in the back. She wore a gray linsey-woolsey dress reaching to her ankles, with long sleeves, high neckline, with a lace ruffle at the neck and cuffs. She wore an oval broach at her throat. She always wore a long white gathered front apron. She operated a millinery shop situated above Palmer’s Market on Spanish Fork Main Street, a covered stairway led up to her place of business. Prior to this, she had shops at Silver City, Eureka and in Benjamin, in part of her frame home. She also had several cats. She was very talented in her chosen profession. At that time, it was fashionable for young women to wear hats. One lady told me of the hats that Mrs. Hayes had made for her and her sisters. Her hat was orchid georgette or crepe de chine with forget me nots flowers for trim. She dearly loved this hat. My mother was truly a good friend of Mrs. Hayes. In appreciation for her friendship, she would pick up mother’s hand and kiss it. Her only other friend was an elderly gentleman, whom after the death of her husband, she eventually married. At one time, my aunt chastized mother, “Annie, there’s been talk about you befriending Mrs. Hayes. You must realize that your own reputation is at stake.” But that didn’t bother mother, who told us, “She doesn’t even know her. You be kind to Mrs. Hayes. She has had a sad life.” Mrs. Hayes was a guest in our home for dinner. We didn’t have a car, so she would have had to walk nearly six blocks to our home. My sister remembers on that occasion, she wore a pretty pink dress, not the latest style, but she was neat and clean, pleasant and so appreciative. When her health wouldn’t permit her to work in the shop, she gave mother a large box, about four foot square, of all types of hats. We took our little red wagon to bring the big box of hats home. She also gave us several oleander plants in large containers. In this box were six of these pioneer type bonnets, which we loaned out and eventually lost all but one, which I still have. I added flowers across the front and sewed ribbon so it could be tied under the chin. This is the hat I wore in the parade. Mrs. Hayes was born in Malime (Possibly Malmo) Sweden Feb. 12 1847. Her parents were Andrew and Anna Hanson. They were converted to the L.D.S. faith and emigrated to America. They crossed the plains in a handcart company. Mrs. Hayes maiden hame was Caroline. Yes, she had a sad life. Let me relate it to you. On Feb 16, 1895 three young men of Lake Shore were murdered at the Hayes ranch near Pelican Point, and their bodies were found on the west side of the lake in April. All three had been shot. The men were Albert Enstrom, (who sometimes went by the name of Hayes), Andrew Johnson and Alfred Nelson. In December Harry Hayes, who was the stepfather of young Entrom, was indicted for the killing of his stepson. He was found guilty in January and in April was sentenced to hang June 19, 1896. However, shortly before the sentence was to be carried out, Hayes received a postponement of the sentence. In October, he asked for a new trial, but it was refused and a new execution date was set for January 22, 1897. At this time, Hayes presented a application for a pardon to the Board of Pardons. In the absence of a motive stronger than hatred of his stepson, Hayes was generally believed to be guilty. However, no positive evidence was found. The fidelity of his wife, throughout was a barrier. She helped his alibi in many places, particularly against the testimony that he was seen going to Pelican Point in February when he swore he had been at home in Eureka. The big flaw in the prosecution of Hayes was the failure of the state to explain the missing horses, wagon, harness and other things which were stolen at the time of the murders. Newly elected sheriff, George A. Storrs took an interest in the missing property almost from the moment he was inducted into office. On trips through Utah County, he made inquires about the case, searching for a clue. His efforts led him to Mapleton to George F. Wright (alias James G. Weeks, alias C. T. Case). Four months after the murders, the Weeks moved to Pondtown (Salem) Utah, where the sheriff issued a warrent for the arrest of Wright for stealing cattle from the Dunton ranch. Wright posted bond, absconded, and Utah knew him no more. The following month, Mrs. Wright sold the household items and went to New York to her mother. The following February, she heard from Wright. He wrote her from Pueblo, Colorado asking her to meet him in St. Louis. She never met him and he never wrote again. Having abandoned his wife, Wright could except no further shielding from her. Mrs. Wright, no longer motivated by fear of her husband, told the whole story, took an oath it was true, and it is now, part of the record in the form of an affidavit. There is no question in the minds of the Utah County authorities that Wright, the man of many aliases, committed the Pelican Point murders. Harry Hayes died August 9, 1911. He was born Sept 19, 1854. The inscription on his headstone reads—Him shall the score and wrath of man pursue with deadly aim; and malice, envy, spite and lies shall desecrate his name. But truth shall conquer at the last. For round and round we run. And ever the right comes uppermost. And ever is justice done. The other headstones in Benjamin Cemetery read—Albert S. Enstrom, age 23 years. Andrew Johnson, Age 20 years 20 days old and Alfred Nelson age 17 years—said to be massacred Feb 16, 1895 with the inscription, “Cursed is the man and void of laws and right, unworthy property unworthy light. Unfit for public or private care. Whose lust is murder, and whose horrid joy is theft. After her husbands death, Caroline Hanson, Enstrom Hayes married Llewellyn M Jones who was later found dead in his rooming house on 24 March, 1935. Mrs. Hayes Jones, became of ill health, went to live with a nephew, Orin Porter Tyrrell in Spanish Fork, Utah. The Tyrrell’s had a large gray cat and Caroline would wrap it in her long scarf, cuddle it in her arms murmuring, “My baby! My Baby! as she rocked in her rocking chair. Mrs. Caroline Hanson Enstrom Hayes Jones died February 3, 1936 shortly before her 89th birthday. She lies buried in the Benjamin Cemetery in an unmarked grave.

Taken from the Autobiography of George A. Storrs Sheriff at the time of the Pelican Point Murders His account of his search for the Murderer

Contributor: Brian Created: 5 days ago Updated: 5 days ago

In 1894 I was elected sheriff of Utah County. Prior to being Marshall at Springville I was Justice of the Peace for a number of years. While sheriff of Utah County I was still interested in grade construction work. I held the office for ten years, both under Democratic and Republican Administration, being at time the only Democrat elected in Utah County. I had a great many real experiences while in the sheriff’s office. I did practically all of the criminal work, leaving others in the office to take care of the civil matters. One of the most trying cases I had was when I first took the office. A man by the name of Harry Hayes had been convicted of murder in the first degree for the killing of three boys on the west shore of Utah Lake. It was supposed that he had killed the boys through spite work, as he had taken their wagon from the ranch, loaded the tools and equipment of different kinds in it, and took their quilts, sacks of corn, guns, etc., and had put their bodies into the wagon and drove it out on the Utah Lake and sank it through the ice. He was proven guilty on circumstantial evidence and the circumstances were woven about him so strongly that there was no one at that time but what thought he was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. I took office on the first of January after he had been convicted and sentenced -7- to hang on the 16th. We had the gallows all ready, the rope with the knot in it already made up, which we had bought from a St. Louis firm who made a specialty of that business, and everything was in readiness for the execution, when M. M. Warner, who was Hayes’ attorney, had Hayes brought to the Supreme Court on a Habeas Corpus proceeding. I brought him to Salt Lake and had him locked up in the county jail by the sheriff Thomas Lewis, and that night I asked the sheriff to lock me up with the prisoner. My idea was that if Hayes was guilty he must have had a confederate and by being locked up with him over night and having been denied any clemency of the court, I thought he would be in the frame of mind to divulge or make clear the matters of his crime. I had no thought at that time but that he was guilty. I started with him that night by questioning him in many ways. At one time he would be crying and at another time he would be serious and swearing. In protesting his innocence all the time this night and being with him I became convinced that he was as innocent of the crime as I was. I took the matter up direct with Governor Wells, and told the Governor that I believed, if he would commute his sentence to life imprisonment, I could find evidence that would prove that he was not guilty. I started in the matter, by getting a complete list through the wife of Harry Hayes and the cousins of the boys who had been killed, or murdered, of everything that had been taken from the Pelican Point ranch where the boys were. There were articles of all descriptions; chains, crowbars, pitchforks, guns, cans of powder, a team and wagon, and other articles too numerous to mention. I made a complete list with the description of each article as far as I could and sent it out in circular form to all police offices, post offices and constables in the country. Possible three months after the circulars had been sent out a man by the name of Thomas Williams came to the sheriff’s office in Provo and called me outside and told me that Tom Waterman, who was constable at Mapleton, had showed him a list of the stuff taken from the Pelican Point ranch. He told me that he helped to unload all the stuff and put it in a cabin at the mouth of Spanish Fork Canyon. A man by the name of Weeks had rented his cabin a short time previous to this, and that this man and his wife had come to the cabin with all of these things, and I helped them unload them. Williams told me at this time, that this man, Weeks, was the man who sheriff Brown and I had arrested for stealing Dunion’s cattle, and had been taken before John S. Boyer, Justice of the Peace at Springville and put under a $400.00 bond, and that ………. his bond. -8- Something over a year had elapsed from the time of the Pelican Point Murder and the time of Williams’ telling me this. I asked Mr. Williams to tell me who, if he could, had brought any of these articles that Mrs. Weeks had sold. He gave me the names of different people who had bought quilts, pitchforks, cro-bars, etc. I started out immediately with a team and buggy and went down to Lake Shore below Spanish Fork and got the mother of one of the boys that had been murdered to go with me. We first went to Mr. Perry, who had bought some of the articles and I went to the house, leaving the lady in the buggy; I had not told this lady anything of what I wanted of her at all, and Mr. Perry brought out first some of his own quilts and laid them on the fence where she could see them, then he brought some of the quilts that they had bought from Mrs. Weeks, as they were being brought out, on at a time, and laid on the fence, I asked her if she could recognize them. He finally brought a quilt out and hanged it on the fence and she recognized it at once and started screaming saying, “that is my boys quilt”. It was an old fashion blocked quilt, made of pieces of goods and remnants. She said that she had gotten these remnants from a store in Payson, and that time she was making another quilt for the boy out of the same material when he was murdered and that she had this quilt partly made up of the same remnants as in this quilt, the same pattern at her home was found at the Lake Shore. Then I was compelled to ask her if she could identify a gun that her son owned, and she said that she could. I asked her if she could describe it, she said “Yes”, that it was a Spencer rifle, model 1873, and that at one time she and the boy were going to Wyoming and had hanged the gun on the bows of the wagon and it had worn a hole in the stock and that in taking it down one day, it fell and one of the sights were knocked loose or to one side and the boy had put this gun in a vise at the blacksmith shop, and had re-fitted the sights and made a mark on it with a cold chisel in front of the sight so that he could tell whether it needed to be fitted again if it ever came loose or out of place by this mark. I had not seen the gun yet, but I had Mr. Perry bring it out and when I examined it I found it to be exactly as she had described, so that I was absolutely sure as to the gun. We then took a quilt with other quilts that she had identified to her home at Lake Shore. She brought out quilts that she had been making and the remnants in that quilt fitted exactly with the quilts that Mrs. Weeks had sold, and of which Thomas Williams had helped unload from the wagon. After she had described it I followed it up and found other articles which were as definitely identified as the quilts, for instance, a grab-hook on one of the chains that had been taken from Pelican Point and sold by -9- Mrs. Weeks, was identified by a blacksmith who had made this grab-hook and put it on the chain for one of the boys who had been murdered. When we had definitely decided that there was no question that Weeks had practically all the stuff that was taken from Point Pelican, or Pelican Point ranch, and unloaded it in this cabin about the time of the murder was supposed to have been committed, then I started out to try to find Weeks. I learned that he had started away from Mapleton on a pinto horse. I found out that he had gone up through Colton and said he was going over to Rangley, Colorado. I followed through to Rangley, and talked to an old settler there by the name of Colthrop. I described the man and asked him if he ever knew a man by that name coming through there. He says, “I should say I have”. A man answering that description came through here when we were threshing a year ago on a pinto horse. He rode up to the corral and saw that we were having some trouble with our threshing machine. He remarked, “It looks like it was a good thing I came, I happen to be a Nephew of J. I. Case who made that machine; my name is C. T. Case, and I can run that machine”. He came over and started to work for me and was with me for several months and was a good man to work. Just before he left he produced a letter supposed to have been written by a man in Vernal, Utah, who had a band of range horses running near Rangley. This letter stated that this man owned the horses and offered Weeks, or Case, one-half of this band of horses if he would gather them up and deliver them to him at Vernal. He got a young fellow there who was working for me that gathered up the horses and sent half of them to Vernal by this boy and drove the rest of them towards Meeker, Colorado. Mr. Colthorp paid Case off and took a receipt in Case’s handwriting for the work that he had done on the threshing machine. This letter, I got and, there is no question but what it was Weeks’ handwriting. I went up to Meeker and found that Weeks had sold the horses there and had his picture taken at Meeker. I went to the photographer and saw the picture, then it was no longer a question with me at all but that I was after the right man. He told the people in Meeker that he was going to Cripple Creek, Colorado, and gave them his name as C. T. Case. I went on over to Cripple Creek, and the day I arrived there they were having a Labor Day celebration at a little placed called “Grassy”. Thinking I might be able to see him around there, or learn something about him, I was sitting on a bench watching the people when a newsboy came along with the Denver Republican. I bought a paper from the newsboy and noticed on the front page a large -10- photograph of Weeks, and in bold type these words, “C. T. Case, Attorney at Law and once king of Freshwater, brought back from the East, now in jail at Guffie for the murder of William Crampton”. I hired a team and buggy to take me to Guffie that night, and paid this man for the trip, $36.00. When I arrived in Guffie I first went to see the Justice of the Peace and he informed me that it was all true, except that the sheriff had not yet arrived with his man but he expected him in a day or two. I waited around there for a day or two, getting the facts and particulars of Weeks’ activities and what was supposed to have been done by him. He had gone into this little mining camp called Freshwater and put up a little cabin and put his shingle out in front which read as follows: “C. T. Case, Attorney at Law”. He seemed to be just the man these old settlers wanted, for nearly all of them had possession of a low grade ore and they were hoping that someone would come along and install a machine with which they could mill it. C. T. Case at once interested himself with these miners and they became interested in him, and he was just the kind of man that soon won their confidence and also at interest in their mining claims. He had given banquets and was a very brilliant speaker. He soon acquired a considerable amount of money and told the old settlers that he was going back East to interest capital and have a mill erected in Freshwater and make it a real live mining camp. There were two brothers, William and Henry Crampton, who didn’t take any stock in this man Case, and Case in making his last attempt to win their confidence and become interested in their claims, went to their house to see them and only one of them was at home. They got into an argument and Case killed William Crampton. Case then came up into the town and told the Justice of the Peace that he had just came past the Crampton place and had looked in at the door and saw blood on the floor and it appeared that there may have been foul play. He (Case) headed a searching party and went down to the Crampton place and found the body where it had been dragged out behind the house into some bushes. He then told the Justice of the Peace that as an attorney he would advise them to hold an inquest. This was done and Case was foreman of the jury and wrote the verdict. I saw this verdict which was written in Weeks’, or Case’s handwriting, to the effect that William Crampton had been found murdered, and the party who murdered him was unknown. Then Weeks left for the East shortly after this murder was committed and he had only been gone a little while when a young fellow came to the sheriff and told him that he had seen Case -11- kill Crampton and that Case had threatened to kill him if he told anyone about it. A complaint was made against Case, and the County and State offered a reward of seven hundred dollars for C. T. Case. He was located shortly thereafter in the city of Chicago by Pinkerton. The sheriff had gone back for him and they were expecting him to return at any time. I got tired waiting and went to Denver, and while in the sheriff’s office at Denver the sheriff from Guffie came in without his man and said that he had an argument with Pinkerton, or that Pinkerton had wired him to bring the reward money, and, as I remember it, the sheriff claimed a part of the reward and Pinkerton turned him loose. This was a very keen disappointment for me, as I had wired Governor Wells from Guffie, Colo., what they had told me about him being in custody. I went to Chicago and met with Pinkerton and this is, as the story goes: This man had been living at the Sea Shore Hotel in Chicago, writing a brief, or summary of facts, of the Klondike Region for the Chicago Times. They had him arrested and locked up, waiting for the sheriff to come for him and when the sheriff came he tried to parley over the reward and he turned him loose, but that he had learned through letters found on Case, that he was engaged to a girl in Delphia, Indiana, and he believed that if he was engaged to the girl that he would go there. He said he would do everything in the world to help me locate him and sent a man with me to Delphia, Indiana. This girl, whom he had been courting, was the post mistress at Delphia. She recognized the photograph as being him and seemed to be a very intelligent lady, and admitted being engaged to Case. Case came to her after his arrest and after being turned loose told her the facts of the case and said that he was going back to Colorado and face the charge of which he was not guilty. She had a letter from him a little while after that which he had been mailed on a train in which he said he had decided that life was not worth living, and he was going to kill himself. This is the last definite knowledge we have ever had of Weeks. I came home and started a national-wide search throughout the country for him. We thought we had him located in several different places. We even went to Oklahoma, Denver, San Francisco, Oregon and numerous places, but it was never the man we were looking for. In the meantime, I was working on the case at this end of the line endeavoring to locate a trace of Weeks and where he came from before coming to the cabin located at the mouth of Spanish Fork Canyon, when a Mr. McClelland, who had been a United States Marshall, sent for me and told me that he had information that might help me. -12- I went to Mr. McClelland and he informed me that he knew George Wright, alias Weeks, alias Case, and knew all about him, that he had a home out on West Jordan, and that he had been accused of stealing cattle and sheep from a live stock company near Salt Lake and he had had a grand jury investigation by which an indictment was found against him. He and Mr. Dyer had gone out to arrest Weeks at his home and were met at the door by Mrs. Weeks. She invited them in and were seated when she informed them that Mr. Weeks had just gone out to the corral and would be back in a moment. They waited a while and went out to the corral and concluded that Weeks had left the premises. It was later found that he had jumped on a horse barebacked and rode south on what is now Redwood Road to a place where a dance was being held at Riverton where some horses with saddles were tied to posts outside near the dance hall. He had changed his horse for one with a saddle and rode farther south to the Pelican Point ranch and stopped with the boys for two or three days. The neighbors at that point and in that vicinity recognized the picture in the paper as being him; the man that came there at this time, who helped the boys do some surveying. Weeks was a civil engineer. He then went south and stopped at Dick Kinzies camp near Goshen. He was a tall fine looking fellow, appeared very bright and openly, well dressed, wearing a cap nearly all the time. He told the boys at Kinzies camp that he had been doing some surveying for the boys at the Pelican Point ranch. He went from there to Nephi and registered at the hotel, and from there he went to Cache Valley and back down through Spanish Fork Canyon to Mapleton. There he met Williams and leased a place telling Williams that he was a cattleman, that he had a ranch in Caster Valley and another in Camas, and wanted this place of Mr. Williams’ for a half-way place. The next time Williams saw him was when he brought some cattle to the place and sold them to the butchers in that vicinity. In the meantime he became acquainted with the people in Mapleton and gave banquets and met with them socially and became quite popular among them, especially with Gregory Metcalf and his wife. Finally he sold some cattle from Dunion near the point of the mountain, drove them down through Springville and sold them to Mr. Miner the butcher. Dunion traced the cattle to Springville. I was marshall at that time, and we got John A. Brown, who was then sheriff of Utah County, went up to Weeks’ cabin and arrested him and took him before the Justice of the Peace and bound him over. -13- After my trip into Colorado, and after I had secured a photograph of Weeks, I went to see Mr. Beckstead, who was at the point of the mountain. I had heard he was well acquainted with Weeks so I asked him if he recognized the photograph. He said, “Yes”, he had known him all his life and knew his people, that his name was George H. Wright instead of Weeks, and that the last he knew of him was when he moved from his place in West Jordan with his wife and little daughter. George H. Wright had come to his place with a wagon and team, had stopped over night with him and told him that he was moving into Rush Valley. He was then on the way to his place in West Jordan to get his wife and daughter and furniture to take them over to the place in rush Valley. We went and got his wife, daughter and furniture, and came back to Beckstead and told him that his wagon was too heavy so we asked him to trade for a lighter wagon, which Beckstead did. The next morning when Wright was leaving he asked Beckstead if he could borrow a team from him to help pull his load up to the top of the mountain, which is called the Point of the Mountain. Beckstead loaned him his team and changed harness with him, and that is the last time Beckstead ever seen him. Beckstead told me that George H. Wright’s parents and relatives lived in Medford, Minnesota, and said they were very refined people; they had spent a lot of money in educating George. He was a graduate of Ann Arbor, Michigan, starting his life as a preacher, later as a lawyer, and then as a civil engineer. His parents were among the most prominent families living in that part of the country. He gave me all the information that he could, and the wagon which he traded for from Weeks was found to be beyond any doubt, the wagon taken from the Pelican Point. When we had gathered all the evidence possible, relevant to the issue, it appeared that Case’s wife must have been an accessory after the fact in this murder. A complaint was brought against Mrs. Weeks and I started to locate her. I learned that she was corresponding with Mrs. Metcalf, and that only a short time previous to this Mrs. Metcalf had received a letter from her which had been mailed at a hotel in Govenor, New York. I immediately got in touch with authorities at that place and they wired me that they had her in custody and that she had acknowledged being the wife of George H. Wright. I went to Govenor, New York, taking my wife, Mrs. Storrs, with me and brought Mrs. Wright back with us. She was very liberate in telling all she knew regarding the crime. She had formed her opinion from what Weeks had told her concerning the murdered boys, and she knew where the Pelican Point horses had been killed and left. -14- Mr. Jake Evans, who was then County Attorney, Mrs. Wright and I, drove over to the point of the mountain where he had taken these Pelican Point horses and lead them down into a wash some distance below the wagon road and shot them. We found bullet holes in the foreheads of their carcass’s where they had been shot which corroborated the story which Mrs. Wright had related. She also informed us that she had never heard from George H. Wright since the night he jumped his bond and left her at the mouth of Spanish Fork Canyon. She gave us valuable information in regard to Wright’s doings. It seemed that he started his career of crime at the time of leaving school at Ann Arbor. He interested some school teachers at Lansing, Michigan, to put up money for him to take up timber lands in Colorado with which he pretended to be familiar. He used the money worthlessly and came back to Lansing, where he married Mrs. Wright. On the night of their wedding reception, these school teachers that had been buncoed out of their money got out a warrant for his arrest and the officers came for him during his reception. He got away from them and came to Utah and first lived somewhere near Ninth East and Ninth South, and pretended to have a ranch in Camas and would bring cattle to this place in Ninth East and Ninth South, and sell them to his neighbors. Later it was learned that what he claimed to be bringing from his ranch was stolen from different places and from various parties living in Salt Lake, and at the same time selling them to his neighbors. When he moved out to West Jordan he built a beautiful home with a large basement and a tower on the top of the house from where he could see all the country near. His wife said he would come home on Main Street at night and take buggies from implement houses and bring them home and compel her to re-paint them, then he would taken them and sell them in Salt Lake. After they had left West Jordan the Salt Lake officers searched his place and found a little of everything, such as wheels, scrapers, etc., all of which were found in the basement of his home. He had his wife frightened of her life, so she stated to me, and I think that statement was true. After bringing Mrs. Wright back from the East, instead of putting her in the county jail at Provo, I took her and her little girl to my home and later my cousin, Frank Storrs, from Williams, Iowa, came to this country to visit us and married Mrs. Wright. She had became almost a total wreck, even though her constitution was strong in the beginning the trouble and worry had reduced her health greatly, and after she married Frank Storrs she became addicted to the use of “dope” and finally -15- developed into a stage so dreadful that he had to leave her. He was granted a divorce and she went to San Pete County, I believe Salina, and married an old man, but never quit the use of “dope” and later died a fearful and despondent death. Her daughter grew into womanhood and married a young man in that part of the country and she now has a child and I understand is happily married. My opinion is that George H. Wright, alias Weeks, either killed himself or joined the army at the time of the Spanish American War for which they were recruiting, and may now be living in some foreign country. One instance I will never forget when we arrested him at the mouth of Spanish Fork Canyon for the stealing of Dunion’s cattle, and while riding down to Springville he turned to me and said, “Mr. Storrs, do I look like a criminal”. I replied that he did not. He had the most brilliant and powerful toned voice I had ever heard, and his language was of splendor. He said, “You know this is something I have never before experienced and I wish you would recommend me to some lawyer, for courts are somewhat like this experience and I know very little of them”. I suggested that he see Mr. Whitecotten who was a very able lawyer. I telephoned Mr. Whitecotten and he argued his case before the Justice of the Peace. He told a that time that he had a ranch in Camas, another in Emery County, and was on his way down Provo Canyon on horseback when he met a man driving these cattle (Mr. Dunion’s) and being in the cattle business himself he inquired what the fellow would take for them. The man named an exceedingly low price and he said he bought them and drove them to Provo and sold them to Mr. Miner, the butcher. He asked to give bond for his appearance at a later date, and stated he felt sure he could find this man who sold him the cattle. He had no trouble in securing a bond of four hundred dollars for his appearance, for there were three farmers who were really anxious to sign his bond. Later a large library of law books which Wright owned were found where Mrs. Wright had stored them away. Mr. Whitecotten attached them for his fee and regarded them as an elegant library. Wright was granted a free and unconditional pardon by William McCarty, Judge of the Court sitting at the time of his sentence. Mr. McCarty was a member of the Supreme Court, also a member of the Board of Pardons at the time we presented evidence which we had collected. He then stated, that while he had absolutely no doubt as to Hayes’ guilt at the time he sentenced him, he was equally sure that Hayes had no intention whatever of committing the crime charged. A finding of this later evidence was made circumstantial, which surrounded Hayes at the time of his conviction, -16- which appeared so far fetched that it was actually ridiculous. There were many instances at the time of Hayes’ trial that pointed to his guilt that when the facts were presented it looked ridiculous in the extreme. Hayes was liberated and went back to Eureka where he contracted tuberculosis and died a few years later. More history of George A. Storrs continues from here, but this is where the Pelican Point Murder search of Sheriff Storrs’ autobiography ended. I have typed it, just as he wrote it, from a copy of his autobiography. I also typed in the page numbers from his story. (Joan Hutchings Carpenter) Photo of Sheriff George A. Storrs Appeared in Provo Daily Herald on January 14, 2007 Article written by Amber Foote

Murder at the lake- Daily Herald 2007

Contributor: Brian Created: 5 days ago Updated: 5 days ago

Murder at the lake: The Pelican Point mystery By Amber Foote Sunday, January 14, 2007 Utah Lake has long been a venue for industry and recreation, from the now-quiet steel yards and factories hugging its east side, to the numerous resorts and harbors which have sprung up and faded from its shores over the last century. But few remember that due west across the lake from Geneva Resort near the now-abandoned mining and farming town of Pelican Point, one of the most nefarious and publicized murders in Utah history occurred in 1895. Two more bodies were found five days later in close proximity to each other and about three miles downshore from the first. All three men had been shot through the head with a .38-caliber pistol, with one body carrying an additional bullet in the chest. The young men, all cousins, were Albert Enstrom, 22, of Eureka; Alfred Nelson, 17, of Lakeshore; and Andrew Johnson, 20, of Benjamin. They had been killed while sleeping in the cabin where they tended livestock near Pelican Point. Their bodies had been loaded into the back of a wagon which was then driven out onto the frozen lake behind a team of horses, and their bodies were dumped through a hole cut in the ice. The murderer had then loaded the wagon with the boys' goods -- quilts, food, guns and tools -- and disappeared. Upon discovery of the bodies, the victims' families revealed that the three had been missing since Feb. 17. It was supposed that they had gone to Arizona for a few weeks. Not until April 15, 1895, was the boys' true fate discovered. The bodies, even after two months, had been eerily well preserved in the icy waters (only their faces were unrecognizable, and officials presumed that the young men had been killed soon after their arrival at Pelican Point. The case pulled a variety of law officers from around the county, most notably Sheriff George Storrs from Provo. The suspects THE INVESTIGATION that ensued produced a string of suspects who were examined and interrogated: The first was Oliver Slade of Lehi. Slade had a lawsuit pending against the stepfather of victim Albert Enstrom. Enstrom's family had once lived in another cabin at Pelican Point which was owned by Slade and were evicted for non-payment just months before the murders. Slade brought a suit for damages against Enstrom's stepfather for destruction of property. It was for a hearing on this suit in Lehi, that Enstrom, Nelson, and Johnson were last seen on Feb. 15, 1895. Slade was released from suspicion just days into the investigation because of lack of evidence and his reputation for being a peaceful citizen. The eye of suspicion next moved to members of the victims' own families. Harry Hayes, Albert Enstrom's stepfather, was at the center of a whirlwind of accusations and rumors. Eyebrows rose at Hayes's nonchalant attitude and lack of emotion concerning the disappearances and deaths. He displayed what many believed was suspicious and inappropriate behavior during the investigation. Adding grist to the rumor mill, witnesses told investigators that Harry's relationship with Albert was rocky; the two were often on bad terms. It was reported by several different witnesses that they had heard the two arguing quite violently at times and had even seen Hayes threaten Enstrom with a gun. Hayes's apparent apathy toward the crime and his reputation for being, as a newspaper reported, an "eccentric and mean old cuss," combined with circumstantial evidence to make him the primary suspect. Authorities conjectured that Hayes had acted out of spite with the help of his natural son, George, who had been visiting his father from the East. George, however, was cleared upon the discovery that he had left the territory and returned to Connecticut before the murders occurred. His innocence was further reinforced by the discovery of the dislike George had for his father as a result of the abuse he had suffered under his hand. William Tyril, Porter Rockwell's grandson and stepfather to victim Andrew Johnson, was next under the microscope. He was suspected of having acted with Hayes in the slayings. Tyril was also said to have been on bad terms with his stepson Andrew. A possible motive for the murders was that two of the young men, Enstrom and Johnson, had been bequeathed the property and cabin at Pelican Point by their mothers, who were the wives of Hayes and Tyril. The property was being held in the mothers' names, and it was thought that Enstrom and Johnson had plans to assert their rights of ownership. Authorities suspected that Hayes and Tyril had been coveting the property and livestock and had murdered all three young men before they could take the land for themselves. Again there was insufficient evidence, and Tyril was cleared of wrongdoing. Hayes then became the sole suspect. Daily Herald http://www.heraldextra.com Powered by Joomla! Generated: 14 January, 2007, 12:28 The lawman GEORGE STORRS was elected as Provo sheriff approximately one year following the murders and became a key player in Hayes's fate and the outcome of the case in general. In later years, Storrs documented the investigation of the Pelican Point murders in his personal journal and related that the case against Hayes was "woven about him so strongly that there was no one at that time but thought he was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt." Storrs also noted that the amount of circumstantial evidence against Hayes was weak to the point of being "ridiculous." Despite efforts by his attorney, Hayes was tried and convicted of the murders and sentenced to be hanged on June 16, 1896. Storrs had taken office just two weeks before Hayes was to be noosed and felt an acute interest in the case. He noted, "[W]e had the gallows all ready, the rope with the knot in it already made up ... and everything was in readiness for the execution." The night before the hanging was to take place, Storrs locked himself in with the prisoner intending to get Hayes to admit guilt for the murders. Storrs interrogated Hayes all night; Hayes responded with intermittent crying, swearing and seriousness, but always proclaiming his innocence. Storrs was convinced that Hayes was "as innocent of the crime as I was" and took up the matter with Gov. Heber Wells. Storrs told the governor that if he would commute Hayes's sentence to life imprisonment, Storrs would find evidence to prove his innocence. Thus began a lifelong commitment by Storrs to bring the real killer to justice. Storrs began his search by compiling a list of all the items that were said to have been stolen from the ranch at Pelican Point on the night of the murder. Items such as chains, crowbars, pitchforks, guns, ammo, food, quilts, and a team and wagon -- among many other things -- were included on the list. He sent out a circular with these items to every police officer, post office and constable he could around the "country." Three months later, Storrs received a lead from a man in Mapleton who stated that he had helped unload many items on the list from a wagon into a cabin at the mouth of Spanish Fork canyon. The cabin was being rented by a man by the name of James Weeks, who shared it with his wife, Jennie, and small daughter. The Mapleton man told Storrs that Weeks and his family had brought the wagon and items to the cabin. Upon seeing a photograph, Storrs remembered that he had arrested Weeks a year earlier for cattle rustling just days after the Pelican Point murders had been committed. Weeks was released on bond but disappeared. Stolen goods FOLLOWING THE TRAIL of stolen items from the cabin, Storrs found that they had been sold by Jennie Weeks and purchased by various people in the area. One by one, he began locating the purchasers of the goods in an attempt to positively identify the items as belonging to the murdered youths. In doing so, Storrs drove to Lake Shore and showed the mother of one of the victims several different quilts he lined up on a fence. She failed to recognize any of them until an old-fashioned blocked quilt made of remnants was brought out. She screamed, "That is my boy's quilt!" She had an identical one at her home. She also described a Spencer rifle with identifying marks on the stock and sights that had been owned by her son. A rifle was then brought out and examined by Storrs and found to match the description. Storrs followed up on other items that had been sold, including the missing wagon. Positive links were made to Pelican Point. The team of horses also was located -- their remains, that is. More than a year had elapsed sinced the murders. The horses were found shot dead in a gully. There was no doubt that Weeks had been in possession of all the wares taken from Pelican Point, and Storrs was convinced that Weeks was responsible for killing Enstrom, Nelson and Johnson. He learned that, upon breaking bond, Weeks had left the cabin at Spanish Fork on a horse and headed for Colorado. Storrs began his manhunt by following a trail that was more than a year stale. In Colorado, Storrs met an old settler who claimed that Weeks, using the name C.T. Case, had worked for him for several months the previous year. He said that Case had moved on to Cripple Creek, Colo. The sheriff came into Cripple Creek during the Labor Day celebration and sat down on a bench to observe the townspeople. He bought a copy of the Denver Republican and was astounded to see a photograph of Weeks with the lines, "C.T. Case, Attorney at Law and once king of Freshwater ... now in jail at Guffey for the murder of William Crampton." Incredulous at this timely discovery and shocked at the announcement of another murder committed by his suspect, Storrs immediately hired a team and buggy and drove to Guffey, Colo. There he found that Weeks, a.k.a. Case, was in the custody of a Pinkerton agent in Chicago, and the Guffey sheriff had gone to pick up the prisoner. While waiting for their arrival, Storrs took time to collect information on Case's activities and dealings in the area. Storrs learned that Case had gone into the small mining camp of Freshwater to offer his services as an attorney. The miners saw him as an enterprising man who could help jump-start their camp and turn it into a profitable town. Through banquets and engaging speeches, Case won their confidence and trust -- and, cunningly, an interest in their mining claims. Daily Herald http://www.heraldextra.com Powered by Joomla! Generated: 14 January, 2007, 12:28 Two brothers by the name of Crampton, however, were not taken in by Case's ideas. In an effort to win them over, Case went to their home on Jan. 17, 1896, where an argument ensued with William Crampton, who was alone at the cabin. Case ended the argument by killing Crampton. He then went to the justice of the peace, reported that he had been at the Crampton place and observed blood on the floor, which led him to suspect foul play. Case even rounded up a search party to "investigate" the murder, volunteered himself as coroner, and wrote the official verdict of murder, killer unknown. Case soon left the area and traveled east where he took up residence at the Sea Shore Hotel and began writing for the Chicago Times. He also found a woman, a local postmistress, and was engaged to marry her, though he was still legally married to Jennie Weeks. Young witness UNFORTUNATELY FOR CASE'S SCAM, a young boy in Freshwater, Colo., told local authorities that he had seen Case kill Cramptom and that Case had threatened his life if he told anyone. A large reward was offered for Case's capture, whereupon the Pinkerton agent apprehended him in Chicago. After waiting for several days back in Colorado, Storrs was disappointed. The Guffey sheriff showed up without Case in custody. Demanding an explanation, Storrs learned that the sheriff had asked for half of the reward money for the capture of the fugitive. Unwilling to give up the money, the Pinkerton agent had simply released Case, who seemed to have the uncanny ability to elude justice at every turn. Upon interviewing Case's fiancée, Storrs learned that Case had come to her after his release and said he was heading back to Colorado to face the murder charge of which he was innocent. She also had a letter from him, mailed from a train, stating that life was not worth living and he was going to kill himself. Whether a red herring or legitimate, that note, according to Storrs, was the "last definite knowledge we ever had of (Case)." Storrs went back to Utah and started a nationwide search for Case/Weeks and followed leads that took him to Oklahoma, Denver, San Francisco, Oregon and other places. Despite his dedicated persistence over the years, the sheriff always came up empty-handed. In later years, Storrs speculated that Weeks may have actually followed through on his threat to commit suicide or else had joined the army during the Spanish-American war and lived out his life eluding the law in some foreign country. As a side note, Weeks's wife, Jennie, had left Utah with her daughter after being abandoned by her husband. Storrs brought her back to Utah from New York to help in the investigation and search. Although she was an accessory to the Pelican Point murders by virtue of concealing her husband's crimes, Jennie had acted out of fear for herself and her daughter and was absolved of wrongdoing. She eventually became acquainted with -- and later married -- Frank Storrs, the cousin of Sheriff George Storrs. Under stress and worry because of her past, Jennie became addicted to drugs, probably marijuana or opium. She was later divorced. It was noted by Sheriff Storrs that she died a "fearful and despondent death" as a result of her addiction. Charming chameleon STORRS LEARNED MUCH about the real character and background of the Pelican Point murderer. The chameleon's real name was George H. Wright, using the aliases Weeks and Case, born of one of the most prominent and refined families in Minnesota. Well educated, he began his career as a preacher, then moved on to become an attorney and later a civil engineer. He was a successful businessman, adept at fitting into any social situation. Storrs's own encounter with Wright, as well as his interviews with witnesses, produced testimony that described Wright as charming, handsome, well spoken, gentlemanly and very intelligent. Storrs recalled the night when he had initially arrested Wright for cattle rustling just after the Pelican Point murders. While riding into town in the sheriff's custody, Wright turned and asked Storrs if he looked like a criminal. "I replied that he did not," Storrs later related. "He had the most brilliant and powerful toned voice I had ever heard, and his language was of splendor." Storrs would never forget that for a moment he unknowingly had the Pelican Point killer in his custody. It was never known absolutely what the motive was behind the killing of the three young men. Storrs did learn that Weeks had stopped off at the youths' Pelican Point ranch during February 1895 while on the run for cattle rustling. He had pretended to be a land surveyor and was apparently engaged in that business for several days at the ranch. Storrs suspected that Weeks had developed an interest in the livestock at the ranch and was caught in the act of theft by Albert Enstrom. It is thought that Wright killed Enstrom first, near the corrals, and then shot the other two boys as they slept in the cabin. Memorials Daily Herald http://www.heraldextra.com Powered by Joomla! Generated: 14 January, 2007, 12:28 FOR MORE THAN A HUNDRED YEARS now, Enstrom, Johnson and Nelson have rested side by side on the northward slope of the quiet, hillside cemetery in Benjamin. At the base of each obelisk headstone is etched the sobering words, "Said to be massacred." Next to the three young men's graves also stands a memorial to Harry Hayes, who was wrongly convicted and later absolved of the murders after serving four years in prison. Hayes's headstone seems to capture the sentiments of one long seeking acknowledgement that he had been convicted of a crime he never committed. His epitaph reads in part: "... But truth shall conquer at the last, for round and round we run. And ever the right comes uppermost, and ever is justice done." This story appeared in The Daily Herald on page A1.

Portraits of a Utah town

Contributor: Brian Created: 5 days ago Updated: 5 days ago

Portraits of a Utah Town Lehi Information taken from Lehi History Book called Lehi Portraits of a Utah Town, Written by: Richard S. Van Wagoner. I found this while looking for more information about Pelican Point. Page 56 – 57 … In addition to the jail, a small building was built on the lot in 1895 to house the Silver Bandwagon. In June of that year the city council directed Gay Whipple to erect a ninety-foot high liberty pole of native pine near the jail. When Utah Statehood was granted on 4 January 1896 the liberty pole sported a new thirty-five foot American Flag. This two-ton liberty pole came crashing down during a windstorm on 3 October 1906. Just prior to Utah statehood celebrations, a multiple murder near Lehi shocked the entire territory. Cousins Albert Enstrom (22), Alfred Neilson (18), and Albert Johnson (20) were last seen alive on 14 February 1895. Staying on the Hayes Ranch south of Pelican Point, the young men were shot to death while sleeping in their small cabin. Their bodies were then dragged out onto frozen Utah Lake and stuffed into a hole in the ice. Family members, though concerned about the youth’s whereabouts, could find no trace of them. On 16 April a sheepherder walking along the beach three miles south of Pelican Point discovered Enstrom’s body floating in the water and broken ice. It was taken to Lehi where an autopsy revealed two bullet holes in the left breast just above the heart. Initially the two cousins were suspected. But four days later their blackened, battered corpses, both with fatal bullet wounds, also washed ashore. An inquest was held in Lehi on 22 April. While the coroner’s jury considered the case behind closed doors in the city hall, Main Street was alive with people awaiting news. The jury did not release a verdict, however, until 10 June. The ruling was that the three “came to their deaths from gunshot wounds fired by a person or persons unknown.” Law enforcement officials initially suspected that family difficulties were at the bottom of the murders. It was widely known that there was no love lost between young Enstrom and his stepfather, Harry Hayes. In addition Hayes, who then lived in Eureka, behaved in a rather suspicious manner during the investigation. A Grand Jury indicted Hayes and on 6 December 1895 he was arrested, arraigned before the Fourth District Court, and entered a plea of not guilty. The “Pelican Point Murder Mystery” trial lasted from 23 March to 1 April 1896. After an eighteen-hour deliberation the jury was unanimous in its vote of guilty of murder in the first degree. On 27 April Judge McCarty sentenced Hayes to be hanged on 19 June. A stay of execution was awarded but the Utah Supreme Court ruled against Hayes on 12 October 1896. Another death date was set for 22 January 1897, but one week before the hanging was to be carried out the Board of Pardons commuted the death sentence to life imprisonment. Newly elected Utah County Sheriff George A. Storrs, the man who would have carried out Hayes’s execution, after spending a night in the man’s cell listening to his story, became convinced he was innocent. Starting with a list of items missing from the cabin where the murders took place, Storrs was able to locate many of them in Mapleton and Payson where they were positively identified by family members. All items were traced to George H. Wright, a man of many aliases. As Wright he was an “all round thief and scamp” in Salt Lake and North Point. As James Weeks he was a cattle rustler and thief at Mapleton, Utah. As Charles Case he was a murderer, forger, and thief at Freshwater, Fairplay, and Rangely, Colorado. Most importantly, a man matching his description was seen crossing eastward on Utah Lake ice with a wagon load of household goods at approximately the time of the Pelican Point murders. Unfortunately Wright had left the state and Sheriff Storrs was unable to locate him for questioning. But Wright’s abandoned wife, Jennie, then living in New York, wrote to a friend in Mapleton. Sheriff Storrs traveled to New York and returned with the woman on 9 January 1899. She implicated her husband in the murders, calling him an “outlaw who lived by plunder and rapine”. On 6 May 1899 the Board of Pardons, after hearing evidence from Harry Hayes’s attorneys and Sheriff Storrs, unanimously voted to pardon the convicted man. He left the prison the following day a “cheerful and lighthearted” man, and returned to Eureka. He died on 9 August 1911 and is buried in the Benjamin, Utah, cemetery with the following epitaph: Him shall the scorn and wrath of man Pursue with deadly aim; And malice, envy, spite, and lies, Shall desecrate his name. But truth shall conquer, at the last, For round and round we run. And ever the right comes uppermost And ever is justice done. Meanwhile Governor Heber Wells had offered a $500 reward for Wright’s capture. Though he was spotted about the country, he was never apprehended nor brought to trial. His wife, Jennie, who was granted a divorce and use of her maiden name, married a cousin of Sheriff Storrs on 17 August 1899. Despite the sensational murders that have occasionally involved Lehi officers, most police work has been less than exciting or heroic. A Lehi reporter for the Desert News went so far as to write on 15 October 1885, “Police business here is very dull, and the court has gone to farming in order to keep body and soul alive”. Furthermore, a colorful weekly vignette, “Judge Taylor’s Moving Pictures,” in the 13 August 1908 Lehi Banner reported: In Judge Taylor’s Court this week, There is very little doing, The attorney A. J. gone away, For his health it needs renewing. The jail is empty, no one’s there, The Marshal’s looking wise And keeping watch on all the drunks, For the town’s in need of fives. Yes, two Provo chaps the other day, Came just inside of town, And both being full of whiskey booze, And Henry not around. They stopped their horse, and out they got, And at each other went, And when the spree was over, They looked like thirty cents. But the Marshal he got busy, And run them both in jail, And when the ten went up for them, He let them out on bail. So the Judge’s Moving Pictures Just keep moving on, And perhaps next week the Judge May have a larger throng. ……. Page 250 – 252 Pelican Point In the early years the road west of Utah Lake was often used for wagon traffic to the southern settlements. Not far from the roadway near Pelican Point was a large outcropping of limestone. In 1856 lime production began at this site. Burned with cedar wood, the first load of lime was pulled across Utah Lake on a raft and from there by ox team to Salt Lake City, where it was used in construction of Brigham Young’s Lion House. Limestone production at Pelican Point increased dramatically after the leases were bought by the Utah Sugar Company in 1890. Lime was a vital product in the manufacturing of sugar. The Lehi Sugar Factory, along with other Utah Sugar Company factories, used tons of Pelican Point and Topliff limestone. In 1914 a lime burning kiln was built at the Point, and by the 1950s Lakeside Lime & Stone Company was using twelve huge kilns each sixty feet deep. The kilns were stuffed on a twenty-four-hour basis with one part coke (from Geneva Steel plant) and two parts limestone (supplied by Roger Cedarstrom). Two hundred tons of lime per day were produced by the company in its peak years of operation. The hydrated lime, packaged in fifty pound bags, was shipped throughout the western states for use in plaster and mortar. Lump lime was also used in the manufacture of putty. Approximately sixty tons of this product were shipped to U. S. Steel’s Geneva plant to be used in the soaking pits. More than eighty tons of lime rock dust, produced as a by-product of Lakeside Lime, was shipped daily to the Utah coal areas where it was used in mines to help prevent explosions. During the 1950s uranium mills in Monticello, Utah also used twenty-five tons of lime per day as a flux. Lakeside Lime eventually became Larson Lakeside Lime. The name Cedarstrom is firmly linked with mining activities at Pelican Point. In 1863 a Swedish Mormon convert, “Pear” Christofferson, who later changed his name to Pearson, began homesteading on Pelican Point. That lonely sagebrush strip of rocky soil was difficult to farm, but Pearson worked hard at the task. The land was eventually taken over by his son-in-law Olaf Cedarstrom, who continued the back-breaking labor. While searching for wood on the hillside west of his home, Olaf’s eldest son Oliver, came across some deposits of onyx – beautiful orange and chocolate-streaked specimens. For years the Cedarstrom family developed the Utah onyx. The stone achieved much fame when a replica of the Salt Lake Temple and a cover for a family Bible, both carved from onyx by Olaf Cedarstrom, won first prize at the World’s Fair in Chicago. Pelican Point onyx was extensively used in the interior of the city and county building in Salt Lake City, which was completed in 1889, and restored in 1989. It was also popular for tabletops, lamp stands, bookends, and various other ornaments. Although its popularity peaked at the turn of the century, Roger Cedarstrom in the 1950s and 1960s was still shipping several hundred tons a years, mostly to India, where the mineral was prized for statuette making. While the onyx industry was an important one for the Cedarstroms, their financial success chiefly came from the mining of calcite, an important mineral in the poultry, livestock, and building industries. The vein of calcite at Pelican Point (thirty feet wide, five hundred feet deep, and three miles long) was first noticed by Olaf Cedarstrom, who gathered a few crystals in 1902 and sent them to Professor James E. Talmage of the University of Utah, who used them in his geology classes. It was not until 1923, however, when the Utah poultry industry was dramatically on the rise, that the Cedarstroms began working their deposits. Roger Cedarstrom took samples to Professor Alder of the Utah State Agricultural College, who agreed to run a two-year test to determine whether calcite would be a suitable mineral to feed poultry and livestock. Laboratory tests assayed the calcite at 99 percent calcium, and determined that it would make an excellent mineral supplement. At that time ranchers were purchasing pulverized oyster shells from the Texas coast. Professor Alder alerted them to the less expensive alternative of calcite, and Cedarstrom’s fortunes were at hand. The Royal Crushing Company Calcite Mill was established on a spur of the Orem Interurban Railroad at Third North and Fifth West. During the peak years of calcite production it was estimated that Cedarstrom’s discovery saved western poultry and livestock men more than $4 million in shopping costs. In addition to being a food supplement, calcite was also used extensively in the construction industry. When mixed with a chocolate-colored onyx and black marble, calcite becomes terrazzo, a hard-surfaced material used for interiors, floors, and table tops. The walls and floors of the tunnels in the Hoover Dam were made from Cedarstrom terrazzo. Modern stucco roofs and walls are given a silvery sheen when plastered with a composition of calcite. When ground to a fine powder the tiny crystals are also used by many paint manufacturers as a paint filler. The pure white crystals for a time made a popular roofing material; several Lehi homes still have this type of roof covering. For many years the Cedarstroms also mined large clay beds to the south of their calcite mine. During peak years of production more than 39,000 tons of first grade clay was used by Utah brick manufacturers to create beautiful desert coral and golden mottled brick. Twenty-four hours a day twenty trucks shuttled back and forth from the huge clay mountain to the brick plants in Salt Lake City. The clay deposits, six hundred feet wide, over five hundred feet deep, and three miles long, were estimated to last five hundred years at the rate they were being mined in the 1960s – the last decade of active production. An outgrowth of the clay business was the Western Fire Clay Company, with B. H. Lee President, and Roger Cedarstrom as vice-president and general manager. In addition to the clay at the brick beds, deposits of even higher quality clay were found nearby. With the establishment of Geneva Steel during World War II, there was a strong demand for this quality material to be used in tapping holes and the runs that carry the molten steel. A clay with the rating of twenty-nine cone was required, and Pelican Point was the only place which could provide it. Under the direction of Ernest Cedarstrom, Roger’s son, more than thirty tons a day of this high-grade clay was mined and hauled to Murray Refractories where it was dried, pulverized, and trucked to the Geneva Steel Plant. The only industry operated by the Cedarstroms in the Pelican Point area today is Cedarstrom Calcite which is owned by Pauline Cedarstrom Pugh. Grand Cedarstrom manages the plant which employs four men in 1989.

Story of hole in the wall-Pelican Point

Contributor: Brian Created: 5 days ago Updated: 5 days ago

PELICAN POINT CASE: Daily Enquirere, Provo, Ut. -- Apr - Dec 1895 -- 25 Feb - Mar 27, Apr 1 896, 2 Jan 1897. The Deseret Evening News, SLC, Ut. - Mar 1896 - Apr 1899 - D45 The Evening Dispatch, Provo, Ut. -- 23 Apr 1895. The Salt Lake Tribune, SLC, Ut. - Mar 1896 - Jan-May 1899 SA37 - Mar 1 930. INSCRIPTION TAKEN FROM THE TOMBSTONE IN BENJAMIN CEMETARY: In memory of Andrew Johnson, aged 20 years, and 20 days, said to be massacred February 16, 1895. Alford Nielsen or Alfred Nelson, Albert Enstrom and Andrew Johnson were murdered on or about 16 Feb 1895. They had lived in the Benjamin-Lake Shore area. Murdered at a cabin at Pelican Point on Utah Lake. Caroline and Harry Hayes lived in Eureka. Alfred Nelson was a nephew of Lars Peterson, and had emigrated to this country two years earlier (893) before being murdered. Information obtained from records and research in possession of Joan Hutchings Carpenter - June 1993 - Research done by Jim and Alice Allen. ! Also in my possession is a copy of a book called "Murder in any Degree" an account of two unsolved murders in Utah County, by Delila Williams and LaNora Allred. Part of it is the story of Andrew Johnson's murder at Pelican Point on Feb 16 1895. This story says that Andrew Johnson shares the grave in Benjamin, Utah with his cousin, Alfred (who was also killed that day). On the other side of Alfred's grave marker is written: “In memory of Andrew Johnson, age 20 years and 20 days, said to be massacred Feb 16, 1895." PELICAN POINT MURDERS MARCH 11, 1930 The Story of a Hole in the Wall and How it Figured in the Solution of one of the More Gruesome Murders in the Annuls of the West. The reaction upon the average mentality to a shocking murder is usually a hysteria which interferes with an orderly, sane, intelligent investigation. This hysteria is manifest by confusion in the minds of investigators who feel obligated to listen, to probe and to eliminate or substantiate, as the case may be. Very often in attempting to find tangible clues, to establish motives, and to find evidence which will point indubitable to the murder, the obvious is overlooked. The murderer is busy with his alibi, always fearing he may have left some telltale track which, when found, will open a plain trail toward him. The instinct of self preservation is so strong in all humans, murderers included, that if the memory recalls some slight misstep, some trace that has not been blotted out, the guilty person will fashion a way of "covering up," thus, further safeguarding his liberty. Three boys, Albert E. Enstrom, ANDREW JOHNSON and Alfred Nielsen were asleep in a little cabin, a plain shack at the edge of the Lake. The boys were cousins. They had been taking care of the little ranch, running cattle, hauling ice from the Lake Point and otherwise keeping themselves busy. The last that had been seen of any of them was on 14 February 1895. The winter held that region in its frosty grip. There was plenty of ice on the Lake, and if the boys did not appear at Lehi, or any other communities, for several weeks, no concern was felt in those days, when travel was so slow. A reporter for the Tribune spent most of the night riding in a buggy from Salt Lake to the scene of the murder. It was not to be wondered at that remote place like Pelican Point remained unvisited for weeks at a time. Along in April, after the ice on the lake had broken up and the weather cleared, a sheepherder walking along the shores of Pelican Point found the body of Enstrom floating face down in the water. He spread the alarm and Sheriff Brown, a squad of deputies, City Marshall Karrens of Lehi and others went to investigate. It was known that Enstrom's cousins had been with him. Now they were gone. A pool of blood was found in the little cabin. A bullet hole was found in the board wall near the bed. The first suspicion was directed at the two cousins. Reconstructing the scene as the three boys slept in the cabin, it was regarded likely that Enstrom would sleep in the double bed, near which was found the bullet hole in the wall. This did not escape the eye of Marshall Karrens. BODIES OF TWO OTHER VICTIMS DISCOVERED LATER: The utter absence of motive on the part of the cousins soon dissipated any suspicion toward them, and the lake was dragged for days. It appeared to the sheriff and others that not only Enstrom had been killed, but his two cousins as well. Harry Hayes, a stepfather of Enstrom, had been found. Hayes found the bodies of the other two in the lake. He was left in lonely vigil to guard them while the officer hurried to Lehi for wagons. While the inquest was being held at Lehi, it was discovered that the horses, wagon and harness used by the boys had disappeared. The lake was dragged again. The hand of suspicion pointed first to one and then another. Neighbors recalled there had been a land feud between Hayes who claimed the little ranch, the Slades and the Cederstroms. The boys had gone to court to testify in the case, but there had come a postponement and they returned to the ranch. ILL FEELING EXISTED BETWEEN WARRING FACTIONS Between the warring factions in the feud there was ill feeling. Hayes did not oppose the growing suspicion against Oliver Slade, yet he did nothing to strengthen it. Feeling was at fever heat in Utah County. The coroner's inquest went into secret sessions. The press was barred. A dozen motives sprang logically to the mind, the fact was never overlooked that in the land feud fences had been torn down, violence threatened, some men were known to have been armed. All of a sudden the inquest was over, nothing developed from it, and the farmers of Utah County went about their work, as spring advanced, they were puzzled over the failure to penetrate the mystery. PIECE OF PAPER PASTED OVER BULLET HOLE IN WALL During the summer Marshall Karrens, of Lehi, received an anonymous letter. It called to him, "The bullet hole in the wall". He went to Pelican Point Cabin to investigate. There he found Hayes and his family and some others, at work on the little ranch, all living in the cabin where, months before, the tragedy had occurred. The discerning eye of the Marshall noticed, as he examined the interior of the cabin, that a piece of paper had been pasted over the bullet hole in the wall. There could be two explanations of this, it might be the women in the household wanted to erase all trace of the tragedy, merely to eliminate a constant reminder. The other theory related to the superstition that the murderer always returns to the scene of the crime. What for? Had anyone noticed the bullet mark? Could the size of the bullet be determined by the hole in the board? What did the writer of the anonymous letter try to convey when he called attention to the paper? He must have been in the house after the hole was concealed. He might be one of the household. CRIME RECONSTRUCTION TAKES FORM, PIECE BY PIECE Piece by piece, the crime was being reconstructed. The circumstantial evidence was being woven into the pattern. The search for the horses and wagon was without result, but a piece of harness was found in the corral, buried, and later used by Hayes. Towards fall, the picture was almost complete, the bits of evidence fitted into a mosaic, which needed only a clear motive to make it perfect. Joseph Barnes recalled having played cards with the three boys at the cabin, recollected that Enstrom said, "If Hayes comes, we will have to hang him." The significance of that was to become apparent later. Olaf Cederstrom had written a letter to Hayes about the stock not being cared for during these weeks when the bodies of the boys were floating in the icy waters of the lake. Hayes wouldn't go to the ranch, but Mrs. Hayes went. Neighbors thought this significant. The late E. A. Wedgewood was brought to aid Sheriff Brown. The boys had been slain in February, their bodies found in April, and it was now December. The case was built up, piece by piece, into a circumstantial fabric, with the motive so weak it was never thoroughly accepted. Early in December Hayes was indicted for murder by the Utah County Grand Jury. In the absence of the motive, stronger than hatred of his stepson, Hayes was generally believed to be guilty. No positive evidence was found but some of his statements, which remained unshaken for months, were proven false. The fidelity of his wife throughout the investigation was a barrier. She helped his alibi in many places, particularly against the testimony that he was seen going to Pelican Point in February, when he swore he had been at home. CASE AS FINALLY PRESENTED IN PROSECUTION OF HAYES The case finally presented in prosecution of Hayes was substantially this: He had gone to the cabin from Eureka on the night of 16 Feb 1895, stealthy opened the door. In the dim light he discerned two bodies on the double bed. He knew he would have to tackle them first and did. He shot them both just as Enstrom, the stepson for whom he was seeking, ran out the door. Hayes killed him as he ran. Then he lugged all three bodies to the lake and dumped them through the ice. Hayes maintained his innocence, but a jury convicted him and the Supreme Court affirmed the judgment of the Utah County Court. Hayes was sentenced to be shot. The late O. W. Powers entered the case as attorney for Hayes. As the date for his execution approached, nearly two years after the murder, preparations were made to set up a tent, with five holes in it, at Point of the Mountain. PARDON BOARD COMMUTES SENTENCE TO LIFE IMPRISONMENT Utah and Juab County residents signed a petition to the State Board of Pardons for commutations. There was a lingering doubt that the circumstantial evidence was strong enough to justify capital punishment. The preparation for the shooting of Hayes went on, until the Pardon Board commuted his sentence for life imprisonment. There are those old timers around the shores of Utah Lake who still believe Hayes might never have been indicted for the murder had he not put an obvious paper patch over the bullet hole in the cabin where he committed the murder. When Harry Hayes escaped the gallows at Point of the Mountain, the mystery of the triple murder at Pelican Point appeared to have been solved for all time. Hayes was accounted. George A. Storrs, who had only a few weeks before assumed his new duties as sheriff of Utah County, borrowed a gallows from Salt Lake and purchased a brand new rope from St. Louis. Had he carried out the order of the court sending Hayes to eternity, there might have been no thought of pursuing the matter further, but while there is life there is always hope. It had been the strangest of murder mysteries, and ranks with the great murder mysteries of all times. It had been observed that very often the obvious has been overlooked in the mad hysterical reaction which first attends a shocking crime. In the hysteria that followed the Pelican Point Murders, wherein three boys were shot to death, the most vital of all clues was overlooked entirely in the attempt to substantiate a circumstantial theory as to the guilt of Harry Hayes. STATE FAILS TO FIND MOTIVE FOR CRIME As had been said, the motive established by the state was weak. The threats Hayes had made upon his step son's life were not, in truth, any more than a habitual manner of speaking on the part of Hayes. When he menaced the boys by saying, "If you don't do this or that, I'll kill you", it was merely his way of frightening the lad. Had the character of Hayes been better understood, the proper psychological reaction to these repeated statements would have been advantageous to the convicted man in his trial. In relating the story of the murders at Pelican Point, the first chapter was closed when Hayes escaped the gallows through a commutation of sentence by the Pardons Board. The murders had occurred in Jan 1895, the bodies of the three boys found in the lake in April; Hayes indicted for murder in December of the same year, tried the next year, and after an appeal to the Supreme Court availed nothing, was sentenced to be executed on January 22, 1897, almost two years after the murders. The respite came while preparations for the hanging went on, and Hayes went to prison protesting his innocence. FAILURE TO LOCATE MISSING WAGON HURTS CASE The big flaw in the prosecution of Hayes was the failure of the State to explain the missing horses, wagon, harness, and other things which were stolen at the time of the murder. Why would Hayes steal this property which was mostly his own, unless he wanted the police to believe the motive was robbery? In the absence of a definite motive on his part, the ruse did not seem consistent. If the State had invested him with a competent motive, it might easily have been shown that he stole his own property to fool the law. Sheriff Storrs took an interest in the missing property almost from the moment he was inducted into office. Always, on trips through Utah County, he made inquires and always he had his eyes open for the horses, the wagon, the harness, the household things that had disappeared. The new county attorney was S. A. King, then a young lawyer, and now a practicing attorney in Salt Lake. Storrs and King got hold of an idea and followed it through. Suspicion fastened upon Chris Peterson from Payson, and Sheriff Storrs took him to Pelican Point, slept with him in the death cabin and tried to wring a confession from him. But Peterson stuck to his alibi and it was unshaken. He was eliminated. Into southern Utah the trail led, into Idaho, but always Storrs was met with the same baffling report. He was on the point of abandoning the chase, when he met Tom Williams of Provo. Williams knew a man named G. Weeks who had been arrested as a cattle thief. He jumped his bond and disappeared. Williams told of Mrs. Weeks selling off all her property at Mapleton, preparatory to moving away. That was seven months after the murder, and two years before Storrs met Williams. Sheriff Storrs grasped at this tiny lead. He traced the articles that had been purchased by persons in the little communities around Utah Lake. At Milton H. Smith's house in Payson he found certain articles, at Harvey Perry's in Mapleton he found the harness. MOTHER SCREAMS WHEN SHE SEES QUILT Mrs. Hayes, wife of the man in jail was sent for. She screamed when she saw a quilt which she knew her son had in the Pelican Point cabin. Mrs. Celia Tyrrell, mother of Andrew Johnson, another of the murder victims, was similarly affected when she identified another article as having belonged to her son. Her son's gun was found. One thing after another had been sold by Mrs. Weeks, and for two years she had been absent from the little cabin in Mapleton. Weeks having jumped his bond, after arrest as a cattle thief, Sheriff Storrs started a search for him which later became nationwide, involving officers of a dozen states and bringing in old W. A. Pinkerton himself and the resources of his detective agency. By this time, rewards were issued for the arrest of Weeks. When the trail led to Rangely, Colorado, Storrs obtained a requisition for Weeks for cattle rustling, and followed. He went by wagon across Uintah, ostensibly to arrest Chris Madsen, who had shot the Sheriff's brother, Charles A. Storrs, at Richfield. When Storrs reached Rangely, the trail led to Freshwater where he sought the sheriff. The Sheriff had gone to arrest C. T. Case, who was wanted for the murder of W. D. Crampton in January 1896. The Colorado sheriff lost his man in Chicago. Storrs encountered a striking thing in Colorado. The man Weeks, whom he sought, was none other than C. T. Case. The only line on him led toward Jonnie McCain, a sweetheart at Kolomo, Ind., whom he had promised to marry. The wedding was to be in September 1897, but Case wrote her he intended to commit suicide, and she never saw him again. WRIGHT ABANDONS WIFE IN NEW YORK TOWN The trail led on to Governor, N. Y., and Sam King wrote to the sheriff at Governor to inquire about Jennie M. Wright. The only reaction to this was a reply that Jennie's husband was George H. Wright, that he had abandoned his wife, and she had not seen him for a year. Storrs worked quietly, effectively. He found that William Beckstead, of South Jordan, had traded a wagon to Case. The Beckstead wagon was found to have been sold by Mrs. Weeks to Harrold Tweede of Mapleton. Both wagons were identified and the chain had another link. There are so many sheriffs and detectives mixed up in this case, wrote William Allen Pinkerton from Chicago, where Case had abandoned his baggage with imminence of arrest. He dubbed Case as a forger, swindler and matrimonial shark. It was in February 1898, after Hayes had served a year in prison, that Mrs. Weeks wrote a letter to a friend in Mapleton inquiring about the Pelican Point murder. Sheriff Storrs dictated the reply and many replies thereafter during the correspondence. From February to October the correspondence went on, and then the sheriff at Governor interviewed Mrs. Wright. Mrs. Wright was the missing Mrs. Weeks and she told of the shooting of one of the Hayes horses and the hiding of him near the Dunyan Ranch. Storrs began to see the end of the long, long trail. Before he went east, he drifted up into Oregon but the trail was fruitless. In January 1899, Storrs caught a train for New York and returned with Mrs. Wright - alias Mrs. Weeks. MRS. WRIGHT TELLS LIFE STORY The story of Mrs. Wright is vital to the solution of the Pelican Point murder. She had married George H. Wright at Alma, Mich., and came with him to Salt Lake in 1890. Her husband had plenty of money. He had been a mining man, a lawyer and what-not. He set up a home on 9th street; walked out at night a great deal, telling his wife he couldn't sleep. He returned around daylight, usually. The house on 9th South was traded for a ranch at North Point. Wright built a big corral and now and then came home with cows and horses and sometimes sheep. The cattle were killed and dressed and the meat peddled by Wright. His wife helped him dress the beef. She suspected he was stealing cattle, but she was afraid and said nothing. Later on, he confessed to her, and still she remained silent. In December 1894, Wright was summoned before the Grand Jury, which was investigating sheep and cattle thefts. He disappeared from North Point when Deputy Marshalls went there to search the house. His wife aided his escape. He spent New Year's Eve with his wife, but disappeared again and was gone until March 1895. This time he had a wagon and team and some other articles. He and his wife packed all their belongings and abandoned the North Point Ranch. They traveled southward to the Beckstead Ranch at South Jordan. The wagon was traded to Beckstead, and Wright borrowed two horses. Reaching the cabin of Tom Williams at Mapleton, which Wright had leased, he forced his wife to adopt the alias of Weeks, and he became known as James G. Weeks. WRIGHT TURNS PALE WHEN HE HEARS OF DISCOVERY Tom Williams and Greg Metcalf came over for dinner along in April. They told of finding three bodies at Pelican Point. Wright turned pale. It made him ill for two weeks. The Tribune had carried a description of the missing articles from the Hayes cabin. Among them was a duck coat. Mrs. Wright, now alias Weeks, now remembered the duck coat her husband had brought to North Point, and she knew the solution to the mystery of the Pelican Point Murders. In May the Weeks moved to Pond Town. That was four months after the murders on Pelican Point. In August Mrs. Wright had a birthday. It was celebrated by the sheriff, who came to her house and arrested Wright for stealing cattle from the Dunyon Ranch. Wright gave bond, absconded, and Utah knew him no more. The following month Mrs. Wright sold the household belongings and went to New York to her mother. The following February she heard from Wright, alias Weeks, and alias Case. He wrote from Pueblo, Colo., asking her to meet him in St. Louis. But he never wrote again and she remained at home at Governor. There is no question in the minds of the Utah County authority that Wright, the man of many aliases, committed the Pelican Point murders. He is over 70 now if he is still alive. He is a very much wanted man, had been for years, and his appearance in Utah, even now, would be welcome. HAYES WIFE WAITS WHILE HE IS IN PRISON Having abandoned his wife, who was held to him for years through fear, Wright could expect no further from her. Mrs. Wright, no longer motivated by fear of her husband, told the whole story, took an oath it was true and it is now part of the record in the form of an affidavit. Hayes was released from the state prison in May 1899, and while the same "finis" could not be written across the last entry relating to the Pelican Point murders, as appeared there when he cheated the gallows. The true solution of the mystery was obvious from the beginning. When Hayes was released from the penitentiary, he returned to Eureka, where his faithful wife had a millinery shop. He died several years ago. George Wright returned to the vicinity of the crime, leaving a trail which was picked up by the new sheriff, and the young county attorney. Storrs afterwards became warden of the State Penitentiary, and now resides in Los Angeles. The records of the Utah County Courts show that Wright, alias "Weeks", alias "Case", is wanted for murder. His confession would add an epilogue to one of the most sensational murders, and man hunts, in the annals of the west. Note: Andrew Johnson was the son of Celia Hanson Allen Tyrrell Albert Enstrom was the son of Carolina Hanson Enstrom Jones Alford Nielsen was a nephew of Lars C. Peterson and John Hanson Andrew Johnson born 27 Jan 1875 died 16 Feb 1895 Albert Enstrom born 18 May 1872 died 16 Feb 1895 Alford Nelsen died 16 Feb 1895 Some newspapers list Alford Nielsen as Alford Nelson The above article was given to James E. Allen by Reva Tyrrell Andreason some years ago. The newspaper was quite yellowed with age. Reva Tyrrell was a niece to Andrew Johnson’s mother. James E. Allen was a grandson of Andrew Johnson's mother.

Life timeline of Albert Enstrom

Albert Enstrom was born on 18 May 1872
Albert Enstrom was 17 years old when The Eiffel Tower is officially opened. The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower.
Albert Enstrom died on 16 Feb 1895 at the age of 22
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Albert Enstrom (18 May 1872 - 16 Feb 1895), BillionGraves Record 34688067 Benjamin, Utah, Utah, United States

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