Agnes Ott Littlefield

19 Jan 1918 - 28 May 2012

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Agnes Ott Littlefield

19 Jan 1918 - 28 May 2012
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Grave site information of Agnes Ott Littlefield (19 Jan 1918 - 28 May 2012) at Georgetown Cemetery in Cannonville, Garfield, Utah, United States from BillionGraves

Life Information

Agnes Ott Littlefield

Born:
Married: 20 Jun 1935
Died:

Georgetown Cemetery

about 3 miles south of Cannonville on Kodacrome Way (a few hundred yards to the west)
Cannonville, Garfield, Utah
United States

Epitaph

Father; Mother; Their children, He Saved Soles, In His Will Is Our Peace, Married Sep 14, 1935; sealed Sept 27, 1952, Wife of Seth Johnson Peace Perfect Peace A Loving Wife, A Mother Dear, A friend to all, Lies Buried Here, Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta G Johnson, married June 29, 1956; children Clara S, A. True, Marilyn K., Richard W., Joyce F, A Devoted Husband and a Loving Father a True Latter Day Saint, Beloved Father

Headstone Description

Father - Joseph Edward
Mother - Susan J
Children: Joseph E, Alfred D, Karma J, US ARMY WORLD WAR II, says and Baby, Children: Saundra, Ronald Lee, Sheila, Nila, Sue Ellen, Children: Billy, Sherman, Gwen, Deane, David, Dimion, Karen, Rebecca, Mother
Father, Sealed Sept 27, 1952
Children: Larry W - Ladona - Myrna L - Alma D - Ramona J - Joseph D, Son of Adelbert & Mary J Heaps, Children of Nephi & Zina Johnson, Children of Irving A & Daisie C Johnson, Utah
Cpl 12 Infantry
World War II BSM-PH, Married Irving A Johnson Sept 5, 1923, A loving wife & mother...
A friend to all..., Sons of Geo. W & Henrietta C. Johnson, Wife: Shana
Daughter: Kori Lee, Sealed June 28, 1939, US ARMY
WORLD WAR II, DEAN: US ARMY WORLD WAR II, UTAH CPL 1050 BASE UNIT AAF
WORLD WAR II, PFC US ARMY
WORLD WAR I, Children: Clara S - A True - Marilyn K - Richard W - Joyce F, Wife of Cyrus Mangum, Daugh of Marion..., Son of R. W. & Clara E Pinney, Magleby Mortuary, Husband of Sarah A Dutton, Daughter of Richard C & Susanah D. Pinney
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Agnes Ott Littlefield is buried in the Georgetown Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Memories

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The Founding of Tropic

Contributor: GlacierSiren Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

The following is an excerpt from The History of Garfield County, Utah Centennial County Series, found on pages 199-207. The photos are both courtesy of June Shakespear. The first is a snapshot of one of the earliest stores in Tropic, that was also used as a cafe. The other is a shot of the first meeting house built in Tropic in 1895 for religious, educational, and social activities. The first community east of Bryce Canyon along Utah Highway 12 is Tropic. The town's residents considered a number of possibilities for its name. Jesse W Crosby suggested Erastus—for LDS church leader Erastus Snow; someone else proposed the biblical name Ur; still, another wanted it called Hansen, after Tropic's first bishop, Andrew James Hansen, but Hansen himself objected to that idea and suggested the name of Tropic because the area's climate, while not tropical, was at least warmer than that of Panguitch. Even Panguitch was not as cold as the high meadow country along the East Fork of the Sevier River between the two towns. Through the years Bishop Hansen would often be quoted as saying, "The coldest night I ever spent was sleeping between my two wives on the East Fork"; one was in Tropic, the other in Panguitch. The actual founding of the town of Tropic came about as a direct result of two water projects. First, John Hatch sold the water rights to Spring Creek and some springs west of the future town in 1889. This was followed by the construction of a canal about ten miles long that would take water from the East Fork of the Sevier River over the east rim of the Paunsaugunt Plateau and drop it 1,500 feet down to the upper Paria Valley. Several earlier attempts to divert this water from the Great Basin drainage area to the Colorado River drainage system had failed. William Lewman (Luman) and others revived interest in such a project in 1889. They formed the East Fork Irrigation Company of Cannonville, with Andrew J. Hansen as president, Abe Workman as vice-president, William Jasper Henderson as secretary, and K.A. Fletcher and William Lewman as directors. The company incorporated on 5 May 1889. It used revenue received from stock purchases to buy simple survey equipment and tools with which to dig the canal. Lewman, Henderson, Henry Mecham, Emery Mecham, and Ole Ahlstrom completed the survey of the canal by early July 1889. The actual digging began in September of that year. Anticipating the benefits of a reliable source of irrigation water, James Ahlstrom and Ole Ahlstrom built homes in the area in 1890 and 1891, respectively. They were followed by Charles W Snyder and G J. Simonds, but the actual organization of the community had begun when William Lewman, Andrew Hansen, and James Ahlstrom surveyed the townsite in the spring of 1889, shortly after the Cannonville meeting. It included sixteen blocks of four lots per block, each lot measuring about one and a quarter acres. The lots sold for $7.50, and this low price attracted additional settlers. William, John E, and Dan Pollock; John Ahlstrom; Joseph and James Robert Ott; Will Chatwin; George Shakespear; William and John Spendlove; Levison Hancock; Henry and William B. Mecham; John F. Manwill; Orin Mangum; Seth Alvin; Sena Schow Johnson; and Andrew Perkins all came to make their homes in Tropic. Ole Ahlstrom listed thirty-nine men who worked on the canal. The builders, most of whom were or became residents of the new town, completed the canal by the spring of 1892, a remarkable accomplishment considering the tools they had to work with. Hansen recalled finding a group of people camped on the East Fork about the time the workers were ready to send water down the canal. He explained to them that water would be coming down near their campsite and suggested they move to higher ground. They didn't believe him, and he reported that he enjoyed hearing them shout expletives in the night when their camp flooded. In modern-day vernacular, Garfield residents often refer to Tropic as being located "under the dump," meaning it is below "where the East Fork water was 'dumped' into the channel of Water Canyon, falling about 1,000 feet in less than two miles." Others maintain that stockmen called the area the dump as they drove their livestock over the rim of the Paunsaugunt Plateau to take them to their winter range. As the water began to flow into the valley on 23 May 1892, residents of Tropic and other already established communities that would benefit from this new life-giving water celebrated at the home of Caroline Hansen, A.J.'s second wife, with a feast of barbecued beef, veal, and mutton. One participant in the gala event recalled: "A country, they said, had been born, and so they sang out praises and prophesied great things about our future We danced all night till broad daylight and went home with the girls in the morning." The next year, 1893, the two water systems, Spring Creek and East Fork, came under the administration of the newly organized Tropic and East Fork Irrigation Company. Residents used the Spring Creek water for culinary purposes and for irrigating town lots from ditches dug along the streets. The water that came over the dump from the East Fork of the Sevier River irrigated the fields. For several years Seth Alvin Johnson served as water master for the company; he also served for a term as president. As had been the case with other communities in the Paria Valley, newcomers brought cattle and sheep herds with them as they established their new homes. Tropic was well situated between summer and winter ranges. These suitable conditions attracted Hyrum and Joseph Hilton and the Hintons from the Dixie area and brothers William and Henry Jolley from Long Valley. The depression of 1893 hurt the stockmen, but their animals could be traded for other commodities and thus they survived the hard times. Despite the depression, 1893 saw the beginnings of a new enterprise in Tropic. A man from Iowa brought a load of fruit trees to the settlement and traded them for horses. These trees became the nucleus for fine orchards established within the community, especially the apple and plum orchards. Also, the Jolley brothers brought in several wagon loads of trees from Long Valley, and most of the townspeople planted some of them on their land. Residents also grew grains, alfalfa, and corn. Tropic did not always live up to its name, however. Some years killing frosts in the last part of May or the first part of June would ruin the gardens and fruit crops that year. Animals were also vulnerable. During the early spring of 1900, for example, when John Johnson and Maurice Cope were herding sheep for Ole Ahlstrom, it turned very cold and began to snow. By the next morning, the snow was three feet deep and 300 sheep lay dead. In early May, men from Tropic arrived with teams and, by dragging trees behind them to make a path, got the remaining sheep out of the snow. A number of Tropic citizens including Thomas McClellan, George William, and Joe Shakespear had homestead s in nearby mountains. Whole families would spend the summer months tending their dairy herds, milking the cows, and making cheese and butter to sell or trade. The James Robert and Janet M. Johnson Ott family purchased the Yellow Creek Ranch, located about two miles from Georgetown, the village where Janet's parents resided. Their son, James A. Ott, fondly recalled spending most of his summers on the mountain with the family. He experienced adventures common to other children of that era and circumstance—enduring scary pranks of an older brother, getting bit by a rattlesnake, climbing boulder-strewn hills, searching for arrowheads, helping to milk cows and irrigate the fields, hunting small animals with a "flipper," or slingshot, and enjoying the bountiful yield from summer gardens—especially the watermelons and muskmelons, about which he wrote: We went often during the day and stuffed ourselves to the fill….It was astonishing the amount of these things we could "put out of sight." Our clothes became so stiff with watermelon juice and dirt that about all we needed to do was to stand them in the middle of the floor at night and then run and jump into them in the morning. During these summers away from Tropic, the Ott children relied on one another for playmates; occasionally cousins visited. The isolation of Yellow Creek allowed their imaginations to flourish. Ott described other playtime activities: In the shade of the old cottonwood trees in front of the house, we used spools to make wagon tracks over roadways and dug roads we constructed. We sometimes used onion tops put together and buried in the ground as pipelines through which we ran water. We built corral and pasture fences out of little sticks and had shiny hard rocks for the cows and horses. Sometimes we built little rock houses and log cabins. Neither isolation nor hard economic times dampened the settlers' enthusiasm for recreation. Afternoon dance s for the youth and evening dances for the adults furnished plenty of social interaction in the town of Tropic. John Pollock and David B. Ott played their fiddles. A later dance "orchestra" included Jack Pollock on the violin, William Pollock on the accordion, Lizzie Pollock Reynolds on the drums, and Lizzie Mecham Barton and Hortense Cope Munson on the organ or piano. They even played some popular LDS hymns to which the participants danced. Horse races, wrestling, and boxing matches, footraces, rabbit drives, and, when the snow was deep, sleigh rides, all provided a needed diversion. Groups of young people would sing together on street corners. Newlyweds were given "bundle showers," social occasions when friends and family would gather together things they could spare and present the "bundles" to the newly married couples to help them set up housekeeping. Theatrical productions came under the direction of Alvin Seth Johnson and Charley Pinney. Most of these early events, along with church meetings and school, took place in the Johnson home. Nineteen children received an elementary school education beginning in 1892 from Phoebe Cox. Murray E. King and Sabina Chidester succeeded her as local teachers. The county organized the Tropic School District on 8 June 1893; John A. Spendlove, Levison Hancock, and William W. Pollock became its trustees. At first, members of the LDS church in Tropic constituted a branch of the Cannonville Ward. By 1895, thirty-five families lived in the area, so on 23 May, when the town celebrated its birthday, Panguitch LDS Stake officers joined in the festivities and organized the Tropic Ward. Unlike present-day practice, the townspeople cast votes for their first bishop. They chose Andrew Hansen for the position, with William J. Jolley and Hyrum Hilton as his counselors. The members also laid the cornerstone for their first meetinghouse that day. This event stimulated the purchase of a sawmill near Flake Meadows by the Ahlstrom’s, George Bybee, and Andrew Hansen. Their first order for lumber was for the proposed meetinghouse. When the men went out to cut logs for the mill, Louisa Bybee went along to cook for them. Under C.W Snyder's direction, nearly everyone in town helped in one way or another to construct the building, which was made up mainly of two-by-six planks. When completed, as with other settlements in the county, the finished structure served multiple functions for the community. With all the tourists flocking to Bryce Canyon today it is hard to believe that for a long time Tropic remained a fairly isolated community. An early road, built in 1893 into the valley, extended from King Springs and down through Little Henderson Canyon. One of the county commissioners, however, Allen Miller from Panguitch, refused to grant needed maintenance money for this steep road. According to a lifelong resident of Tropic, Wallace Ott, the commissioner looked grudgingly on those who left Panguitch to settle in Tropic because of the "climate." As far as he was concerned, the people there would just have to climb through the canyon. Among those who had moved from Panguitch to Tropic in order to raise gardens and fruit trees were the William, Joseph, Richard, and George Shakespear families, the William Marshall family, and Heber and Frank Riding. Finally, in 1898, the state granted road funds, and Mahonri M. Steele, Jr., received the contract to lay out a road from the top of the dump down Tropic Canyon. Tropic resident John Ahlstrom, then serving as commissioner, secured additional funds to improve the existing road. As Tropic grew and attracted more families, a rivalry of sorts developed between it and what remained of the east valley settlement of Clifton, where the mail for Tropic was sent. On 5 June 1893 Tropic's citizens asked the probate court in Panguitch to designate their community as a polling precinct. In spite of a protest by Clifton residents, after hearing testimony on both sides the court granted Tropic's petition. It appointed the following officers: Joseph Hilton, justice of the peace; John F. Pollock, constable; John A. Steele, road supervisor; and John A. Spendlove, Levison Hancock, and William W Pollock as trustees for the new school district. Ira C. Schow became the first postmaster for Tropic. According to the 1900 census, the population of Tropic had grown to 379. The residents felt they needed to devise further means of protecting their rights; they, therefore, decided to incorporate their town. They presented their petition of incorporation with ninety-six signatures to the court on 24 June 1902. After the request was granted, the following individuals acted as the town board: Andrew Hansen, president; William J. Jolley, Jr., Ole Ahlstrom, John Ahlstrom, and Hyrum H. Hilton as trustees; Joseph A. Tippets as town marshal and pound keeper, and Thomas R. Cope as justice of the peace. Early business conducted by the board included the adoption of policies and regulations and the improvement of the town's infrastructure. By 1904 town officials even adopted a curfew policy that by today's standards seems rather strict: between 15 October and 15 March anyone under the age of sixteen had to be off the streets by 8:00 P.M. unless accompanied by an adult. During the warmer months, the curfew hour was relaxed to 9:00 P.M. In October 1910 the town board addressed the problem of unsafe water conditions—they passed an ordinance prohibiting the watering of any horse or mule in town ditches if the animal suffered from distemper, glanders, or other diseases that could taint the culinary water. The board also began to plan toward installing a new water system, which they accomplished a few years later. In 1893 Tropic had its own militia company, organized as part of the National Guard of the Territory of Utah. Company L, First Infantry, had a roster of seventy-five men, with John M. Dunning serving as captain, Andrew Hansen as 1st lieutenant, and George W Johnson as 2nd lieutenant. This organization lasted only three years, however, being discontinued in 1896. Residents of Tropic experienced a particularly devastating diphtheria epidemic during the winter of 1902—03. Before the disease ran its course, it had claimed the lives of fourteen children. Then, in early winter 1905, a scarlet fever epidemic broke out, taking the lives of other Tropic children. How many actually succumbed to the disease is unknown, but James Alvin Ott recorded that four children in his family, including himself, contracted scarlet fever, and two of his older sisters died as a result. Twenty years after its founding, the population of Tropic had stabilized and the community progressed along with its neighbors in the upper Paria Valley, remaining the largest of the three towns. Along with the businesses already mentioned, Ole Ahlstrom and Jedediah Adair operated early stores. Tropic also had a general merchandise store established by Seth Johnson. Later, another store was owned by Seth's son George and C.D. White. Two Johnson half-sisters, Janet Matilda Johnson Ott, and Lydia Ann Johnson Jolley were among the clerks at these establishments. Such enterprises strengthened familial ties that remained important as the village grew. Although life could be precarious for its settlers, Tropic offered a close-knit community and peaceful atmosphere in the midst of scenic beauty.

Life timeline of Agnes Ott Littlefield

Agnes Ott Littlefield was born on 19 Jan 1918
Agnes Ott Littlefield was 12 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
Agnes Ott Littlefield was 13 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Agnes Ott Littlefield was 28 years old when World War II: Nagasaki is devastated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, is dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. Thirty-five thousand people are killed outright, including 23,200-28,200 Japanese war workers, 2,000 Korean forced workers, and 150 Japanese soldiers. Nagasaki is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan. The city's name, 長崎, means "long cape" in Japanese. Nagasaki became a centre of colonial Portuguese and Dutch influence in the 16th through 19th centuries, and the Hidden Christian Sites in the Nagasaki Region have been recognized and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Part of Nagasaki was home to a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War.
Agnes Ott Littlefield was 40 years old when Space Race: Launch of Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth. The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability. It had its origins in the missile-based nuclear arms race between the two nations that occurred following World War II, aided by captured German missile technology and personnel from the Aggregat program. The technological superiority required for such dominance was seen as necessary for national security, and symbolic of ideological superiority. The Space Race spawned pioneering efforts to launch artificial satellites, uncrewed space probes of the Moon, Venus, and Mars, and human spaceflight in low Earth orbit and to the Moon.
Agnes Ott Littlefield was 47 years old when Thirty-five hundred United States Marines are the first American land combat forces committed during the Vietnam War. The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.
Agnes Ott Littlefield was 55 years old when Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers leave South Vietnam. The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and the government of South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese army was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; the South Vietnamese army was supported by the United States, South Korea, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some US perspectives. The majority of Americans believe the war was unjustified. The war would last roughly 19 years and would also form the Laotian Civil War as well as the Cambodian Civil War, which also saw all three countries become communist states in 1975.
Agnes Ott Littlefield was 71 years old when The tanker Exxon Valdez spilled 10.8 million US gallons (260,000 bbl; 41,000 m3) of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska, causing one of the most devastating man-made maritime environmental disasters. A tanker is a ship designed to transport or store liquids or gases in bulk. Major types of tankship include the oil tanker, the chemical tanker, and gas carrier. Tankers also carry commodities such as vegetable oils, molasses and wine. In the United States Navy and Military Sealift Command, a tanker used to refuel other ships is called an oiler but many other navies use the terms tanker and replenishment tanker.
Agnes Ott Littlefield was 74 years old when The World Wide Web is opened to the public. The World Wide Web (WWW), also called the Web, is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and accessible via the Internet. English scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989. He wrote the first web browser in 1990 while employed at CERN in Switzerland. The browser was released outside CERN in 1991, first to other research institutions starting in January 1991 and to the general public on the Internet in August 1991.
Agnes Ott Littlefield was 84 years old when The September 11 attacks, a series of coordinated suicide attacks killing 2,996 people using four aircraft hijacked by 19 members of al-Qaeda. Two aircraft crash into the World Trade Center in New York City, a third crashes into The Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia, and a fourth into a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania. The September 11 attacks were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda against the United States on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The attacks killed 2,996 people, injured over 6,000 others, and caused at least $10 billion in infrastructure and property damage. Additional people died of 9/11-related cancer and respiratory diseases in the months and years following the attacks.
Agnes Ott Littlefield died on 28 May 2012 at the age of 94
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Agnes Ott Littlefield (19 Jan 1918 - 28 May 2012), BillionGraves Record 4092180 Cannonville, Garfield, Utah, United States

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