Adolphus Babcock

23 Feb 1800 - 15 Mar 1872

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Adolphus Babcock

23 Feb 1800 - 15 Mar 1872
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At the age of 21 years, Adolphus married Jerusha Jane Rowley, daughter of John Rowley, of Mina, New York. Adolphus built for his young bride a two room home of hewn logs with floor and doors made of puncheon. The chimney was built of sand and rock, and the corners were mortised together. He was in a

Life Information

Adolphus Babcock

Born:
Died:

Spanish Fork City Cemetery

Cemetery Roads
Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Born at Middlefield, Hampshire, Massachusetts
Oxteam Company Member
Transcriber

Rachelle

July 3, 2012
Photographer

B Hold

May 23, 2012

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1821

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

At the age of 21 years, Adolphus married Jerusha Jane Rowley, daughter of John Rowley, of Mina, New York. Adolphus built for his young bride a two room home of hewn logs with floor and doors made of puncheon. The chimney was built of sand and rock, and the corners were mortised together. He was in all the forced relocations from state to state with the earlier church members. From New York the Saints migrated to Ohio, from Ohio to Missouri. In Missouri he accumulated a large tract of land and was fast becoming financially independent when he was forced to sacrifice his property and follow the Saints to Nauvoo. It is interesting to note here the precaution he took in safe guarding his money along with the valuable possessions he had been able to accumulate in Missouri from mob theft and Indian raids while traveling from Missouri to Nauvoo and likewise from Nauvoo to Zion. He had an old common looking keg that he used to store pieces of iron, loose bolts, screws and burs from wagons that he had a chance to pick up. In this decrepit old keg, that looked more like a junk box than anything else, he carefully placed his hard-earned money and personal and household treasures Jerusha was not prone to part with. On arriving at Nauvoo, he took his closely guarded money and bought a large tract of land three miles out from Nauvoo called Green Plains, where a group of Saints settled because of more fertile soil. This is just another evidence of the sound judgment of Adolphus Babcock, because Green Plains was and is now the most fertile spot and more adapted for agriculture than any part of that vicinity. Here, Adolphus built a comfortable home and a large barn and again started breaking ground for spring planting. Adolphus, like the other Saints, conscientious and God-fearing, settled down to enjoy a little piece of mind and soul. He remained on his property in Nauvoo until the expulsion of the Saints February 16, 1846. During the night of February 15, 1846, a mob of men clamored on his front door to inform him that he would have 24 hours to gather his belongings and be out of his place or everything would be burned on his property. He,like hundreds of other Saints, could be seen hurrying from barn to house, gathering the necessities needed to maintain his family during the last long flight of the Saints to safety. They crossed the Mississippi River on ice and camped on the banks of the river until open weather. Adolphus settled in Salt Lake City for two years. In 1849, Brigham Young assigned Adolphus the charge of all the church's cattle. Adolphus moved his family to Bountiful and proceeded from Bountiful with his son, George, into Cache Valley, where he grazed and protected the church cattle from Indian attacks until President Young, fearing for their safety, sent word for them to bring the cattle in. The drive back with the cattle became much more hazardous than taking cattle out into Cache Valley three years previous. The Indians had become more fearless and bold in their attacks on the settlers in the outskirts of the small towns which had been settled by the pioneers, necessitating a constant guard over the cattle night and day. They returned with the cattle and turned them over to the church authorities in 1851. In 1852, the gold rush to California proved too tempting for Adolphus. He left his family in the care of his oldest son, Lorenzo, and taking his son, George, traveled to California in pursuit of wealth. While in California, he came in contact with freighters from South America and purchased alfalfa seed and brought it to Utah with him. He was the first to introduce alfalfa growing in the state. He also brought fruit trees, including apples, peaches, pears, apricots, currants, grapes and plums. Arriving back in Bountiful in the year 1853, he found his wife Jerusha had died the previous September, 1852, leaving the family without parental care. Adolphus, on returning, gathered his children together and made a home for them in Provo for a year or two. While in Provo he encouraged and helped financially to build the Provo Woolen Mills. From Provo he moved to Palmyra,Utah. In 1856 the people from Palmyra were ordered by the church authorities to move to Spanish Fork where a fort had been built for protection from the Indians. He homesteaded 22 acres of land, built a home of adobe with walls 18 inches thick, each adobe being 12x6x4. The walls were plastered inside and out. Shingles for the roofing were made by his son, Lorenzo, and the nails were handmade on a hand- made forge by Adolphus, who was a blacksmith by trade. The rafters and joists were pinned together by handmade wooden pegs. Here he and his family lived until his death. Around the 22 acres of land he built a wall made of mud and straw, partitioning off a portion of ground where he started the first orchard in Spanish Fork. The sterling qualities of Adolphus's character can only be appreciated when we know of some of the courageous tasks he was called to do. His entire life from the time he was baptized into the church until his death was spent in serving his God, his church, and his community. Although a hardworking and saving man, his honesty and generosity to the less fortunate were strong characteristics of his life. I have selected the following experiences from among many that prove his generosity and fairness in dealing with others. During the settlement of Spanish Fork, one harvest season resulted in a failure for most of the pioneers. Fortunately, the crops of Adolphus were successful that year. Realizing the conditions of the less fortunate in the settlement, Adolphus made known to the settlers, through testimony, that those in need could share his wheat, molasses and meat. He urged the men to come and get food and seed with which to plant their crops. In exchange for the food and grain, the men worked with Adolphus in building the mud wall around his property. It is of record that had Adolphus not come to the aid of the settlers, many, if not all, would have been compelled to migrate to other settlements or perish during the hard winter. Adolphus and Jerusha's children were: Sophronia, Lorenzo, Eliza, George, Lucy, Permelia, Albern, John, and Henry, the youngest child, was born in Salt Lake City three months after they arrived in Utah. Dolphus changed his name to Adolphus. Many early records have the name Dolphus. Later records have the name Adolphus. !CROSSING THE PLAINS: Babcock family members were in the Fifth Ten (led by Thomas Orr, Sr.) of the First Fifty (led by Joseph Horne) of the Second Hundred (led by Edward Hunter) of the 1847 pioneers, City on 29 Sep 1847. "Pioneers of 1847: A Sesquicentennial Remembrance," compiled by Susan Ward Easton-Black. I will tell the story of how I found the death record of Adolphus. I was visiting my grandson, who lives in Spanish Fork ,Utah. I went down to the Spanish Fork City Office Building to see where I could find land records of Adolphus Babcock. While there a young women was sitting at a desk and asked me if I was doing genealogy. I said yes. She said there were some old books that the University was getting ready to microfilm. She asked me if I would like to see them. We went up in the attic and in an old dusty corner was a note book called "The Book Of The Dead". This note book was an index to the large "Book Of The Dead". I asked her where this book might be. She did not know, but asked someone else and they said to go down stairs where the people of Spanish Fork pay their water or electric bill. I went down stairs and when I asked the lady she brought out a large very, very old original book showing the early deaths in Spanish Fork and the cause of the deaths, parents of the person and doctor who attended. I was very happy to see this book as it had the original source date for many Babcock's including Adolphus Babcock. I would never of thought to look there for such a book. Source: Spanish Fork Record Of Death, Book 1, Nov 13, 1853--Sept 18, 1939. Adolphus Babcock, Birth: February 23, 1800, Middlefield, Mass. Father: Daniel Babcock ,Mother: Jerusha Taylor, Church: LDS, died of Tyroid Fever, March 15, 1872, Doctor: Dr. Clark. Occupation: Farmer Written by Patricia Ruth Major Miller, Adolphus's is my g-g-grandfather. Family links: Parents: Daniel Babcock (1756 - ____) Jerusha Zereptha Taylor Babcock (1765 - 1828) Spouse: Jerusha Jane Rowley Babcock (1802 - 1850)* Children: Sophronia Babcock Carter (1822 - 1847)* Lorenzo Babcock (1823 - 1903)* Eliza Babcock Young Groves (1828 - 1868)* George William Babcock (1831 - 1899)* Lucy Babcock Wood (1832 - 1863)* Permelia Babcock Young (1837 - 1916)* Albern Babcock (1840 - 1917)* Hannah Alice Babcock Campbell (1859 - 1906)* *Point here for explanation

Reodolphus Babcock Biography

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Pioneer of 1847 A.O. Smoot Company Daniel Babcock and Jerusha Taylor of Springfield, Massachusetts were married December 4, 1787 and had the following children: Betsy, Cloe, Daniel, George, Jehiel, Jerusha, Lavisa, Permelia, Reodolphus and Thankful. Reodolphus, the youngest was born February 23, 1800 at Middlefield Massachusetts. The father, Daniel was a very prominent member of the Congressional Church at Middlefield, but over some disagreement in the location of a new church building, Daniel left the Congressional Church and with his wife, Jerusha, and family migrated to Mina, Chautauqua County, New York, Here in Mina, Reodolphus, who had changed his name to Adolphus, became converted to the gospel preached by the Latter day Saints elders and joined the church, He was baptized and confirmed by Elder John Gould in the year 1835. At the age of 21 years, Adolphus married Jerusha Rowley, daughter of John Rowley, of Mina, New York. Adolphus built for his young bride a two room home of hewn logs with floor and doors made of puncheon. The chimney was built of sand and rock and the corners were mortised together (in the year 1912, the house, after having been moved several times, is being preserved by the Chautauqua Education Association of New York. He was in all the forced relocations from state to state with the earlier church members. From New York the Saints migrated to Ohio, from Ohio to Missouri. In Missouri he accumulated a large tract of land and was fast becoming financially independent when he was forced to sacrifice his property and follow the Saints to Nauvoo. It is interesting to note here the precaution he took in safe guarding his money along with the valuable possessions he had been able to accumulate in Missouri from mob theft and Indian raids while traveling from Missouri to Nauvoo and likewise from Nauvoo to Zion. He had an old common-looking keg that he used to store pieces of iron, loose bolts, screws and burrs from wagons that he had a change to pick up. In this decrepit old keg, that looked more like a junk box than anything else, he carefully placed his hard earned money and personal and household treasures Jerusha was not prone to part with. On arriving at Nauvoo, he took his closely guarded money and bought a large tract of land three miles out of Nauvoo called Green Plains, where a group of Saints settled because of more fertile soil. This is just another evidence of the sound judgment of Adolphus Babcock, because Green Plains was and is now the most fertile spot and more adapted for agriculture than any part of that vicinity. Here, Adolphus built a comfortable home and a large barn and again started breaking ground for spring planting, Adolphus, like the other Saints, conscientious and God fearing, settled down to enjoy a little piece of mind and soul. He remained on his property in Nauvoo until the expulsion of the Saints February 16, 1846. During the night of February 15, 1846, a mob of men clamored on his front door to inform him that he would have 24 hours to gather his belongings and be out of his place or everything would be burned on his property. He, like hundreds of other Saints, could be seen hurrying from barn to house, gathering the necessities needed to maintain his family during the last long flight of the Saints to safety. They crossed the Mississippi River on ice and camped on the banks of the river until open weather. At this time, Adolphus and Jerusha's family had grown to eight children, Lorenzo, George, Albern, Sophronia, Eliza, Permelia, John and Lucy. Henry, the youngest child was born in Salt Lake City three months after they arrived in Utah. Adolphus and family were designed by Brigham Young to travel in the A.O. Smooth Company, which was the second company of pioneers to arrive in Salt Lake City. The A.O. Smoot company was the first company to break trail from the Missouri River bank to Winter quarters where they built temporary houses to remain in the remaining part of the bad winter weather. It was at this point that the U.S. government asked Brigham Young for 500 volunteers to assist the U.S. with its war in Mexico, which had recently been declared. Lorenzo, the oldest son of Adolphus, was one of the first to enlist. When spring broke, the A.O. Smoot Company slowly broke the trail on to Pisgah, another temporary camp. At Pisgah, Brigham Young's company overtook the Smoot Company and pushed on ahead and arrived in Sale Lake o July 24, 1847. The A.O. Smoot company arrived October 7, 1847. Adolphus settled in Salt Lake City for two years. In 1849 Brigham Young assigned Adolphus the charge of all the church's cattle. Adolphus moved his family to Bountiful and proceeded from Bountiful with his son, George into Cache Valley, where he grazed and protected the church cattle from Indian attacked until President Young, fearing for their safety, sent word for them to bring the cattle in. The drive back with the cattle became much more hazardous than taking cattle out in Cache Valley three years previous. The Indians had become more fearless and bold in their attacks on the settlers in the outskirts of the small towns which had been settled by the pioneers, necessitating a constant guard over the cattle night and day. They returned with the cattle and turned them over to the church authorities in 1851. In 1852, the gold rush to California proved too tempting for Adolphus. He left his family in the care of his oldest son, Lorenzo, and taking his son George, traveled to California in pursuit of wealth. While in California, he came in contact with freighters from South America and purchased alfalfa seed and brought it to Utah with him. He was the first to introduce alfalfa growing in the state. He also brought fruit trees, including apples, peaches, pears, apricots, currants, grapes and plums. Arriving back in Bountiful in the year 1853, he found his wife Jerusha had died the previous September, 1852, leaving the family without parental care. The bishop of the ward distributed the small children among families in the ward. Adolphus, upon returning, gathered his children together and made a home for them in Provo for a year or two. While in Provo he encouraged and helped financially to build the Provo Woolen Mills. From Provo he moved to Palmyra. In 1856 the people from Palmyra were ordered by the church authorities to move to Spanish Fork where a fort had been built for protection from the Indians. He homesteaded 22 acres of land, built a home of adobe with walls 18 inches thick, each adobe being 12x6x4. The walls were plastered inside and out. Shingles for the roofing were made by his son, Lorenzo and the nails were hand made on a hand made forge by Adolphus, who was a blacksmith by trade. The rafters and joists were pinned together by hand made wooden pegs. Here he and his family lived until his death. Around the 22 acres of land he built a wall made of mud and straw, partitioning off a portion of ground where he started the first orchard in Spanish Fork. A portion of the wall and possibly some of the trees are now standing on the land originally owned by Adolphus Babcock and now owned by Bishop George of Spanish Fork. The sterling qualities of Adolphus character can only be appreciated when we know of some of the courageous tasks he was called to do. His entire life from the time he was baptized into the church until his death was spent in serving his God, his church and his community. Although a hard working and saving man, his honest and generosity to the less fortunate were strong characteristics of his life. I have selected the following experiences from among many that prove his generosity and fairness in dealing with others. During the settlement of Spanish Fork, one harvest season resulted in a failure for most of the pioneers. Fortunately, the crops of Adolphus were successful that year. Realizing the conditions of the less fortunate in the settlement, Adolphus made known to the settlers, through testimony, that those in need could share his wheat, molasses and meat. He urged the men to come and get food and seed with which to plant their crops. In exchange for the food and grain, the men worked with Adolphus in building the mud wall around his property. It is of record that had Adolphus not come to the aid of the settlers, many, if not all, would have been compelled to migrate to other settlements or perish during the hard winter. His honesty in all transactions is perhaps very forcibly illustrated by the following experience: At one time, Daniel King, Sr. borrowed wheat for four from Adolphus, and his interest for the use of the wheat was agreed upon as one peck per bushel. In the fall when the grain was harvested, King returned the grain with the extra pecks for interest. Adolphus, after weighing out the wheat, said "Brother King, you have brought too much." King asked, "Isn't the interest one peck per bushel?" "Yes, Brother King. when people do not pay back their wheat when they are able, but when this is done, I do not accept interest." Adolphus Babcock died at Spanish Fork April 15, 1872, at the age of 72 years.

Personal History of Reodolphus Babcock

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

By Berl Babcock Cook (1960) Reodolphus Babcock, the son of Daniel Babcock and Jerusha Taylor, was born in Middlefield, Hampshire, Mass. either on the 23rd or 26th of February 1800. The Vital Statistics of Middlefield, Hampshire, Mass. Records the birth as 26 Feb 1800. Of the eleven children born, he is third to the last, all of them born in Middlefield. According to the records of Middlefield, he was given the name of Reodolphus. As the years went by he dropped the first part of his name and was known in the following records under the name of Dolphus. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, his own endowment card, his son Lorenzo’s endowment card, His daughter Eliza’s endowment card, and son John’s endowment card. On two other endowment cards with his work done for him at a later date his name is given as Rodolphus. His name is on record in Spanish Fork, Utah, records as Dolphus and a newspaper clipping of Spanish Fork, gives his name as Dolphus. He was elected an Alderman under the name of Adolphus in 1861. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 728 lists this information: Adolphus Bab*****on of Daniel Babcock, came to Utah 1847, Oxteam Company. Married Jerusha Jane Rowley in New York. Their children: (among others) Albern; William Henry, born July 15, 1848, married Mary Jane Parsons, etc. Farmer. The Daniel Babcock family moved from Middlefield, Mass. To Mina, Chatauqua, New York, in 1806. Reodolphus was about six years old at that time. He grew up in Mina, New York. In the year 1817, at the age of 17, Reodolphus took up some land in Mina and built a log cabin. He kept “Bachelor’s Misery” until he married Jerusha Jane Rowley, four years later in Mina, New York, in 1821. Jerusha Jane was the daughter of John Rowley and Roxanna Westlund. Reodolphus and Jerusha had their first baby on 14 July 1822 in Mina, and they named her Sophrona. The next, a boy, was born in Mina 22 Dec 1823, named Lorenzo. Then another baby girl was born in Mina 8 Oct 1826 and they named her Eliza. George was born 7 Feb 1831 n Mina, N.Y. Lucy born 1 December 1832 in Mina, N.Y. In about the year 1832, Reodolphus Babcock took his wife Jerusha and his children and joined up with Mormons and moved to Jackson County, Missouri. There another baby girl was born 6 Oct 1837 whom they named Parmelia. According to the record, Reodolphus Babcock was baptized in 1835 by John Gould. He was ordained a High Priest on 31 Jan 1869. When the Saints were driven from Missouri, Reodolphus and his family, ever faithful, were driven also, and he moved his family to Hancock County, Illinois, along with the other Saints. There in Nauvoo, Hancock, Ill. A baby boy was born 28 Jan 1841, whom they named Albern. John was born in Nauvoo 13 Dec 1842. The Latter-day Saints built a temple to their God in Nauvoo and were able to complete it enough for many of the Saints to receive their endowments and be sealed for time and eternity before they were driven from Nauvoo. Reodolphus and his wife were among those who received their endowments in the Nauvoo Temple on 3 Feb 1846. Things got so bad for the Saints in Nauvoo that Reodolphus along with other Saints had to leave Nauvoo and move their families in 1847 to Winter Quarters, Nebraska. He joined the great Mormon migration westward under Brigham Young in the spring of that year. He arrived in the Great Salt Lake Valley with his wife and children on 29 Sep 1847 in the Abraham O. Smoot Co. While Reodolphus was yet in Nauvoo, Ill., he received his Patriarchal Blessing under the hand of John Smith. The blessing is recorded in the Library of the Church Historians Office in Vol. 9, page 483. The only information given to the public from the blessings is the genealogical information and the lineage. In the blessing his name was given as Dolphus Bab*****on of Daniel Babcock and Jerusha Babcock, born 23 February 1800 in Hampshire County, Massachusetts. Date of blessing was 21 Nov. 1845 in Nauvoo, Illinois, and his lineage of Juda. He received a second blessing while living in Palmyra, Utah and it also gave his name as Dolphus Babcock born 23 Feb 1800 in Hampshire County, Mass. His father’s name was given as Daniel and his mother as Gerutus. Date of blessing, 29 Jan 1856 and lineage—Abraham. This second blessing was given by John Young and recorded in Church Historian Library in Vol. 25, page 29. When Reodolpus’ parents moved to Mina, New York in 1806, his older brother, George, was with them. George followed the example of his brother, Reodolphus, and went West in 1850. He joined the Mormons and took his wife to California where she died. After the death of his wife, he returned to Utah, where he married Annie Catherine Anderson in 1862. They had four children—George Henry, Rozially, Rufus and Ovica. All of them married and had large families. After Reodolphus arrived in the Great Salt Lake Valley, his family had to use their wagon to live in. A son, the last of the children born to Reodolphus and Jerusha, was born in that wagon box home in Salt Lake City, Utah 15 July 1848. They named him William Henry. When the Gold Rush to California started, Reodolphus went with some other men to California in 1849, and was gone two years. While he was gone, his wife who had contracted consumption because of the hardships she had suffered when the Saints were driven from their home, beaten and robbed, also from privations suffered while in Winter Quarters, died 25 Sept 1850 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He had left his family in the care of Brigham Young while he was gone. His son, William Henry, was two years old when she died. She was buried in the City Cemetery in Salt Lake City, Utah. When Reodolphus returned from California, he took his family to Palmyra, Utah, near where the town of Spanish Fork now stands. There he took up a farm of 40 acres and began to rear his children without a mother’s care. He later married a woman by the name of Hannah Alice Chapman. Hannah had been married before to a man by the name of Joseph Goodworth. Reodolphus and Hannah had a daughter born in 8 April 1858 whom they named Hannah Alice. According to what little information is available, Hannah and Reodolphus did not get along very well in their marriage. Also, Reodolphus’ son was supposed to have been mean to his step-mother, Hannah. This along with the information that she met a man who came through in a wagon train and fell in love with him and left with him, seemed to be the cause of their separation. According to the story told, she walked to Soda Springs in Caribou County, Idaho. Their daughter, Hannah Alice, went with her mother to Idaho and married Jared Edward Campbell. Jared and Hannah had one child, a daughter, born in Soda Springs 11 May 1901. They named her Alva Gladys, and she married Earl French. About five years after the birth of her only child, Hannah Alice Babcock Campbell died in Soda Springs, Idaho, 10 July 1906. Of the children of Reodolphus and Jerusha, Sophrona was baptized into the church but her record was lost. She married Dominicus Carter as his second wife. She was endowed in Nauvoo on 10 January 1846. Lorenzo married Amy Ann Marble. He was baptized in the church but his record was lost. He received his endowments in Nauvoo on 2 Oct 1845. He served in the Mexican War and crossed the plains to California in 1847, serving in the Mormon Battalion. Eliza first married Brigham Young, then was divorced and married John Groves 10 May 1855. She was baptized but her record also was lost. She received her endowments on 10 Jan 1846 in Nauvoo. Their son, George, moved from Utah to New Mexico in 1860 with his wife, Molly Easton. He was baptized into the church about 1839 but the record was lost. Then his baptism was done on 16 Aug 1910 and his endowments on 17 August 1910. One record has it that he probably died 1904 and another shows 11 February 1902. Their daughter, Lucy, married William Wood on 4 March 1849. According to her endowment card, she was baptized in 1842, but the record was also lost. She was endowed on 18 July 1863 and died on 6 December 1863 a few days after the birth of her last baby, born 2 December 1863. Daughter, Parmelia, married Johansen Branch Bryant Young. She was baptized in 1861 and endowed 19 September 1863. She lived with her husband in Mona, Utah. She died on 18 Jul 1916. Son Albern, was baptized in 1849 and endowed 17 Feb. 1858. He married (1) Mary Conover, then (2) Judith Hannah King. He lived with his second wife in Spanish Fork, Utah, on the old Babcock homestead, then moved to Lost River, Utah, in 1906. Son John was baptized into the church but record was lost. He received his endowments on 16 Feb 1869 and married Harriet Persis McKee on that date. They lived in Spanish Fork, Utah where he died 24 April 1888. William Henry, the last child in the family, married Mary Jane Parsons in the endowment House in Salt Lake on 21 Dec 1868. They lived in Spanish Fork, Utah. When Reodolphus got his farm in Palmyra, Utah, he hired some men to build an adobe wall around his farm. The wall was about four feet high and eighteen inches wide. He planted mock orange trees on the wall and some of the wall was still standing until a few years ago. While the men were building the wall, he paid them in grain. That was a great help to the men, because they needed the grain to help feed their families. He was promised by the prophet, Brigham Young, that he would never see the bottom of his grain bin if he would help the poor and needy and pay his tithing in full. His patriarchal blessing said, “Thou art of the lineage of Juda and thine inheritance shall be in the land of Joseph.” (9-488) He was certainly a blessed man and the Lord prospered him in this land of his inheritance. In the Deseret News on Monday, 25 Feb 1935 was listed the following account of Spanish Fork, Utah. Personal of Branch by Andrew Jensen, Assistant Church Historian. From the original documents we find the following: In January 1852 the Spanish Fork branch of the LDS Church lists 75 families, among them was Adolphus Babcock and his children. A water company was organized on 15 March 1852. They ran the ditch called the “South Ditch” and fortune seemed to favor the few settlers and a good crop was raised the following season. In August 1852, brother George A. Smith, father to President George A. Smith, arrived in the locality. He located in the town of Palmyra, and in September of the same year immigration came sufficiently to increase the population. A petition was then presented to the Territorial Legislature, asking for a city charter. The petition being granted, the citizens proceeded to elect city officers. Soon after obtaining a city charter, a company of home guards was organized for the purpose of defending the citizens and property against Indian raids. Stephen Markham was Major. The winter of 1852 was very hard one for the people of Palmyra, causing them to take a great loss in livestock. Palmyra was about one and one-half miles west-north west of the present Spanish Fork center. It contained a fort enclosing about 40 acres of land. The upper fort was called the “old fort.” This fort was located two blocks south of the present Spanish Fork Public square on the ground later owned by Alfred Becks. Many of the meetings both church and public, were held in private homes until Palmyra was founded. Thus, Palmyra was on the Spanish Fork River in Utah County, being one of the most delightful spots in the mountains. Rodolphus and his family was an important factor in the building up of this community. The first of the Babcock progenitors of Reodolphus Babcock in this country was shown on the old Boston records, dates back to 1652. It seems that a David Babcock and his wife with their children who are as follows: Margret, Geoge, Robert, and James, came from Essex Co., England. Reodolphus was a descendant of Robert Babcock and the late Professor Maude May Babcock of the University of Utah, was a descendant of James Babcock. In 1916 a convert by the name of George Milton Babcock, a descendent of George Babcock, came to Salt Lake City. The name of Babcock used to be spelled “BADCOCK” which was derived from the fact that his forefathers used to raise and keep game ***** for fighting purposes, but in 1750, one of his progenitors by the name of James Babcock, who was chief magistrate of Westerly, R. I. signed his name “BABCOCK” and the name generally became spelled that way afterwards. The Coat of Arms used by the Babcock progenitors was made up of three pale ***** and one red cock. Reodolphus Babcock died in Spanish Fork, Utah, on 15 March 1872, leaving behind a goodly posterity. He was buried 18 March 1872 in the Spanish Fork Cemetery. Since his death, his temple work has been done for him several times; one of the latest being done by descendants of his second wife as follows: Baptism on 13 Dec 1930 and endowments on 16 March 1931. All the children were sealed to Rodolphus and his wife Jerusha by the Ray Curtis Cook family in the Salt Lake Temple on 10 Jun 1938. His wife was sealed to him on 5 October 1870, thus completing all the work for the family.

Adolphus Babcock Information Researched By Patricia Major Miller

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

1.This is information that I have researched: I tried to keep the record as true to each person that wrote his history. As all histories, the dates may be different. Stories could be different. I have put sources in as I have found them. Tried to keep the spelling original. Patricia Ruth Major Miller. Rodolphus was my 2nd great grandfather. 2.Title: A History of the Town of Middlefield, Massachusetts_Author: Edward Church Smith, Philip Mack Smith. Page 408-Publication: Privately printed by authors (1924)-Call Number: 074/423/M1 H1 RODOLPHUS BABCOCK, s. Daniel and Jerusha (Taylor) Babcock, b. Mid. 2-26-1800;-d. Spanish Fork, Utah, 3-15-1872; m. Mina, N. Y. 1821, Jerusha Rowley who d. Salt Lake City, Sept. 1850. In 1817 he took up some land there, built a cabin and kept "Bachelor’s Misery" until he married four years later. About 1832 he joined the Mormons and moved to Jackson Co., Mo. Driven from there, he moved to Hancock Co., Ill., moved in 1847 to Winter Quarters, Nebraska, joining the great Mormon migration under Brigham Young in the spring of that year arriving in Salt Lake Valley in October. Went to California and found_gold in 1849. Lived later at Plymira (Palmyra) and Spanish Fork, Utah. (Information furnished by A. Rowley Babcock.) 3.NOTE: From the Spanish Fork History "Spanish Fork, City on the Rio De Aguas Calientes" --1854 - In the regular election on May 6 the following officials were selected: Mayor, George d. Snell; aldermen were Orville M. Allen, John Murray, Sr., Adolphus Babcock, Thomas Robertson. High Priest Record, Spanish Fork, Ut 4.Dolphus Babcock’s had two Patriarchal Blessings November 21, 1845 A blessing by John Smith Patriarch, upon the head of Dolphus Babcock son of Daniel and Jerusha, born, February 23 ,1800 Hampshire Co. Massachusetts. Given in Nauvoo, Illinois, at the hand of John Smith. The blessing is recorded in the Library of the Church Historian Office in Vol. 9 page 488. John Smith died in Salt Lake in 1854. He held many important positions in the Church including President of four different Stakes, a Patriarch in Nauvoo, and finally, in 1847, becoming Patriarch to the whole Church. His son, George A. Smith was to become one of the most influential Mormon leaders of his generation. “I have not put his Blessing on this site. Patricia Ruth Major Miller, 5. Book: "Ensign to the Nations" by Russell R. Rich page 3 notes February 2, 1846 the Twelve Apostles, and a few others met to determine the feelings of those who were about to start westward. An Agreement was reached that it was necessary to start as soon as possible. At 4:00 p.m. the same day Brigham Young met with the captains of hundreds and fifties to give them the same advice. They approved of it and dispersed to carry it out. In the meantime the Nauvoo Temple continued to be used for endowment work, which had begun for the general membership of the Church on December 10, 1845. By February 7, 1846, at least 5,515 endowments had been given. Apparently, Brigham Young did not want to administer the endowment in the temple on Tuesday, February 3. Instead, he wanted to go home to begin loading his wagons for the trek westward. He reminded the Saints gathered at the temple that they would build more temples and there would be further opportunities to perform temple ordinances. He left the temple but soon returned and found the crowd still gathered, hoping for their endowments. He recorded in his journal: Looking upon the multitude and knowing their anxiety, as they were thirsting and hungering for the word, we continued at work diligently in the House of the Lord. That day 295 ordinances were administered. (This was the day that Adolphus Babcock received his Endowments, Feb. 3 1846.) He was one of the 295. 6.ADOLPHUS BABCOCK Pioneer of 1847 A.O. Smoot Company (?) Not correct Pat Miller Prepared by Permelia Babcock Morgan Granddaughter Camp Spanish Fork Updated by Patricia R. Miller Great-great granddaughter Camp Red Hills Hurricane, Utah 1999 ADOLPHUS BABCOCK Daniel Babcock and Jerusha Taylor of Springfield, Massachusetts, were married December 4, 1787, and had the following children: Betsy, Cloe, Daniel, George, Jehiel, Jerusha, Lavisa, Permelia, Reodolphus and Thankful. Rudolph’s, the youngest, was born February 23, 1800, at Middlefield, Massachusetts. The father, Daniel, was a very prominent member of the Congressional Church at Middlefield, but over some disagreement in the location of a new church building, Daniel left the Congressional Church and with his wife, Jerusha, and family migrated to Mina, Chautauqua County, New York. Here in Mina, Reodolphus, who had changed his name to Adolphus, became converted to the gospel preached by the Latter-day Saint elders and joined the church. He was baptized and confirmed by Elder John Gould in the year 1835. At the age of 21 years, Adolphus married Jerusha Rowley, daughter of John Rowley, of Mina, New York. Adolphus built for his young bride a two room home of hewn logs with floor and doors made of puncheon. The chimney was built of sand and rock, and the corners were mortised together (in the year 1912, the house, after having been moved several times, is being preserved by the Chatauqua Educational Association of New York.) He was in all the forced relocations from state to state with the earlier church members. From New York the Saints migrated to Ohio, from Ohio to Missouri. In Missouri he accumulated a large tract of land and was fast becoming financially independent when he was forced to sacrifice his property and follow the Saints to Nauvoo. It is interesting to note here the precaution he took in safe guarding his money along with the valuable possessions he had been able to accumulate in Missouri from mob theft and Indian raids while traveling from Missouri to Nauvoo and likewise from Nauvoo to Zion. He had an old common looking keg that he used to store pieces of iron, loose bolts, screws and burs from wagons that he had a chance to pick up. In this decrepit old keg, that looked more like a junk box than anything else, he carefully placed his hard-earned money and personal and household treasures Jerusha was not prone to part with. On arriving at Nauvoo, he took his closely guarded money and bought a large tract of land three miles out from Nauvoo called Green Plains, where a group of Saints settled because of more fertile soil. This is just another evidence of the sound judgment of Adolphus Babcock, because Green Plains was and is now the most fertile spot and more adapted for agriculture than any part of that vicinity. Here, Adolphus built a comfortable home and a large barn and again started breaking ground for spring planting. Adolphus, like the other Saints, conscientious and God-fearing, settled down to enjoy a little piece of mind and soul. He remained on his property in Nauvoo until the expulsion of the Saints February 16, 1846. During the night of February 15, 1846, a mob of man clamored on his front door to inform him that he would have 24 hours to gather his belongings and be out of his place or everything would be burned on his property. He, like hundreds of other Saints, could be seen hurrying from barn to house, gathering the necessities needed to maintain his family during the last long flight of the Saints to safety. They crossed the Mississippi River on ice and camped on the banks of the river until open weather. At this time, Adolphus and Jerusha’s family had grown to eight children: Lorenzo, George, Albern, Sophronia, Eliza, Permelia, John, and Lucy. Henry, the youngest child, was born in Salt Lake City three months after they arrived in Utah. Adolphus and family were designated by Brigham Young to travel in the A.O.. Smoot Company, which was the second company of pioneers to arrive in Salt Lake City. The A.O. Smoot Company was the first company to break trail from the Missouri River bank to Winter Quarters where they built temporary houses to remain in the remaining part of the bad winter weather. It was at this point that the U.S. government asked Brigham Young for 500 volunteers to assist the U.S. with its war in Mexico, which had recently been declared. Lorenzo, the oldest son of Adolphus, was one of the first to enlist. When spring broke, the A.0.Smoot Company slowly broke the trail on to Pisgah, another temporary camp. At Pisgah, Brigham Young’s company overtook the Smoot Company and pushed on ahead and arrived in Salt Lake on July 24, 1847. The A.O. Smoot Company arrived 20 October 7, 1847. Adolphus settled in Salt Lake City for two years. In 1849, Brigham Young assigned Adolphus the charge of all the church’s cattle. Adolphus moved his family to Bountiful and proceeded from Bountiful with his son, George, into Cache Valley, where he grazed and protected the church cattle from Indian attacks until President Young, fearing for their safety, sent word for them to bring the cattle in. The drive back with the cattle became much more hazardous than taking cattle out into Cache Valley three years previous. The Indians had become more fearless and bold in their attacks on the settlers in the outskirts of the small towns which had been settled by the pioneers, necessitating a constant guard over the cattle night and day. They returned with the cattle and turned them over to the church authorities in 1851. In 1852, the gold rush to California proved too tempting for Adolphus. He left his family in the care of his oldest son, Lorenzo, and taking his son, George, traveled to California in pursuit of wealth. While in California, he came in contact with freighters from South America and purchased alfalfa seed and brought it to Utah with him. He was the first to introduce alfalfa growing in the state. He also brought fruit trees, including apples, peaches, pears, apricots, currants, grapes and plums. Arriving back in Bountiful in the year 1853, he found his wife Jerusha had died the previous September, 1850, leaving the family without parental care. The bishop of the ward distributed the small children among families in the ward. Adolphus, on returning, gathered his children together and made a home for them in Provo for a year or two. While in Provo he encouraged and helped financially to build the Provo Woolen Mills. From Provo he moved to Palmyra. In 1856 the people from Palmyra were ordered by the church authorities to move to Spanish Fork where a fort had been built for protection from the Indians. He homesteaded 22 acres of land, built a home of adobe with walls 18 inches thick, each adobe being 12x6x4. The walls were plastered inside and out. Shingles for the roofing were made by his son, Lorenzo, and the nails were handmade on a hand- made forge by Adolphus, who was a blacksmith by trade. The rafters and joists were pinned together by handmade wooden pegs. Here he and his family lived until his death. Around the 22 acres of land he built a wall made of mud and straw, partitioning off a portion of ground where he started the first orchard in Spanish Fork. A portion of the wall and possibly some of the trees are now standing on the land originally owned by Adolphus Babcock and now owned by Bishop George of Spanish Fork. The sterling qualities of Adolphus's character can only be appreciated when we know of some of the courageous tasks he was called to do. His entire life from the time he was baptized into the church until his death was spent in serving his God, his church, and his community. Although a hardworking and saving man, his honesty and generosity to the less fortunate were strong characteristics of his life. I have selected the following experiences from among many that prove his generosity and fairness in dealing with others. During the settlement of Spanish Fork, one harvest season resulted in a failure for most of the pioneers. Fortunately, the crops of Adolphus were successful that year. Realizing the conditions of the less fortunate in the settlement, Adolphus made known to the settlers, through testimony, that those in need could share his wheat, molasses and meat. He urged the men to come and get food and seed with which to plant their crops. In exchange for the food and grain, the men worked with Adolphus in building the mud wall around his property. It is of record that had Adolphus not come to the aid of the settlers, many, if not all, would have been compelled to migrate to other settlements or perish during the hard winter. His honesty in all transactions is perhaps very forcibly illustrated by the following experience: At one time Daniel King, Sr. borrowed wheat for flour from Adolphus, and his interest for the use of the wheat was agreed upon as one peck per bushel. In the fall when the grain was harvested, King returned the grain with the extra pecks for interest. Adolphus, after weighing out the wheat, said, “ Brother King, you have brought too much.” King asked, "Isn't the interest one peck per bushel?” “Yes, Brother King, when people do not pay back their wheat when they are able, but when this is done, I do not accept interest.” Adolphus Babcock died at Spanish Fork April 15, 1872, at the age of 72 years. 7.Note: Reference: Babcock gen. by Steph. Babcock. New York NameBirth/Death Date(s)Reference Title and LocationBYU Call Number Babcock, Adolphus Mar 1872 Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah. Frank Esshom. Salt Lake City: Western Epics, Inc., 1966. p.728 Microform/Genealogy Ref BX 8670 .Ex77 1966 also Hum. Ref BX 8670 .Ex77 1966 also Americana BX 8670 Nauvoo, Illinois Tax Index, 1842 Given Name: Dolphus Surname: Babcock Page: 204 Coord.: 7N8W 8.__!CROSSING THE PLAINS:_Babcock family members were in the Fifth Ten (led by Thomas Orr, Sr.) of the First Fifty (led by Joseph Horne) of the Second Hundred (led by Edward Hunter) of the 1847 pioneers, departing 17 Jun 1847 and arriving in Salt Lake City on 29 Sep 1847. "Pioneers of 1847: A Sesquicentennial Remembrance," compiled_by Susan Ward Easton-Black. ( His history given by his granddaughter has him with A.O. Smoot. Church records have him with Edward Hunter Company.) Pat Miller Joseph Horne's fifty, part of the Edward Hunter Company also officially started their pioneer trek. The Horne fifty (also known as the John Taylor company) consisted of 72 wagons and 197 people. The captains of tens were Ariah C. Brower, Abraham Hoagland, Archibald Gardner, William Taylor, and Thomas Orr Sr. __!SOURCES:_* Compare data in Ancestral File with family group sheet prepared by Thomas A. Mathews and sheets for individual children for inconsistencies which need to be resolved._" Membership of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 18930-1848," compiled by Susan Ward Easton Black (BYU Religious Studies Center, 1984-88), Vol. 3, Pages 37 - 42_Listed as "Adolphus Babcock"._Nauvoo Temple Endowment Register, with listing as "Dolphus Babcock."__ID Number 270310 Grooms First Name Adolphus Grooms Last Name BABCOCK Grooms Residence Brides First Name Hannah, Mrs. Brides Last Name GOODWORTH Brides Residence County of Record Utah Co., Utah Place of Marriage Spanish Fork City Date of Marriage 25 May 1858 Volume 4 Page 28 Comment Source: UGA, "Deseret News" Marriage by Lundberg and Hansen 9.253468 Grooms First Name Dolf. Grooms Last Name BABCOCK Grooms Residence Brides First Name Hannah Brides Last Name BABCOCK Brides Residence County of Record Utah Co., Utah Place of Marriage Date of Marriage Volume 1 Page 343 Comment Divorce Decree, 22 May 1859 Source: Utah County Probate Docket 10.DEATH: Utah County, Utah Cemetery Index Record Surname, Name:Adolphus (or Dolphus) Babcock Birth Date:23 February 1800 Death Date:15 March 1872 Cemetery:Spanish Fork, Utah 11.Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 Adolphus Babcock and family came in the Edward Hunter - Joseph Horne Company (1847) Departure: 17 June 1847 Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 29 September 1847 Company Information: Also known as the John Taylor Co. 197 individuals and 72 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post on the Elkhorn River about 27 miles west of Winter Quarters, Nebraska. Included in the fifth ten led by Thomas Orr Sr. were: Elizabeth Albern Babcock, Dolphus Babcock, George Babcock, Jerusha Jane Babcock, John Babcock, Lucy Babcock, Permelia Babcock, David Blackhurst, Ellen Blackhurst, Joseph B. Blackhurst, William Blackhurst, Catherine Orr, Isabella Orr, May Ann Orr, Thomas Orr Jr., Thomas Orr Sr., Jane Park, John Park, Louisa Park, Louisa Park, Marian Park, Mary Ann Park, Ann Pitchforth, Mary Mitchell Pitchforth, Mercy Pitchforth, Samuel Pitchforth, Sarah Barbara Pitchforth, Francis Pullin, Hannah Pullin, and Edward Tattersall.] Title: Pioneers of 1847: A Sesquicentennial Remembrance_Author: Black, Susan Ward Easton (as Susan Ward Easton)_Call Number: 979.2 W2_Page: Page 78_(led by Joseph Horne) of the Second Hundred (led by Edward Hunter) of the 1847 pioneers, departing 17 Jun 1847 and arriving in Salt Lake City on 29 Sep 1847. MARRIAGE: Married, Spanish Fork, 25 May 1858, Adolphus BABCOCK and Hannah GOODWORTH 12. Inventory of the Property of Dolphus Babcock Deceased 22 June 1872 27 Acres, farming and hay land, more or less, with house, $1155.00 Barn and orchard. Said land is located at Spanish Fork City, Utah County, Utah Territory. 2 City Lots with improvements, consisting of House on each $600.00 Lot and orchard on same said lots containing in the aggregate 2 Acres and 48 Rods of ground and located in the town of Spanish Fork City, Utah County, Utah Territory. 5 Head of Horned Cattle $165.00 1 Calf 5.00 2 Pigs or Swine $6.00 Each 12.00 6 1/4 Shares in the Woolen Factory at Provo City, Utah County Utah Territory 1 Old Waggon $ 90.00 3 Sets Plow Irons $8.00 per set 24.00 1 Old Plow 5.00 3 Old guns 10.00 1 Cooking Stove 30.00 Cash on hand at time of decease 200.00 1 Bedstead and Bedding 15.00 3 Chairs $1.00 each 3.00 1 Cupboard 15.00 5 Brass kettles $1.00 each 5.00 1 Old Table 1.00 3 Old Chests $1.50 each 4.50 3 augers, 1 Square, 1 Saw, (all old) 3.75 15 Bushels Wheat $1.10 per bushel 16.50 8 Bushels Barley $1.10 per bushel 8.80 30 Lbs Sole Leather abt. 0.35 per pound 10.50 ½ box Window Glass at $4.00 per box 2.00 3 Saddle Scythes at $1.00 each $3.00 2 Sets Knives and Forks at $2.00 per set 4.00 1 Old Scythe Snath .75 1 Sett Harrow Teeth 2.50 __________ $ 2391.30 SOURCE: RECORD FOUND IN THE FOURTH DISTRICT COURT IN PROVO, UTAH. MICRO FILM OF UTAH COUNTY PROBATE FILES, ROLL #76 TO #118, 1894-189? DOLPHUS BABCOCK IS # 94 ON THIS FILM. SOURCE: PROPERTY: T7 R8 Sec 20 NE SW 40 acres T7 R8 Sec 20 SW/4 40 acres SOURCE: NAUVOO RECORDS: Nauvoo Temple Endowment Register, p 277 Members, LDS, 1830-1848, by Susan Easton Black, Vol 3, pp 28-31. Pioneers of 1847, p 78 SOURCE: HISTORY/HISTORIES: Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p 728 SOURCE: NAME VARIANT: DOLPHUS BIRTHDATE VARIANT: 23 Feb 1800 TERRITORY OF UTAH COUNTY OF UTAH We, the undersigned appraisers of the Estate of Dolphus Babcock Deceased do hereby certify that the foregoing appraisement and inventory of the Estate of Dolphus Babcock deceased is just correct and true according to the best of our knowledge, skill and ability and that the valuations herein given are correct according to the best of our knowledge. In Testimony where of we, the appraisers have hereunto set our hands and signed our names this 22nd day of June A.D. 1872 at the City of Spanish Fork in the County and Territory aforesaid. NAME OF APPRAISERS “UNREADABLE NAME” ALBERN BABCOCK, JOHN BABCOCK, IRA CLARK Book accounts due Dolphus Babcock at the time of his Decease $175.00 value of the above accounts it is impossible to estimate. History of Westfield, NY FROM: History of Chautauqua County, New York and its people John P. Downs - Editor-in-Charge. Fenwick Y. Hedley Editor-in-Chief. Published By American Historical Society, Inc. 1921 Original Purchases in Township 4, Range 14.-This book shows where Dolphus bought land:( 37 acres in July,182I, Dolphus Babcock) NAME: Dulphus (Rodolphus Or Adolphus) /BABCOCK/ SOURCE: The John Taylor Nauvoo Journal Adolphus Babcock (1800-1872) was born at Middlefield, Hampshire, Massachusetts (E.C.I.F.). Eyre Walter Genealogy and Pioneer Histories, July 1990 by Geraldine Bangerter_RFD #1, Box 220-1, Alpine, American Fork, UT 84003 From FGS in that record. FGS_Also cited the following sources: Mrs. Arvilla Eyre Shelly, 341 No. Center St., American Fork, Utah 84003. Family Records of William Wood; St. Peters Par Reg. of Hereford, Engl from G. Foster Carter Vicar; Marden 1850 Census Returns_Bundle 1977 From Ira Mount 1939; Mormon Bat. Rec., Minersville Ward Rec., and St. Temple Rec. Heart Throbs of the West: Volume 8_They Came in '47_Later Emigration of 1847_Babcock, Dolphus 47 Feb. 23, 1800 Middlefield, Mass.
Babcock, Jerusha 43 June 30, 1804 Schenectady, N.Y.Babcock, George 16 Feb. 7, 1831 Mina, Chautauqua, N.Y._Babcock, Lucy 14 Nov. 30, 1833 Mina, Chautauqua, N.Y._Babcock, Pamela 10 Oct. 6, 1837 Far West, Caldwell, Mo._Babcock, Albern 7 Jan. 28, 1840 Adams, Ill._Babcock, John 4 Dec. 13, 1843 Nauvoo, Ill. Adolphus Babcock Written by: Emily Whitesides Sketch dictated from memory by J. Hannah King Babcock to Emily Whitesides the evening of January 9, 1930 at Santa Ana, California. Rudolphus Babcock (changed name from Rudolphus to Adolphus at Middlefield Massachusetts). Was the son of Daniel Babcock, moved from Middlefield Massachusetts to Mina, Chautauqua County, New York (after disagreement over location in building of church. At Mina he joined Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Married Jerusha Rowley about sic1832, (1821) daughter of John Rowley. They built two room home of hew logs with puncheon floor. Doors were also made of puncheon. The chimney was built of sand and rock, corners were mortised together. In the year 1912 this house after having been moved twice was being preserved by Chatauqua Educational association of New York. In the year of 1840 they moved from Mina, New York to Green Plains near Nauvoo, Illinois, where a body of L.D.S. people were located. At the expulsion of L.D.S. people from Nauvoo, Illinois, in Feb. 1846 they crossed the Missouri river on the ice and camped on banks of the river until open weather. At this time they had a family of eight children, Lorenzo, George, John, Albern, Sophronia, Eliza, Permelia, and Lucy. With open weather breaking they left the camp made on the banks of the Missouri river with A. O. Smoot’s( sic) Company starting for the Rocky Mountains camping at Winter Quarters. The U.S. Government called for a Battalion of five hundred men to join a army to fight against Mexico. Lorenzo enlisted with the Mormon Battalion within forty eight hours after the call was received. Five hundred men were ready to go. Before the men left, Brigham Young called them together and promised them that if they live up to the gospel and be faithful and prayerful all would be saved to return to their families. This promise was fulfilled. Lorenzo Babcock testified many times of this promise being made and fulfilled. Lorenzo was married to Mary Ann Marble at this time and left his wife and family at Winter Quarters leaving with the Battalion going toward Mexico. Before arriving at his destination Lorenzo became very ill and was taken to Pueblo Colorado. Recouping in health he went back to Winter Quarters in the year 1852 and brought Mary Ann and Children to Utah. (Lorenzo and Mary Ann lost their child, George at Winter Quarters. Insert by Pat Miller ) Surname: BABCOCK First Name: George Ward: Winter Quarters Ward 11 Birth Date: 27 Feb 1846 Birth Place: Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Death Date: 9 Aug 1847 Death Place: Winter Quarters, Nebraska Territory Burial Place: Winter Quarters, Nebraska Territory Grave #193 Fathers Name: Babcock, Lorenzo Mothers Name: Marble, Amy Ann Adolphus and Jerusha and remaining children came on from Winter Quarters soon after Lorenzo left with the Mormon Battalion. Sophronia had been secretly married at Nauvoo to Dominicus Carter. After leaving Winter Quarters with her family while out on the plains at Pisgah, Sophorina died during childbirth. Both mother and child were buried by the roadside. Eliza was also secretly married at Nauvoo to Brigham Young at the same time of Sophronia’s marriage. Their father Adolphus disapproved of the secret marriages. Brigham Young’s Company came upon the Smoot Company at Pisgah about this time and took Eliza with him. (Insert by Pat Miller) Company: Brigham Young Company (1848) Pioneer Information: She broke her collar bone at the Elk Horn River, and it is speculated that she may have returned to Winter Quarters, not coming to Utah until 1853 in the Wilkin company. Sources: Ballantyne, Richard, Journal, 1848 May-Aug. Upon the arrival of Eliza’s people ( Adolphus and Jerusha Babcock) Eliza left Brigham Young and went to live with her father. Soon after Eliza married John Groves. Eight children were born, but all died in infancy. All were buried at Salt Lake City cemetery. At Eliza’s death she was also buried at Salt lake City Cemetery. From Salt Lake City Adolphus and family moved to Bountiful. This was about the year 1851. (In Feb 1848 Henry was born). At Bountiful Utah, Adolphus and son George had charge of the cattle belonging to the church. The cattle were taken up into Cache Valley, Utah. Indians began to be very “troublesome”. Adolphus and George were ordered by Brigham Young to bring cattle back into Davis County. They would rather have kept the cattle in Catch Valley as feed was better. Brigham Young told them the second time to return cattle to Davis County which they did. They turned the cattle back to the church. Spring of 1852 ( sic ) wrong date Jerusha was alive when they left for California . She died in 1850. Pat Miller) Adolphus and son George left the family at Bountiful and went to California. Fall of September 3, 1852 (sic) Jerusha died while Adolphus and George were still in California. This condition left the children without parental care. The Bishop took the four little children remaining at home and placed them in care of different families. Permelia age 12, Albern aged 10, John 8, Henry 4. In Spring 1853 (sic)Adolphus and George returned to find that his wife and mother had died and children were scattered. The people having charge of children would not give the children up without Bishop’s consent. This offended George and he apostatized from the church and went east. Met a Spanish lady and married her. He accumulated considerable property. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in the army. While in this service, his property was destroyed and his wife eloped with an army officer. After the war was over George came back to Colorado and married Molly where he lived until fall of (sic) 1872. Adolphus finally gathered the four youngest children and made a home for them at Provo for a short time. From here he moved to Palmyra, west of Spanish Fork. In the year 1857 people from Palmyra and upper settlement were ordered to move to Spanish Fork, where a Fort was built for protection from Indians. He then homesteaded twenty two acres of ground, built a home, of adobe walls eighteen inches thick, plastered both inside and out. Each adobe was 12" x 6" x 4". Shingles were made by Lorenzo with a ? Nails were made by Adolphus (who was a blacksmith by trade) over a forge by hand. Rafters and joice were pinned together with handmade wooden pegs. Adolphus married a (sic) Mrs. Goodrich (Goodworth, Chapman ) who had two sons. Adolphous and wife had one daughter named Mary Alice. While Mary Alice was little her father (Adolphus) and mother separated. Mary Alice, her mother and two step brothers moved to Soda Springs, Idaho. Later Mary Alice married a Mr. Campbell. Adolphus filled many positions both in civil and religious capacity; he was known for his honesty and generosity to the poor. At one time Daniel King Sr. borrowed wheat for flour from Adolphus Babcock. His interest was one peck per bushel. In the fall after grain was harvested, Daniel King returned grain with extra pecks. Babcock said to King talking in a slow quiet way as was his custom. “Brother King you brought too much!” King asked “Isn’t interest one peck per bushel”? Babcock’s answer “Yes, brother King, when people don’t pay when they can. When this is done I don’t except interest” He died in April 18, 1872 leaving a will distributing property among his children. Fall of 1872 George Babcock (his son) coming through Salt Lake City, with his family on road to California, camped at the old Tithing yard. (Hotel Utah now stands on this particular spot.). George bought a Dessert News paper which contained an account advertising for George (himself) by Babcock heirs of Estate. Found in Utah Digital Newspaper: DESERET NEWS 1872 Local and other Matters--From Monday's Daily, Aug 26, 1872 page 449, The Deseret News Aug 28, 1872. INFORMATION WANTED----Spanish Fork City, August 25th, 1872. I wish to ascertain the whereabouts of my brother George Babcock, as he would find it to his advantage to communicate to me at Spanish Fork City. The last I knew of him he was running the Green River Ferry along with Lewis Robinson, some twenty-one or two years ago. Please ask the Nebraska papers to copy. ALBEM BABCOCK (PER DESERET TELEGRAPH) (Found in old newspaper’s by Pat Miller) George then went to Spanish Fork, spent the winter there with brothers, remaining winter of 1872-73. From here he went to California remaining one and one half years. Returning to Spanish Fork winter of 1875-76. From here he moved to (sic) Apache County, Mexico where he made his home, returning on a visit once about 1889 to see his brothers and sisters. After his return to Mexico from this trip he died during year of 1892. His family corresponded with Albern’s family until year 1904. ( sic) George died in 1899 in Aztec, New Mexico. Pat Miller) Albern Babcock was born Jan 28, 1840 in Nauvoo, Hancock county, Illinois. At the age of seven years he left with his parents during the expulsion from Nauvoo. He rode a little donkey many weeks along his trail. One morning to his great sorrow he found his donkey dead. After this himself and little friend Plep Bradford took turns riding the old cannon nicknamed “the old Sow” the remainder of the way across the plains. This particular cannon was rooted out of the ground near Nauvoo by an old sow and her young pigs. Hence the name “the Old Sow”. This cannon now stands in the museum located on Temple grounds, in Salt Lake City, Utah. While yet in his teen’s Albern made several trips to meet the Emigrants coming to Utah. He stood guard with a man during Walker Indian War. At the age of fourteen years he freighted from Butte Montana, to Pioche, Nevada sometimes driving mules and sometimes cattle. He served during the Black Hawk war. Married Mary Conover 1864 and child Mary Jane was from to them. They were devoiced in year of 1868. Mary Jane married Joseph Boren of Provo. She died leaving Hazel Boren two years old. Now Mrs. Delano Chipman Sr. of Provo. Albern owned a sawmill for many years at Spanish Fork Canyon, Where he made many friends with Indians. (Chief Petetneete’s oldest son, Santaquin was one of Albern’s best Indian friends. Santaquin owned much land and many cattle and horses also a frame and log house at Bennie Creek near Albern’s saw mill. At this time an epidemic of typhoid fever broke out in Santaquin’s family, several dying. One called Snow, a grown son committed suicide by shooting himself in a fit of deliluim with the fever. Santaquin grieved very much over this tragedy, as he feared for his son Snow’s salvation for committing such a deed. “Saniquin said his son Snow would never travel the great white way to reach the Happy Hunting Ground”. Albern and workman made all the coffins and helped bury Santaquin’s children and assisted them during their sorrow and illness as much as possible. Santaquin never forgot this kindly deed and made regular yearly visits to see the Babcock family. After he had moved away from the saw mill back to Spanish Fork. The last year 1905, Albern told Santaquin he was leaving the old home and moving to Moore , Idaho, By this time Santaquin’s hair was grey. He said to Albern “Me never see white man friend on this land again. Me go to meet you again in Happy Hunting Ground. Tears rolled down the old Indians cheeks as he said “Adors my friend”. The Indian family always stayed two nights, and one day in the Babcock home pitching their wickiup out in the orchard. They joined the L.D.S. church. They had ten children and lost all but one called George during the typhoid epidemic. After saw the Mill was sold Albern moved back to the old home on his father’s estate. Albern B. and J. Hannah King were married May 12, 1881. To this union were born ten children. Hannah Permelia (Millie), A ( Albern) Rowley, Mary Rebeca, Daniel John, Reuben Harold, Ross Osborn, Emily Sophronia and Emma Elizabeth , Claude Dewey, Ralph Charles, Rebeca and Emma died while infants in year March 26, 1906. The family moved to Moore, Idaho, living on a ranch. At this ranch house Albern died Feb 1, 1917. Post Script added later to History About 1860 when the Mormon immigrants were coming into Utah some of them did not have enough food for their winter needs. Adolphus Babcock always had a bin full of wheat. People often came to him for food, and without money to pay for it. So he had a wall of mud and straw built around his 20-acre farm and men with hungry families were given wheat and also employed to work on the mud wall to pay for it. The wall was about four feet high and two feet wide. It was also built through one end of the place, making a grove of cotton-wood trees on one side. Osage Orange trees (shrubs) were planted along the wall at one end of the field. The men were paid for their work in butter, eggs and wheat. He told the men he could not afford to give them the food or lend it to them, but they paid for it in this way. Albern Babcock lived in Nauvoo as a very young boy and told of having once seen the Prophet Joseph Smith standing at a window. Also, he remembered sitting on the floor of the old adobe house listening to his older brother Lorenzo, tell of the Martyrdom of the Prophet, and of the lightning and thunder storms that occurred at that time. This history dictated to Emily by her mother, January 9, 1930. Copied and corrected slightly by Bertha N. Babcock. Winter of 1964 SOURCES: 1. History of Middlefield, Mass. (Smith). 2. Babcock family rec by A. Rowley Babcock. 3. L.D.S. Archives. 4. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p. 728. 5. Dates from Patriarchal Blessings. 6. The Babcock Family by George Jos. Babcock p. 10. 7. Pioneer record 1847. Dalphus (sic) Babcock is found in the 1835 New York State Census in the Town of Mina, N. Y. Found on Ancestry.com 1850 United States Federal Census Name: Dolphus Babcock Age: 51 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1799 Birth Place: Massachusetts Gender: Male Home in 1850(City,County,State): Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory Household Members: Name Age Albern Babcock 10 Dolphus Babcock 51 John Babcock 8 Permelia Babcock 13 William Babcock http://familyhistory.mathews2000.com/ Massachusetts Town Birth Records Name: Reodolphus Babcock Birth Date: 26 Feb 1800 Birth Place: Middlefield Father's First Name: Daniel Mother's First Name: Jerusha Source: Vital Records of Middlefield Found on Ancestry.com Dolphus ( or Adolphus ), born 23 Feb. 1800, Middlefield, Hampshire Co. Mass. son of Daniel Babcock & Jerusha Taylor, Bapt. 1835 by Elder John Gould, Husband of Jerusha Rowley, died 15 March 1872, of Spanish Fork Ward. Source: Book, Spanish Fork Utah County from Salt Lake Genealogy Library--979.224/53 Adolpohus (Dolphus) Babcock land in Nauvoo: Property: T7 R8 Sec 20 NE SW 40 Acres T7 R8 Sec 20 SW/4 40 Acres Dolphus Babcock Total Personal Property, Hancock County, 1842 Tax Record: $215 (seems like a little money, but the other people on the list had $ 100 or $150) Value of Cattle: $50 Value of Horses: $75 Value of Wagons: $50 Other Property: $40 Source: Information from Land Office in Nauvoo. RIN # 829 Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict by Clark V. Johnson The Mormon expulsion from Missouri is one of the most violent stories of religious persecution in U.S. frontier history. The collection of affidavits, or petitions for redress, provides a detailed account of the persecution of the Saints in Missouri as recorded by those who suffered there, but it also reflects the cultural, economic, social, and spiritual activities of the Saints who were present on the Missouri frontier in the 1830s. BABCOCK, Dolphus Illenois Quincy May th 14 1839 a bill of Damages against the State of Mysorie in Conciquence of the Govners Exterminating order- first, for mooving to the State $125.00 for propperty lost in the State 1,280.00 for leaving the State by mob 10.00 $1,415.00 I certify the above to be Just and true acording to the Best I left the spelling as it was in the book. (Patricia Major Miller, Adolphus Babcock was my 2nd great grandfather)

Adolphus Babcock (23 February 1800 – 15 March 1872)

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

At the age of 21 years, Adolphus married Jerusha Jane Rowley, daughter of John Rowley, of Mina, New York. Adolphus built for his young bride a two room home of hewn logs with floor and doors made of puncheon. The chimney was built of sand and rock, and the corners were mortised together. He was in all the forced relocations from state to state with the earlier church members. From New York the Saints migrated to Ohio, from Ohio to Missouri. In Missouri he accumulated a large tract of land and was fast becoming financially independent when he was forced to sacrifice his property and follow the Saints to Nauvoo. It is interesting to note here the precaution he took in safe guarding his money along with the valuable possessions he had been able to accumulate in Missouri from mob theft and Indian raids while traveling from Missouri to Nauvoo and likewise from Nauvoo to Zion. He had an old common looking keg that he used to store pieces of iron, loose bolts, screws and burs from wagons that he had a chance to pick up. In this decrepit old keg, that looked more like a junk box than anything else, he carefully placed his hard-earned money and personal and household treasures Jerusha was not prone to part with. On arriving at Nauvoo, he took his closely guarded money and bought a large tract of land three miles out from Nauvoo called Green Plains, where a group of Saints settled because of more fertile soil. This is just another evidence of the sound judgment of Adolphus Babcock, because Green Plains was and is now the most fertile spot and more adapted for agriculture than any part of that vicinity. Here, Adolphus built a comfortable home and a large barn and again started breaking ground for spring planting. Adolphus, like the other Saints, conscientious and God-fearing, settled down to enjoy a little piece of mind and soul. He remained on his property in Nauvoo until the expulsion of the Saints February 16, 1846. During the night of February 15, 1846, a mob of men clamored on his front door to inform him that he would have 24 hours to gather his belongings and be out of his place or everything would be burned on his property. He,like hundreds of other Saints, could be seen hurrying from barn to house, gathering the necessities needed to maintain his family during the last long flight of the Saints to safety. They crossed the Mississippi River on ice and camped on the banks of the river until open weather. Adolphus settled in Salt Lake City for two years. In 1849, Brigham Young assigned Adolphus the charge of all the church's cattle. Adolphus moved his family to Bountiful and proceeded from Bountiful with his son, George, into Cache Valley, where he grazed and protected the church cattle from Indian attacks until President Young, fearing for their safety, sent word for them to bring the cattle in. The drive back with the cattle became much more hazardous than taking cattle out into Cache Valley three years previous. The Indians had become more fearless and bold in their attacks on the settlers in the outskirts of the small towns which had been settled by the pioneers, necessitating a constant guard over the cattle night and day. They returned with the cattle and turned them over to the church authorities in 1851. Went to California and foundgold in 1849. He left his family in the care of his oldest son, Lorenzo, and taking his son, George, traveled to California in pursuit of wealth. While in California, he came in contact with freighters from South America and purchased alfalfa seed and brought it to Utah with him. He was the first to introduce alfalfa growing in the state. He also brought fruit trees, including apples, peaches, pears, apricots, currants, grapes and plums. Arriving back in Bountiful in the year 1853, he found his wife Jerusha had died the previous September, 1850, leaving the family without parental care. Adolphus, on returning, gathered his children together and made a home for them in Provo for a year or two. While in Provo he encouraged and helped financially to build the Provo Woolen Mills. From Provo he moved to Palmyra,Utah. In 1856 the people from Palmyra were ordered by the church authorities to move to Spanish Fork where a fort had been built for protection from the Indians. He homesteaded 22 acres of land, built a home of adobe with walls 18 inches thick, each adobe being 12x6x4. The walls were plastered inside and out. Shingles for the roofing were made by his son, Lorenzo, and the nails were handmade on a hand - made forge by Adolphus, who was a blacksmith by trade. The rafters and joists were pinned together by handmade wooden pegs. Here he and his family lived until his death. Around the 22 acres of land he built a wall made of mud and straw, partitioning off a portion of ground where he started the first orchard in Spanish Fork. The sterling qualities of Adolphus's character can only be appreciated when we know of some of the courageous tasks he was called to do. His entire life from the time he was baptized into the church until his death was spent in serving his God, his church, and his community. Although a hardworking and saving man, his honesty and generosity to the less fortunate were strong characteristics of his life. I have selected the following experiences from among many that prove his generosity and fairness in dealing with others. During the settlement of Spanish Fork, one harvest season resulted in a failure for most of the pioneers. Fortunately, the crops of Adolphus were successful that year. Realizing the conditions of the less fortunate in the settlement, Adolphus made known to the settlers, through testimony, that those in need could share his wheat, molasses and meat. He urged the men to come and get food and seed with which to plant their crops. In exchange for the food and grain, the men worked with Adolphus in building the mud wall around his property. It is of record that had Adolphus not come to the aid of the settlers, many, if not all, would have been compelled to migrate to other settlements or perish during the hard winter. Adolphus and Jerusha's children were: Sophronia, Lorenzo, Eliza, George, Lucy, Permelia, Albern, John, and Henry, the youngest child, was born in Salt Lake City three months after they arrived in Utah. Dolphus changed his name to Adolphus. Many early records have the name Dolphus. Later records have the name Adolphus. Permelia Babcock Morgan Granddaughter Camp Spanish Fork Updated by Patricia R. Miller Great-great granddaughter Camp Red Hills Hurricane, Utah 1999 _________________________________________________________________ CROSSING THE PLAINS: Babcock family members were in the Fifth Ten (led by Thomas Orr, Sr.) of the First Fifty (led by Joseph Horne) of the Second Hundred (led by Edward Hunter) of the 1847 pioneers, City on 29 Sep 1847. "Pioneers of 1847: A Sesquicentennial Remembrance," compiled by Susan Ward Easton-Black. I will tell the story of how I found the death record of Adolphus. I was visiting my grandson, who lives in Spanish Fork ,Utah. I went down to the Spanish Fork City Office Building to see where I could find land records of Adolphus Babcock. While there a young women was sitting at a desk and asked me if I was doing genealogy. I said yes. She said there were some old books that the University was getting ready to microfilm. She asked me if I would like to see them. We went up in the attic and in an old dusty corner was a note book called "The Book Of The Dead". This note book was an index to the large "Book Of The Dead". I asked her where this book might be. She did not know, but asked someone else and they said to go down stairs where the people of Spanish Fork pay their water or electric bill. I went down stairs and when I asked the lady she brought out a large very, very old original book showing the early deaths in Spanish Fork and the cause of the deaths, parents of the person and doctor who attended. I was very happy to see this book as it had the original source date for many Babcock's including Adolphus Babcock. I would never of thought to look there for such a book. (Source: Spanish Fork Record Of Death, Book 1, Nov 13, 1853--Sept 18, 1939. Adolphus Babcock, Birth: February 23, 1800, Middlefield, Mass. Father: Daniel Babcock ,Mother: Jerusha Taylor, Church: LDS, died of Tyroid Fever, March 15, 1872, Doctor: Dr. Clark. Occupation: Farmer) Written by Patricia Ruth Major Miller, Adolphus's is my g-g-grandfather.

Hannah Chapman

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

About: Hannah Chapman (1813-1898) Written by: Marjorie Beus Brewer, October 1993 Hannah Chapman Chester Goodworth Babcock Raymond England, a country smaller in area than the state of Alabama, was the birthplace of Hannah Chapman, my maternal great grandmother. She was born March 2, 1813, to William Chapman and Merry (Mary) Drury in Ousefleet, a township in the Whitgift parish, located in West Riding, Yorkshire, England. Ousefleet is about twenty-six miles southeast of York and lies on the river Ouse which empties into the Humber River and ultimately into the North Sea. The general area where the family lived is a lowland region south and east of the Pennine Chain, sometimes called "the backbone of England," because it extends southward from the lowlands of Scotland through the central part of England. There were rich deposits of coal and iron in the Pennine Chain while the lowlands - excluding marshy areas - were used for farming. Other activities common to the area were mining, shipping, and fishing. On April 11, 1813, Hannah was baptized by Minister Simpson in the Whitgift parish. She was the eighth of ten children. Her older brothers and sisters were William, George, John, Mary, Sarah, Richard, and Mary while James and Betty were the younger. Hannah did not lack for playmates, but they all probably had their assigned chores in a family that size. Beyond the information on family group sheets for Hannah's parents and her grandparents, William Chapman and Mrs. Mary Chapman, all of whom lived in Belton, Lincolnshire, England, nothing is known about family occupations or the childhood of Hannah. Thomas Chester, the son of John Post Chester and Frances Davis, was born in Crowle, Lincolnshire, England, on August 8, 1811. Crowle was not too far from Ousefleet so Thomas, when he grew up, did not have far to go to court Hannah. Their wedding day was January 28, 1833. Seven children were born to Thomas and Hannah in nine years, but death and sadness plagued Hannah's life. Little James, Mary, and Emma died in childhood while Ann, Thomas, France's, and William lived to adulthood. On September 11, 1844, sixteen months after the birth of their last child, tragedy struck again; Hannah's husband died. A story has been told in the family that Thomas Chester was a sailor and was lost at sea, but this is not factual. Thomas was a coal merchant and may have sailed on ships, but he died from an abscessed knee at the age of thirty-three. Hannah was with Thomas at the time of his death, undoubtedly ministering to him to the end. This young mother had her hands full with four children and herself to support. Most likely the demands made upon her left little time for mourning the loss of her husband. About a year later, Joseph Goodworth, an eligible bachelor, entered Hannah's life. Joseph, the son of Richard Goodworth and Hannah Brooks was born April 23, 1826, in Barugh, Darton, Yorkshire, England. Whether Hannah had known Joseph before or met him after the death of her husband is not known. Hannah must have been a charmer because she was a widow with four children and was thirteen years older than Joseph. Yet the two were attracted to each other and were married October 29, 1845. Joseph and Hannah lived in Crowle, Lincolnshire, England, where three sons were born to them within a four year period - Richard Brooks, Joseph, and Frederick. Joseph worked as a waterman, and Hannah was kept busy as a wife, homemaker, and mother of seven. It seems unreal that Hannah's second husband - only twenty-eight years old - would be taken from her, but she lost Joseph on May 11, 1853. Another family report is that Hannah lost her second husband at sea. However, Joseph died from kidney disease and a back problem, and Hannah was also present at this death. She buried Joseph three days later in Crowle, Lincolnshire, England. By 1853, Hannah Chapman Chester Goodworth, at the age of forty, had been twice married, twice widowed, and had seven living children. She had lived a lifetime already with experiences that would have cowed a less courageous woman. She could easily have cried, "Why Me?" with the terrible losses she had suffered. Maybe she did, but somewhere she found the wisdom to recognize how many were dependent upon her, the inner strength to endure, and the resolve to make the best of things. She saw an opportunity for improving her situation and was brave enough to leave her homeland, and her saga moved to another continent. Following the founding of the Mormon Church, missionaries were sent to England. Of the nearly seven thousand converts in 1840, five thousand had migrated to Illinois. By 1850, the Perpetual Emigration Fund Company (P.E.F.) had been established to assist in the gathering and transporting of Saints to Zion, but it was not until 1852 that the fund was used to assist Saints in Europe to come to Utah. It became increasingly difficult to keep the fund large enough to accommodate the large numbers of foreign Saints, even though the immigrants were expected to repay their loans through public work. Applications for passage to America were to be accompanied by a one pound deposit for each person, and passengers were to furnish their own beds, bedding, and cooking utensils. In addition, passengers signed a P.E. Fund bond, part of which read, "And that on the arrival in Utah, we will hold ourselves, our time, and our labor subject to the appropriation of the Perpetual Emigrating Fund Company, until the full cost of our emigration is paid, with interest if required." Modifications were continually made to keep the expense of travel as low as possible, and the plan was born for overland migration of the Saints by handcart. Frightening as it must have been, Hannah had faith and took advantage of the P.E.F opportunity to come to America. She was one of those hardy Saints who had the courage to shepherd her family, by herself, across the plains by handcart. It brings a smile to my face to know how many times Hannah was baptized...she was indisputably a member of the Mormon Church. The Soda Springs Ward Record shows that she was baptized in 1848, and the Hull Conference Record records her baptism in 1853. Another baptism was performed in September 1854 in the Endowment House. There were yet other baptisms, and all previous church blessings were reconfirmed and ratified in 1967. As Hannah made plans for her departure to America, she had four Chester children and three Goodworth children for whom she was responsible. It is an assumption that one son, Thomas Chester, was not included in her plan to emigrate. He was married to Priscilla Taylor in the same year that Hannah emigrated, and their names did not appear on the ship's passenger list. Passengers listed with Hannah included Ann, France's, and William Chester together with the three Goodworth sons - all participants in the P.E.F. plan. It is interesting to note that Ann Chester, at the age of twenty, was listed as a spinster. We consider a spinster too old to likely be married. The English thought of a spinster as marriageable. Several Stories surround Hannah and William at this particular time. One was that Hannah met with some resistance from the Chester children's grandfather with regard to religion and the family emigration to America, and it was claimed that he was bitterly opposed to Mormonism. Another was that when the group was at sea, Hannah discovered that William was missing and someone reported to her that an elderly gentleman had been seen walking away with the boy. Yet another story appeared in print - after the death of both Hannah and William - that William had been taken into the home of his grandfather as a baby, which would have meant that William was not in the care of his mother. Searching has also revealed that though the name of Frances was on the ship's passenger list, there is no evidence that she ever left England. Perhaps she was removed from the ship by her grandfather along with William, or she chose to leave the ship. Maybe neither child ever boarded the ship. It is possible that this is one of those experiences so painful that it remained buried in Hannah's heart. In any event, the names of Frances, who was sixteen, and William, soon to be fourteen, do appear on the Enoch Train passenger list as it prepared for departure from Liverpool. Most certainly, Hannah had every intention of keeping her family together. Another passenger list exists in church records which does not contain the names of William or Frances, and their names do not appear on the Ellsworth Handcart membership roster. Whatever circumstances are true, the fact still remains that William and Frances did not travel with their mother to America. We can only imagine the blow to Hannah together with the shock and grief she must have experienced at being separated from her children and guess that she was consoled only by knowing that Grandfather Chester loved his grandchildren and would properly cared for them. Hannah did not ever see Thomas or Frances again, and it was not until years later that she was reunited with William in America. Hannah and her family were among the P.E.F. passengers to set sail on the ship Enoch Train on March 23, 1856, and Boston, Massachusetts, with Captain Henry P. Rich. Five hundred thirty-four saints under the presidency of Elder James Furguson, Edmund Ellsworth, and Daniel D. McArthur made up the first shipload of emigrants who would participate in crossing the plains with handcarts to Utah. Hannah and her charges must have been filled with excitement and fear. It would seem that only a deep abiding faith on Hannah's part could have supplied her with the courage to leave everything that was familiar to her in England. They crossed the ocean in thirty-eight days arriving in Boston April 30, 1856. There was a report that the Saints had to form a louse committee, and they had four births and two deaths on their voyage. For all the emigrants, death on board a ship was a distressing experience because the body was put in a box or simply wrapped in a sheet with a weight attached and put overboard. Other situations endured were overcrowding, illness, difficult cooking arrangements, poor diet, unsanitary conditions, and the smell. However, the emigrants observed routines, participated in religious services, and had other activities which contributed to a generally pleasant and successful voyage on the Enoch Train. On May 1 the group passed inspection and boarded a train the next day for New York City and the westward journey to Iowa. They arrived in Iowa City on May 12 and spent almost four weeks preparing, enduring, and waiting for the handcart trek across the plains. Finally, the first handcart company left on June 9 under their assigned leader, Edmund Ellsworth. the company was organized with about five persons to a handcart and twenty people to a tent. There was a total of fifty-two handcarts and five wagons to be shared by two hundred seventy-four people. We can easily imagine Hannah and her children being responsible for a handcart and being together in a tent. The "traveling" is unimaginable. When the company arrived in Florence, Nebraska, they spent about two weeks regaining strength, repairing the carts, and readying themselves for the thousand mile journey that lay ahead. Though a large number of individuals left the company at Florence to await easier transportation, Hannah and her family were determined to travel to Zion. She, her young sons - six, seven and ten -, and her daughter Ann, walked almost the entire distance across the plains, approximately twelve hundred miles. Richard, the ten year old, pushed the handcart while his mother pulled. He, at such a tender age, developed broken blood vessels in his legs. We have no personal record from Hannah, but some people kept diaries along he way. it is certain that Hannah and her family endured the same hardships - the smothering sand and dust, heat exhaustion, storms, weariness, hunger, illness, fear of Indians, deaths and burials along the trail, and constant handcart repair. Finally, the entire company arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah - receiving a joyous welcome - on September 26, 1856. The serious reader can find a more detailed account of daily travel of the handcart company in Hafen's Handcarts to Zion. After the handcart arrival in Salt Lake City, some emigrants went to the Bear Lake area while many others went to Bountiful, Utah. The exact whereabouts of Hannah and her sons is not known. She was not listed in the Utah 1860 census, and no family record has shown where she was between September 1856 and July 1857. She could have remained in Salt Lake to share her daughter's baptism and confirmation March 10, 1857, and her marriage to Benjamin Ashby on October 25, 1857, or Hannah may have gone to Bountiful, Utah, where her daughter went to live with her husband. Frederick Goodworth, the youngest son, was found at age nine in the 1860 Utah Census living in the Chauncey Loveland household in Bountiful. The other two Goodworth sons had evidently been placed elsewhere while Hannah looked for work. There is a record of Joseph and Richard B. Goodworth being baptized and confirmed March 29, 1857 in the Draper, Utah Ward. Hannah undoubtedly was concerned with repaying her P.E.F debt and was reported as having found work as a housekeeper with the Aldolphs Babcock family. He, a widower, and his children lived in Spanish Fork, Utah. It is relatively certain that she had made the acquaintance of Adolphus Babcock prior to July 1857 because she gave birth to their only child, Hannah Alice Babcock, on April 8, 1858. He was a church member, and possibly public sentiment placed him in an untenable position for Adolphus Babcock married Hannah Goodworth on May 25, 1858. Shortly thereafter, the two separated so the marriage must not have been a happy one. My lineages is through Adolphus Babcock and Hannah Chapman though I never had the joy of knowing my great grandparents. I can remember my mother speaking with love and admiration of her grandmother Hannah and indignantly relating that Hannah was not even allowed to have material for baby clothes for little Hannah Alice. Facts surrounding the family are so limited that we can only assume that Hannah had such a deeply wounded spirit at this time that she chose to be silent. We do not find Hannah again from 1858 until 1865. However, she must have been near her children or must have visited them. It seems likely that Hannah met Charles Jeremiah Raymound in Bountiful, Utah, during such a visit with Frederick, her youngest son, for it appears that Charles was living in Bountiful. On November 7, 1865, Hannah was sealed to Charles Jeremiah in Salt Lake City at the Endowment House. The Raymounds then made their home in Bear Lake Valley, Idaho. Charles and Hannah Raymond were listed in the 1870 Idaho Census with Frederick (Hannah's son), Albert (Charles' son), and Hannah Alice (Babcock) shown in the household. In a personal letter written by Beth Cheney ( a Hannah Chester descendant) to Susan Brady (a Hannah Goodworth descendant) Hannah is quoted as saying, following her marriage to Charles Raymond, that for the first time in her life she had found happiness. It is fortunate that Hannah had found companionship and some happiness for she was again to know great sorrow. Joseph Goodworth, her son, was fatally shot in 1865 when he was just a couple months short of seventeen years old. The Goodworth family related a story that Joseph had been killed by a young man jealous of Joseph's attention to some young lady. However, the following account was found: "FATAL ACCIDENT;- Through Bishop Bradley of Moroni, we learned that a fatal accident occurred on the 20th ult. While part of the Militia were assembled for drill, and some of them were engaged in target shooting, a gun went off uncapped and shot B. Joseph Goodworth in the right temple, who died about half an hour afterwards. He was a young man about 19 years of age, of good character and much respected." (Des. News 15:84). Hannah's youngest son served in the militia in Idaho and may have been living with his mother in 1867. She was to bear the loss of yet another son, and Frederick's death was listed in the family records as March 12, 1869. However, this date is questionable because he was found, as mentioned previously, living in the Raymond household with his mother and half-sister, Hannah Alice, in the 1870 Idaho Census. Nevertheless, he did die as a young man, unmarried, in his early twenties. One Goodworth family record relates that Frederick was never a very robust boy and that he died of pneumonia, but there seems to be no death report to validate the cause or date of his death. As a matter of fact, mystery surrounds Joseph and Frederick. Joseph was found only in 1857 in the Draper Ward and again in the 1865 Deseret News report of his death in Moroni. Frederick was located in the Idaho militia and in the 1860-70 censuses. No burial dates or places have been found for either Goodworth son. Charles and Hannah Raymond were cited among the first early pioneers in Bear Lake County. The Latter-day Saints colonized this area where they worked hard and endured many privations. The winters were hard, and it was impossible to produce full crops. These pioneers practiced the United Order and believed in the doctrine of plural marriage though they were obedient to the church decision to abolish polygamy in accordance with state and national law. The church system of allowing a man to own the property he obtained by drawing a lot number from a hat was quite different from the homestead law passed by Congress. The conflict made it difficult to secure a title to property, and there appears to be no title to a home for Charles and Hannah in the Montpelier area. Later, the family moved to Soda springs, Idaho. Hannah's church membership records were received in Soda Springs in 1871. The couple homesteader this south east quarter of section twelve in township nine containing one hundred and sixty acres and received the patented title in 1881. This area comprised "what is now the southwest section of the city, beginning near the corner of the Lallatin Market, continuing south on Main Street to the present site of the Fish Pond and west to include much of what is now the Lakeview addition. Mr. Raymond owned and operated a shingle mill on Spring Creek about 1878. At one time he built a bathhouse near Heyser Hill which proved to be outside the patented area. When the railroad was being built through the valley, he was employed as a tie cutter. A butcher shop which he owned, near the present location of Fowler's Market, was later sold to William Clemens." Interestingly, by the summer of 1874, William Chester - Hannah's son from England - and his family arrived in Soda Springs. Hannah undoubtedly experienced great joy with this reunion and must have been very happy that William made his home in Soda Springs, not far from where she lived. Hannah Alice Babcock had by 1874 married Jared Edward Campbell and also lived very near her mother. Ann Chester Ashby lived in Bountiful, Utah, with her family, and Richard Brooks Goodworth lived with his family in Kamas, Utah. Still in England were Hannah's other two children and their families, Thomas Chester and France's Chester Clarke. While Charles was busy making a living with farming and pursuing his various other endeavors, Hannah - in addition to caring for her family - found time to be involved in church activities. A group of seven ladies met with Elder Jeppe G. Folkman on February 5 1876, to organize a Relief Society. Mrs. Anna Folkman was named president on April 5, and she chose Hannah Raymond and Mary Jane Sterrett as her counselors on April 8. The Relief Society was reorganized on June 26, 1879, at which time Hannah Raymond became president. Hannah chose Dorothea Lau and Sarah Horsley as first and second counselors. The soda Springs Ward Record refers to Hannah's "ordination" in 1881, but this was not mentioned in the Relief Society minutes. What was called an ordination for Hannah then would be like someone being set apart now. This organization remained intact for fifteen years until July 11, 1894, at which time Hannah, then 83 years of age, was released. There was a steady growth in membership from the initial seven to a total of twenty-five. In 1892, the Soda Springs Relief Society held its first social to celebrate the fifty year jubilee marking the beginning of the parent organization in Nauvoo, Illinois. Other activities during Hannah's years of service included regular donations made to the building of the Logan temple, immigration, Deseret hospital, carpet for the temple, Bear Lake Tabernacle, and sending a missionary to Switzerland. Additionally, Hannah served as a teacher. Mrs. Rose Lau Torgesen related a story about "the time when she, with other little girls of Soda Springs, was entertained by her Sunday School teacher, Mrs. Hannah Rayond,at the Raymond home on Spring Creek. As part of the day's festivities, the children were taken for a tour of the mill. Mrs. Torgesen has a vivid remembrance of the big water wheel which lifted water in tin containers and dumped it into a long trough that carried it into the mill." The mill referred to in this incident was the shingle mill on Spring Creek. Hannah was also cited by Dr. Ellis Kackley as one of the ladies around the Soda Sprigs community who helped nurse his patients. Perhaps part of the reason that Hannah remained so busy in the church and the community was that she continued to suffer the loss of family members. Charles Raymond died in Soda Springs December 2, 1883, and was buried in Montpelier, Idaho. Thomas Chester died March 19, 1886, in England, and Richard Goodworth died May 9, 1896 in Kamas, Utah. Hannah bore the additional burden of losing her eye sight, but she continued to live in her home doing her own work even though she eventually went blind. One amusing story has been told in our family that one of Hannah's neighbors was slipping over at night and diverting her water to his own use. Jared Edward Campbell, her son-in-law, armed himself with a shovel one night and met the water-snitcher in action. The shovel seemed to curb the man's desire for obtaining extra water from a lady with limited eyesight. Hannah Raymond died February 15, 1898, in Soda Springs and was buried in the Chester plot in the Cedar Cemetery. A monument, erected by the daughters of the Utah Pioneers in 1963, bears the names of those buried there. Some names have partially eroded and are now difficult to read. Hannah's obituary, a transcript somewhat repetitious of this account, has been placed at the end for more leisurely reading. There is an epilogue to this stalwart lady's life in which Hannah was spared one final indignity following her death. The Cedar Cemetary had not been used for burials for years. It had not been cared for beyond family members taking flowers on Memoral Day. Headstones were continually destroyed including two for Hannah made and brought from Arizona by a great grandson, LeRoy Campbell. Teenagers were known to have frequented the area where they partied and on one occasion dug up a grave. A stop was put this activity only to be replaced by a more sinister one. A local Soda Springs resident had mad some property available to a building contractor, , and the property apparently included the Cedar Cemetery. New homes were built closer and closer to the graves, and the fence was removed from around the cemetery. One day a call was made to Joy Thomas, a great great granddaughter to Hannah. Joy was told that excavations were being made in the cemetery, and she immediately notified local authorities. After speaking with them, Joy contacted the Idaho Attorney General, and an order was issued making it perfectly clear that a cemetery was consecrated ground which no one could own and on which no building was allowed. Thanks to Joy, no further damage was done. the local National Guard Built a sturdy log fence around the cemetery. And the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers were granted stewardship over the area. It is not until we are made aware of the heartache, the suffering, the labor, and the challenges of another's life that we can be truly appreciative of the strong inheritance and all the comforts and privileges that we enjoy. More importantly, we can view with pride, love, and thankful hearts this dear Hannah who made our lives possible and left us each an outstanding legacy. * * * * * To Hannah The soul would have no rainbow Had the eye no tear. * * * * * Contributions to the story of Hannah Chapman, completed in October 1993, were made by the following people: Marjorie Beus Brewer, a great granddaughter descended from Hannah and Adolphus Babcock, worked for over a year gathering data and writing this story in hopes of presenting, as accurately as possible, a long overdue account of Hannah's life. Susan Goodworth Brady, a great granddaughter descended from Hannah and Joseph Goodworth, unselfishly shared documents obtained from England, information and genealogy on the Goodworth family, and pictures of Hannah, her daughters Ann and Frances Chester, and her son Richard Goodworth. Joy Wilson Thomas, a great great granddaughter descended from Hannah and Adolphus Babcock, related the story about the Cedar Cemetery and was instrumental in preventing the desecration of graves including the grave of Hannah. Joy also supplied the picture of Hannah Alice Babcock. Marilyn Goodworth, a great granddaughter-in-law whose husband descended from Hannah and Joseph Goodworth, secured a picture of the Enoch Train from the Church History Museum in Salt Lake, which allows us a glimpse of the emigrant's transportation from England. Virginia Chester Hall, a great great granddaughter, and Thomas Chester, a great grandson, descended from Hannah and Thomas Chester provided pictures of the Chester plot and the monument in the Cedar Cemetery in Soda Springs on very short notice. Virginia (Ginger) supplied her father with the camera, and he made a special effort to make the trip from Pocatello to Soda Springs to take pictures.

History of Mina, NY FROM: History of Chautauqua County, New York

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

History of Mina, NY FROM: History of Chautauqua County, New York and its people John P. Downs - Editor-in-Charge. Fenwick Y. Hedley Editor-in-Chief. Published By American Historical Society, Inc. 1921 Mina- When on March 23, 1824, Mina, a town of 22,028 acres, high in altitude and of rolling, hilly surface, was set off from the town of Clymer, it included its present area and what is now the town of Sherman, which was taken off eight years later. Findley Lake, a rival of Chautauqua Lake in beauty, if not in size, lies within the town, its waters, shores and two beautiful islands forming pictures of beauty with the varying changes of light temperature and season. Findley Lake, situated among the high hills, is the second largest body of water in Chautauqua county, its waters finding an outlet through French creek, a stream which in earlier years furnished water power in abundance and turned the wheels of many mills. The town is a part of the natural watershed which turns the waters north and south into the valleys of the St. Lawrence and the Mississippi. There are two villages in the town, Mina and Findley Lake, the latter located at the north end of Findley Lake. The population of the town, according to the State census of 1915 is 1,016 citizens and 5 aliens. There is little manufacturing in the town, owing to the insufficiency of the water power and the absence of rail transportation. Mina has been fortunate in having good records of its early days preserved by participants in making the history of the town. The following historical matter relative to Mina is gleaned from an article written by a pioneer of the township and published in 1861: The town of Mina was settled between forty and fifty years ago. Among the first settlers were: Alex. Findley, Geo. Haskell, Roger Haskell, Damon, James Skellie, H. J. Skellie, Robt. Corbett, Philip Mark, Woolcutt, Jos. Palmer, John Keeler, Asa Madden, Potter Sullivan, James Ottaway, Nath. Throop, Seth McCurry, S. Park, S. Curtiss, Benj. Hazen, C. Barnes, Samuel Ellithorp, b, DANIEL BABCOCK, Samuel Gott, E. F. Bisby, HIAL ROWLEY, Z. Beckford, A. Whitney. Alexander Findley, I believe, was the first settler. He came in the year 1816 erected mills soon after. His wife died at the age of nearly one hundred years. The first store was kept by Charles Brockway, on Findley Lake. In 1825 our first inn was kept at Mina Corners by Cullen Barnes. The first death, the mother of Nathaniel Throop, was in 1827. Nathaniel Throop was the first supervisor, elected in 1825; town clerk, Roger Haskell. In 1824-25 Mr. Throop lived on the farm now occupied by Newell Grover. He was the first postmaster and brought the mail on his back once a week from Mayville. Our second postmaster was Potter Sullivan; next, I believe, H. J. Spalding. First physician in town was Dr. Wilcox. He lived in a log house on the farm now occupied by N. Grover. The next was Alma. We have had eleven: Wilcox, Alma, Barnes, Truesdale, Pierce, Sanders, H. J. Rumsey, Philips, Green, A. F. Jenning, Bowen. The first militia training was held at the house of Z. Rickard, near Mina Corners, where Hugh Skellie lives. The captain's name was John R. Adams. We have six sawmills and one gristmill, owned by Robert A. Corbett. The water privilege at Findley Lake is second best in the county. We have eleven school districts, in which school is kept from six to nine months in the year. We have thirty-one road districts and the roads throughout the town are mostly in good condition. We have three meeting houses- the Methodist Episcopal in the west part of town; one at Findley Lake, called the United Brethren; and one near Mina's Corners that belongs to the Germans, Presbyterian. Peter R. Montague, a venerable gentleman who was born in 1809 and without whom a thorough history of Mina could not be told, said: With my parents I came from Middlebury, Wyomrng county, N. Y., in April, 1824, and took up land on lot 36, in an almost unbroken wilderness, with but a few settlers in town. As soon as our house was constructed I set about to make myself a bed with nothing but an augur and axe to work with. It was made out of round poles, and for the cord II used elm bark, quite different from the beds of the present time. In those early days the making of black salts was the chief industry, that commodity always bringing cash. Another young man and myself took a job to clear one acre of land, for which we received ten bushels of wheat and the ashes. The black salts made from the ashes we sold for twenty-one dollars. Those who had pine timber suitable for the purpose could shave shingles and get one dollar a thousand for them in trade at the stores. The price of eggs was six to eight cents per dozen; butter eight to nine cents a pound. Wolves were troublesome and sheep had to be guarded each night. The settlers trapped them by building a pen of logs about twelve feet square at the bottom, tapering to a smaller diameter toward the top till at the height of eight feet it would be but three feet across. With fresh meat used as bait the wolves were often lured into this area during the night, whence they of course could not escape. The two early industries were tanning and distilling. Benjamin Hazen had a few vats and tanned leather for many years. Another Hazen had a small distillery and distilled whiskey from potatoes and corn meal, which readily sold for twenty five cents a gallon. The following is from "Child's Gazetteer": "It is said that Nehemiah Finn made the first butter sent to New York from Chautauqua county, and John Shaver made the first firkin and owned the first dog-power of the county. The first birth was that of a daughter of Nathaniel Throop in 1823, and the first death that of the mother of the same individual, in 1825. The first marriage contracted was that of Isaac Stedman and Nancy Wilcox in April, 1826. Elisha Moore taught the first school in 1826 near Findley's Mills. The first store was kept in 1824 by Horace Brockway on lot fifty-two. " Early Land Purchases. 1811-September, Alex. Findley, 52. 1815-October, Alex. Findley, 42; Jona Darrow, 57 or 58. 1816-March, Geo. Haskell, 58. 1818-October, Aaron Whitney, 59; Robt. Haskell, 1821-May, Geo. Collier, 45; November, Nathan Leach, 44. 1822-September, (Hiel Rowley, 37.) 1823-August, John G. Acres, 38; September, Jas. Ottaway, 14; Wm. Tryon, 31; October, Silas Hazen, Jr., 23; Horace Brockway, 44; November, Jos. Palmer, Palmer, 11; John Barnes, 20. 1824-March, Elisha Morse. 39; Nathan Morse, 45; Edw. P. Morse, 45; April, Ezra Bisby, 26; Ezra F. Bisby, 26; June, Josiah Morse, 61; Elijah Heyden, 33; Chas. T. Bailey, 7; August, Edw. Chambers, 14; September Robt. Corbett, 2 or 3; October, Jas. Nichols, 3. 1825-March, Seth McCurry, 13; Wm. Craig, Jr., 22; April, Squire King, 7; Benjamin R. Teft, 60; Nath. Herrick, 7; May, Jesse Oaks, 27; Josiah R. Keeler, 3; Zina Rickard, 28; October, Nath. Throop, 6; Hugh Findley, 42; Oliver B. Bliss and Henry Bliss, 56; December, West Barber, 47. 1826-January, Hugh I. Skellie, 50, 51; April, Gideon Barlow, 16; June, Jas. Ottaway, Jr., 35; October, Horace Brockway, 59; Jesse Robertson, 62. 1827-March, James W. Robertson, 43. 1828-January, Isaac Fox, 46; February, Geo. Collier, 54; May, Theodore Whitten, 40; Cyrus Underwood, 4o; August, Wm. Tryon, 31; November, Jas. W. Robertson, 34. 1831-May, Daniel S. Richmond, 32; Geo. Pulman, 45. In 1875, of the original purchasers named in the foregoing, Aaron, Whitney, Hiel Brockway, Gideon Barlow and John W. Robertson were the only persons who owned the lands they bought from the Holland Company. Peter R. Montague owned the farm on which he settled with Ezra Bisby, his step-father, the original purchaser, in 1824. Alexander Findley, who is credited with having been the first settler of Mina, came from the North of Ireland about 1790 with his family. He first settled in Greenville, Pa., from where he made excursions as a hunter of wild game and lands that should suit his fancy as the seeker of a permanent home. Being charmed with the situation at the foot of the lake to which his name was later given, he selected and bought in 1811 land on lot 52 there. The Holland Land Company gave him the privilege of building mills. He began to build a sawmill in 1815 and in 1816 he made his permanent home there. In this year he completed his sawmill and soon after a gristmill. The water which first received the name of Findley's Pond later received the more dignified name of Findley's Lake. A settlement sprung up about the mills, which at this time is a prosperous village of some five hundred people, with several stores, a good hotel, a creamery, shops, two churches, an excellent school building and a newspaper. Young says: "By the construction of the dam (for Findley's Mills) several hundred acres of land were overflowed. The dam was several years later swept away by a June freshet and on the land which had again become uncovered, a luxuriant growth of herbage sprung up before a new dam was erected; and the subsequent decomposition of the herbage under the water caused sickness, and Mr. Findley was indicted for maintaining a nuisance." The litigation that was begun as a result was not concluded as long as Mr. Findley lived. About 1827 Findley built a carding mill in which he also dressed cloth. He and his son William served in the War of 1812. Of his eleven children three sons, Hugh B., Russell and Carson, became residents of Mina; Hugh B. and Carson, who inherited the mill properties, sold the upper site to Robert Corbett, who built new mills and stopped the sickness. James D. Findley, a farmer, son of Hugh B., served as postmaster at Findley's Lake. He and his brother, Henry B., served in the Civil War. Henry was killed June 1, 1864, at the battle of Cold Harbor; James D. lost his left arm, June 26, 1864, at Petersburg. Among the early settlers, Aaron Whitney bought on lot 59 in 1818; he lived there all his life and reared a large family. Jonathan Darrow, George and Roger Haskell settled in the same neighborhood, on lots 58 and 59, in the southwestern part of the town, previous to 1820. Aaron Whitney, who bought on lot 59, became a lifelong resident and reared a large family. Jeremiah Knowles, an early settler, was a surveyor and laid out the first road in the western part of the town. Zina Rickards settled on lot 18 in 1818, and Cullen Barnes settled in Mina about the same time. George Collier bought a farm on lot 45 in 1821 and long resided there. His son, George H., went to Oregon from Mina, where he became professor of chemistry and physics in the University of Oregon. In the next three or four years after 1821, new roads were laid out, bridges built, and talk was heard of school and "meeting houses." On the east side of the town, pioneer settlers were coming in from County Kent, England. James Ottaway, whose descendants held important positions in the county, came in 1823. Other settlers were Edward Buss, William and George Relf, Edward Chambers, Edward Barden and Thomas Coveny. The Sons of Edward Chambers were Joseph, Frederick, William and John. George and Isaac Reif, sons of William, were prominent in business and held office. In 1824 Robert Corbett came from Milford, Mass., and bought part of lot 3. The rebuilding of the Findley saw and grist mills at the village by him has already been mentioned. Robert A. Corbett, his son, succeeded to the mills, which were sold in 1864 to William Sellkregg. The officers elected at the first town meeting, held at the school house near Alexander Findley's, in April, 1824, were as follows: Supervisor, Nathaniel Throop; town clerk, Roger Haskell; assessors, Aaron Whitney, Zina Rickard, Otis Skinner; collector, Isaac Hazen; overseers of the poor, Alexander Findley, Orlando Durkee; commissioner of highways, Benjamin Hazen, Jeremiah Knowles, Potter Sullivan; constables, Isaac Hazen, Thomas Downey; commissioners of schools, Zina Rickard, Jeremiah Knowles, Alexander Findley; inspectors of schools, Daniel Waldo, Jr., Isaac Hazen, Samuel Dickerson. The first regular religious meetings were those of the Dutch Reformed Church in 1826, in the barn of Benjamin Hazen, with Rev. Mr. Bradley as the clergyman. Findley Lake Church (United Brethren) was founded in 1855 by Rev. J. W. Clark, pastor. The society built a church in 1862. The American Reformed Church was formed December 19, 1856, with forty-four members, by Rev. J. W. Dunewald. The original members included Lorenzo Buck, Adam Himelein, George Hammer, J. G. Barringer, Adam Merket, their wives, and Margaret B. Phifer. In 1859 a church edifice was built costing $1,400. The Methodist Episcopal church at the Corners was formed May 18, 1858. The first members were Thomas R. Coveny, Daniel Fritz and wife, Alexander D. Hoidridge and wife, Daniel Declow and wife, William Baker, Charity Chase, Lucy and Melissa Hoidridge, Jane Tryon, Lucinda Relf and Betsey Baker. The trustees were A. D. Holdridge, William Baker and Nehum M. Grimes. About the same time, the Methodist Episcopal church, West Mina, was formed. Among its first members were John and Alexander Skellie, Uriah and Azan Fenton, Henry F. and James F. Moore. A church was built in 1859 with capacity for seating three hundred. From the school offices it is noticeable that the pioneers were very particular about their schools. They desired that their children should have the best opportunities for education possible in such primitive surroundings. Considerable attention was paid to the making of roads, too, and keeping them in passable condition. In 1824 the vote in Mina for governor was: Young, 44; Dewitt Clinton, 20. From 1841 to 1845 the strength of the Whigs and Democrats was practically equal. A tie vote occurred for supervisor several times. At one election the vote for highway commissioners was 63 on one side and 64 on the other. The principal era for the building of sawmills and gristmills using water power in the town was from 1825 to 1840. The first steam mill was built by Davidson and Greenman in 1866, in the northwest part of the town, on lot 64. The firms of E. Chesley & Co. and Elmer Chesley & Sons owned it afterwards successively. The Chesley family in America is a very old one, dating back as far as 1633 in Dover, New Hampshire. The Chesleys of later generations have been prominent in New England and elsewhere to the present time. A. D. Hoidridge, an active citizen, built a saw, shingle and lath mill in Mina in 1872. Samuel Gill owned and operated a sawmill on lot i6, in the north part of the town near Ripley line, on Twenty-mile creek, from 1852 to the time of his death in 1879. The business was continued by his son, Samuel H. Gradually, as the timber was cut away, the fields and hillsides became pasture and meadowlands, the herds increased and dairying came into greater and greater prominence as the industry upon which the people relied. Supervisors- 1824-27. Nath. Throop; 1828, Roger Haskell; 1829, Nath. Throop; 1830-31, Otis Skinner; 1832, Elias E. D. Wood; 1833, Joshua LaDue; 1834-37, Joseph Palmer; 1838, David Declow; 1839-42, Valorous Lake; 1843, Jesse B. Moore; 1844, David Declow; 1845, William Putnam; 1846-48, Gideon Barlow; 1849, Cyrus Underwood; 1850, Luke Grover; 1851, Edward Buss; 1852, Gideon Barlow; 1853, Alex. Eddy; 1854, Ora B. Pelton; 1855, Geo Ross; 1856-57, Luke Grover; 1858, Edw Buss; 1859, David Declow; 1860-61, Geo. Relf; 1862, Thos. R. Coveny; 1863; Edw. Buss; 1864-65, Geo. Reif; 1866, Franklin Declow; 1867, Geo. Relf; 1868, Thos. R. Coveny; 1869-70, Henry Q. Ames; 1871, Franklin Declow; 1872, Geo. Relf; 1873-75, John E. Ottaway; 1876-77, Ebenezer Skellie; 1878-82, Dana P. Horton; 1883, John E. Ottaway; 1884, Dana P. Horton; 1883, John E. Ottaway; 1886, Dana P. Horton; 1887, Samuel Barringer; 1888-90, William A. Knowlton; 1891, Dana P. Horton; 1892-93, Alfred M. Douglass; 1894-97, Dana P. Horton; 1898-01, John A. Hill; 1902-03-04-20, W. Layerne Nuttall. In 1906-07-18-19, Mr. Nuttall was chairman pro trm., and in 1920, chairman of the board, that being his nineteenth year of continuous service as supervisor. The full value of the real estate in Mina was placed at $598,110 in 1918, and the assessed value was $469,259. Mina schools have kept pace with the other improvements of the town and are very efficient. Findley Lake is a charge of the Erie Conference of the Methodist Episcopal church, the same pastor also supplying Mina and South Ripley, the three churches having a membership of 110. The United Brethren Church was established at Findley Lake in 1855 by a missionary, Rev. E. B. Torrey; in 1857 Rev. John W. Clark was sent to the mission, and in 1858 a church was, organized. A church edifice was completed in 1860, which was succeeded by the present edifice in 1894. The original church was also used by the Methodists and by the Baptists. The Lakeside Assembly, on the west shore of Findley Lake, was founded in 1895 by Rev. C. G. Langdon, a minister in the United Brethren Church. Rev. Langdon lived in the parsonage on the east shore of the lake. He had succeeded in erecting a fine new church in the village, but as he sat in his study and looked out over the lake into the woods on the west side of the lake he thought of the large audiences that might be gathered in the shade, to rest and at the same time to learn. A plot of ground was secured of J. A. Hill, and Rev. Langdon taking an axe began to cut and clear away the brush and logs. After a short time Dr. F. E. Lilly, who lived at the foot of the lake, was taken into partnership with him. A large tent was secured, several small buildings were erected, lots were laid off and the first season announced. About forty lots were sold and preparations made for the erection of many buildings. Feeling the need of a strong company, the two owners of the new Assembly organized a stock company and secured a State charter, sold stock and planned for a permanent institution. Lakeside Assembly is modeled after Chautauqua in its system and is doing a good work for the section in which it is located.

Written by Patricia Ruth Major Miller, Adolphus's is my g-g-grandfather.

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Adolphus Babcock Birth: Feb. 26, 1800 Middlefield Hampshire County Massachusetts, USA Death: Mar. 15, 1872 Spanish Fork Utah County Utah, USA At the age of 21 years, Adolphus married Jerusha Jane Rowley, daughter of John Rowley, of Mina, New York. Adolphus built for his young bride a two room home of hewn logs with floor and doors made of puncheon. The chimney was built of sand and rock, and the corners were mortised together. He was in all the forced relocations from state to state with the earlier church members. From New York the Saints migrated to Ohio, from Ohio to Missouri. In Missouri he accumulated a large tract of land and was fast becoming financially independent when he was forced to sacrifice his property and follow the Saints to Nauvoo. It is interesting to note here the precaution he took in safe guarding his money along with the valuable possessions he had been able to accumulate in Missouri from mob theft and Indian raids while traveling from Missouri to Nauvoo and likewise from Nauvoo to Zion. He had an old common looking keg that he used to store pieces of iron, loose bolts, screws and burs from wagons that he had a chance to pick up. In this decrepit old keg, that looked more like a junk box than anything else, he carefully placed his hard-earned money and personal and household treasures Jerusha was not prone to part with. On arriving at Nauvoo, he took his closely guarded money and bought a large tract of land three miles out from Nauvoo called Green Plains, where a group of Saints settled because of more fertile soil. This is just another evidence of the sound judgment of Adolphus Babcock, because Green Plains was and is now the most fertile spot and more adapted for agriculture than any part of that vicinity. Here, Adolphus built a comfortable home and a large barn and again started breaking ground for spring planting. Adolphus, like the other Saints, conscientious and God-fearing, settled down to enjoy a little piece of mind and soul. He remained on his property in Nauvoo until the expulsion of the Saints February 16, 1846. During the night of February 15, 1846, a mob of men clamored on his front door to inform him that he would have 24 hours to gather his belongings and be out of his place or everything would be burned on his property. He,like hundreds of other Saints, could be seen hurrying from barn to house, gathering the necessities needed to maintain his family during the last long flight of the Saints to safety. They crossed the Mississippi River on ice and camped on the banks of the river until open weather. Adolphus settled in Salt Lake City for two years. In 1849, Brigham Young assigned Adolphus the charge of all the church's cattle. Adolphus moved his family to Bountiful and proceeded from Bountiful with his son, George, into Cache Valley, where he grazed and protected the church cattle from Indian attacks until President Young, fearing for their safety, sent word for them to bring the cattle in. The drive back with the cattle became much more hazardous than taking cattle out into Cache Valley three years previous. The Indians had become more fearless and bold in their attacks on the settlers in the outskirts of the small towns which had been settled by the pioneers, necessitating a constant guard over the cattle night and day. They returned with the cattle and turned them over to the church authorities in 1851. Went to California and foundgold in 1849. He left his family in the care of his oldest son, Lorenzo, and taking his son, George, traveled to California in pursuit of wealth. While in California, he came in contact with freighters from South America and purchased alfalfa seed and brought it to Utah with him. He was the first to introduce alfalfa growing in the state. He also brought fruit trees, including apples, peaches, pears, apricots, currants, grapes and plums. Arriving back in Bountiful in the year 1853, he found his wife Jerusha had died the previous September, 1850, leaving the family without parental care. Adolphus, on returning, gathered his children together and made a home for them in Provo for a year or two. While in Provo he encouraged and helped financially to build the Provo Woolen Mills. From Provo he moved to Palmyra,Utah. In 1856 the people from Palmyra were ordered by the church authorities to move to Spanish Fork where a fort had been built for protection from the Indians. He homesteaded 22 acres of land, built a home of adobe with walls 18 inches thick, each adobe being 12x6x4. The walls were plastered inside and out. Shingles for the roofing were made by his son, Lorenzo, and the nails were handmade on a hand- made forge by Adolphus, who was a blacksmith by trade. The rafters and joists were pinned together by handmade wooden pegs. Here he and his family lived until his death. Around the 22 acres of land he built a wall made of mud and straw, partitioning off a portion of ground where he started the first orchard in Spanish Fork. The sterling qualities of Adolphus's character can only be appreciated when we know of some of the courageous tasks he was called to do. His entire life from the time he was baptized into the church until his death was spent in serving his God, his church, and his community. Although a hardworking and saving man, his honesty and generosity to the less fortunate were strong characteristics of his life. I have selected the following experiences from among many that prove his generosity and fairness in dealing with others. During the settlement of Spanish Fork, one harvest season resulted in a failure for most of the pioneers. Fortunately, the crops of Adolphus were successful that year. Realizing the conditions of the less fortunate in the settlement, Adolphus made known to the settlers, through testimony, that those in need could share his wheat, molasses and meat. He urged the men to come and get food and seed with which to plant their crops. In exchange for the food and grain, the men worked with Adolphus in building the mud wall around his property. It is of record that had Adolphus not come to the aid of the settlers, many, if not all, would have been compelled to migrate to other settlements or perish during the hard winter. Adolphus and Jerusha's children were: Sophronia, Lorenzo, Eliza, George, Lucy, Permelia, Albern, John, and Henry, the youngest child, was born in Salt Lake City three months after they arrived in Utah. Dolphus changed his name to Adolphus. Many early records have the name Dolphus. Later records have the name Adolphus. Permelia Babcock Morgan Granddaughter Camp Spanish Fork Updated by Patricia R. Miller Great-great granddaughter Camp Red Hills Hurricane, Utah 1999 !CROSSING THE PLAINS: Babcock family members were in the Fifth Ten (led by Thomas Orr, Sr.) of the First Fifty (led by Joseph Horne) of the Second Hundred (led by Edward Hunter) of the 1847 pioneers, City on 29 Sep 1847. "Pioneers of 1847: A Sesquicentennial Remembrance," compiled by Susan Ward Easton-Black. I will tell the story of how I found the death record of Adolphus. I was visiting my grandson, who lives in Spanish Fork ,Utah. I went down to the Spanish Fork City Office Building to see where I could find land records of Adolphus Babcock. While there a young women was sitting at a desk and asked me if I was doing genealogy. I said yes. She said there were some old books that the University was getting ready to microfilm. She asked me if I would like to see them. We went up in the attic and in an old dusty corner was a note book called "The Book Of The Dead". This note book was an index to the large "Book Of The Dead". I asked her where this book might be. She did not know, but asked someone else and they said to go down stairs where the people of Spanish Fork pay their water or electric bill. I went down stairs and when I asked the lady she brought out a large very, very old original book showing the early deaths in Spanish Fork and the cause of the deaths, parents of the person and doctor who attended. I was very happy to see this book as it had the original source date for many Babcock's including Adolphus Babcock. I would never of thought to look there for such a book. Source: Spanish Fork Record Of Death, Book 1, Nov 13, 1853--Sept 18, 1939. Adolphus Babcock, Birth: February 23, 1800, Middlefield, Mass. Father: Daniel Babcock ,Mother: Jerusha Taylor, Church: LDS, died of Tyroid Fever, March 15, 1872, Doctor: Dr. Clark. Occupation: Farmer Written by Patricia Ruth Major Miller, Adolphus's is my g-g-grandfather. Family links: Parents: Daniel Babcock (1756 - ____) Jerusha Zereptha Taylor Babcock (1765 - 1828) Spouses: Jerusha Jane Rowley Babcock (1802 - 1850)* Hannah Chapman Raymond (1813 - 1898)* Children: Sophronia Babcock Carter (1822 - 1847)* Lorenzo Babcock (1823 - 1903)* Eliza Babcock Young Groves (1828 - 1868)* George William Babcock (1831 - 1899)* Lucy Babcock Wood (1832 - 1863)* Permelia Babcock Young (1837 - 1916)* Albern Babcock (1840 - 1917)* William Henry Babcock (1848 - 1928)* Hannah Alice Babcock Campbell (1859 - 1906)* *Calculated relationship Burial: Spanish Fork City Cemetery Spanish Fork Utah County Utah, USA Created by: Patricia R. Major Miller Record added: Aug 17, 2008 Find A Grave Memorial# 29104613

Bits and Pieces

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

The stories keep coming as I get more acquainted with our distant relatives. Here are a few more I heard after the book was compiled and at the editor/printer's. (Fall, 2017) From Sharon O'Brien, the lively, fun, later resident of John Babcock's house in Spanish Fork: Some grand daughters of John came to see the house they remembered and shared a few memories with Sharon, the owner of the house at that time. Grand daughter, Blanche, said she remembered how many times her grandmother Harriet (John's wife) would say, “Blanche, go home”. The words still echoed in her memory. Blanche's family lived near and loved to go to Grandma Harriet's after church. Sometimes there would be cousins to play with. Blanche's mother didn't like the steep stairs in Harriet's house and had a difficult time with them; so she avoided going up them. This only made it more exciting for the girls to go up and play uninterrupted. They had lots of fun up there. One year Blanche's mother, Susan Sophia, carefully made new dresses for Blanche and her sisters to wear to school that year. The sisters were excited when Susan let them wear the new dresses to church one Sunday just before school started. They had strict instructions to change out of the new dresses as soon as church was over. The girls didn't, they went upstairs as usual to play with their dolls. Cousins were over this time-even more fun. As they pretended all sorts of things, someone decided they should pretend to “nurse their babies” like real mothers do. The new dresses were not designed to accommodate that particular activity so they got scissors and cut holes in the appropriate places for “nursing” and went on innocently pretending at being mamas, never dreaming of the consequences of cutting holes in their new school clothes. Well there were consequences. Mother was beyond upset; she had spent a long time sewing those dresses and there was no money for more material let alone ready-made dresses. (I'm sure Blanche' heard the familiar words “Blanche, go home” more than once that day.) Susan had that pioneer ingenuity and came up with a solution. For school, the sisters wore their new dresses with little vests sewn onto the fronts of their dresses as if that's how they were supposed to be in the first place and life went on. (Sharon told me that her own father as a child during the same time was just as creative a child. He got his siblings together, made up plays, and charged the neighborhood kids admission to see them. Of course, admission was mostly a pretty rock or an apple picked off a neighbor's tree. One time he charged admission for rides on his donkey. The ride started in the yard and went into the home, around the kitchen table, and out the back door. Needless to say, his mother cut that venture short.) I took my sister and went to visit Don Yates in Mona, Utah. He is the grandson of Permelia and son of Permelia's daughter, Sumantha. Sumantha and family lived on the Young Farm in Mona after Permelia and Branch were gone. Don showed us where the farm was and how large it was. Then he told about Sumantha and his family. His stories were absolutely worth saving and sharing. Sumantha was known for being fearless. She wasn't afraid of anyone, even Indians. Her husband and sons were up on the east bench near the farm cutting wood and left Sumantha and girls at home for a few days. One of these nights, Sumantha heard things happening outside. Two men had drove up to the place in a little buckboard wagon. They pulled up to a haystack near the house and began pitching hay from it onto their buckboard. Sumantha wasn't about to let thieves drive off with hay they had worked hard to raise and harvest. She slipped out her back door and crept behind the sheds and around the back of the stack. There was a pitchfork right there and she picked it up and burst out from behind the haystack pointing the business end of the fork at the men and shouting “Now you start pitching that hay back on the haystack or one of you is gonna get hurt!” The two men did exactly what they were told and pitched the stolen hay right back on the stack. Then they drove away. No hay was stolen that night-not under Sumantha's watch. Don told us about passing the sacrament one unusual Sunday. The ward (congregation) was small when he was 12; twenty or so people. The church had no water in it and water for the sacrament was scooped out of a stone ditch that ran through the church yard with a special little bucket just for that purpose. It was well dented from many years of use. One Sunday the water trays were not available. Don doesn't remember why. So an old pioneer water cup was pulled out from the depths of a storage closet. It was made from metal with a handle on each side of it's round shape. Don thought it was about 8-10 inches high. Sacrament service was held as usual. Don was the one to pass the water, which is why he remembered the unusual water cup so well. He held it by both handles as he passed it between the rows of people. He was pretty sure some of the congregation only pretended to drink from the communal cup. Don thinks it was the last time the old pioneer sacrament cup was used. I was in an antique store in December of 2017 and noticed some Juvenile Instructor magazines. Knowing that Albern's daughter, Millie had submitted a story to it back in 1894, I wanted to see what the magazine looked like and how it was put together. There was a February 15,1895 issue. I looked through it and to my complete surprise, there was a story ending with her name and age. I stood there with my mouth open for a few minutes til I came to my senses. “Wow, that just can't be coincidence”, I thought to myself and immediately purchased it. I have often thought that all these stories seem to want to be told by our family that is already in Heaven. Why else would these little paths to them open so easily. Millie wrote a complete story of Daniel King's sailor voyage when he was converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Daniel was her mother's father so not a actual member of the family I have been collecting stories about. But it is part of my adventure and was written down by someone who is a member of the Babcock family. Millie received prizes for her submissions at least two times her writing was so good. Once “a handsome” set of books entitled Simple Bible Stories and another time a gilt copy of the LDS Hymn book. Millie didn't have a chance to leave a posterity behind but it is comforting to see that she did leave a part of herself in her obvious interest and talent in writing. It is fun to imagine what she might have done had she lived a full life. So I quote the story that wanted to be told. “How Grandpa was caught in the Gospel Net”. There is a shipping office on Tower Hill, London, England, and on April 10th, 1852, at that office grandpa, with twenty-three more men, signed articles of agreement to sail in the bark “John Walker”. These articles of agreement that they signed stated that they were to go first to Germany, from thence to New York, and from there to Quebec. By their agreement they were to receive about fifteen dollars per month. The sailors received one month's payment in advance, on the day they signed the articles, with which to lay in their sea stock of needles, thread, pipes, and other necessaries. The Sunday bill of fare of these sailors consisted of one and one-half pounds of salt beef, one half-pound of flour, which the cook makes into a pudding, with which they eat molasses, and one pound of sea-biscuits or hard bread, called by the sailors “hard tack”. On Monday they had the same amount of beef and bread, with boiled rice for dinner. On Tuesday they had they had one and one-fourth pounds of salt pork, with pea-soup for dinner. They had the same amount of bread every day. They had this same amount of pork three times a week, with pea-soup for dinner, beef four times a week, boiled rice twice a week, with “duff” and molasses on Sunday and Thursday. “Duff” is a sailor's name for pudding. They started on their voyage from London on April 12th. When they were ready to start one of the crew, Morris White, took sick, and another man from the sane boarding-house, named William W Baxter, came in his place. While going down the the river they were towed some distance with the tug-boat, by a rope three inches in diameter. The sailors were then called on the quarter-deck and placed in a row. Now comes the choosing. This choosing is done by the captain and the chief mate. The second mate is always in the captain's watch. The captain had his first choice of men, then the chief mate chooses one, and so on alternately until the crew is equally divided. These divisions are called watches. The captain's men are called the starboard watch, and the mate's men are called the larboard or port watch. The men are all busy now getting ready for sea. About six-o'clock they are at the mouth of the Thames River, and the tide and wind being against them, they drop an anchor and wait for the turn of the tide. The captain and officers go into the cabin for supper, and the sailors go into the forecastle for the same purpose. After eating supper they indulge in smoking, spinning yarns, singing songs, etc. While thus passing the time, this man Baxter changed the subject of conversation by asking each man what Church he belonged to. One professed to be a Catholic, one a Methodist, another a Lutheran: other were members of the Church of England. He then asked grandpa what religion he believed in. Grandpa told him he did not believe in any. “But wasn't you raised to some religion?” was the next question asked. Grandpa answered, “Yes, I was raised in the Church of England.” “Well,” asked Baxter, “do you believe that church is right?” “No, I do not,” Grandpa replied; “but I believe it is as good as any other, as I look upon all religions as a humbug, gotten up to keep poor people in bondage and pick their pockets.” Grandpa thought that this man was about to make fun of religious people, and asked him what religious body he belonged to. He answered, with a smile on his countenance, that he belonged to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints. Grandpa thought then that he was in for fun, having never heard of that religious body before, and he made up his mind to spoil his fun by turning a joke on him. He again asked the question, “What religious body of worshipers do you belong to?” and got the same reply and the same kind of smile. Right at this time the chief mate calls out, “Whose watch is it?” The Latter-Day-Saint answers, “Mine”, and went on deck two hours, that being the length of an anchor watch. Baxter's going on deck spoiled grandpa's chance for turning the tables. Baxter's duty was to see that the ship didn't drag her anchor, and also to warn the crew of any danger whatever. These watches are called anchor watches, because the ship is lying at anchor. There are also other watches: one is called the dog-watch, which commences at 4 o'clock, p.m. The second dog-watch commences at the end of the first, at 6 o'clock and ends at 8 o'clock. Then commences the sea-watches, which last four hours. The first is from eight to twelve o'clock at night; the second is from midnight to four in the morning, and so they change every four hours until 4 o'clock p.m. When the dog watches commence. One half of the ship's crew must be in readiness for any call during these watches. Most of the time during the watches from 6 till 9 o'clock is spent by the crew below enjoying themselves, singing songs, talking of their last voyages, and of the beautiful sights they have seen; also telling of the different countries where they have been. Sometimes, for amusement in fine weather, they would dance hornpipes and Irish jigs, to what ever music there might be on board. The dog-watches are arranged so that the same part of the ship's crew will not have eight hours watch each night, but that the larboard watch, having the first and last watch one night, will have the middle watch the next night, thus changing the watches every night. One man is at the wheel all the time, night and day, and is changed every two hours. Sometimes it is necessary for two men to be at the wheel in a storm. At night there is one man on the look out. In the daytime whichever portion of the ship's crew is on deck is kept busy repairing and tightening the rigging, cleaning and painting the ship, mending the flags and sails, splicing ropes, and many other things. At 6 o'clock every morning, at sea, whichever watch is on deck has to wash and scrub the decks. At the turn of the tide the noise made by the ships weighing their anchors can be heard all around. The first thing they do is to pull the anchor to the hose-pipe, then they haul it to the cat-head, which is a piece of timber sticking out over the bows of the ship. In this cat-head are sheaves, through which a rope is passed, the same rope going through a cat-block. This block is hooked in the ring in the shank of the anchor; the rope in them taken to the capstan, and the sailors place their capstan bars in position and commence walking around in a circle, one man singing a song, the rest joining in the chorus at the end of every line. They next fish the anchor by hooking a fish-hook in the flukes of it, thus bringing this part of the anchor on board. This fish-hook is not a common fish-hook, but grandpa says it is a hook made of iron, as big around as his wrist. The anchor is now made fast, and they are off to sea. In a short time they are at Bremerhaven, the port they are bound to, in Germany. The ship is now made fast with ropes to the quay. The next day after their arrival they commenced preparing for their passengers. On Sunday the Latter-Day Saint gave grandpa a couple of tracts to read, as he did also to the rest of the sailors. One was called, “The Only Way to be Saved” by Lorenzo Snow. The other was “Faith and Doctrines of the Latter-Day Saints, with Scriptural Proofs,” by the Prophet Joseph Smith. The Mormon also took a lot of tracts and went on shore, distributing them about the city. When he returned in the evening grandpa gave him the tracts back. To his question , “What do you think of them?” he answered, “They are good, and if the Latter-Day Saints carry out these principles they are certainly a good people.” Yet he was still of the opinion that religion was a humbug. This ended their talk on religion. William S. Baxter was promoted from an able seaman to second mate. This took him from the forecastle to the cabin. The former second mate was taken from there and placed on board another ship belonging to the same company. They are interrupted in their preparations for passengers, the insurance agents having condemned the ship as being unfit to carry passengers. The bunks they had made for the passengers were taken down, and the provisions they had taken on board for them were all taken on shore again, except a few potatoes. They then leave Germany direct for Quebec. As they have no passengers they have no need to go to New York. When out on the Atlantic Ocean, going into the forecastle, grandpa saw lying on a sailor's chest a small book, which proved to be the “Voice of Warning”. So he picked it up and looked at the preface. Seeing where Brother Pratt hints about the persecutions the Saints passed through, he thought it was a history of the Latter-Day Saints; and being fond of reading history, he put it under his pillow and went to bed. When grandpa did open the book and found the first chapter on prophecy already fulfilled, the second on prophecy yet to be fulfilled, and the third on the “Kingdom of God,” he was very much disappointed, but he thought he would read it anyway. He had read the Bible considerable in his youth, and in reading the “Voice of Warning” he saw that the quotations from the Bible, by apostle Parley P. Pratt, were correct, though in a different light than he had ever seen them before. The third chapter made him more sure that the religions of the day were what grandpa told the Latter-Day Saint they were, and if God had a people on the earth it must be the Latter-Day Saints. If He did not acknowledge them as His people then grandpa was still right that religion was a humbug. Now how was he to know whether the Latter-Day Saints were God's people or not, for all the different sects of the day claimed to be right, and one testimony was just as good to him as the other. Grandpa came to the conclusion that nothing but a testimony from God would satisfy him, and he had not the least doubt in his mind that he could get it. So he determined to ask for it. One evening, while still out on the ocean, he watched his opportunity, and when all were below except the man at the wheel, he went over the boughs of the ship, by the figurehead. Grandpa knelt down upon a board about four inches wide and two inches thick. That was all that was between him and the water. There he prayed to the Lord concerning this work. He had learned prayers in the Sunday School of the Church of England, one for every day in the year; he had also been taught the Lord's Prayer by his parents; but neither this prayer, nor any he had learned in Sunday School would answer his purpose. So he prayed in this way: “O God, Thou who knowest all men. I ask Thee in the name of Thy Son Jesus Christ, if this people called Latter-Day Saints are Thy people, and if Thou dost acknowledge them as such, wilt Thou make it known unto me, and I will unite with them; if not, I don't want anything to do with them, Amen. The answer came by a voice, which repeated these words: “Yes, this is my work, and this man, the Latter-Day Saint, was sent on board this ship to bring you to a knowledge of the the truth.” Grandpa said: “That is enough Lord, I am satisfied.” Let no man think this was imagination on grandpa's part, for he did hear these words as plainly as if spoken by one man to another. This shows how providential it was for the Latter-Day Saint to come on board the ship instead of the man who was taken sick after signing the agreement to go. When they arrived in Quebec grandpa applied to a Latter-Day Saint for baptism. He asked grandpa to put it off for one week. Grandpa did so, when he again made the request to postpone it another week, Grandpa told him, “No sir; I've put it off one week on your account, I now demand baptism at your hands.” The man replied, “All right, we will see to it tomorrow night.” Grandpa said, “That will do.” And well does he recollect what serious reflections arose in his mind in regard to what he was about to do. He came to the conclusion to forsake all and suffer everything for the Gospel's sake. He was baptized in the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, by a Priest, and as no Elder that they knew of was there at that time, he had to wait until they arrived in London, six weeks afterwards, before he could be confirmed. While the sailors are in harbor they have the same kind and amount of bread they have at sea, but their salt pork and beef were exchanged for two pounds of fresh meat each day, or one and a half pound of fresh vegetables. The second day after their arrival they commenced loading their vessel with timber. They had three tiers of timber on their deck, leaving very little of the bulwarks above the timber. Even their long boat on the main deck was loaded with pipe stays. Every place where one of these stays could be put it was crowded in. They also took on board two hundred barrels of flour, which was stowed in the cabin. They are now loaded, and start for London, requiring twenty-three feet of water to swim in. They have a fair wind, which is right “abaft” or behind. The wind continues in that direction all the way home. It took them sixteen days to make the trip to London. All went right until they arrived in the English Channel, when the ship sprung a leak, and they had to work at the pumps night and day until they arrived safe in the Commercial Docks of London. They were then paid off in August and bid the bark “John Walker” good-by. Millie Babcock, age 12 years, Spanish Fork Utah

Dolphus and Jerusha Family

Contributor: Rachelle Created: 3 years ago Updated: 3 years ago

Document contains roots and large history of Jerusha and Dolphus Babcock and their children; Lorenzo, Sophronia, Eliza, Lucy, Permelia, Albern, George, John, and W Henry. More details are in the next document, More Bits and Pieces. I have compiled a book with this text plus photos and documents. Requests; cbmax1@gmail.com Introduction and Sources I have been puzzled over the inconsistencies and conflicts in our different versions of the Dolphus and Jerusha Babcock family stories since I began reading them. So I decided to go on a hunt and see if I could clear up my questions. I looked for clues in the history that surrounds our family. The Babcocks were a part of the history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints almost from the start of the church itself. It wasn’t hard to find clues in the many journals, histories, records, and documents. In fact there is so much it is overwhelming and it has taken much, much longer then I imagined it would. During the course of my research, online resources have exploded. It is incredible what is at our fingertips. Most due to the work of many indexers. I have divided it into 3 parts; getting the Babcocks to the Salt Lake Valley, life after arriving, and the lives of the children. I have enjoyed the challenge of the hunt and how inspiring the faith of our pioneer families is. I am using the family story versions handed down from Emily Babcock Whitesides and copied by Agnes Babcock Cuyler. Another version was dictated by Judith Hannah King Babcock. Still another version is on FamilySearch and another that Pat Miller got from www.lifefromscratch.com. One more version is from Geraldine Hamblin Bangerter. I have not noted them. I refer to those histories as "our family stories or histories". Quotations I have noted are from “Journey to Zion” by Carol Cornwall Madsen (cc),” 500 Wagons Stood Still” , by Shirley N. Maynes(5w), “Daughters in My Kingdom” published by the LDS church(dk), and journals written by pioneers that are in the Mormon Overland Travel website. Other small quotations are from the histories of Dolphus’ children. I have used the Mormon Overland Travel records to document Dolphus ‘ family in the trek. There is a letter by Lorenzo written in 1897 and a letter written by John G. Acers in 1851. I have refered to Dominicus Carter’s history, too. My own conclusions and opinions are in parentheses. There are parts of histories written and contributed to FamilySearch by Reed Stanley Hall and Pat Miller. A large portion of Lorenzo's history comes from pension applications from the Mormon Battalion. I quote “The Quincy Miracle” by general editor Susan Easton Black and contributing editors; Glenn Rawson and Dennis Lyman and authors; Jeffery N Walker, Gordon A Madsen, William G Hartley, Alexander L Baugh, Richard E Bennett, Lachlan Mackay, Reg Ankrom. I got some help from author Jolene Allphin, who wrote “Tell My Story Too”. She gave me access to the Spanish Fork Ward Records. I also used an article from the December 2006 Ensign. Others sources are listed at the beginning of the separate histories as I have discovered them in the ongoing search. Nearly all of the histories about Jerusha, Dolphus, and their children talk about each person very seperately. As I have dug and researched, it is obvious that they stayed connected. They were often living in the same places for a while, moving away, and then coming together again. I have tried to help the reader see that they really lived connected and not seperately. I put the family stories together and then put them together with the local and church history. Now that this is all together the story is colorful and big. And so I titled it “Together”. I have put my heart into this and I truly love these people-my family. I hope you will, in some measure, come to know our precious family and laugh and cry as I did. THE DOLPHUS AND JERUSHA BABCOK FAMILY HISTORY Our Babcock roots are deep in America. The ancestors of Jerusha and Dolphus came to America early. Our namesake ,James Babcock, came in about 1621.Others-Deacon Samuel Fuller and his wife Bridget M Lee, Nicholas Denslow and his wife Elizabeth Doling, and the Filleys also came in those early years. Their desire to worship God the way they wanted was so important to them that they were prepared to leave all that they knew behind and set off into an unknown, faraway future. It is fascinating and compelling to see the life-changing moves our family has been willing to make, all for the sake of religion. Their desire to worship according to the dictates of their own conscience was that important. As you read what we know about Dolphus and Jerusha’s family, keep their dedication to God in mind and think about what is that important to you. Part One: The Beginning Daniel Babcock and Jerusha Taylor of Springfield, Massachusetts were married Dec. 4, 1787. Their children were Betsy, Louisa, Daniel, Jerusha, Permelia, Chloe, George, Thankful, Reodolphus, Jehiel, and Nathaniel. Rodolphus was born Feb 23, 1800 in Middlefield, Mass. John Rowley and Roxena Weston of Windsor, Connecticut were married about 1789. Their children were Timothy and Henry, Polly, Nathan, a boy, Jehiel, John, and Jerusha Jane. Jerusha Jane was born on June 30, 1802 in Schenectady, New York. Daniel was a very prominent member of the Congressional Church at Middlefield, but over a disagreement in the location of a new church building, Daniel left the church with his wife Jerusha and migrated to Mina, Chautaqua County, New York. Rodolphus took up some land there when he was 17, built a cabin and kept “bachelor’s misery” from 1817 til 1821 when he married Jerusha Jane Rowley. The cabin was a 2-room home of hewn logs with floor and doors of puncheon. The chimney was of sand and rock. (In 1912, the house had been moved several times. It is being preserved by the Chautaqua Educational Association of New York). In New York, Rodolphus and Jerusha began their family; Sophronia was born July 14, 1822; Lorenzo, the following year on Dec. 22. Eliza was born Aug.10, 1826 or 28; and George was born Feb. 7 1831. Lucy was born Nov. 1832. In Mina, Rodolphus who had changed his name to Dolphus, became converted to the gospel preached by the Latter-Day Saint Elders. He was baptized and confirmed by Elder John Gould in 1835. Dolphus was 35 and Jerusha was about 33 and had given birth to 5 children ages 13 to 3 yrs old. With baptism came the persecution that followed the early saints. They left Mina, New York and with the other early saints, they were driven to Ohio and from Ohio to Far West, Missouri. This was the western frontier of our country at the time and the saints hoped there would be peace here. Dolphus accumulated a large tract of land and was fast becoming financially independent. Permelia's birth was one of the puzzles I wanted to figure out. Some records say she was born in Nauvoo and some say in Far West. I wondered why there wasn't a better record. Looking at general church history makes me quite certain she was born in Far West. Permelia came to their family on Oct, 6 1837. The church was just getting settled and finding some order. Things were looking hopeful. I read more on Church history. "The Quincy Miracle", by general editor; Susan Easton Black tells the story of what happened to our ancestors during 1838-1839. It also explains why there weren't better records kept at that time. I quote: "October 27, 1838, Missouri Governor Lillburn W Boggs signed executive order 44, declaring, "The Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the state if necessary for the public peace." Thousands of Missouri militia forces were called out. They surrounded the Latter-day-saint settlement of Far West and demanded that the Mormons leave the state according to the Governor’s order. But where could more than ten thousand people go on a moment's notice as winter approached? They were already on the western frontier of the US. They couldn't go south: that would take them deeper into Missouri. West was Indian Territory and north was sparsely settled at best. The shortest... route... was due east across the Mississippi and into Illinois. (A few Mormons in Quincy gave encouraging words about the area). The mobs continued to prey on them, plundering, pillaging, raping, and burning. Joseph and Hyrum Smith were taken prisoner along with other Church leaders... Joseph Holbrook commented, "We found that there was no more peace or safety for the saints in the State of Missouri. If the Church would make haste and move as fast as possible, it would aid much to relieve our brethren who are now in jail as our enemies were determined to hold them as hostages until the Church left the state. Every exertion was made in the dead of winter to remove as fast as possible." qm This was a time of chaos for the Mormons, but in spite of the persecution that was being unloaded on them, life still had to happen. Sophronia turned 16 the summer before the extermination order was signed. In October, Dominicus Carter lost his wife "9 miles from Far West, Missouri. This puts Dominicus' family in the area of Haun's MIll Massacre and the Crooked River Conflict". He also lost his 2 yr old daughter, Sarah. With five small children to care for and the militia and mobsters on his heels chasing him from his home there wasn't even time to mourn his losses. He just had to figure out how to survive and care for his family. So it is not unexpected that Dominicus married Sophronia within weeks of his wife's death. She became an instant mother to Arlytia 9, Lucinda 7, Barrett 5, Sidney Rigdon 4, and Lydia 8 months. It was most likely a hasty marriage and there was no time for celebrations or honeymooning. They just focused on escaping and so their marriage date is recorded as "by December 1838" when the saints are walking through snow and frozen mud toward the Mississippi. Church history proves that the Babcocks were in Far West at this time. They were not there long enough to really settle down, however. This explains why Jerusha is shown being baptized on August 15, 1838 in some records but not all records. And it explains the sketchy record of Sophronia’s wedding in 1838. The Redress Petition that Dolphus signed also proves his presence there in 1839. By the way, Dolphus signed his name with a “D”. (I believe that is the best reason to call him Dolphus and not all the other variations of his name.) ( I am paraphrasing from the Quincy Miracle.)The Mormons had left "behind much of what they owned." In the bitter cold of January 1839, hundreds of Mormons traveled along a 200 mile trail east. None had adequate food, clothing or shelter. Some were barefoot. By February hundreds of refugees lined the west bank of the great Mississippi. They were trapped between the terrorizing Missourians and the impenetrable river. And so they waited for the river to freeze. Across the river, citizens of Quincy watched the miserable drama of human suffering. The "Quincy Whig" documented "A large number of families are encamped on the opposite bank of the Mississippi... If they had been thrown upon our shores destitute, through the oppressive people of Missouri, common humanity must oblige us to aid and relieve them all in our power." Braving the dangerous ice-filled river, Quincy residents brought blankets and supplies. The river alternately froze and thawed. In late February the water froze solid. The Mormons struggled across the slick clear ice that was not thick enough for a team of horses. Eleven year old Mosiah Hancock ran as the ice broke up behind his feet. Compassion overwhelmed the citizens of Quincy. They took in the homeless refugees and ministered to their suffering at this desperate time. And they would show compassion again later for their fellow man. Orville Browning of the city leadership declared, "Great God! Have I not seen it? Yes, my eyes have beheld the bloodstained traces of innocent women and children...who have traveled barefoot through frost and snow, to seek refuge from their savage pursuers." When Quincy couldn't provide from their own stores, they sent out pleas for assistance as far away as Washington DC. In April 1839, Joseph Smith escaped prison in Missouri and found his way to Quincy and family. Joseph spent two and a half weeks in and around Quincy, happy to be among those who loved him and had compassion on his people. He held a conference at a Presbyterian campground. Business included a decision to send Sidney Rigdon and other Church leaders to Washington DC to begin petitioning the federal government to force Missouri to compensate the Latter-day-saints for their losses in that state. Hundreds if not thousands of redress petitions were gathered and submitted. qm (It is this petition that Dolphus recorded his own losses which he never recovered.) At the Church History Library in SL, a copy of the 1839 redress petitions state: "Because of the losses suffered by the Saints in Missouri due to persecutions by mobs, Joseph Smith initiated an appeal for the redress from the Federal Government . During 1839, affidavits were collected from the men and women who had experienced these losses. These petitions along with the First Memorial to Congress were then taken to Washington DC in an attempt to get either Congress or President Martin Van Buren to recognize the seriousness of the Saints’ condition and get recompense. The first petition failed to bring relief, however. The Babcocks sacrificed and followed the Saints again. In Dolpus’ affidavit, it says they lost “first for moving to the state, $125.00; for property lost in the state, $1,280.00; for leaving state by mob, $10.00; total $1,415.00." (They probably lost more than that.) The Quincy miracle didn't stop with this initial rescue. Seven years later, in 1846, when the Mormons left Nauvoo to travel to the Rocky Mountains, it was the citizens of Quincy who rallied. They loaded barges with food, clothing and supplies, sailing upriver to aid the poorest of the Mormon exiles. "The legacy of Quincy will forever endure as one of great, human compassion...The deeds of Quincy's Citizenry will live forever... Joseph Smith summed up the deed of Quincy in a resolution in Nauvoo "...that the citizens of Quincy be held in everlasting remembrance for their unparalleled liberality & marked kindness to our People, when in their greatest state of suffering and want." He also said, "Quincy, our first noble city of refuge...should not be forgotten."qm The conflicts in Sophronia’s age and time of marriage along with the confusion surrounding her sister, Eliza’s marriages that are in the different versions of our family stories have always made me a little crazy when I read it. This is the biggest mystery I set out to solve. I looked at different geneology websites including” familysearch”. I compared our family records, and church history. (I feel confident that what I have written here is as correct as it can get without a personal interview with the sisters.) We know that Sophronia was born on July 14, 1822 so the youngest she could have been when she married Domincus Carter was 16 if she married him in 1838 in Far West. There is no way she could have been 14 at marriage or at death like one version states. Dominicus’ history adds witness to the marriage in 1838. His records that I got from the family history library in Nauvoo, show his marriages, temple endowment, picture, and some life history including part of his mission journal. In it, he marries Sophronia “by Dec 1838”. (He really did need some help. But then!...) He married Sylvia A. Mecham in March of 1839, and then Mary Durfee in January, 1844. Then he went on to marry a total of 9 wives! He was quite the polygamist. They made their way to Nauvoo, Illinois. It is interesting to note here the precaution Dolphus took to safeguard his money and valuable possessions from mob theft and Indian raids while traveling from Far West to Nauvoo and likewise from Nauvoo to his winter quarters and on to Salt Lake. He had an old common-looking keg that he used to store pieces of iron, loose bolts, screws, and burs from wagons that he had a chance to pick up. In this decrepit old keg that looked more like a junkbox that anything else, Dolphus carefully placed his hard earned money and personal and household treasures Jerusha wasn’t prone to part with. On arriving in Nauvoo, Dolphus took his closely guarded money and bought a large tract of land 3 miles out of Nauvoo called Green Plains, where a group of Saints settled because of more fertile soil. This is evidence of the sound judgement of Dolphus. Green Plains was and is now the most fertile spot and more adapted for agriculture than any part of that vicinity. Here, Dolphus built a comfortable home and a large barn and again started breaking ground for spring planting. Dolphus and the other saints were conscientious and God-fearing. They settled down to enjoy a little peace of mind and soul. On January 28, 1840 Albern was born. Two years later on the 13th of December 1842, John was born. Dolphus and Jerusha now had 8 kids. Sophronia(married to Dominicus Carter), Lorenzo, Eliza, George, Lucy, Permelia, Albern, and John. In 1844, Dolphus’ oldest son, Lorenzo, married Amy Ann Marble in Nauvoo. Sophronia’s husband , Dominicus Carter,departed for a mission leaving her with his children and 2 other wives. In June, Joseph and Hyrum Smith were killed. Albern’s daughter, Emily, said, “I remember my father tell of seeing Joseph and Hyrum at the windows just before he was martyred, and of the terrific thunder and lightning storm that followed. Also, I remember sitting on the floor of the old adobe house in front of Uncle Lorenzo as he told of watching Joseph and Hyrum at the windows and seeing Joseph martyred. He told of the terrific storm that followed, frightening all. He took Albern by the hand and ran with other people to shelter.” Some versions of our stories say Albern was the one sitting on the floor listening to his brother, Lorenzo. (Don’t you think that an event like the murder of Joseph and Hyrum Smith was important enough that Lorenzo and Albern talked about it many times? I think that Albern and Emily were probably not the only ones to sit on that floor and hear about the shocking event that was embedded in their memories and gave them a resolve that was set in stone forever after to follow the prophet Joseph. Lucy’s history said the prophet’s murder left a deep impression her. She also remembered well how Brigham Young was called to continue. Brigham Young was the president of the Twelve at the time but was not sustained as prophet for a few more years. “Church leaders had talked about moving the Saints west since at least 1834. As persecutions intensified, it became apparent they would have to leave soon. Church leaders had hoped Nauvoo might remain intact as a “temple city” and “a corner stake of Zion”. It was not to be. Mobbers began burning Mormon homes and barns in outlying areas in 1845. Families sought shelter in Nauvoo. The time was clearly at hand to give substance to the vision Joseph Smith had in 1832 of that undefined destination in the West. At the final conference in Nauvoo in the fall of 1845 everyone voted to sacrifice once again for the gospel. But many wondered how they would be able to do it”ccp.16,17. ( Winter was a difficult time to be making preparations for such a long journey. Remember they didn’t have the resources that we have in our world now; a sporting goods store and a local grocery with the money to buy needed supplies would have made the whole thing easier. They had to make and find things themselves. And they did.) “By November 1845, Nauvoo was bustling with preparations. Captains of hundreds, fifties, and tens were called to lead. Wheelwrights, carpenters, cabinetmakers, worked far into the night preparing timber and constructing wagons. Members were sent east to purchase iron. Families collected food, medicine, and supplies. The evacuation was planned for April 1846. But as a result of threats that the state militia intended to prevent the Saints from going, the Twelve and other leaders met Feb 2 and agreed it was imperative to start immediately. Brigham Young had planned to lead them but the temple kept him in Nauvoo. Others started without him on Feb 4. The Saints were anxious to get the blessings of the temple to give them strength for the journey. By the end of November, the upper rooms of the temple were finished, they were dedicated to Lord, and people began coming to get their endowment. “More than 5000 Saints thronged the Nauvoo temple after its dedication so they could receive the endowment ordinance before embarking on their journey into an unknown future. They came to the temple all day long and long into the night. President Young wrote that they were so anxious to receive their ordinances that “I have given myself up entirely to the work of the Lord in the Temple night and day, not taking more than 4 hours sleep, upon an average day, and going home but once a week.” dkp.29 Sisters, Sophronia and Eliza were the first of the Babcock family to go through the temple and get their endowments on Jan 10,1846. It could have been possible that this was the time when Eliza was secretly married to Dominicus Carter or Brigham Young. Dominicus was back from a mission as temple records show he got his endowments in Dec. 1845. And Brigham Young was right there in the Temple. There are many conflicting stories from family histories and not enough documentation to prove anything. Dominicus Carter’s records show nothing of Eliza, only Sophronia. Dominicus is recorded as marrying Mary Durfee in January 1844 then leaving on a mission in May. He was gone til at least February 1845. His next recorded marriage is to Polly Miner in October 1851 in Provo, Utah. ( If Domicus and Eliza were ever married, I believe it was very brief because of all the clues in church history timeline and the Mormon Overland Travel records. In the 'Emer Harris notebook' description there is a reference to Eliza Babcock Carter during the Nauvoo time. That is the only clue I have found that gives Eliza that name. Only Eliza can tell us for sure someday when we see her in heaven.) But it is clear that she was not 14 at any marriage like one of our family stories say. She was born in 1826 or 28. That means she was 10 or 12 in 1838 when Sophronia married Dominicus and she was 17 or 19 when she went through the temple in January of 1846. (I feel much better about the “14 yr old” thing from that story, don’t you?) Lorenzo and Amy Ann went through the temple on Feb 2, 1846 and Dolphus and Jerusha followed on Feb 3,1846. Dolphus remained on his property until the expulsion of the Saints in Feb. During the night of the 15th, a mob of men clamored on his door and informed him he had 24 hours to gather his belongings and be out of his place or everything would be burned on his property. Like hundreds of other Saints, he hurried from barn to house gathering the necessities needed to maintain his family during the next long flight of Saints to safety. They had no idea how long that journey would be but they did the best they could. According to our stories, on February 16, 1846 Lorenzo and his parents’ family crossed the frozen Mississippi River and camped on the banks of the river til open weather. “The first to leave Nauvoo crossed the Mississippi at Sugar Creek, 7 miles from Nauvoo, awaiting church leaders, most of whom, ironically, were still in Nauvoo. At first it was quite pleasant. During the almost month-long wait, however, the Saints began to lose their studied cheerfulness. A heavy snowfall and dropping temperatures , leaking tents and wagon covers, and memories of warm rooms took a toll on the goodwill. The arrival of the legendary William Pitt and his brass band was a welcome sight and lightened the moods of the disheartened exiles. Wallace Stegner observed “Music was their gift and their blessing, an expression of their oneness in the hostile wilderness.” Brigham Young arrived mid-February. His powerful presence and rousing oratory worked the miracle. He reorganized the companies and created an orderly network of communications and responsibility. Faith was stirred and courage renewed.ccp.25,26 As they continued to wait for the rest of their leaders, Amy Ann gave birth to a son. George was born February 27, 1846. Records show baby George’s birth at Nauvoo, suggesting Amy Ann might have stayed in Nauvoo til the baby was born. Even though the first group of Saints started their journey from Sugar Creek on March 1, it was said in many trek stories how the coming and going of the companies were not exact. People trickled over the river, they visited other companies, went back and forth from Nauvoo to camp visiting and getting more supplies and lingering. There were mothers who stayed in the comfort of their Nauvoo homes to give birth before leaving with the Saints. Lorenzo could have helped his parents get over the river and then returned to Amy Ann. They could have left with the initial group on March 1 or lingered and caught up later. It happened often. “ "On March 1, now several thousand strong with 500 wagons, began to roll." At first there were primitive roads to follow. It was uncomfortably close to Missouri’s north border but the exiles needed the settlements. They made many trips into them to exchange possessions and labor for supplies as railsplitters, cornhuskers, and handymen. The biggest job was feeding the numerous cattle and horses. It required many bushels of grain daily to keep them from perishing til spring when grass would begin growing. ccp26 There aren’t many stories of pioneer animals. There were pioneer oxen, pioneer horses, pioneer milkcows, pioneer chickens, and pioneer sheep. Their sacrifice was very great. They starved, they got sick and died from drinking poisoned water, they pulled incredible loads and then died from overwork, they got lost ,mired in mud and stampeded by buffalo. They suffered right alongside their owners. Because animals were so vital to the pioneers ability to live and travel it is easy to understand why blessing an ox was just as important as blessing a person. A Br Nielsen recounted walking between the oxen in the company and blessing those in trouble and then moving on. A certain pioneer later in southern Utah lost his ox when it finally gave out on the top of the last ridge before their destination. The man cried like a baby. They had been through so much together and were a team and friends. These pioneer animals often needed more care than the Saints could give. But they made a valiant effort. A fellow pioneer George Whitaker wrote of a typical experience of going to trade for food for the people and animals. “We traveled to St. Joe about 150 miles. We would trade as we went along, if we saw something we wanted. Sometimes we would go out of our way to farmhouses to see if they had any wheat or corn for sale. So many of our brethren had been down before us that the country had been pretty much cleaned out for grain. Br. Cain offered a saddle for sale. They said it was the very thing they wanted. They gave him 60 bushels of corn for it. We got our corn(for the livestock), we also got wheat, took it to the mill and had it ground into flour, bought 2 cows, did our trading, loaded up our wagons and started back.”ccp.84 “For nearly 4 months this vanguard company trailed on to the Missouri River. Later companies made the same trip in 4 weeks. For a third of those months, they faced drenching rain or heavy snow. Eliza Maria Partridge Lyman put it this way. “Tuesday, 10 (March)- Made preparations, but it soon commenced raining which hindered us from going. It rained all day and is muddy. Wednesday, 11- still raining. Thursday, 12,- the ground is very muddy, we cannot step without getting over shoetop in mud. Obliged to move camp. Friday, 13- Washing, etc. Saturday, 14- ironed etc. Br. Lyman and Rollins killed a mess of squirrels which were very good. Sunday, 15- weather fine but wind very high, can hardly keep our tents right side up. Monday, 16- Friday, 20- some trading, a child died, visited another camp to see my sister, another death, high wind, more trading. Saturday, 21- all well weather fine, traveled 9 miles. Sunday, 20- awoke and found it raining. Traveled 18 miles and camped. Monday, 23- There was so much rain fell during the night that we were obliged to lay by this day. Hailstorm in afternoon. Our men took a job of splitting rails to trade for corn. Tuesday, 24- The rain continues to pour down upon us with some snow. The ground very muddy, almost impossible to get about without getting mired. April Saturday, 4- Arose from our beds sometime in the fore noon and found them and our clothes quite wet with rain. After breakfast, we commenced to dry our bedclothes by the fire in the rain where one side got wet while we were drying the other.” Ccp.92-95 In the 25 days covered in this segment of Eliza Lyman’s journal, they actually traveled a total of 2 days making 27 miles in almost a whole month. The people were so unprepared when they left Nauvoo that they were spending most of their time trying to get prepared and survive the weather. When the Saints had gotten about 145 miles from Nauvoo, they stopped to fulfill their covenant to help the Saints that would follow. With no McDonalds or Conoco around they had to create a resource. They could not afford to wait any longer to plant food and forage crops. So they stopped in a pleasant spot with lots of trees and began to build and plant. Only a third of the Saints came west that spring. Most of them were l in Nauvoo still trying to get prepared and come. They would come in groups throughout the summer ending with the poorest who were forced out in the fall. This stopping place was an important rest stop that would turn into winter quarters for some. “At a place the pioneers called Garden Grove workers immediately began to lay out a settlement, erecting fences, building cabins and planting crops for those yet to come. In 14-15 days they had a settlement built. Prospects for those staying here for the 46-47 winter were grim. Provisions were not going to last past April. Those who chose not to stay in Garden Grove, moved on about 40 miles. The next place was called Mt. Pisgah by Parley P. Pratt.”ccp.26-31 While the crops were being planted and cabins built there was some real estate being sold back in Nauvoo. “Property Transactions in Hancock County” records Dolphus purchase of 40 acres in 1840 and 5 acres in 1843. Then the book records the sale of the same land in April and May of 1846. It might be possible that Dolphus or some one he sent took care of that sale. But his presence was not required. (I hope that Dolphus got the money from that sale but there is no way to know from this information.) Dolphus paid $210 and $25 for the land. They sold for $160 and $35. “Mt. Pisgah, like other Winter Quarters settlements were organized into wards and branches with bishops and others leaders. It became a hub for Saints coming and going. Other Saints settled in the Council Bluffs area in the middle of June. Brigham Young was hoping to push on from this point to the Rockies. He began to recruiting young healthy men to accompany him. This plan was abandoned. Captain James Allen from the US Government appeared requesting a volunteer company to go west as soldiers. The request seemed ludicrous to most Saints. At this time they felt little loyalty to their government. Sarah Rich said,” A more cruel demand could not have been made upon us at this time of our affliction and poverty. Some even feared a plot: that after taking away the best men, the rest of the camp could be destroyed on the plains, or if the Mormons refused to cooperate, the army would attack and put an end to Mormonism. “Few of the pioneers knew that Jesse C. Little had been negotiating in DC for financial help. This recruitment was not what they hoped for but Brigham Young agreed to it seeing the benefit of the much needed soldiers pay. It would also transport at least 500 people west. It was no easier for the volunteers to leave than for the their families to see them go”.ccp.33-34 Lorenzo is said to have been one of the first to enlist. He moved Amy Ann and 4 month old George to Council Bluffs and marched away in Company “C” on July 16. I am including the story of his time in the Battalion in a separate section. “Amy Ann and baby George were left destitute, like many others, on the prairie in new land. With help from church members she moved across the Missouri River to Winter Quarters. Amy Ann eventually became ill with the dreaded scurvy. Fanny Taggert came to care for her. Fannie’s husband was a musician in Company “B” to the Battalion”. 5wp. “She also had no home of her own, but she resourcefully exchanged her nursing services for housing moving from place to place as she was needed”.ccp.34 “Amy Ann had been laid up for 2 months and her limbs were so drawn and the muscles and cords so tight that she could not stand on her feet nor walk a step. Fannie managed some vinegar and pepper and rubbed the mixture on Amy Ann’s legs and feet. She got some “relaxing oil” and a pair of crutches and Amy Ann was soon able to get around again. “The house they were living in was sold. However, the Charles Lambert family lived nearby and the opportunity came up for the two women to stay in the house. Mr. Lambert was working in Missouri and sent for his family to come live with him. Sister Lambert gave Fannie and Amy Ann the privilege of occupying her house til their husbands returned”.5wp. The winter quarters were full of single parent families. If the husbands weren’t on missions or with the Battalion, they were off trading in the Missouri settlements getting much needed food and supplies using what little they had to trade with; usually their time and labor. The wives did what they could to keep their families well, fed and warm. Many sisters took opportunity to meet together often- sharing their love and sympathy with each other. They prayed and sang together. “The Missouri Encampment was as a scene of suffering and hardship that winter. Even the well-prepared soon exhausted their provisions as they shared their goods. The people did much bartering in Missouri and Iowa Settlements, trading whatever they could find. Disease was a major enemy to the Saints, especially the scurvy. With diets short of fruit and vegetables, they were vulnerable to this unrelenting, often fatal disease. Cholera, dysentery, and ague took their toll on health and lives as well. In spite of the 82 per thousand death rate in Winter Quarters, there were “many happy seasons”. Schools, a mill, a ferry, and Council Houses were built. Even a postal system was organized. They held dances, concerts, plays, and celebrations. Meetings and conferences drew the Saints together often. (During this time of high stress and too many deaths, I think the people had emotions that were very near the surface and raw. The gatherings were more than satisfying. They were a lifeline of encouragement-peptalks, if you will.)Since there were many women whose husbands were in the Battalion or serving missions or gone ahead to prepare the way, they learned to depend on each other and be independent. They gathered often and helped each other. Martha Pane Thomas traded 2 lanterns for cloth and dye, she made dresses to sell. She wove over 200 yards of cloth and 40 yards of wagon covers. Lucy Smith and Sarah Allen taught school. And Fanny Taggert loaned out her nursing in exchange for a place to stay. The women also relied on their faith and received blessings of food and help from others. “A significant event happened during this time. For more than 3 years, the Church was governed by the Quorum of the Twelve. The new First Presidency was finally sustained in a celebration held in a log tabernacle in Dec 1848.”ccp.41-47 Dolphus and family as well as Lorenzo’s family both came as far as Mt. Pisgah. Winter Quarters records show the families here and daughter, Eliza, with them. Obviously she wasn’t with the husband she had married in Nauvoo. Our histories say in 1847, Eliza’s husband came to get her while she was living with her parents at Mt. Pisgah. The company her husband was traveling with arrived in Utah before the AO Smoot Company did. In the Mormon Overland Travel Records, the Brigham Young Company was the only one that arrived before the AO Smoot Company in 1847. The Company Dominicus Carter came with didn’t get to Utah til 1852. She must not have stayed with her husband this time either. Ward records have her listed with her parents at winter quarters. It is possible that she could have been married to Brigham young by now too. The Overland Records have Eliza listed as one of the members of a Brigham Young Company that left Winter Quarters June 5, 1848. Dolphus is thought to have said of the secret marriages,”If I could go back, I would”. One of our stories says Dolphus said these words over Sophronia’s grave. Couldn’t be. Sophronia died 2 months after her parents and siblings left Mt. Pisgah. They were two-thirds of the way to Salt Lake Valley when she died. Lorenzo’s personal letter I have included clears that up. Sophronia may have settled in a settlement called Carterville. After surviving the difficult winter of 46-47, she had prospects of being able raise a child she gave birth to! She had been married 9 years. On August 26th of 1847 she and her baby died. A clue to her location and death is in a journal entry from Nancy Naomi Alexander Tracy. She mentions "Roxena Mecham Carter was buried beside my boy,Laconius who was also by Sophronia Babcock Carter. Before we left (Carterville) this place there was quite a little burying ground” ccp.407-408 Part Two:ON TO THE VALLEY There are 2 words I would like to redefine according to the way our ancestors used them. First: Pioneer-the only people the Saints called pioneers were those in that first group of people in Brigham Young’s company that arrived in the Valley the end of July 1847. Second: Winter Quarters- There was a town called Winter Quarters but there is another definition. The Babcock family’s winter quarters was Mt. Pisgah. Sophronia’s was Carterville. There were people who winter quartered in Garden Grove, Kanesville, and the actual town of Winter Quarters. The winter of 46-47 in scattered settlements had not been kind to the refugees from Nauvoo. Not enough food, not enough shelter, too much disease, too many starving animals and death left them anxious to leave it behind. And in spite of the unknown they began. In the words of George Washington Hill who was desperate to change his gravely ill wife’s circumstances, “You may think this was a very hazardous undertaking; well ,we thought so too, but the stakes were terrible we had to pay.”ccp.361 The very brief description of Dolphus’ family being assigned to AO Smoot’s Company and mix up of Mississippi and Missouri rivers has caused me a lot of head scratching. Then looking at Mormon Overland records and seeing the family in a different company altogether, really confused me. After lots of reading, I understand it just fine now. Dolphus probably was assigned to AO Smoot when they left Nauvoo. After the 46-47 winter in Mt. Pisgah, their winter quarters, they were reorganized like everyone else. AO Smoot/Sam Russell Company, Edward Hunter/Joseph Horne Company, and AO Smoot/George Wallace all left the plain 10 miles west of Winter Quarters within 2 days of each other. Then they reorganized themselves 150 miles later because 600 wagons traveling together just wasn’t practical, even if it was safe. The saints did not arrive in the Valley all at once either. So even though Edward Hunter’s Company is recorded as arriving in the valley on September 29, 1847, the journals tell us that Joseph Horne’s Fifty arrived on October 7. It makes sense when you get a picture of what went on during that long, long trek. It was too many to arrive all at once. “Brigham’s Company was first. All who began the western trek were required to take a basic store of supply and gear. Some were able to leave soon after Brigham Young’s first band of pioneers. Others took a year or more to acquire the required store needed for the long journey”. ccp.313 Dolphus was obviously one of the blessed first who was able to get his family the provisions they needed. They are recorded in the Edward Hunter/Joseph Horne Company. It was also known as the John Taylor Company. Their band of pioneers left the Elkhorn River on June 17, 1847 with a covenant in their hearts. Doctrine and Covenants 136: 1-11 gives exact instructions to prepare and organize themselves and help each other along the way with a promise of blessings to come. I quote parts of many pioneer journals but there are 3 that are more significant than the others. George Whitaker was in the same Fifty as the Babcocks and so was Mary Isabella Horne. She was also the wife of Joseph Horne, the leader of the Babcock’s Fifty. Sarah Pea Rich was in the same company. Dolphus and Jerusha’s family didn’t keep a journal that we know of, but their traveling companions who did tell about the remarkable adventures the Babcocks were a part of. Here is part of George Whitaker’s story. “On an open plain 10 miles west of Winter Quarters, we were organized into companies of hundreds, fifties, and tens (and that’s wagons being counted not people). Edward Hunter was the captain of our Hundred. Joseph Horne was the captain of our Fifty. John Taylor traveled with our Fifty. We had six full companies numbering over 600 wagons. We traveled about 15 miles and came to the Elkhorn River. We found the river to be too high to ford it. We made a raft and put the wagons over that way and swam the cattle. It made it very tedious and took some days, but we all got over. “We were now coming to some Indians who, we had been told, were hostile to the whites. It was thought best to travel six wagons abreast so our train would be only one hundred wagons long instead of six hundred. We had 3 cannons with us, and we prepared ourselves as well as we could. It was very unpleasant and disagreeable as the dust would blow from one wagon to another, but we traveled in this way for safety. We then traveled 4 abreast for a few days, then two. About 150 miles from Winter Quarters we crossed the Loup River and a good many of the brethren were dissatisfied with the slow progress. A council was called by Br. Pratt and Br. Taylor. It was concluded that we should travel in Fifties, so that we could travel faster. We traveled much better and with more pleasure.” The land Dolphus and family crossed held many new experiences for them. “The plains were a place of wonder on every side. Sarah Mousley wrote, ”In the midst of a wide spreading prairie…bedecked with varied flowers a beautiful grove, we thought it had been trained by a skillful hand to suit the taste of the possessor instead of being in wild domain of nature, my heart exclaimed how beautiful ,how wonderful thou art, sweet earth.” When the land changed to the magnificent geological formations of Devils Gate, Chimney Rock, etc. the emigrants were surprised to find they had to travel days not hours after they first sighted the giant rocks to get to them. The first sighting of the Western mountains seemed to elicit a more cautious response from journalists. Though ominous at first sight, they would eventually frame their valley home.”ccp. 314-17 “Adding to the wonder of the hauntingly beautiful land were its native inhabitants. Sometimes the Indians stole horses and cattle, bargained for wives, and set off stampedes. Others traded buffalo robes, moccasins, and other useful items for food and trinkets. Sarah Rich traveled in the company with Dolphus and Jerusha. She expressed the fear and nervousness felt by the women. “They traveled with some little fear of trouble with the Indians. Our companies would generally camp close together and sometimes fire off the cannon, as those Indians were very afraid of the big gun. At one time an arrow was shot into a calf, which showed us that Indians were prowling around near our camp. Several times, men out guarding stock at night would see Indians lurking around. Our men would drive our stock into our wagon corrals for safety. It was truly a dangerous trip; and had we not been convinced by the power of the Lord, we could never have undertaken such a journey.ccp.377-78 Joseph Horne’s wife, Mary Isabella, remembered 2 incidents with Indians. “While traveling along the Platte River, a large band of Indians were camped on the opposite side. Many of them, men, women, and children swam across the river and Pres. John Taylor and his wife invited Mr. Horne and myself to go meet them. They wanted to trade buffalo robes for corn and provisions. One of the Indians took a fancy to my baby girl and wanted me to trade her for a pony. When I refused, he brought another pony, and another, until finally he went to get a fourth one. He seemed so determined to have her that I was afraid he would steal her from my arms. Just about this time the rest of our company came up. While the brethren were trading with the Indian men, the squaws and children were going among our wagons, stealing cooking utensils or anything they could get a hold of, so that when we camped that night many useful articles were missing.” Sara Alexander in her later years said, “I shall always be glad I have seen the Indians in their primitive grandeur, in their own country where they were kings and dominated so royally. I pity their humiliation in compelling them to become “civilized”. So much has to be crushed in the making of a nation.” Ccp. “Sharing the dominion of this western land were the vast herds of buffalo. The animals, at times, bore down so rapidly on the wagon trains that the pioneers hardly had time to take cover or hold their own oxen as the immense herds rushed toward them.ccp.319 George Whitaker’s telling of buffalo that the Babcocks and the rest of the Fifty saw is especially good. “We were now fairly into buffalo country. There were tens of thousands of them, the hills perfectly black with them. We had all gone into camp one evening very close to the river, and had all retired for the night except the guard which we always placed around the camp. A noise was heard from the other side of the river, like distant thunder. We all got up, not knowing what it was. We soon heard splashing in the water. Then we knew what it was. It was a large herd of buffalo crossing the river. We were frightened as they were opposite our camp. We were afraid they would run over our camp and stampede our cattle, which would have caused a good deal of trouble and taken us some time to find them. We all got down by the side of the river and shouted to try to turn them. They turned a little on one side of our camp and passed by without doing our camp any harm. The buffalos travel in this way from one place to another in very large droves and nothing can impede their progress. After our fright we all went to bed.”. “Sarah Rich wrote this, “While passing through the buffalo country, we did not travel very fast for all the menfolks seemed to want to kill a buffalo, for that was a new sport to them.” They often jerked the meat and put it in sacks for their trip. Sarah said, “It was the sweetest meat I ever tasted. The children grew fat on it.”ccp. 379 George Whitaker completely disagrees with Sarah. He said,”The buffalo beef is not so good as tame beef, being hard and tough.” “The common task of night guarding challenged the men’s endurance. Richard Warburton wrote “No one knows unless they have had the same experience. What a trial it was to drive team all day and guard at night. The loss of sleep was something fearful”. When they added hunting, wagon repairing, yoking and unyoking balky animals and herding livestock to their days’ tasks, emigrant men discovered a new dimension to the meaning of long-suffering. “ Women trudged alongside their men in long skirts and petticoats, which were never designed for the western trail. Against all odds, they tried to maintain some domestic amenities in the routine of camp life. But cooking over open fires, washing clothes and bathing in cold streams, birthing on the move and living without privacy were strong deterrents. They depended on buffalo chips for fuel when wood was scarce. Sarah Burbank knew just how to use them. She would dig a hole in the ground, put the skillet in the hole with a tight lid on it, and then lay buffalo chips on the lid and ignite them. “It baked the bread just right” she found.”ccp.322-323 At Chimney Rock, Sarah Rich’s husband “wrote his name on the rock with red keal, also my name and the names of his other wives that was with us and our children’s names. Saleratus Lake was a beautiful lake, as white as snow, and was pure saleratus, which we would cut out in large cakes, which lasted us a long time to make bread with.”ccp. Saleratus was also deadly. George said,” We had to cross an alkali desert, about 40 miles, to get to Independence Rock on the Sweetwater. When we got to the Sweetwater, quite a number of our cattle died from the effects of drinking alkali water, as there was no other for them. We were not aware it would be so injurious to them or we could have prevented them from drinking. The cattle would swell up and die in a little while. A great many were sick, but recovered after we had given them something that would operate against the poison. It crippled us in our teams.” Let’s reflect on 7 yr old Albern at this point. (He and his little brother, John (5 yrs) probably had different memories of the trek than the grownups.) Our family stories tell that they had rode on a little donkey for many weeks of the journey. One morning, to their great sorrow, they found the little burro dead. Most likely the little burro was worn out from too little food and long hard days like many other of the pioneer stock. It wasn’t long til Albern and John and their friend, Ples( their mother thought the name was Pleasant) Bradford found another ride with the rest of the small boys in camp. They took turns riding on the old cannon that had been brought along for protection. The cannon was nicknamed “the old sow” because it had been dug up by an old sow near Nauvoo. This cannon is now in the Church History Museum in SLC. (Note: Ples’s full name was Pleasant Sprague Bradford. He was 4 yrs.old.) Albern also remembers Bishop Hunter, the captain of the Babcock’s company, carrying him piggyback across streams as they went along. Albern gave piggyback rides too. His sister, Permelia, said that she got a few rides on her little brother’s back during the trek. While Dolphus and family continued, Lorenzo was already in the Salt Lake Valley. He had gotten injured while marching with the Battalion and left his Company with the Willis Sick Detachment. They recuperated in Pueblo, Colorado. In the spring of ‘47 he traveled from Pueblo, Colorado with his fellow soldiers to the Salt Lake Valley. The first pioneers had arrived a few weeks before. Brigham Young had brought what extra men he could get with his first bunch of pioneers to get things started for all who would be following in the next months and years. These men started planting crops, building a fort, etc. They were joined by the men from the Sick Detachments of the Mormon Battalion. They must have been anxious to get back to the families they had left in hard circumstances back in Iowa. The threat of accidental injuries and death was always present. I am sure they wondered if they would find each other alive. In a letter Lorenzo wrote in 1897(I left his spelling as he did it) he wrote, “I arived in Salt Lake Valley with Captain James Brown in August 47 soon after the Pioneers. I was mustered out of survise of the United States Armey. The next day after ariving in the Valley. Then I went to work with the Pioneers. I helped build the Fort for the first Emigration that came in 47. I helped make the first Irrigating ditch that was made in Utah by the mormon people. President Young’s council to all was to build the fort. ready for putting on the roof before anyone started back to Winter Quarters. (At the end of August) President Young started the Ox teames and one hundred and thirty or forty men back to Winter Quarters boath Pioneers and Battalion men. Our Provisions ware pretty well nigh exhasted. Two weeks ahead of the tames, we was to stop when we got down in the Buffalo Country and hunt and prepare some meat for President Young’s Company. The first Company we met was JD Grant at Pacific Springs sought pas. P.P.Pratt further on we met John Taylor. I had the plasure of meeting my Father Mother and brothers + sisters-Dolphus Babcock. Further on we met AO Smoot all we met ware feeling well and rejoicing to think they ware going away from mobocracy and tyrants.” While Lorenzo was catching up with his parents and siblings, Mary Isabella Horne and George Whitaker wrote what else took place when the coming and going groups met. “Bishop Hunter and John Taylor suggested a feast to be made in honor of the Pioneers. A nice fat steer was bought from Bishop Hunter, the dishes were brought out. It was snowing which made cooking over a fire difficult. But the storm passed before dinner. The brethren cleared away the brush and improvised a rude table. And I can assure you we had a feast indeed, spiritual as well as temporal. The next morning the sun shone brightly. We bade the Pioneers good-bye, they going east and we going west. It was not long before the snow was gone. When we came to some grass we stopped to let the cattle graze. They had not got anything to eat all that day before because of the snow.” “Lorenzo’s company traveling east reached Winter Quarters in the late fall. When he found Amy Ann “ the reunion was very special. Lorenzo had been gone sixteen months. He was relieved to know his wife had not perished and Amy Ann was overjoyed in the fact that her husband had made it back to her. However, this happy occasion had one sad overtone… their little boy had died of canker just a few weeks before Lorenzo arrived in August 1847.” “Lorenzo found employment in Missouri in order to obtain the necessary equipment consisting of a wagon, oxen and enough supplies to make the journey to SL Valley. Two children were born in Missouri at this time. William Lorenzo on July 15, 1848 and John Rowley on Feb 10, 1852.”5wp.51 Dolphus and Jerusha’s family arrived in the Valley about September 29th,1847. Dolphus was 47, Jerusha 43, George 16, Lucy 14, Permelia 9, Albern 7, John 5. John said that they used their wagon as a home for a time. A son, the last of the children, was born in that wagon box home on July 15th 1848. He was named William Henry. There would be many, many more emigrants and many, many more stories to come in the next 20 some years, but none like the unique circumstances and covenants of the 1st emigration of 1847. George Washington Hill summed it up “I believe today that notwithstanding we had to suffer so much for even the commonest necessities of life, that the first immigrants were the best satisfied and grumbled the least of any immigration that has ever come to Utah. We were all poor alike, we were all hungry alike, and we were all naked alike and we could each sympathize with the other.”ccp. 373 PART THREE: LIFE IN UTAH Jean Anderson, a new found cousin of mine, who is married to a descendant of Lorenzo discovered a thought provoking record of minutes taken from a High Council Meeting. It is found in “Our Pioneer Heritage”, Kate B Carter, DUP, SLC, UT, 1966 page 9. During that first winter of 1847-1848 in the Salt Lake Valley, the people were supposed to stay in a fort that had been built by themselves and the Battalion members who arrived in August 1847. The Fort was too new for an organized law system, so the Church’s High Council kept order. Some minutes from High Council meetings are found in the book “Our Pioneer Heritage” by Kate B Carter. The clerk was Albert Carrington. His notes are very brief. Each subject that was discussed at length usually had only a sentence written about it. Committees were appointed to draft laws, lay out farm land, build a mill, and locate a cemetery. They made the decisions on how much someone was to be paid for work; disagreements over animals were resolved and the speed at which a horse could go inside the fort was decided. They even created rules for dogs. Companies were reorganized and ward boundaries made. Building with logs was tightly controlled because the was such a limited supply. Most homes were adobe giving the settlements the nickname “doby” cities. On page 96 and 99, a Babcock is mentioned. “A decision was made that Br Babcock deliver to Pres Smith an ox of his which Babcock had picked up on the road and worked and then refused to deliver, without pay for driving the animal.” 2 days later: “John Young reported that William Weeks, Heber Kimball, Lorenzo Babcock and others had gone north with their families and were not considered by himself and Pres. John Smith to be of good faith.” ( Clerk Carrington has Lorenzo confused with the Babcock that is there, which is probably Dolphus. Lorenzo had been in the Valley first working on the fort. When he left to retrieve his family, his dad arrived in the Valley within a few weeks. So a Mr Babcock was nearly always there. Of course there were disagreements. It is a lot to expect of anyone to follow one man’s direction when they were capable of taking care of themselves. But obedience was the best way to prove strong and true to a way of life everyone was new too. Unity was imperative if a foundation for a new way of life was going to work. Mr Babcock and Weeks and Kimball weren’t bad. They just wanted to choose their own place to live even if it didn’t agree with Brigham Young’s plan.) A month later: “The marshal reported that Weeks and Kimball were nearby and Babcock and Gardner were near the Warm Springs with Gardner’s brothers and father. I had never considered how the people kept order in untried land with a new religion combined with a variety of people. They had a desire to follow the gospel in common with each other but they were still individual people with differing ideas and views. It must have given Brigham Young a lot of gray hair and sleepless nights as he and the Twelve did their best to manage every day conflicts and life in general. Dolphus and Jerusha lived in the Salt Lake Valley long enough for W. Henry to be born July 15, 1848. On the very same day, they got a grandson many,many miles away in Missouri. Lorenzo and Amy Ann had a brand new son, William Lorenzo. Lorenzo was working there to earn enough to get back to Utah with his wife Amy Ann and their children. Things get a little fuzzy for a bit. All I have are some histories telling that Dolphus and son George took care of the church cattle. I haven't found any information contradicting or supporting this story. "Dolphus moved his family to the Bountiful area. From there he and his son George were put in charge of the Church's cattle in Cache Valley. Here they watched over the grazing and safety of the cattle. The Indians began to be quite troublesome and Brigham Young sent word for them to bring the cows back to Davis County. One history says that Dolphus wanted to stay in Cache Valley where the feed was good and Brigham Young ordered the cows home a second time and Dolphus complied. The other version just says that the drive back with the cattle became much more hazardous than taking the cattle out to Cache Valley 3 years previous had been. The Indians had become more fearless and bold in their attacks on the settlers in the outskirts of the small towns, necessitating a constant guard over the cattle night and day. They returned with the cattle and turned them over to the church authorities in 1851." The details of the next few years come from a letter written by John G Acers to Jerusha's brother John, (Acers is John's brother-in-law). He includes a quotation from a letter Dolphus wrote to him on May 3rd 1851 from Salt Lake City. This letter is currently located at the Oregon State Library. It is brief and patchy but the only thing that resembles an autobiography I know of. Read the letter then you can agree or disagree with what I have added to it. The blank spots are illegible. "I started from Missouri with 9 cows and a yoke of 3 yr old steers and a wagon worth $50. Pick-up things to the amount of $40. Came to the Great Salt Lake Valley ____ City, where I found my wife and 4 children..." Missouri? What was he doing in Missouri and when? Dolphus' son, Lorenzo was there working. Many other Mormon settlers found work there, especially around St. Joseph which is south of Winter Quarters on the river. Maybe Dolphus went back there to work too. If he took his son, George, with and got back to Salt Lake after his daughter, Lucy, married William Wood in March of 1849, then there would have been 4 kids to come home to-Permelia and her 3 little brothers Albern, John, and W. Henry. The letter;"With one cow, one yoke of oxen, one old broken waggon, went at my old trade, hard labor. Jerusha wanted to move to the Sand____ Valley 150 miles south. I agreed to work here for grain and she and George and William Wood should move..." The Sand_____ Valley is very likely the Sanpitch Valley. From Sanpete County History online it says: "On June 14, 1849, Ute Chiefs Walkara and Sowiette went to Salt Lake to ask Brigham Young to settle a group of his people in the valley of SanPitch about 125 miles south. Brigham Young sent a party to explore the area in August. Then Brigham Young called Isaac Morley and George Washington Bradley to organize about 50 families to go. They arrived in Nov of 1849. SanPitch was the name of a Ute Chief which was changed to Sanpete. The letter: …she( Jerusha), George, and William Wood "went as far as Utah Valley. Stopped and built a log house. The Indian War commenced and they moved into the fort. I went up there and built a house..." From utah.com I quote from the history of Provo. "Provo was settled by Mormons in 1849. It was the first Mormon colony outside of the Salt Lake Valley. The Mormon settlers had problems with the Indians that lived in the area. The Ute Indians were very aggressive towards groups of people who tried to move in and take over their land. The new settlers built the town into a defensive fort called Fort Utah. It was built as a stockade." They had to live in a manner that was close to a state of war from the time that the first settlers came to Provo. After the first year, the settlers had to build homes outside the fort to make Provo a more comfortable place to live." Fort Utah was later moved to the North Park location where its museum now stands. In Dolphus' letter, he says William Wood was with Jerusha and George. Records say that William and Lucy had a child in Dec 1849 in Provo. That date and place fit with the Acer letter. Some of our histories say Dolphus helped get Provo Woolen Mill going. But this time in 1849 is the only time our histories have Dolphus in the Provo area. The Provo history says the mill was built in 1870-72 and financed by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Dolphus was in his last two years of his life then. The letter: "...Indians killed about 50 head of cattle, 40 Indians was killed, war over, snow 2 ft deep. My cattle poor, moved back to the Salt Lake Valley. Camped 3 weeks. Started to move north 40 miles. Jerusha was not willing to live with me. She promised 3 times to George and me to go to California and then gave it up. William Wood, my son-in-law, and I started to move north 40 miles." Dolphus' desire to move 40 miles north of Salt Lake puts him in the Bountiful area. From Davis County History it says: "Davis County's great agricultural potential was recognized by the pioneers. During the winter of 1847-48 several families moved livestock into that area for winter forage. By 1850, a number of farms dotted the south half of the county." If Dolphus' cattle were poor, this area was a good move to make. Incidently, there were several places settled within 2 years of the Saints arrival in the Salt Lake Valley. Brigham Young didn't waste any time in getting the region settled. Bountiful was settled in 1847, Ogden and West Jordan in 1848, and Kaysville, Provo, Manti, and Tooele in 1849. Lucy and William continue to move with Dolphus and Jerusha. Dolphus mentions William several times. The births of their children tell us where they were. The letter: "...Jerusha started 2 or 3 days before. Went to the City, told Brigham Young she expected that I was going to move to California and take my two little boys with me. I talked in the winter of going there but had entirely given it up. Lucy thought that her mother had not her right mind." The phrase "I talked in the winter of going there"... gives the impression that winter is behind them. It is most likely 1850 now in Dolphus' narrative. Spring would be the best time for them to move north. I am not commenting on the next 26 lines expressed by Dolphus, except that he talks of being " back at my waggon". He comes to the conclusion that "all I had to do was go to the gold mines" for his way to deal with the trial he was facing. He finally ends up with only the wagon he talks of and a yoke of oxen. The letter: "...I went and bought one and a half bushels of meal, one and a half of corn. Bid my children good bye. Left one whimpering, he could not speak. Went to Bear River, 80 miles. Had three pheasants, two snipes, one crane,3 or 4 halfpints of milk. Stopped there at least two weeks..." At least 2 histories talk of Dolphus in Cache Valley caring for the church cattle. Dolphus doesn't mention anything about it in his letter but that doesn't mean it didn't happen. It might mean he just didn't mention it. Could the job guarding church cattle have happened now? Maybe. He was there for at least two weeks. The letter: "...Weighed 17 ___ ___, sold my steers, paid passage to California to ride all the way that the going was good." Dolphus is now on his way to the 'gold mines'. He encounters deep snow and the group he was with had to pull the cattle up the mountains. They started crossing the 20th of June and got over the last of July. Dolphus says he worked and earned. He was at Sutters Fort, Sacramento City. 'Saw people from every clime." In at least one of our histories it says Dolphus purchased alfalfa seed and brought it back with him to Utah. It says "he was the first to introduce alfalfa growing in the state. It also says that, "he brought fruit trees, including apples, peaches, pears, apricots, currants, grapes, plums." The histories also say that he was there in 1852 when he got all those things. In the W.Eyre history, it says Dolphus went in 1849 and stayed for two years. Could Dolphus had brought all those seeds and plants and equipment to haul it? Not with the money written in the letter. Maybe he went again in 1852 like some histories say. According to the letter, Dolphus was gone months- no more than a year. Acers quit quoting Dolphus at this point and paraphrases. The letter:"...Came back to Bear River, heard of Jerusha's death. She died on the 25th of last September. Came back to the Salt Lake Valley. Found his children in a little shantie with his little English Son-in-Law." (It makes me smile when William is refered to as the "little English son-in-law". I wonder if William kept his accent. It must have been quite endearing.) According to Lucy and William's records, their 2cd child was born in May 1851 in Centerville right next to Bountiful. John Acers writes that Dolphus wrote his letter on May 3rd, 1851. So if Jerusha died last September from 1851 and they are in Bountiful/Centerville, then the stories of Jerusha dying in 1852 in Spanish Fork are wrong. When I went and looked at Jerusha's grave it also says 1850. Dolphus' description of how he was separated from his children changes the way the histories record that part of the story too. Our stories tell of Dolphus coming back to wife dead and children scattered among families in the community. The families would not give the children back without the consent of the bishop. The whole mess offended George so much, he left the church. But according to Dolphus' letter, they were separated before he went to California and weren't divided among other families. They were found with the "little English son-in-law" when he returned. The sentence "Had to go to Brigham Young twice and rent some land before he could get his children" has me believing Dolphus wasn't happy with Brigham Young's conditions. It also illustrates Brigham's strong hand, Brigham was not going to change his mind. One family story relates that George was deeply offended over his family situation when he and his father returned home. In fact, he was so upset he left the Church and the valley entirely. George must have been offended with the way Brigham Young handled things. He later married Mary Ann Eason August 19, 1866 in Hardecrable, Colorado. The family histories say that George went with his father. Dolphus doesn't mention him in the letter, but once again that doesn't mean George wasn't there, it just means George wasn't mentioned. Dolphus does write that Jerusha "had promised 3 times to George and me to go to California" and George was 19 in 1850, certainly old enough to do men's work. So you can make that judgment for yourself as the reader. (Dolphus is a single father now. He has lost his wife in difficult circumstances and now his right hand companion has left him too. Dolphus must have had quite a heartache over Jerusha and George. Permelia was 13, Albern 11, John 8, and little W. Henry 2 or 3. Maybe Dolphus just wanted to gather what he could of his family and just settle down.) It's time to catch up with Eliza. She did not come to Utah with her family and siblings back in 1847. In all the Winter Quarters ward and branch records she is shown with her father and mother and now she is shown in the Brigham Young Company departing WQ on the 5th of June 1848. There were a massive 1220 people when it began. With such a crowd, you can imagine the number of oxen and horses being harnessed every morning and the inevitable chaos of gathering everyone and all their stuff together along with the cattle herds and other animals. What a daunting scene! Elkhorn River had to be crossed 27 miles from the beginning of the trek. This took a few days. Journal entries from Mormon Overland Travel mention accidents regularly taking place during river crossings. A note from the D. Wilken Company in 1853 brought to my attention in a "find a grave" entry from Pat Miller, says Eliza may have been the woman who was in the 1848 B.Y. Company. She broke her collarbone at the Elkhorn River. She may have returned to WQ and delayed coming to Utah until 1853 with the David Wilken Company. An excerpt from Richard Ballantyn's journal writes: "Sat 29th- We have laid by and made some improvements on our wagons as we could not get across the river. Br. Brigham has come on from WQ. In crossing the river this morning a wagon got into the river and injured a considerable portion the Brother's provisions. Yesterday one boy belonging to Br. Webb was drowned in the Horn. His body was found about 2 hours after. Today another boy has been drowned. These unfortunate circumstances have occured in consequence of the parents allowing their children to amuse themselves on the Brink of the River. For three days the brethren have been crossing the Horn on a Raft of Logs. This river is about 8 rods wide, and the country around here is very beautiful. Yesterday a wagon run over the body of Eliza Babcock, by which her collarbone was broke, and the granddaughter of Sister Angel was also run over by a wagon." Mormon Overland Travel say Eliza's age was 19 in 1848 and 24 in 1853 in the companies. Those ages match our Eliza. By the way, she is listed as Eliza Babcock on both campany lists, no married names. Back to Dolphus and children. It's 1851, Jerusha is dead and buried in Salt Lake Cemetery. Sophronia is buried back at "Carterville" WQ in Nebraska. Lorenzo and family are in Missouri growing and preparing to try at coming west again. George seems to have left the area, possibly east. Lucy may still be in Centerville, soon to move to San Bernardino California. So Dolphus and children with him make a much smaller family of five. In the Spanish Fork Library there is a old history book called "The History of Spanish Fork" by Elisha Warner, published in 1930. Dolphus and family were an integral part of the town's history. I am quoting and writing from that book. It paints such a picture of what adventures Dolphus and his family encountered in the next 15 plus years. Here we go: "Geo. A Hicks came to Spanish Fork in 1853. He lists the following as having located here in 1850 and 1851: D.O. James McFate, Charles Price, Jesse Payton Holt, Adolphus Babcock, Samuel Thompson, and J.B. Hawks." When Dolphus and children arrived in Spanish Fork, the first irrigation had begun. A branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints was organized. The first settlers grew a good crop that first year and that was very important to their survival. The church branch gave order to the community and life began to settle down to a more orderly routine. "During the summer of 1852 it was felt that there were sufficient settlers on the Spanish Fork River to form a town, George A. Smith of the Quorum of the Twelve, of the Church, located the townsite of Palmyra, about three miles west of the present site of Spanish Fork. The name, Palmyra, was in honor of Palmyra, New York. Under the date of December 26, 1852, George A. Smith wrote to Samuel W. Richards, editor of the Millenial Star concerning the new settlement of Palmyra, as follows: "I have sought out the location of the city of Palmyra, along the Spanish Fork River in Utah County,and procured a survey of 360 lots, containing 100 rods of ground each, a temple square of 13 acres, and four school squares of two and one half acres each. The streets are six rods wide. The public square commands a view of all the settlements of Utah Valley except Mountainville (Alpine) and one of the most delightful spots in the mountains. The plot was surveyed in July and the first house was built on it in August. A good adobe school house thirty-five feet by twenty-two feet inside has been erected." At this same time, Dolphus' oldest son, Lorenzo was finally able to make it to Utah with his family. Lorenzo and Amy Ann left Kanesville, Iowa with their two little boys, William Lorenzo and tiny 4 month old John Rowley. They arrived in Salt Lake in September with the Isaac M. Stewart Company. They stayed in the Salt Lake Valley for a while. "Immigration in September and October into Spanish Fork was sufficient to raise the population to 75 families. A petition was then presented to the Territorial Legislature by Silas Hillman, authorized representative to the new community, for a city charter, which was granted. Wesley W. Willis, a member of the Mormon Battalion, was chosen as first Mayor, with Samuel Pollock as secretary. George H. Hicks writes of the conditions of the times: Bishop Stephen Markham deserves special mention for his fatherly care over the people in supplying them with seed grain. He took all the money he could raise of his own, and all he could borrow, and bought seed for us,loaning it to us until after the harvest." In July 1853 in Springville, Walker, whose name in the Ute dialect means "yellow" was camped near the headwaters of Spring Creek with his band of about 100 families. They were hunting, fishing and begging. An Indian named Shower Socketts (Blue Rabbit) began to abuse and beat his squaw when he wasn't satisfied with the trade she made of trout for flour. A James Ivie stopped the abuse by hitting the Indian over the head with his own gun. Unfortunately, the blow did more than stop the beating, it also killed the Indian and the Walker War began. A messenger came to the settlement of Palmyra on the night on July 18th with news that the Indians were on the warpath. Volunteers from around the area marched to Payson where they were joined by volunteers from Springville and Provo. The Indians had moved further up Payson canyon and the settlers were afraid the Indians would head into Sanpete Valley and attack the white people there. Under the command of Colonel P.W. Conover of Provo, the troops followed the Indians. The Indians throughout the entire central portion of the territory were now all stirred up and took every opportunity to commit depradations on the settlers wherever they could. On July 23rd, Clark Roberts and John W. Berry were dispatched to Salt Lake City with messages to Ganeral Wells asking for further orders. When they passed through Palmyra, they found the citizens camped in the school house. During November, Indians had stolen about 50 head of stock. The Indians drove the stock up Spanish Fork Canyon and spent the winter camping there and eating the beef. All the settlers from the upper settlement (Spanish Fork) had moved to Palmyra for the winter, not knowing when the Indians might attack them. Dolphus' son Albern helped stand guard that winter when he turned 14. Officials went through the state giving food and gifts to the Indians and the war ended in a peace council during the spring of 1854. In the midst of the Walker War, guess who finally made it to Utah?...Eliza! She finally made it into the SL Valley on September 9th 1853 with the David Wilken Company. It was a much smaller company than the 1848 Brigham Young Company she tried to come with. A 128 wagons came. In one of our family stories it is told that "Eliza hid in a wagon filled with people returning from conference in SLC. When she was dicovered, it was too late to take her back so they took her with them to Spanish Fork and to her family. One day her husband came to get her and she ran and hid in an outbuilding. Her father went to get her but the husband decided not to force her to go with him. So they were separated. Online "brigham youngswives" it talks about 3 young women who divorced B. Young. "After the Church began recording divorces in 1851, MaryAnn Turley and Mary Jane Bigelow obtaines divorces. Eliza Babcock in 1853... They were under twenty when they married B Young and had never became a part of his household. They all remarried and remained in Utah. Eliza is listed as #47 wife. (I wonder if Dolphus was glad to have a woman in the house again to put a stop to the bad cooking.) A favorite story I heard my own Daddy tell was when Dolphus was "batching" with his sons. It was a favorite joke among the men that one morning the oatmeal was unsalted because no one remembered to do it. The next morning the mush was very well salted-4 times. One day they cooked rice. Having no experience with it, they didn't allow for its swelling as it cooked. As it expanded they kept removing some to another pan til they had several pans full, "enough to feed an army" according to family tradition. They grew tired of mush and one morning Henry's socks were found in the mush. After that, they had a change of menu. In Warner's history it says: Following the close of the Walker War in the summer of 1854, those who had taken land in the Spanish Fork River bottoms above Palmyra, felt safe to return to their homes, but for protection against further depradation from the Indians, decided to build a fort in which the settlers could live. Nine city blocks were surveyed and divided into eight lots each. Settlers began building their homes on these lots during the spring of 1855. In 1856 the population increased by about 400. Palmyra was abandoned and Spanish Fork began to be what it is now. Building a home in the early days called for a lot of ingenuity rather than money. Adobes, or sun-dried brick, proved to be a fair material and many houses were built of them. Clay for this purpose was usually near at hand. One simply poured enough water on the clay to give it the right amount of moisture and worked it to the proper consistency by trampling it with his feet. The clay was put in wooden molds and left to dry. A superior clay called "blue adobe" came from a spring at Springville. It was necessary to secure lumber for the roof, floor, door, window, etc. There was no lumber yard so the home builder yoked up his oxen and drove to the canyon, cut down pine trees and sawed them into lumber at an old sawmill. Glass had to be shipped from the east. It was expensive, so windows were small. Our family stories share a description of Dolphus' home: Dolphus homesteaded 22 acres of ground and built a home of adobe. The walls were 18 inches thick, plastered inside and out. Shingles were made by his son Lorenzo. In a handmade forge, Dolphus who was a blacksmith by trade, made nails. Rafters and joists were pinned together with handmade wooden pegs. Dolphus partitioned off part of his farm and planted Spanish Fork's first orchard. One end of the farm had an existing grove of cottonwoods. Their fir wood was cut from this grove. They started on one end, cutting as they went. By the time they got to the other end, the first trees had grown up again. Osage orange trees were planted along one wall. There was also a raspberry patch and a strawberry patch. And, of course hay and grain were raised. Some Mock Orange trees were also planted. Back to Warner's book- Indians were not the only nor the most sinister foe the pioneer inhabitants had to fight. The summer of 1855 brought one which, in many respects, did more damage and was more feared than the red man. In the fall of 1854, there came a great cloud of grasshoppers and settled upon the land along the river. The settlers thought nothing of their coming, for it was too late in the fall for them to any great amount of damage to their crops, everything had been harvested except some late pieces of corn. In the spring of 1855, however the young hoppers hatched out by the millions and began to devour the sprouting crops. Everything green was devoured by them and the valley appeared as though scorched by fire. Famine stared the settlers in the face. ( What a cheerless time for a wedding, nevertheless, Eliza married John Groves this year and they lived in Sugarhouse.) In consequence of the ravages of the grasshoppers, the winter of 1855-56 furnish some of the darkest pages in the history of Spanish Fork and Palmyra. The consideration and brotherly love the people manifested toward each other make the pages bright in retrospect. Following the council of B Young, the settlers who had any food shared with those who did not. There was fish and in the early spring lambsquarter or "pigweed". In the spring potatoes sold for 3.00 a bushel and flour at 10.00 per hundred. Fortunately, the crops of Dolphus were successful that year, our stories say. He had grain and other supplies. Dolphus made known to the settlers through testimony, that those in need could share his wheat, molasses, and meat. He urged the men to come and get food and seed with which to plant their crops. People came to get food from him but had no way to pay for anything. So Dolphus had a mud wall built around his farm by the men with hungry families and no money. This wall stood for many years. It was about 4 ft high and 2 ft thick. It is of record that had Dolphus not come to the aid of the people, many would have been compelled to migrate to other settlements or perish. During the winter he was promised by Brigham Young that he would never see the bottom of his grain bin if he would help the poor and needy and pay his tithing in full. (This beloved story fits in this time frame perfectly.) Warner's book says: Learning that bran and shorts was available at Fillmore, the people sent teams for supply. Bran mush and bread became standard for the settlers. A substance was found on the leaves of trees in the Provo bottoms. So the settlers gathered, soaked off and reduced it to brown sugar. Mrs Hannah Swenson said this about that starvation period,"Bread was made from corn that was grated over a pan with holes driven into the bottom. Soap was made from grease and saleratus, the latter was gathered from clay beds. For light they used a cloth dipped in grease kept burning in a pan called a "bitch" light." Men turned out enmasse for weeks at a time to perform public labor while the women and children were out digging roots and gathering greens to augment their diet. (Dolphus served as an Alderman for the city of Spanish Fork during this early time.) About this time a brand new character enters our story. Mrs Hannah Goodworth arrived in Utah in September of 1856 looking for a way to support herself. She was a widow who had farmed out her boys after getting to SL Valley. Her daughter married and moved to Bountiful. She was alone and Dolphus hired her to be a house keeper. The next thing we know there is a marriage and a baby. Dolphus and Hannah found themselves as new parents when Hannah Alice was born April 8, 1858. Dolphus and Hannah married on May 25th, 1858. Hannah was 45, Dolphus 48. One of our histories says the boys of the two families disagreed so much that is caused a separation. Another history says Dolphus' boy was mean to his stepmother. All this contention, along with the information that she had met a man who came through on a wagon train and fell in love with him and left with him, seemed to be the cause of the separation of the new couple. We don't know how long the marriage actually lasted. But we do know she married again in 1865, according the book "Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude". Sometime before April 1859, Lorenzo and Amy Ann come to Spanish Fork. The clue in Dolphus' house description leads one to believe Lorenzo was there to make the shingles. Records show Lorenzo and Amy Ann had Joseph in April 1859 in Spanish Fork. The next year in November, Permelia was also in Spanish Fork with her family and had a baby too. Little Luna Luretta. ( It appears that the Babcock family were quite close in spite of all the moving around trying to find the best situation to settle their own families into. I like to think that Hannah was still married to Dolphus at this time and in a perfect situation to use her nursing skills to help Permelia and Amy Ann with their new babies.) Lorenzo and AmyAnn had come from Manti/Sevier River and moved back to Manti after their time in Spanish Fork. Permelia and Branch had recently moved back to Spanish Fork from Grass Valley, CA. They moved to Warm Creek shortly after. (This short time could have been happy with so much family around.) Dolphus lived in his adobe home the rest of his life. Most of our family stories mention the goodness Dolphus had in him. Dolphus filled many positions, in both civil and religious capacities. He was known for his honesty and generosity to the poor. His honesty is perhaps, very forcibly illustrated by the following experience. At one time, Daniel King Sr. borrowed wheat for flour from Dolphus, and his interest for the use of the wheat was agreed upon as one peck per bushel. In the fall, after the grain was harvested, Daniel King returned the grain with the extra pecks for interest. Dolphus weighed the wheat. Then in a slow, quiet way as was his custom, Dolphus said, "Br. King, you have brought too much." Br. King replied,"Isn't the interest on peck per bushel?" "Yes, Br. King when people don't pay when they are able. But when people pay justly, I do not accept interest." On October 5th Dolphus went to the Endowment House in SL and got sealed to Jerusha. This completed the commitment he made to the gospel of Jesus Christ and His church. It made Dolphus and Jerusha's family eternal. Dolphus died 2 years later on March 15th, 1872. He's buried in the Spanish Fork Cemetery. As was the custom, poetry was written to his children. The author was Hannah Cornaby. PART FOUR: THE CHILDREN I have learned what I could about each of Dolphus and Jerusha's children and written what I have gathered in no particular order. There is alot about some of them and very little about others. Lorenzo served in the Mormon Battalion, so I have included some history of that event in his story. Our family is more part of Utah history than I ever realized. We helped settle Price, Warm Creek(Fayette), Minersville, Spring Glen, as well as Spanish Fork. We were a part of the mining in Utah and lost some one to it's inherent danger. We rescued the handcart and wagon companies of the well known year 1856. Our family witnessed the first of the trains pass through Utah and welcomed its power to move people and stuff with more convenience they had ever known. We took part in Indian wars and made friends with them. And at least one house stands today that was built by our ancestors. Headstones all over the state stand in monument to the heritage that belongs to us, the blessed descendants of Jerusha and Dolphus LORENZO I learned about enduring well from Lorenzo, not just enduring. He suffered from the effects of two injuries his whole life and just kept trying. What an admirable quality! There was quite a tidy amount of information in the Pension Applications he made from 1883 through 1890 about him and where he lived. I am also using our family stories and vital records from census', death records, family group records, a letter he dictated to his sister in 1897, and a few bits from "Mormon Battalion"by Norma Baldwin Ricketts and "The Mormon Battalion" by B.H. Roberts. Also information from the handout I got at the LDS Church's Center in San Diego when I visited the Mormon Battalion Memorial. As you have read in Part One, Lorenzo was born in New York in 1823 before the family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He probably remembered the missionaries teaching them. Lorenzo was about 16 when his older sister, Sophronia got married to Dominicus Carter in Far West Missouri. By the time the family moved to Nauvoo area in 1840, Lorenzo was 17 and old enough to make his own decision of where he wanted to live and work. He grew to be 5’7”, light complected with auburn hair and gray eyes. He stayed with his family and worked for neighbors. (which makes me believe he had his own testimony of the gospel of Jesus Christ and chose to be a faithful member of His church). In a deposition he dictated in 1890 he said this, "I lived in Green Plains, Hancock Co. Illinois. I farmed for a JW Allen working by the month. lived with him over a year, before working for him I worked for William Dustin of Atlas ? , White Co, Illinois lived with him one or two years- before that I lived with my father at Green Plains, Hancock Co. Ill." In 1843, Dolphus bought another small piece of land seperate from the original farm. Lorenzo and Amy Ann were married in 1844 or 45. Her family had come from Ohio. The Babcocks and the Marbles had both come to Nauvoo to be a part of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Amy Ann's parents were Mary/Polly King and Nathanial Marble. Amy Ann was born in Huntsburg, Ohio on Valentine's Day 1826. On February 2, 1846, Lorenzo and Amy Ann went through the Nauvoo Temple to make covenants and receive blessings from the Lord. Lorenzo and Amy Ann must have been baptized before this event as it was necessary before going to the temple even though there seems to be no recorded dates for their baptisms. Our family stories say Amy Ann fainted and was unable to complete the endowment process that day. (No doubt, because she was in the last 3 weeks before delivering their first child.) There were over 200 people receiving their endowment that day and Amy Ann was surely in line waiting her turn more than once and that is a difficult thing to do for such a pregnant woman. However their names are recorded in the Nauvoo Temple Registry for that day so Amy Ann must have finished. Just that incident reveals how important their belief in God's temple blessings was to them. They could have chose not to go. Everyone would have understood with Amy Ann in such a compromised condition. But not only did they go, they stayed long enough to make sure they got every blessing possible to give them strength for the next unknown journey they would be making. The crowning blessing of being sealed as an eternal family would have to wait because the Nauvoo Temple was not complete. Incidently, Amy Ann's name is listed several different ways on records I looked at- Emma Ann, Amenia, and Mamie. Being exact was not so important then, and the recorders just wrote what they heard. Our family story says Lorenzo crossed the river with his parents and brothers and sisters on February 16, 1846. (I believe Amy Ann may have stayed in Nauvoo til her baby was born. I read several journal entries of other women who did this. The people gathered on the banks of Sugar Creek gradually until their leader and prophet, Brigham Young was able to join them in the later part of February.) How hard it must have been to travel with a new baby-in February-with an unheated wagon. But they did! In May of 1846, an American troop was captured by Mexico on the east side of the Rio Grande. 16 men were killed, prompting Congress to declare war on Mexico. Jesse Little, a representative of the Mormon exiles in Washington DC, was asked to come up with 500 volunteers to march to San Diego CA. Mr Little accepted. In July 1846, Captain James Allen of the US Army came to Brigham Young seeking to enlist 4 or 5 companies of infantry to participate in the war with Mexico. The Mormons were in desperate circumstances. Forming a battalion was a severe test of national loyalty for the harried pioneers who had just been driven out of the US and were camping in Indian Territory. Nancy Naomi Alexander wrote in her journal, "We were ten miles from the Missouri river and where the Pottawatamie Indians with some French and half-breeds and some Indian traders lived. This was the time when Uncle Sam followed us up to get 500 able bodied men from the Mormon camps to go and help fight Mexico. How was this when they could not let us have a place amoungst them and we were already on the march for the wilderness. Did not this look like they were determined to follow and harass us to demand all the able-bodied men and thus leaved aged and feeble men, women, and children to travel through an Indian country unprotected. Whoever heard of such a thing? But our brethren complied with this demand and the 500 volunteered and went, leaving their wives and little ones to travel on as best they could. We now came to the conclusion to stay here at Council Bluffs until spring. Pres. Young found this offer a blessing and answer to their prayers. The volunteers would be paid and the US Government would never be able to question or criticize the Mormons after being so willing to fight this war. The Saints hesitated. They would lose their men and they needed them badly. Who would drive the wagons, tend the teams and cattleherds, hunt and protect the pioneers? They sacrificed their husbands and fathers. The volunteers cheered them by saying 'we're going that way anyway'.(from Ricketts/Roberts) Lorenzo enlisted in Company C on July 16 near Council Bluffs. His future brother-in-law, William Woods, happened to be in the same company. Lorenzo left 20-yr old Amy Ann with 5 mon. old George and hoped for the best. The volunteers were given the best sendoff the pioneers could muster with a rousing dance party. Pres. Young called them together and promised them that if they would go and be prayerful and live their religion they would return back in safety.(from Ricketts/Roberts) Amy Ann's story of her own battle in written in Part One. Her friend and nurse Fanny Taggert was crucial in Amy Ann's recovery from scurvy during the next year. Lorenzo and the other volunteers marched away. The nondescript-looking group of men and 84 women and children marched to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas where they were outfitted. It was a severe 10 days. The route was generally along the steaming lowlands of the Missouri. They averaged 20 miles a day. Few had shelter. They suffered 3 giant rainstorms never drying between. Swarms of mosquitos attacked them both day and night. And there were miles of mud to greet the volunteers everywhere. Fort Leavenworth was in a heatwave when they arrived. Malaria became widespread. Their beloved non-Mormon commander, James Allen died of malaria at Ft Leavenworth. He was one of the very few who was kind to the volunteers. All the men were paid a "uniform allowance" of 42 dollars. Instead of buying uniforms, most of the men sent their money back to Council Bluffs with Parley P Pratt, John Taylor and Orson Hyde, who were visiting. The money totaled aver $5800. They were issued a gun, knapsack and blanket. Army leaders were impressed with obedience and that all the volunteers could write their names. The over all mission of the Mormon Battalion was twofold: 1, to reinforce the Army of the West. and 2, to build a wagon road from Santa Fe to California. This was very early in the war with Mexico and a supply route was considered vital for future military and commercial operations. The Battalion left Ft Leavenworth on Aug. 12 with Lt. AJ Smith in command. His overpowering desire was to get them to Santa Fe as soon as possible and he led them hard and fast those 900 miles down the Santa Fe Trail. Smith and his surgeon Sanderson, seemed to hate the men. They were forced to take calomel and/or arsenic no matter what they were sick with if they needed a ride in the wagon. One man rode in a pork barrel for a few days to avoid the colomel and the bad-mouthed Dr Sanderson. The other major problems were the heat and the rapid pace. At the Arkansas River crossing, the soldiers crossed paths with a group of Mormons traveling from Mississippi. They had been staying in Pueblo Colorado, a mountain man settlement. The group had sent out some explorers and it was these explorers the Battalion had run into. Lt. Smith detached a number of women and children and sick to return to Pueblo with the explorers. Smith continued to push the men too hard. At some point, messengers from Winter Quarters, Br Lee and Br Egan, came to carry pay back to the families. They saw the terrible condition of the men and insisted Smith take a ride with them. They scolded Smith and told him the men could mutiny at one word from their leader if given. Smith took the fastest and went on to Santa Fe, hoping to get there by Oct. 10. If they missed the window of time they wouldn't get outfitted. Oman was left in charge of the slow, broken, sick group of soldiers. Still he continued to march the men too hard for their physical condition. The march to Santa Fe took 2 months, a total of 860 miles. The Battalion saw thousands of Buffalo for the first time and ate many of them. When they arrived in Santa Fe, they were relieved to hear that Lt. Col. P. St. George Cooke would be taking Smith's place as their leader. Colonel Cooke's candid assessment of the Battalion was:" Everything conspired to discourage the extraordinary undertaking... as mules are nearly broken down at the outset." Lorenzo was driving a 10 mule-team. This should have been a good place for him to be but the mules he was forced to handle made his job dangerous. He said,"I had been driving a 10 mule-team and every day or two one would give out and I had to put in a new one that had never been broken." Colonel Cooke carefully screened the Battalion. The initial route from Santa Fe was southward along the Rio Grande River. Some animal trades were made along the way, improving things. Mexicans and Indians were a novelty. Colonel Cooke was an improvement from Smith but was still very strict. Hot days and cold nights meant more illness. The soldiers had to push the wagons through the sand when the weak animals couldn't pull them. Water crossings were difficult. Conflict over leadership and not enough food took its toll on the moral and physical condition of the men.(from Ricketts/Roberts) Lorenzo was still with the Battalion. In his 1890 deposition and the dictated letter Permelia wrote for him, Lorenzo tells what happened to him. In our family stories, it was thought that Lorenzo got mountain fever and had to return to Pueblo because of it. It is exciting to hear what truly happened and from Lorenzo’s own words. "The first hurt I got was about Nov 8/46, 21 days march from Santa Fe. I had been driving a 10 mule team and every day or two one would give out and I had to put in a new one that had never been broken. and one of them wild ones kicked me in the side or rather in the stomach. I felt a severe pain a stinging pain, did not know what it was. I was detailed to go back with Lt. WW Willis with 54 men to drive team and help take care of the sick. On the way back to Pueblo I found out I was ruptured and I think I told Cazier(a friend) about it" Lorenzo was much better off than the 4 men he remembered dying before they got to Pueblo. "The first man lost was John Green, the next was Richard Carter he walked all day we camped on the Rio Del Norte River. The sun was one hour high Carter laid down on his back. he called for a drink of water I went for water some near 200 yards off when I came back with the water Carter was dead. The next man died was George Freeman, the next man was Mr Coalman." (The men were in such poor condition it's a wonder they made it back to Pueblo at all.) Lorenzo relates another injury. "After wading through the snow going over Ratoon Range (Raton is a pass on the southern border of Colorado.)my ankle began to swell, it got hot at night. W. Rust who was in charge of the sick ?ed my ankle, and did what he could for it but it got so bad that when I got to Pueblo I had to have it lanced by Dr McIntyre." These injuries went on to haunt Lorenzo for the rest of his life getting worse the older he got. Pueblo was pleasant. Houses and even a meetinghouse had been built. Food grew. Indians traded horses til the men had a cavelry. They hunted deer, elk, and buffalo whose hides were valueable. They built more houses and went through military drills for a possible spring march. Dances were held; a branch of the church was organized; and a few romances even grew. About 275 men, women, and children spent the winter there.(from Ricketts/Roberts) In spring of 1847, there were disagreements over whether to go get their families from Winter Quarters first or go on to the Salt Lake Valley first. Most went on to the Valley first and arrived around July 29th. Lorenzo said, "I arrived with Cap James Brown in early August soon after the pioneers I was mustered out of survise of the United States Army. The next day after arriving in the valley then I went to work." Lorenzo was obedient to Pres. Young's council to help build the "fort ready for putting on the roof" before he started back to WQ. ( He must have been anxious to get back to his young wife and baby he'd been away from so long.) He and some others traveled ahead of the eastbound company of 130-140 pioneers and Battalion men. They were assigned to go hunting and prepare meat for the company. It's worth telling again that Lorenzo "had the pleasure of meeting" his father, mother and brothers and sisters who were heading west towards Salt Lake. What a delightful and unexpected coincidence to have happen in such a big expanse of land. And Lorenzo was feeling well enough that Permelia didn't recall his injuries that day. There is no mention of how much time the family spent together before moving on in their seperate directions. I'm sure Lorenzo was in a very happy mood as he went on his way, hoping he'd find Amy Ann and baby George well and happy too. Unfortunately, George died of canker before Lorenzo got to them. Lorenzo and Amy Ann had nothing. They moved south of WQ to Savannah, Andrew Co Missouri. There Lorenzo "worked around. John B Burnett and Isaih Burnett was my employer as was also John ? I lived ther til 1852 and moved to Salt Lake." In the 1850 census, Lorenzo and Amy Ann were in Nodaway, Andrew Co. Missouri. A boy William Lorenzo, is shown as 2 yrs old born in Illinois. Other sources say William Lorenzo's birthdate is July 15 1848. Before Lorenzo and Amy Ann came to Utah in 1852, John Rowley was also born on Feb 10 of that year. The long awaited day finally came for the family to move. On June 19th, 1852 about 245 people and 53 wagons departed from Kanesville, Iowa. In the Isaac M Stewart Company. William Lorenzo is listed as 4 and John Rowley was only 4 months. Both boys needed constant care and attention . The family walked most of the way. Imagine Amy Ann being pregnant for most of this journey. "The resolutions, which were fairly standard for all the companies, stated: That a horn would blow at 4 am, for arising, another for prayers, and another for evening prayers at half past eight. Profane swearing would be reproved; if it persisted, the offender would be published from the stand. There would be no unnecessary cruelty to animals, and loaded firearms would not be allowed in camp except for the guard or in case of necessity. Dogs should be tied up when not traveling. When ready to travel, the captain of his ten attended to his company under the supervision of the captain of fifty. The wagonbox was 6 ft wide and with its bows and wagon cover served as living quarters for each family as the traveled along. The family slept in these wagons and cooked in the open. "Sand was a problem as well as muddy stream crossings, exposure to wetness, heat, lack of feed for the animals and likely campsites that had already been overgrazed. Wagons broke down and had to be repaired. Many cattle became lame. At times, there was a lack of water and fuel. Buffalo chips became a substitute for wood." Amy Ann would rise early in the morning and build a fire to prepare breakfast for her family. Their cow had to be milked and livestock fed. Many times the wagons traveled from 12-16 hours a day. Bed and sleep was a welcome time of day. After 3 months of this routine the company entered the Valley in September. Their family arrived in the SL Valley with the Isaac M Stewart Company on Sep 18th according to the Mormon Overland Records. There is some confusion about the birth of their first daughter, AmyAnn. In the book "500 Wagons Stood Still" by Shirley Maynes, it says they came to Utah in 1853 and that little AmyAnn was born and died right after they arrived. In Mormon Overland Travel Records, the family is listed in the Isaac Stewart Company that came in 1852. The Mormon Overland Records are documents so I choose the date Lorenzo put in his pension applications that is also different from fall 1853. On this particular form Lorenzo states his marriage to Amy Ann as May 18, 1845 by Justice A C Brower in Hancock Co. Ill. He states his children George born Feb 13 1846; William L born Aug 1848; John Rowley born Feb 10, 1851; AmyAnn born March 4, 1853; Nathaniel born Feb 23, 1854; Mary Ann born Sept 20, 1860; and Jane born Sept 2 1865. As I have looked at birth, death, census, temple, and other records, I often see that dates and ages are approximate. That helps explain why there are often conflicting dates for things. Lorenzo is most likely a widower at the time he applied for pension so his wife isn't there to help his memory. He even forgot to put down his boy, Joseph on the pension record with the other kids on. But it is the best we have for little AmyAnn. In 1853, Lorenzo's, brother-in-law, Branch Young says he worked with Lorenzo at Big Cottonwood. They may have met when Branch married Lorenzo's little sister, Permelia, in March of that year. This is the start of a close relationship between the two sibling's families. Lorenzo and Amy Ann really moved around; many times into the settlement with Permelia and Branch again. Branch states that he employed Lorenzo at Spanish Fork in 1855. Around that same time Lorenzo's dad, Dolphus was building his adobe home. Lorenzo made the shingles. So that documents Lorenzo's family was in Spanish Fork for a while. (At this point I believe Lorenzo's injuries have begun to cause him some real trouble, making it hard for him to work as well as other men.) Then Amy Ann had a baby in Manti. Mary Ann is her name and she was born in 1856 there. The next date is the birth of their son, Joseph in Spanish Fork in 1859. Permelia's family was in SF about this time again; she had a baby in SF in 1860. Before Permelia had her baby in SF though, Lorenzo and Amy Ann went back to Manti. The June, 1860 census shows them there with their children and Lorenzo employed as a laborer. (By the way, Amy Ann's brother Horace is listed on the census right after Lorenzo's name meaning he was probably next door, He may have helped Lorenzo too.) A few years later, Lorenzo joins with his sister's family again in Warm Creek (Fayette). There both families have a daughter. Amy Ann and Lorenzo bring Janie J.(Jerusha Jane) into the world in 1862 or 65, and Permelia and Branch have Cinda Rilla. Branch once again employs Lorenzo at farm labor there in 1864. On a side note: One family story says Lorenzo fought in the Civil War. With all the documents available now, I am certain the Lorenzo Babcock that fought in the Civil War was the same one our Lorenzo is mixed up with earlier. That Lorenzo married a Lydia Palmer in New York about the same time our Lorenzo married Amy Ann in Nauvoo. I was able to straighten that out with a New York census. Lorenzo was not able-bodied enough to go to war and all the records show him in Utah during the time of the civil war. One pension form is Lorenzo's word that he was in Utah during the civil war. All the family records I have looked at say Amy Ann died in 1862 shortly after Jerusha Jane was born. It didn't make sense to me that Janie J was born in Warm Springs and her mother was buried in Price. Why would they take Amy Ann clear to Price to be buried if they lived in Warm Springs? Price is across the Wasatch Plateau Range (Manti Mountains) from Warm Springs. I began digging and found that Price didn't have any recorded settlers til 1877. So of course there was no cemetery til after that time. I tried to document Lorenzo's presence in Price but haven't been able to til the Pension Applications. Thanks to all the updated records there is a remarkable improvement to the possibilities of the Dolphus and Jerusha family stories. I was able to find so much more than anyone could in the past. It is incredible what is available now. (I think Lorenzo's father and siblings did their best to help Lorenzo with his physical limits. He moved so much. Lorenzo may have had a hard time finding or keeping work and he always moved back to wherever there was family.) In the 1870 census Lorenzo and Amy Ann are in Mt Vernon Tooele Co. This was a pretty good time for them. The value of their personal estate was at $300. Soon he was employed by Branch again and this continues on and off til 1884. (I feel proud to think our family worked together to make sure Lorenzo could provide for his family with dignity.) In the 1880 census Amy Ann is still alive and well, living in Annabella,Sevier Co. Her sons, Nathaniel (25) and Joseph (21) are with her working as laborers. She is listed without Lorenzo in this census because Lorenzo is in Los Pinos,Conejos Co. Colorado in the household of a Hal C Tait. Lorenzo is working as a laborer on the railroad grade and the sons are at home earning a living. Finally in 1883, Lorenzo can be documented in Price. He turned 60 yrs old making him eligible for military pension. He begins his applications there. There are over 198 pages covering 1883 through 1890. It's accessable on the "Fold3" site under Mexican War. It was an awful lot to look through. There is a series of applications, physicians reports, affidavits, and depositions signed by notaries, justices of the peace, witnesses, attornies, etc. There is a list of 24 witness accounts made in 1890. Fellow soldiers John Cazier, William Rust , Samuel Thompson, Thomas Nielson, and Elam Ludington are on that list along with Lorenzo's son John, sister and husband Permelia and Branch. But notably, his wife Amy Ann is not on that list. She may be dead by 1883. I had to laugh at the volume of forms and accounts meant to prove Lorenzo's story. The military's reputaion for endless paperwork had already begun even back then. Then I was disgusted to read the affidavit from 1885 where Lorenzo had to declare his loyalty to the Union by testifying on paper that "during the time of the late Rebellion of the Southern States I was living in Utah and did not engage in said Rebellion nor render aid and comfort to those engaged in said Rebellion." It is signed by a notary in Spanish Fork where he was a resident at the time. ( Lorenzo had to go through many questions over and over to the point of humiliation, as far as I can see.) Our family stories say his first check was for $450 followed by $36 every three months thereafter. One of the papers had numbers I don't understand much but they appear to be payments of $4, then $8, than $12, and that agrees with the family stories. In 1890, Lorenzo's friend, John Cazier said Lorenzo was getting $8 a month. Whatever the amount was, it was enough to pay for the treatment doctors had available at that time and buy a prospect hole on the northeast bench of Mona. It was a place referred to as Starr Ranch, later as Fowler Ranch. Lorenzo built a cabin on the side of the canyon and lived there several years. His boys, William and Nathaniel, lived with him part of the time. He tried to be self-sufficient and carried his provisions on his shoulder the 3 miles to his cabin. Lorenzo's injuries from the Mormon Battalion disabled him more and more as time went on. Branch's affidavit said he knew Lorenzo "to be disabled by rupture all of the time they worked together and from lameness in his left foot which had finally become considerabley deformed by reason of the severity of the ? ? has suffered in it, and that he was frequently obliged to stop work and was sometimes confined to his bed a day or two at a time and has been unable to do, upon average more than 1/3 of the manual labor of an able bodied man, and that Lorenzo's wages were but 1/3 of ? able bodied men were receiving for the same kind of labor." Branch mentioned that Lorenzo had the responsiblity of "taking charge of pigs" and wasn't able to "all the time" on account of his injuries. Lorenzo eventually got a crutch as his ankle got stiffer and turned outward til his left foot was at a right angle to the other foot. Lorenzo was ambitious in spite of his disability. Our stories say he smoked a pipe at night when he was nervous. (I wonder if pain had something to do with it too.) One day he said he would master the habit. He put the pipe on the shelf and never touched it anymore. Lorenzo spent alot of his later years staying with his sister Permelia in Mona or with his brother Albern in Spanish Fork where one of his doctors was. In 1897, the State of Utah put on a grand Jubilee Celebration for the Pioneers of 1847. Lorenzo was invited along with Permelia. Permelia wrote the response to an invitation for herself and Lorenzo. He hoped to go but a few weeks later he sent a note expressing regret at not being able to go on account of his health. (I have written about the Jubilee in Permelia’s story) A few years before Lorenzo died, Permelia's daughter, Sumantha, had taken over the Young family farm. Lorenzo was staying with her when he died on March 16, 1903. He was 79. His rifle from the Battalion March was supposed to have been donated to the Spanish Fork Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum. It was not there when I looked about 2001. I called the Museum in SLC in 2017 and they couldn’t find it there either. To me, Lorenzo was a courageous and steady man. He seemed to have an determined attitude and kept trying. I loved most of all to see the family pull together for their big brother and son just as a family was meant to do. SOPHRONIA AND ELIZA I am putting these two sisters histories together. They both married Dominicus Carter, they went through the Nauvoo Temple on the same day, and they both died much too young in childbirth. All I know about Sophronia is told in Part One of this history. Eliza didn't leave any posterity either and there is very little about her. Most of her story is in Part One. After she divorced Brigham Young in 1853, her next try was John Groves. We think they were married about 1855. There are stories told that Eliza had several pregnancies that all ended with no live baby. She and John lived in Sugarhouse Ward. In "Abstracts of Death & Marriage Notices Unique to the Deseret News, Semi Weekly of SLC (1865-1900) 21 July 1868 issue, page 8, col 3 it says," In Sugarhouse Ward, July 12th, Eliza Babcock Groves of childbirth". She was 39. Her grave is in the SLC cemetery. In the 1870 census there is a tiny bit about John. In that year he is listed as 40 and as mulatto for his race. He is living with a Mary A 34yrs, a William 2yrs, and a Frederic 1yr. and still living in the Sugarhouse ward. In the 1890 Utah Directoy, John is shown as a gardener still living in Sugarhouse. While doing research at the Church History Library, a helper showed me that Eliza and Sophronia's names come up in the 'Emer Harris notebook'. Emer Harris was Martin Harris' older brother. He was born in 1781. During the time his poetry was written, he was a school teacher in or around Nauvoo. He was in his sixties during this time and in the notebook there are poems for "ladies, young men, young women, a woman who was a nurse for his wife, one of the twelve apostles, a pupil, Jesus Christ, and Book of Mormon. Most of them were "by request". Most of the poems are written in an acrostic style. Emer has taken the name of a person and used each letter of their name to begin a line of poetry. The poems are another thing Sophronia and Eliza had in common in their shortened lives. I believe they were good friends and well as sisters. Sophronia Babcock Acrostic by request Seek now the Lord while in thy youth Obey and love and serve the truth Prepare for death now while you may Health strength and youth will soon decay Refrain therefore from every sin Obtain the promise and glory win Now serve the Lord with all your might In righteousness there's great delight All Earthly things must soon decay But lasting in the coming Day All truth and grace will God bestow Blessing the saints while here below Come serve the Lord without disguise Observe this counsil and be wise Come follow me and watch and pray King Jesus thus to all doath (doth) say Eliza Babcock Acrostic by request for a young woman May 12, 1844 Enjoy you may the pleasant way Like them of ancient time In love obey go watch and pray Zion you soon shall find And if you loe the Lord above Behold He soon will comke And like a dove dwell in His Love Before He takes you home Come to His arms enjoy His charms Only His word obey Cast off alarms and from no harms Keep close to God always LUCY Nearly all I have put down in this story comes from Reed Stanley Hall, Edith H Young, Pat Miller and William Wood's daughter. I am including a letter William wrote to his parents in England. I don't have any comments. All the research is done and I didn't really have a chance to get involved with her. But knowing that Lucy and William took care of Lucy’s little sister and brothers makes me feel such a high regard for them. They had very little to share but they did. And I will say that I certainly understand she and William had a limit of endurance. I felt great empathy for them when they moved right after the grizzly death of their daughter. Lucy was the last child born to Jerusha and Dolphus in Mina, New York before the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints changed their lives forever. She was a toddler when her family began following the church from place to place. Lucy was baptized a member in 1842 in Nauvoo. When Joseph and Hyrum Smith were murdered in 1844 it made a deep impression on Lucy. She remembered how the Lord chose Brigham Young to carry on as leader of the church. I mentioned this in Part One. When she arrived in Salt Lake in 1847, Lucy was 14. Her oldest sister, Sophronia was dead by then and the next oldest sister, Eliza was still at Winter Quarters. She was the oldest daughter at home. The family moved to Bountiful shortly after arriving and lived there for a time. Lucy met William Wood during this time; William came from California where he had completed the Mormon Battalion march. He came to Utah in 1848. William and Lucy married on March 14 1849. They were reportedly married by Parley P Pratt in Salt Lake City. 14 years later they were sealed in the Endowment House on July 18 1863. ( This isn't much about Lucy. Maybe that means "no news in good news" and she got along fine.) But William left several stories of his life and a wonderful letter to his parents back in England, and some histories by his descendants. He was born on Feb 2 1823 in Lugwardine, Herfordshire, England to John Wood and Ann Lawrence. He was apparently among the large group of United Brethren members that joined the church when Wilford Woodruff was prompted to go to that area. After he quietly got baptized under cover of darkness, no one would hire him. He was glad when a Green family offered to help him emmigrate to America. He came to America on the ship Medford with 268 other converts. With more help he was able to get to Nauvoo where he was delighted to meet Joseph Smith. William left Nauvoo with the other saints. In Edith Young's history this remarkable story is told. " When William finally arrived in Nauvoo in 1843, he suffered along with the rest of the people. He too was one of the many crossing the Mississippi in winter of 1845-46. He was crossing the Mississippi when it was frozen on foot and alone. A third of the way across he heard a voice say, 'go back and get a pole'. He stopped for a seond but he could see no one so went on again. It was repeated a second and third time. By this time he was about 2\3 of the way across. He wondered at the meaning of the voice that he had heard for there were no people for miles around, but obeying the voice of warning he turned back and when he reached the shore from which he started, a pole 18 feet long lay in the exact spot from which he had started. He started back across the river and reached the spot where he had turned back. He went on just a few feet further and the ice broke and he slipped in the icy water ot the Mississippi. The ends of the pole he was carrying hit on solid ice, and by its aid he was able to get himself to safety.' William served in the Mormon Battalion in Company C with his future brother in law, Lorenzo. Lorenzo didn't make it to California but William did. He was around for the gold discovery and he helped build wells and roads. he was discharged in June of 1847 in California. (Stories of the Mormon Battalion are told in Lorenzo's story) When William got to Utah he wrote to his folks back in England. It was worth adding to this history. The same year that Lucy and William were married (according to the Acer letter in Part Two of this history), they moved south with Jerusha and George, Permelia, Albern,John, and Henry. They had planned to go to the Sanpete Valley but only got as far as Provo. There they built a log house. Lucy had her first child in Fort Utah in December 1849. Her name was Lucy Ann. It has been a family tradition that Lucy Ann was the first white child born in Provo, but, in fact, Edward Holden and Gilbert Oliver Haws were born 2 months before. In the Acer letter it says that Dolphus went down and built a house too. Most likely one was for Lucy and William and one for Jerusha and Dolphus. (The letter also was enough to convince me that William basically joined Lucy's family and they traveled and stayed together the first 2 or so years of their marriage.) After a hard winter in Provo, the family went back to the SL Valley where their starving cattle had better grass with plans to continue north to the Bountiful area. Father Dolphus left for California (possibly with his son George) after a big disagreement with Jerusha. He left Jerusha and the 4 youngest children in the the care of William and Lucy. I really wanted to find a story about Jerusha but, in all my looking, I found nothing except what tiny bits Lucy shared about her mother. When Jerusha and Dolphus parted it was Lucy that said she thought her mother 'had not her right mind' and it is Lucy's history that tells us that Jerusha died from privations suffered in WQ and at the hands of the mobs. Dolphus wasn't around when his wife died in Sep 1850. Lucy was. Lucy and William continued to take care of the 4 young siblings along with their own little baby Lucy Ann. (What a blessing for Permelia, Albern, John, and Henry to have their sister and husband to get them through such a tragic time. Dolphus returned to Utah in May 1851 to find his children still living with his 'little English Son in law'. Lucy had her second child a few weeks later on May 18. A boy named William B. In Feb 1852, Brigham Young called Amasa Lyman, Charles Rich, and a group to go to San Bernardino California to establish a 'stronghold for the gathering of the Saints in lower California. The group started at Payson, Utah. When B Y visited the group on the eve of their departure, he was shocked to find 437 people ready to leave. Nora Lund, a DUP historian, wrote 'We do not think Lucy and William were among the group that left at that time. However, by the time their third child, Mary Jerusha, was born in March 1853, they were with that group in San Bernardino.' The family remained there untill the call came for all loyal saints to return to Utah at the invasion of Johnstons Army. The land in this part of California was fertile, water plentiful, and the climate ideal for raising abundant crops. The Wood family increased by two while they lived in this delightful place. Eliza Francis was born Jan 9 1855 and John Albert was born July 4 1856. John died only two months later. Everything was going well for the Mormons who had spread out in every direction from SL. Then because false stories had drifted back to Washington that the Mormons were rebellious against the US Government, Johnstons army was sent to Utah to suppress the supposed uprising. Fresh in the minds of the Saints were the memories of mobs and being driven out of Missouri and Illinois. The church leaders were not willing to let anything like that happen again in their stronghold in the Rockies. Hence, B Y sent out a command for all people in outlying areas to return to Utah. Lucy and William obeyed and left pleasant San Bernardino to return to Utah. Lucy and William sold their property for a span of mules. The property they had is how in the center of the business district of that city. The children recalled walking the distance over desert wastes and driving their small flock of sheep so that when they arrived at their new home they would have some means of support, food and wool for clothing. They stopped in Washington Ut and settled there. Another daughter was born in 1858 A terrible event took the life of little Eliza Francis. She had just passed her 5th birthday. From "A Mormon Chronicle, The Diaries of John D Lee 1848-1876" vol1. 'Washington Jan 18, 1860, Today I hewed and set gateposts. Geo & Alma querrying and hauling stone. Wm. Freem. at carpenter work on my building. About 10 am a shocking occurance happened. Wm Slade shot from one of my doors a crow. The ball glanced and struck one of Br Wm. Wood little girls above the forehead, shot away the scull, leaving the brain pan bare. the alarm was given, the Neighbors flockes to the scene. The child lay in its gore, apparantly lifeless, the parents almost frantic. I called them to order laid hands on it, with Elder Freem. and others, rebuked the powers of death, and asked the Lord to raise it, and the child immediately came to. This gave confidence to all present and I hope it will be a warning to all careless shooting." Of course Eliza didn't live. Some records have her death in 1859, but the diary entry is 1860. The horrific death of their innocent little girl must have haunted Lucy and William. The next month another diary entry says 'Thurs Feb 23 1860, I building stone fense, hauling wood, etc. About 9 morning T. Turley, including Fred & Steven Franklin and their families, also Wm. Wood, McNight, Jes Glossop & Jno Lee and their families & effects all rolled out for Minersville, Beaver Co.' Lucy and William sold their home for a barrel of mollasses and moved about 80 miles north with the group. Lucy found the people friendly and kind and was glad to find a place to make a permanent home. Lucy's seventh child Abram was born in Minersville in May 1860. Francis Permelia (Rose) was added to the family in Jan 1862. The family settled down to typical family life. William was a church organist, a store proprietor, and served on the first town board. In Dec 1863, Celestia Ann was born. Lucy ws 31 yrs old and though she had the best midwife care available, nature did not react in her behalf and she died 4 days later, on Dec 6th following complications of childbirth. She was sorrowfully laid to rest. Celestia Ann lived until April 1864 being cared for by kind neighbors anxious to help the bereaved family. Edith Young's history has this sad tale. '14 yr old Lucy Ann and 10 yr old Mary had to take care of the family. They always took the baby to bed to sleep between them at night while it was so cold outside. One morning they woke up and could not find little Celestia Ann. They looked and found her in the bottom of the bed smothered. She was 4 months old.' William knew he had to have help in raising his family of six children and he was lonesome without a companion. He gave much prayerful thought to the matter to find a suitable woman that would take such a responsibility. In Minersville was a fine young woman by the name of Ann Eyre Banks. He approached her, telling of his need for a wife in such a convincing manner that she consented to take on the huge task of mothering another woman's children and loving her husband. William and Ann were married March 7, 1865 and Ann was a good mother to Lucy's children. She and William had 14 children together. On FamilySearch Pat Miller had wrote about the dedication of the Pioneer Women Memorial Monument in Washington, UT. Lucy's name is among those listed. It was dedicated by Jeffery R Holland in 2001. PERMELIA I have been thoroughly delighted to learn about Permelia. What a remarkable life and a wonderful woman. It was so exciting to get such a wealth of information about this sibling. And she's a woman! Most of my research has turned up bits and pieces about men. That makes it a double delight. I can hardly wait to meet her in heaven someday. I learned that she was devoted to her family and helped them wherever she could and she taught her children to do the same. Her husband was right there with her to help others where there was a need. Permelia's descendants have given me so much about her. I have written parts from Alice Yates Lynn, Zelda Kay, Nora Lund-Nibley Park, Ruth Naylor given by Don Yates, and Shirley Young Barber. I have used things from the Biography of Henry Ichabod Young 1798-1885 compiled by Richard H Ledoquist. Permelia was privileged to be one of the honored pioneer guests of the 1897 Pioneer Jubilee. Her brothers, Lorenzo and John were invited. I have written about the Jubilee in Permelia's history but it is part of Albern's too. He was there and maybe John was too. Permelia was just a girl when she crossed the plains to the Salt Lake Valley. The beginning of her life is mentioned in Part One. I believe she was proud of who she was as an 1847 Pioneer. In a letter responding to and invitation for all pioneers of 1847 to attend the grand celebration to be held in 1897 in SLC, she wrote in her brief letter "I wish to inform you that I an one the Pioneers. I came in Salt Lake Valley with my Father's family whos name was Dolphus Babcock. We arrived in the The Valley October the 5th in 1847. We traveled in John Taylor's Co. Edward Hunter was Captain over one hundred Joseph Horne Captain over The fifty and Thomas Orr was Captain over the ten. which we traveled under. my age was nine years on the 6 of October. The day after we arrived in the Valley." I got the impression she was thrilled to tell others she had a birthday the day after their arrival in the Salt Lake Valley. What an extraordinary birthday gift—a home! Permelia's mother died 3 years later, leaving Permelia and her brothers to be mothered by her older sister, Lucy for several months. When Dolphus moved them to Spanish Fork, Permelia became a 14 yr old mother to her three younger brothers. Even when she married J Branch B Young in March 1853 at age 15 1/2 yrs old, she continued to care for her siblings and others throughout her life. Branch was born April 1 1833 in Tennesee to Henry I Young and Temperance Jolley. His father was a school teacher. The extended Young family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints about 1842. They moved to Nauvoo. Branch even helped build the temple as a boy. When his family eventually settled in Grove Creek (Pleasant Grove), Branch met Permelia. Some histories say they were married in Palmyra, one says the Old Endowment House in SLC. Temple records show they were endowed and sealed Sep 19,1863 in the Endowment House. Branch had family who had moved to Grass Valley, California. He and Permelia thought it would be a good place to begin their life together. In the history written by Zelda Kay it reads; "That same year they moved to California, settling in Grass Valley. Interested in the spirit of the gold rush, Branch tried his hand at panning gold from the river." Apparently, they became fairly well established there and settled down to raise a family. Their first child was Johnson Williamson, born March 2, 1854. Then Ashbel Payton came along on August 15, 1856. In 1857 the family moved back to Utah when Brigham Young called all missionaries and settlers in distant colonies to come home. Johnston's Army was approaching and the people were once again under threat. The US government had not told anyone why in Utah so B Young and the other leaders assumed the worst and they needed everyone to stand together. They ended up back in Spanish Fork where Luna Luretta was born on Nov 11 1860. They're back in town with Permelia's father, stepmother and little girl, and all her brothers except George. Luna died a few days later and is buried in Spanish Fork. (I like to think the comfort of all her nearby family helped at such a sad time.) Soon Branch and Permelia moved to Heber gaining another girl. Sumantha was born Oct 20, 1861. Heber went through a change of being divided into lots and farms so the Young family had to move their sheep herd's grazing grounds. They began grazing them at Warm Creek and decided to move their family to Warm Creek, as well. It is possible that Brigham Young sent the family to help settle Warm Creek(Fayette) which is west of Manti. Here Lorenzo's family and Branch's father and brother joined them. With the number of families settling there, the church organized a branch there. And Branch was called as branch president (no pun intended). Warm Creek or Fayette began in 1861 when a few families moved there from Springville. Crops were planted but in the autumn, church leaders counseled the famlies to move to Fort Gunnison to be safe from the Indians that were harassing the settlers in that area. The next spring, the Mellor and Bartholomew families returned, traded with Chief Arapene for the water, spring, and the meadow. Then farming operations were increased. During the summer of 1862, other families moved in and this is when a church branch was organized. Branch served as branch president for 2 years. A grist mill was built. With the warm water it could operate all year round. Lorenzo and Branch worked together here. Warm Creek was changed to Fayette after Fayette, NY where the church was first organized. Families took pride in their well built dugouts. A log meeting house was built in 1864. The Blackhawk War started in 1865. Branch took his turns guarding livestock. A post office was established in Dec 1864. Branch's father was postmaster. Cinda Rilla was born to Permelia nd Branch here on Nov 24th, 1863. Cinda Rilla died and is buried there. In fall 1867, three Indians killed a militiaman on duty. Indians began stealing horses and cattle. Several families moved and the rest went to Gunnison Fort. After that only militia and men returned to work and guard for a while. During this upheaval, another baby was born. Branch Bryant was born on Jan 22 1866. Some records show Corn Creek which is west of Gunnison. Other records show Warm Creek. Not long after Branchy (Permelia's nickname for him) was born. Branch and Permelia moved along with Branch's father, Henry, to Mona. There were a number of people called to settle Clover Creek between 1860-1867. Clover Creek was named Mona after the Isle of Mann. A former surgeon in the British army, Matthew McCune suggested it because it reminded him of his home there. The settlers filed their official claims for lots beginning Dec 1869. Branch's father filed for room to build a log home and a school room. It was the first school in Mona. Ruben Dolphus was born March 28, 1867-8. Permelia had 8 more children: Henry Wallace, 1871; Eli Herbert 1873; Lorenzo and Alonzo 1875 (Lorenzo died); Hettie Flavilla 1877; John 1879; William Albern 1880; Alice P and Ada Rebecca 1882 (Alice died). By the end of 1882, there were 12 children in the Young family. Branch wanted to go into the livestock business there. He bought sheep and cattle and the land to run them on. He and his sons worked hard and Branch had good business skills. They became wealthy. There was work for all Branch's boys and 2-3 hired men during the winter. They fed cattle and got them ready for market in California. Branch hired Lorenzo a few times as well. A spacious 11 room house was built for the family. Like his father before him, education was the one important thing. As long as means permitted, tutors were engaged for the Young children. They also had a chance to attend Brigham Young University in Provo. The Young children showed a great deal of respect for their parents. The addressed them as Father and Mother. The girls were the task and say of their mother while Father Branch had say of the boys. Sumantha's biography has a fabulous description of life at the Young home(contributed to familyssearch by Della Ann Yates Cossey). "In her early teens, Sumantha cut alfalfa with a scythe to feed a herd of seventy-five to a hundred head of pigs daily during the summer months. Her brothers milked a herd of cows. Sumantha helped to take care of the milk, straining it into pans night and morning. The milk would stand overnight or longer, a sufficient time for the cream to rise to the top of the milk. She would then skim the cream off the top into a large crock jar. When time permitted, Sumantha churned butter and made cheese. Her parents took the butter and cheese to Spanish For and exchange it and other farm products for groceries and other supplies their large family needed. Sumantha went to school in a room built from logs with a dirt roof. The house was owned by her grandfather, Henry I Young. He was also the teacher. He taught her most throughout her schooling. The children sat on a plank extending from sawhorse to saw horse. Sumantha took advantage of her opportunities and received a good education. The school room was kept warm in the winter by a fireplace and fuel was mostly sagebrush. Some of the parents brought a few blocks of wood to burn. Sumantha rode to and from school on a horse. She had very good penmanship. She was the only girl in the family for a number of years so she was her mother's helper. They made candles which they burned for light before they used kerosene lamps. She helped piece quilt blocks for quilts which were made into beautiful designs. She helped with the laundry- washing clothes on a washboard. They started early in the morning and washed all day into the dark of the night. They also made soap by boiling in a large kettle for hours. Soap was made from lard after it had been rendered. Sumantha also washed and carded wool that was sheared from their sheep. The wool was made into bats for the quilts and spun into yarn that she and her mother would knit into stockings for the family to wear in the winter. The eleven room house was theirs to clean. They scrubbed the bare board floors every week. The mother daughter team cut and sewed carpet rags and then wound them into balls. The rags were later woven into carpets. Her parents were quite wealthy for the time and their children were dressed in the finest dresses and suits. (The finest that could be had at the time) Sumantha was considered the best dressed girls in the county; her dresses were made of calico material but very nice." Sumantha was a practical nurse for the town of Mona. She took care of her Uncle Lorenzo in his last days. Branch taught his children well and allowed them many privileges. They always had fine saddle horses to ride (Sumantha's story illustrates that) and a snappy buggy team to drive. A family story says Permelia always carried a pearl handled revolver on her hip. Once she was attacked and shot her attacker dead. The family knew she had children to finish raising so two of her sons confessed to the shooting and got on horseback and rode to North Dakota and weren't found. Maybe the attacker knew she was a wealthy woman. Her grand-daughter, Zelma Y Romney remembers Permelia had 20 dollar gold pieces sewn into the hem of her skirt. What loyalty and love Permelia's sons had for their mother and family to make such a sacrifice. (Zelma also remembers Permelia had bees and alot of money.) Permelia's great grand-daughter, Shirley Young Barber, told me this story about the the great grandson of the son who went to North Dakota. " Dick LeDosquet told me his great grandfather, Johnson Williamson Young, a brother to my grandfather, Branchy, is the one who took the rap for his mother, Permelia. There are different stories of why she shot the man with her pearl handled gun and who he was. "My sister Afton says our grandfather Branchy went with Johnson W when he left town. Afton says a trunk passed down from Branch to Alton, our father, and it is the trunk that traveled with to hold their belongings when they went to North Dakota. "Dick LeDosquet said this is why Johnson W went to N Dakota and why the family ended up there. Dick had tears as he told me this. He felt a loss because of the circumstances. He wished he had had more contact with the Young family. Dick wrote and published a book titled "The Biography of Henry Ichabod Young". According to the pedigree charts Johnson W ended up in California; the state he was born in. He died there." Permelia and Branch's family opened their home and their arms to an unusual addition to their family in the brief story of Indian Boy. While Branch and his older sons were grazing cattle in the rich Ogden valley, Ashbel Payton and the adopted son known to us only as Indian Boy witnessed the first passing of the train in 1869. That was an event that was surely never forgotten by those two boys. Permelia and Branch had lots of children to care for and still found room for one more. Indian Boy wove a quirt while in the family. Eli Herbert's great-grandson has that quirt at present, proving Indian Boy was real. Eli Herbert's granddaughter, Ruth Naylor, shared her story of having a reoccuring dream about being in charge of a hungry small child. This dream kept coming til she searched and Indian Boy came to mind. When she got permission to call him Indian Boy and do temple work for him the dream stopped. Indian Boy must have felt loved in the Young Family it he wanted to be sealed to them bad enough to get in someone's dreams. Permelia helped raise other boys too. When her son, Branchy's wife died, their son Ruben was raised by Permelia. Branchy's second wife died too. And their son, Alton was cared for by the maternal grandparents til it was time for him to go to school, then he came to Mona with his father and lived with Branch and Permelia. Permelia and Branch bought modern machinery to do the farming with. They were generous with it and lent it to others. Branch was in the company of 3 who owned a threshing machine which greatly helped the local farmers with their harvests. In 1897, the grand "Utah Pioneer Jubilee" was celebrated. All the pioneers that arrived in 1847 were invited to be special guests for the 3 day- long celebration. Their response letters afforded them each a ticket, accomodations, and a gold pin and ribbon from Tiffanys. It was a 50 year celebration in their honor. The Semi-Centennial Commission had been planning it for 10 months. Government officials and other dignitaries were invited including some well known Indians. Extensive decorations were put up around the city of Salt Lake. Colors were picked out to represent sagebrush, sunflowers, and indian paintbrush. Designers and electricians worked to complete electrical displays. This was a novelty and a source of wonder for those who had never see electricity yet. Individual businesses installed lighted displays and festooned their enterprises with Chinese lanterns, American flags, and thousands of yards of bunting. A prize was given out for designing the cover of the official program. In addition to the 663 living pioneers of 1847, tens of thousands of additional visitors arrived to enjoy the great Jubilee. The morning of the Pioneer parade, the first parade of the Jubilee, the honored pioneers and their helpers gathered on Pioneer Square. Their eyes filled with tears as they greeted old acquaintances and expressed gratitude that they were able to attend. They marched amid bands and decorated horses and a platoon of policemen. The Brigham Young Pioneer Monument was unveiled to cheer upon cheer from the crowds filling the streets and every possible perch and porch. A boom from the cannon and a cacophony of steam sirens went off in honor of the heroic figure. A dedicatory prayer was given followed by singing from the Tabernacle Choir and then speeches. In the afternoon of the first day, the honored pioneers were ushered into alphabetical seating in the Tabernacle. More music and speeches were heard from church leaders and then the crowning event began. Twenty seven county queens arrayed in lovely white gowns and colored sashes distributed the gold pins from Tiffanys to each assembled pioneer. Every possible recreational site had special events. Saltair had a trapeze act, fireworks, and world famed high divers and balancing acts to entertain crowds. Big slides were put up, a cowboy tournament was held, more parades marched; and more concerts and orations were held in the Tabernacle. Beck Hotsprings hosted bicycle races and baseball games along with the resort’s warm and hotspring pools. Calder Park had horse races and Indians camped there entertained crowds with war dances and ghost dances. Band concerts were held in the afternoons while people rowed around the small lake. The audience could stay for the grand balls held every night. Poems, songs, and music were written. Concerts and speeches were given in honor of the 1847 pioneers. Plays performed in the Salt Lake Theatre. There was a musical competition. At Fort Douglass, the “Buffalo Soldiers” furnished lively drills, re-enactments and trick riding to the delighted spectators. The last day, a sixth parade marched through the streets again. 1847 Pioneers walked again to the cheers of the crowds too big to count. There were survivors of the Mormon Battalion, Nauvoo Legion, and National Guard of Utah. Brighams Young’s carriages from the trek across the plains came down the streets. When a representation of the original wagon train rolled through the streets, people were amazed to see how their progressive communities had began. They were intrigued at the dilapidated wagons and trappings. There is so much more that I didn’t write down. If you want to know more, find it in the DUP lesson for February 2011. It was the biggest party the state could put on! A group photo was given to each pioneer there among many other honors and privileges. It would have been a great honor to go. (As far as I know Permelia and her brother Albern were the only ones in the family that attended. Lorenzo declined to go because of his health. I don't know about John. And W Henry was not eligible because he was born in the SL Valley. At the present time the photograph by well known photographer George Anderson, is in the possession of Jim Babcock. The medal from Tiffany's is owned by R Harold Babcock. Permelia attended several more pioneer celebrations as time went on. In their declining years, Permelia and Branch moved to Provo. In 1903, they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. In those days, a 50th anniversary was celebrated by the whole extended family and the whole community. The party was held in Spanish Fork. It could have been at the old Dolphus home owned by Albern at the time. John was also living on that farm. Poems were a popular way to show honor and a high regard for someone. They were written at special times. A poem was written for them by "H Babcock, a brother". It could only be Permelia's little brother, W Henry. It is a sweet set of words. (I kept the original spelling) lines ? for the fiftyeth aniversetty of my brother and sister weding at spanish fork March 10 1903 How long ago it seems since that day dawned Yes half a century has come and gone since at the alter of god you stood in youthful man and womanhood how well you've keept the promise made to cherish each other in sunshine and shade, to love and honor your hole life through and surely youve both been faithfull and true. then all honor to the Bride the Bride of fifty years all honor to the Bridegroom who shard her joys and tears fifty years of joy and sadness fifty years of peace and love it makes the heart thrill with gladness to have known such faithfull love Hearts that beat so true and steadfast faithfull through so many years ? no task however bitter but grow strong and stronger to the last How can I write the thoughts I have the words I fain would voice seen ritten only in my heart and sweetly bids you all rejoice what pen can tell the pleasures This day must to you bring to see geathered all your sons and daughters it makes your ears with music ring it makes your heart grow younger it makes your dim eyes bright to mingle with these friends and wonder ? we chase away the shadows of the night Yes let us chase away the shadows banish all but sunshine here fill with mirth each heart and gladness greet kindly all we meet both far and near those sons and daughters whom heaven sent to bless and comfort and to cheer when you with age are old and bent they will love and bid you do not fear then may roses crown your pathway ? up each little thorn making every day still brighter than the last or yester morn bringing with their fragrance peace and rest spreading sweetness every where Bringing many happy days to bless you the aged though happy pair By H Babcock Branch died Feb 17th, 1906 in Provo. After that, Permelia went to live with her daughter, Hettie in Lehi. She wrote a letter to her son Branchy in 1911 that is very interesting.(I kept the original spelling) Lehi, July 25th, 1911 Dear Branchey & all the rest of the family I will write some to you all this morning to say we are all well here in Lehi Hettie and Wayn & I got home here from Salt Lake City & Wandermear Resort at 6 o'clock pm. We did have a nice time us old pioneers our attendance. We had a very nice dinner Hettie was ----- attendentent & we took Wayne with us & his lunch but he was permitted to eat at the table with us one of the waters said that Wayne was all right & he took his lunch box back home & did not undo it until he got home We got free tickets from Lehi to Salt Lake depo free street car tickets to the Wandermears & Back to the Depo of Salt Lake so our fare did not cost us any thing We had to give the hack driver 50 cts to take us from Bret Goodwins to the D&R G Depo We was honored with the going threw the greate Utah Hotel We took the Elevator clear to the roof of the Hotel & we walked around on top of the roof & we had a good view all over the Salt Lake City the roof of the Hotel is flat & has sement about three & half feet high all around the edge so there is not any danger of any body falling off the roof is as high as the Angel Moroni statute which is on the high steeple of the temple and the statute looks ten times larger to us then it does when we was on the street Well I can say we had a good time & got back home all right & safe but a little tired & we feel quite a bit wrested up this morning Hettie is going to wash today & Frankey is picking the cucumbers to take to the pickling plant the cucumbers does not to very well there are millions of small grey flyes that eat the leaves & stunting the vines I do not think there will be very much proffet made on the cucumbers. I wish now that I would have had more potatoes put in instead of cucumbers. It had turned cloudy today & it is cooler then it was yesterday I hope it will rain as the ground is quite dry I am intending to go to Heber City Provo Valley to the Black Hawk War reunion on the 8th day of August if I keep my health & after the reunion is over I am intending to go to Mona & staying with you folks a while there was a young man that got knocked off the track yesterday the train that we atarted home on & another train came along just as the train that we was on got about one minl from the Depo the young man was trying to ------& this other train came up aon the other tract clost back of the young man & knocked him between the two train tracks the train that knocked the young man went on the the train that we was on took the young man back to the Depo the train went backwards with to the Depo with the man that was hurt the conductor did not think he would die I seen Jane Carter & her mother Old Lady Clark & Mirtle & Earma to Wandermears yesterday & talked with them for a while Jane said that Henry and Lizie and their children was well well I will quit writing now & commence dinner for me and Frank & hope all are well with you folks as ever your friend & mother Permelia Young Permelia died 10 years after Branch on Oct 5th 1916. She and Branch are buried in Mona. ALBERN Because Albern is my Great Grandpa I have many more resources for history than his siblings. It has been hard to put them all together and know exactly how much to include. After reading many bits and pieces about Albern, I learned that he was a very likeable person. He really cared about people. He took good care of his family, friends, and animals. He was a true friend to the end as exhibited by his lifelong friendship with Chief Santaquin. He gave his all in the rescue of the 1856 Handcart Disaster and earned the title of hero. He and Judith Hannah had 10 children together but only 5 grew up, married and had families. It must have been hard to watch two babies die, then lose 2 more before Albern died and one right after. There was quite a bit to learn about Albern's wife, Judith Hannah. I love her; she was such a kind person. I have some things in common with her, probably because of her. The sources I have used are Elisha Warner's "History of Spanish Fork"; history written by Albern's daughter, Emily Babcock Whitesides; County Land Records; Deseret News Sunday Sep. 26, 1948; Archives of the Genealogical Society of Utah(Judith Hannah's biography); biographies contributed by Emily Paige Jardine; and essays of Albern and Judith Hannah's neighbor and daughter-in-law, Bertha Artelle Noble Babcock. Aunt Agnes Babcock Cuyler and my father, Reuben Harold Babcock contributed documents and memories. I used articles from the December 2006 Ensign,July 1984 New Era, and September 1985 Ensign. I also used stories from "Tell My Story Too" by Jolene Allphin. She also helped me know where to find documentation of Albern's presence in the 1856 Rescue. Since Albern was involved in the 1856 rescue I have written about it and other missions to retrieve saints from Florence Nebraska, as Winter Quarters came to be known as. Once in the Salt Lake Valley, Albern was off to a rough start. His mother died while his father was away when Albern was only 10 years old. Thank goodness his sister, Lucy and her husband were there to pick up the pieces til father Dolphus returned. Dolphus came a year later and retrieved his children from Lucy and William's care. They moved to Spanish Fork where Albern grew up. When the Walker War broke out in July 1853, the settlers had to defend themselves. By the time Albern was 14, he was standing guard. Soon Albern was doing a man's work. As a teen, Albern made several trips back to Winter Quarters to meet emigrants coming to Utah. His daughter, Emily, wrote that her father told the family about those trips. The conditions were pitiful-dead among the living; sick and unclean. These two short sentences tell such a minute piece of what happened in 1856. It is only enough to say that Albern was involved somehow. So I investigated. Jolene Allphin wrote a book called "Tell My Story Too". She had done extensive research on many of the people involved in the 1856 rescue of the Martin and Willie Handcart and Hunt and Hodgett wagon companies. She has a list of 384 rescuers on the website of the same name. Albern is on that list. She gave me the sources her information came from as soon as I contacted her. I am proud to know he was willing to give whatever might be required to rescue those in a predicament they could not help themselves out of. The extremities suffered by all, even the rescuers, earns them all a place in heaven. I have heard the two minute version of the Martin and Willie Handcart companies so many times, I am ashamed to admit I have closed my ears sometimes. It has never been something I could relate to...until now. Now it is real and I understand on a personal level how important it is to never forget what happened that year in respect of those who submitted to such severe affliction in the name of faith. I got nearly all this information from an article in the December 2006 Ensign, "Go and Bring Them In" and from the information J Allphin provided. "The rescue of the handcart companies from the terrible snows of Wyoming in 1856 has been called "one of the great tales of the West and America. A total of 10 handcart companies traveled to SLC between 1856 and 1860. Eight of those successfully arrived in SLC. Two however, met with tragedy-the fourth company of 500 led by James Willie and the fifth company of 600 led by Edward Martin. They were not the only victims; two independent wagon companies made up of saints who had the means to purchase their own wagons-one company of 185 led by William B Hodgett and the other of 200 led by John A Hunt. They traveled near the Martin company. These saints, motivated by their desire to follow a living prophet, found themselves in the midst of extraordinary circumstances due to a late start and early snow. They displayed such courage and faith as they relied on God, the gospel, and one another. No one could have predicted the severity of the snowstorms that created such suffering, nor could they have predicted the heights to which Brigham Young, the saints in Utah, the immigrants, and the rescuers would rise in the midst of extreme difficulty. ( Why did those companies start so late from Florence, Nebraska? I wondered) At that time "jobs were scarce and survival depended upon homesteading skills that the immigrants had not learned in factories" back in Europe. Some were opposed to leaving Florence so late. But a meeting was held and the people voted to go on. The Willie company left August 16 and the Martin company left August 25. The wagon companies left Florence by September 2, 1856. Elder Richards with some other returned missionaries passed the companies early on in September as they traveled west. They promised the companies they would return with help from SLC to assist with the reduced provisions the handcart companies had with them. Elder Richards arrived in SLC October 4 and told Brigham Young of the situation. There were hundreds of men, women children scattered over the long trail. Ahead of them lay a trail that was uphill all the way to the Continental Divide with many, many miles beyond that. They were in desperate trouble. Brigham Young had no knowledge any other groups were coming that season so the usual routine of sending supply wagons back along the trail at the scheduled time was now weeks behind. President Young promptly called a meeting. President Hinckley said "I think President Young did not sleep that night." The next morning he said to the people at conference, "Many of our brethren and sisters are on the plains with handcarts, and probably many are now 700 miles from this place, they must be brought here, we must... get them here. I shall call upon the bishops this day...for 60 good mule teams and 12-15 wagons. I do not want oxen, I want good horses and mules. Also, 12 tons of flour and 40 good teamsters, besides those that drive the teams. I will tell you that your faith and religion will never save one soul of you, unless you carry out just such principles. Go and bring in those people now on the plains! That afternoon food, bedding, and clothing in great quanties were assembled by the women. The next morning horses were shod and wagons were repaired and loaded. Tuesday, 16 mule teams pulled out and headed eastward. (The call to help continued for eight weeks. Utah County wards were involved mostly in the later supply parties.) By the end of October there were 250 teams on the road to give relief." ( Brigham Young went along too, but he became ill by the time they reached East City Creek and had to return to SLC. Teachings of the Presidents, Gordon B Hinckley) With such great effort, it would still be 63 days before all the surviving Immigrants would be safe in SLC." The stranded handcart and wagon companies were much farther away than anticipated. The rescue parties along with the emigrants were slammed with blizzard after paralyzing blizzard all along the way. The first and worst blizzard blasted in on October 19; stopping everyone in their tracks. The rescue party and Willie handcart company were 3 days apart east of South Pass in Wyoming. The Martin handcart and Hodgett and Hunt companies were much farther east. It took the rescue party 9 more days to get to them. Those 9 days killed people and hurt others beyond recovery. The stories of individual emigrants and rescuers are heart wrenching and bittersweet as everyone gave and gavel for each other. When supply wagons caught up with emigrants there was often not enough supplies to last long. Rescuers made trips back and forth many times between searching and returning to supply camps and they often did it in driving snow. As soon as one group of emigrants were found part of the rescuers immediately began helping them west toward supply camps, Fort Bridger, and the SL valley. Sometimes supply wagon drivers gave up hope and turned back to SLC only to be turned east again by some express riders carrying messages and hope and news of success. The Martin company with its wagon companion companies were bigger with more women, children and aged. When the rescue and emigrant companies all finally met up, the rescuers gave up their wagons. Only a third of the Martin company could even walk. Rescuer Asa Hawley described the routine that took place daily until all the companies and their rescuers reached SLC. "We would carry the immigrants to our wagons. After seeing them to bed we closed the wagon covers thus shutting out all the cold possible...Then shoveling away the snow we would lay our scanty blankets down for a little rest, then up in the morning a long time before daylight we would build a big fire and prepare breakfast. When all was about ready, we would arouse our passengers...and pass them their food... We then loaded them into our wagons and traveled on." ( Picture those young men,including Albern, carefully carrying those fragile desperate people one by one with such kindness day after day.) Fort Bridger was a crucial part in the rescue effort and provided a place to rest and regroup. There were a few resources as well. Some of those who weren’t critical stayed there a few days before continuing on to the Valley. The emigrants in the worst condition were brought as soon as possible in “ambulance” light wagons. The first arrived weeks earlier than he bulk of the emigrants. In Jolene Allphin's book "Tell My Story Too", 8th Edition, the account of the Spanish Fork's Bishop John Butler is recorded from his journal. Bishop Butler's son, Kenion Taylor and Albern went along to rescue. Bishop writes, "Well the word came down to me to rig up six teams and to send two men for every team for teamsters, and there were to be 4 mules or horses to each wagon. (This was done willingly by donation along with horsefeed, provisions, clothing and every comfort that could be sent. I can only imagine the dread that Dolphus felt as he watched his 16 year old son drive off into the menacing mountains and be swallowed up in the snow clouds that cover the tops of the Wasatch Range when it storms.) “It was December…bitter cold. The snow in the valley was 18 inches deep on the level and it was snowing in the mountains all the time...(Kenion) said that there were teams that reached nearly from the City to Fort Bridger. They had to have men shoveling out snow and breaking the road and in some placed the snow was up above the wagon bows on each side. Then they found the saints in an awful condition, some with their feet froze and some with their fingers froze, and they had no food to eat, and he said that he never saw such a sight before; it was dreadful. And he said that (the emigrants) were so overjoyed they did not know what to do hardly." (Getting to the emigrants was only part of the daunting task the rescue parties faced. Every day til they actually drove into SLC was filled with challenges of breaking road in such deep snow that shoveling it high enough to get it on top of the roadsides must have been discouraging. Keeping each other warm in constant snowfall? The ones in the wagons must have hugged each other all day.) "Well they were all picked up and fed and clothes given to them. When they camped at night there were a whole lot of the boys would break a road to a tree and cut it down for firewood. And when they were coming back, they never saw the sun for six days and it snowed all the time, and they had to break the road over again." (Not only did the "Valley boys" feed hundreds of starving people and themselves, they had compassion on the cattle. One account tells of trees being felled so the cattle could eat the leaves and bark to survive.) In the Spanish Fork Ward Manuscript History and Historical Reports, 1851-1900, it says: "This was the year of the handcart disaster. Spanish Fork sent out its quota of brave men and teams to rescue the poor emigrants who were perishing in the snows. The names of those who went from Spanish Fork Settlement were: Jacob Cloward, captain; K T Butler, assistant captain; George McKinley, J M Thomas, John Banks, Joseph Howell, Wilson D Pace, James L Higginson, Albern Babcock, George W Sevey, S M Hicks, Thomas H Beck. There were five wagons sent, and there were loaded to their utmost capacity with emigrants. That season greatly increased the population of the settlement. The people built dugouts for the emigrants and did all that was possible to feed and comfort them during the winter of 1856-7. There is quite a large sprinkling of the handcart emigrants and their offspring in the population of Spanish Fork." To continue with Bishop Butler's journal: “They brought some of the folks down to Spanish Fork and I never saw such objects in my life as they were. There was a young man that George Sevey(Bishop's son-in-law) brought down with him that looked like a shadow. He would reel to and fro when he walked he was so weak, and his toes were froze. (Bishop's daughter, Charity)told of some the rescued people sent to her father's home. "One poor victim that had his leg amputated cried all night at the pain that went all the way down to his toes." Some of the rescuers suffered frozen hands and toes. One journal entry records that he lost most of his fingernails and toenails because of frostbite but he felt blessed. William P Bown, a 11 year old boy from the Hunt wagon company, wrote a tribute to his rescuers. "I would like to pay tribute to the those brave and hardy men who came out from Utah to meet us. And who broke the road through the snow. They did not seem to mind the trials and hardships that they had to pass through in order to save our lives, which they surely did. They were jovial and good natured at night as if they were at a picnic which disposition seems to have been transmitted to many of their descendants up to the present time." Thus ended one of the great tales of the West. The story of a prophet, rescuers, and saints who provided from their own scarcity to care for the emigrants until they could care for themselves. They were "desirous to come into the fold of God, and to be called his people and were...willing to bear one another’s burdens that they may be light; (and were) willing to mourn with those that mourn; to stand as witnesses of God at all times." Mosiah 18: 8-9. I have written down only a fraction of that incredible, unbelievable time in the history of Albern. I wanted to write more but felt it wouldn't be Albern's story anymore if I did. I encourage all of you to read the Ensign article I used or read Allphin's book. You will never look at life the same way again. Albern's daughter, Emily, wrote that Albern made trips-in plural-toward Winter Quarters. It is possible that he could have been part of the routine supply wagon trains that took provisions back along the trail to give the successful handcart companies places to restock as they traveled to SLC. Those journeys went on til 1860. Then Brigham Young came up with a new plan. I asked the Church History Library about the other possibilities. They told me about the "out and back" missions to Winter Quarters and gave me two articles written by William Hartley. One in the July 1984 New Era and one in the September 1985 Ensign. This is what I learned from those two articles. Abraham Lincoln was elected in 1860 and that started the ball rolling toward a civil war. The Southern States seceded and the "Rebellion of the Southern States" began. Church leaders were concerned. Would armies commandeer all the available transportation? Many emigrants were too poor to buy wagons and teams and the Church lacked the funds to buy them even if wagons were available. Inexpensive handcarts had too little protection from the elements and no room for extra food. Thus, the leaders devised a new way for the emigrants to travel to Zion. In February 1860, Brigham Young had asked Utah church wards for loans of wagons and teams for the six month round trip in exchange for tithing credits. Seventy-five wards-nearly every ward in the state-donated a fully outfitted wagon and yoke of oxen, and most sent two or more outfits. These "down and back" wagons were enough to make up four Church wagon trains. Brigham Young now needed drivers for the wagons and he knew that teenagers like to drive. So he called young men called the "Utah boys" on "down and back" missions for the spring and summer beginning in April 1861. (Albern was 21 by now and could have been one of these Utah boys.) On April 23, 1861, the day after news arrived of Fort Sumter's fall, two hundred wagons and 1700 oxen left the SL Valley for Florence, Nebraska Territory to provide transportation for hundreds of needy emigrant saints. The Utah trains didn't travel empty. Some had passengers going east, others were stuffed to their bows and covers with flour and supplies to be dropped off at 4 trail stations along the way. They deposited tons of flour-also donated by Utah wards- to feed the Saints during the return trip. About eight weeks later, they parked their wagons 2 miles northwest of Florence, Missouri. River steamers unloaded company after company of saints at the giant campground in Florence, congesting it; "emigrants stowed in every nook and corner," is how Zeb Jacobs described it. The Civil War had curtailed Missouri river traffic, forcing emigrants to overload available steamboats. George Ottinger wrote that on his boat "the people piled endways, sideways, crossings, and every way all as thick as hops." Secessionists were burning railroad bridges and tearing up tracks as emigrants scurried to Florence. The number of arriving emigrants exceeded expectations. There were Germans, Swiss, Italians, Danes, Swedes, Norwegians, Scots, Welsh, English, Irish, and Canadians. Saints unable to buy wagons and teams, signed up in the "down and back" companies. Capt. Joseph W Young supervised the "ticket sales" and loading of the four Church trains. Emigrants waited for their wagon assignments while assembling wagons, sewing wagon covers, and practicing cooking over a fire and handling ox teams. The "out and back" trains moved out during the first two weeks in July, just before the first major battle of the Civil War. About 1700 emigrants from Europe and the Eastern States traveled to Utah in the four "down and back" wagon companies. Some of the emigrants were troubled by the rough looking, rough talking “Utah boys”. But they learned quickly to appreciate the boys’ abilities with oxen and wagons. And they liked to see the Utah boys do much of the wagon trains' dirty work. The boys hunted for firewood and buffalo chips; built fires and tracked down missing cattle. They set up camps and broke camps; hauled water and spent hours in rivers helping wagons to cross. At Loup Fork Crossing, for example, Zeb Jacobs "had the pleasure of getting a dunking several times, helping the wagons over." Near Ft Laramie, Zeb wrote; "I was in the water most of the afternoon helping the teams across. The weather was cold." The boys seemed to enjoy showing off their expertise and strength, however, especially when teenage girls were watching. On the 1000 mile trip to Utah, the wagon trains passed U.S. army units that had once been stationed in Utah-with their troops and baggage wagons heading east to join in the fighting. During August, September, and October, the wagon trains reached SL Valley. The "down and back" wagon trains were disbanded for the year and the Utah boys resumed their less exciting work. These "down and back" wagon trains were sent to Florence from 1861-1868. Albern hauled freight from Butte, Montana to Pioche, Nevada sometimes driving mules and sometimes oxen. He also hauled freight from Eagle Rock (Idaho Falls) to Salt Lake City with ox teams. While working this job, Albern came in contact with a man named Swanson. He was from the Lost River Valley in Idaho- the place Albern would eventually move his family to. Swanson and Albern passed each other every other day as they traveled the same route; Swanson with his horses and Albern with his oxen. Albern's oxen were slower than Swanson's horses, but they chewed their cud as they went along and were able to pull heavier loads than horses. They also had to stop more often to eat and rest. When Swanson got stalled in muddy roads during storms, Albern soon caught up and pulled Swanson's load from the mud with his oxen. (I can imagine the teasing and competition that probably went on between the two.) After the railroad came through Utah in 1869, Albern freighted from Corrine, Utah to Pioche, Nevada. "From 1865 through 1867 Cheif Black Hawk waged war so successfully against the settlers that the Indian troubles during that time were called the Black Hawk War." Albern and his little brother, W. Henry did their part to help. "The Black Hawk War was the most trying of all the Indian troubles for the pioneers. Most of the depradations occured in San Pete and Sevier Counties. Men were sent from Spanish Fork and other settlements to aid the inhabitants of that section. Locally, however, the people still weren't free from trouble. The murder of the Given family in Thistle Valley is an example. And on the 16th of May 1866, a party of Indians came down from the mountains east of Spanish fork and killed Christian Larsen, who was herding cattle on the east bench. They drove off nearly 200 head of horses from the vicinity. Black Hawk caused the settlers of Cental Utah much trouble before his death in Spring Lake just south of Payson in 1870" (Incidently, Black Hawk was eventually buried there on the hill west of the pond where there is a memorial to him.) In later years, Albern was given a medal by the State of Utah for his services in the Black Hawk War. Records show that Mary Jane Babcock was born to Albern and Mary Eliza Conover on November 19th, 1870 in Mona, Utah. Since Mary Eliza marries again in 1873, she and Albern obviously parted ways. Albern owned a sawmill on the mountain between Spanish Fork and Payson Canyons for many years. He got acquainted with the Indians there. He and Chief Santaquin became good friends. Santaquin owned much land and had cattle and horses. He lived in a cabin he had built of logs at Bennie Creek near Albern's sawmill. The house was furnished nicely. Rugs they made were on the floors; there were beds, a range stove, table, and chairs. The Indian family joined the church due, in part, to the teachings of their friend, Albern. A typhoid fever epidemic broke out in Santaquin's family one year. Many of his children began to die. Santaquin went to the sawmill and told Albern, "heap much trouble in teepee". Albern and others returned with Santaquin to his home. There were six children dead and two very ill- Snow, who was delirious, and George. Santaquin wanted his children buried in coffins "like white man". Albern and his men helped as much as they could. Coffins were built and and graves were dug. Santaquin asked Albern to "pray as white man". Albern dedicated each grave. The children are buried in Spanish Fork Canyon. The son, George, recovered fully but their other son,Snow never did recover mentally. One day Santaquin found Snow dead. He had shot himself. Once again Albern built a coffin for another of Santaquin's children and dug a grave. And one more time Santaquin asked Albern to dedicate the grave. Santaquin feared for Snow's salvation. He told Albern, "He will never travel through the Great White Way to reach the Happy Hunting Ground." Albern was a true friend to Santaquin, Mrs Santaquin, and their son, George. He comforted as much as he could through so much illness and sorrow. And Santaquin never forgot Albern's kindness. He and his wife and son made regular visits twice a yearin the spring and fall, to stay at the Babcock farm after Albern moved back to the "doby" home in Spanish Fork. The Indian family always stayed two days and three nights; pitching a wickiup in the orchard. They did not cook or sleep in Albern's house. They cooked over a fire and slept in their wickiup. Albern's daughter remembered Santaquin's wife holding their son, George's boots over the fire to warm them. Santaquin and wife pampered George and waited upon his every wish. Albern sold his sawmill and bought the family home from his brothers and sisters. On May 12 1881 Albern married Judith Hannah King. Their two families had both lived in Spanish Fork for some time and had been acquainted. Judith Hannah was the oldest of 8 children. She was born in Cottonwood, Salt Lake Valley to Daniel and Mary Green King. Judith's father moved the family to Spanish Fork to put some distance between them and the threat of Johnston's Army that came in 1857. Daniel had been sent to help defend Salt Lake from the incoming army and as soon as the army retreated to Fort Bridger, they moved. In a brief autobiography J Hannah wrote she said, "I lived at home with my parents until 16 years of age taking part in the Sunday School and all other associating that existed in the early days. My parents being poor, I went to Salt Lake City and worked as a domestic for about 8-9 years. I also attended the District Schools receiving all the education that my parents were able to give me. I was married to Albern Babcock in 1881. Since that time I have been engaged in keeping house, do all of the work h___g there to knitting all the winter stockings by hand, doing all the sewing. Also working in the Sunday and the Relief Society as a member of the local board for 9 years." When she was 16 she married P. Reid Simpson. It didn't last and there were no children. Albern was 41 and Judith Hannah was 24 when the two married They had most likely known each other for quite a while. They got busy raising a family right away. From 1882-1899 they brought 10 children into the world: Hannah Permelia (MIllie), Albern Rowley, Mary Rebecca, Daniel John, Reuben Harold, Ross Osborn. Emily Sophronia (Emily), Emma Elizabeth, Claude Dewey, and Ralph Charles (Ralph). Mary Rebecca and Emma Elizabeth both died as infants. They are buried near their grandmother, Mary Green under the same stone in the Spanish Fork Cemetery. Albern and Judith Hannah were busy tending and keeping up the pleasant family farm. Albern's little brother, John, was raising his own family in a roomy brick house on the north edge of the family farm where Father Dolphus had given him a lot. John's family lived there during the winter so the children could go to school. Four of John's children were the same ages as five of Albern's. The kids probably spent plenty of time together. Albern's brother George had returned to Utah after Dolphus died. Albern and his sister, Permelia were quite close and visited each other too. When their oldest brother, Lorenzo lost his wife and got his pension in 1883 it is recorded that he stayed with both Permelia and Albern. Judith Hannah's father, Daniel, is recorded as the one who gave his grandson,Daniel, a name and blessing in 1887. (Between family gatherings which were held at the family farm and John's roomy brick home and semi-annual visits from Santaquin, Albern had friends and family in abundance. It does my heart good to know how much the Babcock brothers and sisters cared for each other.) There were stories from Uncle Lorenzo and Albern about Joseph Smith and the martyrdom. Lorenzo told them of the prophecy of Brigham Young telling the Battalion members if they would live up to the gospel and be prayerful and faithful to their families, they would return. Albern told of going back along the trail to rescue the suffering Willie and Martin handcart and Hodgett and Hunt wagon companies in 1856. The family was together when Lorenzo died in 1903 and when John died in 1888. ( It must have been comforting to have each other at such a time.) When Ross turned 8, he was baptised in a nearby canal by Charles D. Johnson Sr., a friend of the family. (The other siblings and cousins may have been baptised in the same canal.) Lydia Jane, Henry's daughter came to visit her uncles from Spring Glen for social visits and for their help when she suffered the long term effects of a broken leg. And there were probably more times of help and togetherness we don't have recorded. Albern's oldest daughter, Millie, enjoyed the stories she heard from her parents and grandparents while living in Spanish Fork. They made an impression on her and she remembered them well enough to tell at least one of those stories for herself. In 1894, 11 year old Millie submitted a story about her grandfather King to the "Juvenile Instructor". It appeared in the March 15th issue on page 199. She named the story "An Indian's Faith". The 'Juvenile Instructor' was the first magazine published for children west of the Mississippi. George Q Cannon began publication of the magazine in 1866. He owned and published it til his death. His family sold the magazine to the LDS Church's Sunday School Organization in 1901. Cannon had been the superintendent of the Sunday School until he died. It was issued monthly and consisted of catechisms on the Bible, Book of Mormon, and Doctrine and Covenants; musical selections; stories; illustrations; editorial teachings; and others aids to gospel instruction. It also had ads in it. Albern attended the 1897 Pioneer Jubilee, along with his sister, Permelia. It was an enormous production put on by the State of Utah in honor of the 1847 Pioneers. I have written details about it in Permelia's story. In about 1905, Albern decided his boys needed a chance to homestead places of their own. There were 6 sons that could benefit from the adventure. Albern's oldest son, Rowley returned from his mission and went to work for the Union Pacific Railroad. He spent some time in the Lost River Valley of Idaho constructing the Mackay branch line. It ran from Blackfoot to Mackey. He was so impressed with the area, he went to work convincing his family the Lost River Valley was the place to move. They had been considering there and Uinta County of Utah where there was lots of room to grow. Rowley convincing worked and they made plans to move and begin a new adventure. Rowley was 21 and Reuben was 16. They made the trip to Idaho by wagon in the fall of 1905. Rowley went to work at the White Knob Mine near Mackay to work. Reuben "bached" at the farm Albern purchased from Tom Ferguson 20 miles south of the mine. Albern announced the plan to move to his good friend, Chief Santaquin. The Indian and his wife were old now. their heavy braids were gray with years. He said to Albern,"Me never see my white man friend on this land again. Me go to meet you again in the Happy Hunting Ground." Albern told him to come visit them in Idaho. But Santaquin declined. "No, heap bad spirits between here and there." During the Indian war with General Custer, Indian women and children were put into a place walled in by the old lava beds near the Craters of the Moon by the town of Martin. The place had only one opening. When the remaining Indians were able to return to the enclosure, they found all the women and children had perished. From then on it was a place of bad spirits. Albern's daughter, Emily remembered the parting well, Santaquin gave her and her brother, Ross a nickel to keep. Tears rolled down Santaquin's cheeks when he said, "Adios, my friend" The next spring the family loaded their possessions into a boxcar on the train at Spanish Fork. Albern turned the farm over to Bishop John Hales, who had bought the farm. Rowley went with the load as caretaker and his 13 year old brother, Ross climbed in to help with all their stuff. Sometime before they got to Lehi, Ross got thirsty. Rowley got him a drink of water and the brakeman discovered Ross. Only one caretaker was allowed in the boxcar so the brakeman put Ross off at Lehi. His family was surprised when he showed up back at home on the next train south to Spanish Fork. Then Judith Hannah and Albern boarded a train with the rest of their children; Millie 25, Ross 13, Emily 9, Claude 7, and Ralph 6. They arrived at the Lost River Siding about 3/4 of a mile from their new home and their new adventure. There was 3 ft of new snow that had fallen on March 18th to greet them along with Rowley and Reuben. The other brother Dan aged 18 was away working, probably on a sheep shearing team. But he came home later to work on the new farm too. Millie had went to the University of Utah and graduated. She was a certified teacher and began teaching in school in a one room log building. Her little brother Ross, was one of her students. The school was close enough that they walked through the fields to get to it in good weather. In the winter weather they rode in a sleigh, buggy or wagon. Within two years, Albern paid off the remaining $1400 dollars for his 160 acre farm. Shortly after the Babcock family arrived at their new home, they met their neighbors. The Nobles lived just to the west of their farm and the father returned from a mission in the fall. Their names were Selina and Alexander Reid Noble. The oldest Noble daughter was Bertha Artelle. She married Ross when they grew up and wrote some memories about Judith Hannah. "When any of us were sick, Mrs Babcock was right there to help us, and she always knew the right remedies to use. One spring we had the measles. When my turn came to have them, they wouldn't "come out". So Mrs Babcock came over and had me wrapped in a blanket, with my feet in a hot mustard foot-bath, with hot lemonade to drink. I was soon warmed up good, and the measles came out and all was well." Just a couple miles away was a little church where Albern and J. Hannah took their children. In this church dances were sometimes held. And supper was served in the nearby Beverland home to the dancers at midnight. The proceeds from the dance and supper were used to pay for the new church building. Ward reunions were held here. People brought whatever food they could, from roasted chickens and tall layer cakes to cornstarch puddings. It all seemed like a wonderful feast. At these reunions a program was given, and the longer the program, the better. Millie died just 3 years after the family moved to Lost River in 1909. She barely got a chance to try out her career as a teacher and get settled in a new place. Tuberculosis plagued her body for two years before Millie lost her battle with it. Her Young Women’s leaders and friends back in Spanish Fork composed a tribute to her at her death. The Babcocks kept their connections in Spanish Fork in spite of the distance. The rest of the children soon began to leave the nest. Dan bought his own place just north of his father's farm. He had learned to shear sheep at a young age and followed that career most of his life. His shearing crew traveled around the region shearing at many sheep ranches. Ross had also learned to shear from their Uncle Ed King. (I wonder if Ross was part of his brother, Dan's, shearing crew.) Ross recalled staying in a vacant house while on a shearing job, maybe at Birch Creek. During the night rats began running around. One of the crew shined a flashlight on the rats while another crewman shot them with a 30-30 rifle. The boys all helped support the family farm. In addition to shearing sheep, Ross also worked at a sugar factory near Idaho Falls with his brother Reuben. Reuben worked on the ground floor where the beets were sent up on an elevator. Ross worked at the top picking trash out of the beets. One day Reuben had a little fun and killed a muskrat then he sent it up the elevator to Ross. Dan met Hannah Hazel Lublin at a boarding house for ranch hands her family ran in Moore during the early 1900's. Dan and Hazel were married January 14, 1910 in the Salt Lake Temple. Hazel gave birth to Albern's and Judith Hannah's first grandchild in December of that year. In spring 1911, Dan lost his farm. Hazel's family had trouble with their business too. So both families loaded up their things to move to eastern Utah, hoping to find better times. They left Lost River to cross the desert in 4 covered wagons. The mud was so soft the wagons were only making 1 1/2 miles a day. The wheels were sinking to the hubs. After two weeks of this the families knew they were in trouble. There weren't enough supplies for this long of a trip. They were making plans to lighten the load and ration the food and water when 3 wagons headed to Arco (a town just south of Albern's place) came along and saved them. The travelers took 2 of the Babcock/Lublin wagons to Blackfoot and replenished a supply of food and water for the people and horses. The travelers returned to the Babcock/Lublin party with the supplies. It took Dan and company 45 days to get to Blackfoot; a trip of about 55 miles. They had to spend the winter there before heading for Duchesne, Utah. They started on March 22, 1912. It too was a rough slow journey. The weather was bad, the roads were rough and steep, and the canyons were muddy. They arrived two months later at the end of May. Quickly they moved into a 2 room cabin and Hazel immediately planted potato peelings and vegetable seeds. They were able to harvest enough from that garden to get them through the next winter. Dan went right to work shearing sheep and life got better. 1912 turned out to be a very eventful year for the Babcock family. Chief Santaquin is thought to have died this year. Albern took the train and went to the funeral. He officiated at the gravesite just as he had for Santquin's children. Albern's daughter, Emily remembered that all of Santaquin's family is buried in Spanish Fork Canyon except the son George. She remembered there was a fence around the graves. Albern and his brother, George, purchased a marker that read "Santaquin Family". After Mrs Santaquin died, her son George and his beautiful Indian wife came to visit the Babcocks in a Model T Ford. They stayed for a few days and then returned to live in the house Albern had helped Santaquin build near Bennie Creek. In the fall an unexpected tragedy happened. 14 yr old Claude was riding his horse home from a sunday night church activity. He took his usual route home. The night was dark and seeing the gate between fields was impossible but it was nearly always open so Claude was not concerned. He had the horse at full speed; probably enjoying the feel of speed like any young man does. In the dark, he never knew the gate wasn't open til the horse hit the gate throwing them in a heap. Claude was unconscious and laid there til a passerby found him. He was taken to the Mackey hospital where he died the next day. In the midst of the deaths, Rowley was courting a young woman by the name of Maude Eliza Wilson. They married in Dec in the Salt Lake Temple. They began their own life together on the farm Rowley had bought from Dan. They later adopted two children; Olivia and Milton Rowley. Rowley was a brilliant businessman and had extensive holdings in land and feed yards. He owned many cattle and some sheep. He traveled extensively for business and pleasure. He won awards for his Hereford cattle. He was president of the Idaho Cattleman’s Association for years and was widely respected. He gave a considerable sum toward the building of the Moore Ward church building. He was a part of the 4-H and frequently made calves available for the boys to raise on shares. He was a generous uncle to his brother, Ross and family. Ross’s son, Harold remembers Uncle Rowley visiting from time to time and his brother, Jimmy would hide from Rowley. One time Rowley found Jimmy under the bed and "poked him out with a broom handle." When Jimmy and Harold were old enough, Uncle Rowley came and got one of them to work for him. Harold fixed and built fence for him and learned to check the ground around the posts for missing staples. He also helped Rowley trail cows to Bear Creek from the Nichols Reservoir and gather strays and move cows home to the ranch. Harold stacked hay for Rowley with another man. They were on the stack and the hay come up on a beaver slide. Rowley's son Milton hauled the hay with a buck rake. The family continued grow and do well in Lost River in spite of sorrow. Albern had many friends there. One of his best friends was Sara Jane Black (Grandma Black). She had also lived in Spanish Fork and was related to the Barney family. She was always invited to dinner on Albern's birthday in January. The two of them talked over old times together. Albern was much loved by his sister Permelia and she came to visit him at his new place. Albern was a pleasant, good-natured man. He was kind to his children and didn't punish them. His favorite food was bread and milk. He loved to get a little extra cream in it when his thrifty wife wasn't looking. He never went to town more than once a week. Usually not that often. He enjoyed riding his buckskin horse and reading his favorite book,"Shepherd of the Hills, by Harold Bell Wright. He enjoyed swimming in the river that ran through the farm. He and his boys went swimming together. One particular day he went with Rube and Ross intending to swim, but the boys were so black from their day's work, Albern refused to get in the water with them. And the water was running quite well. Albern was an excellent swimmer. Albern had brown eyes, gray hair and wore whiskers. He said he was shaved with a poison razor once and never shaved again. He liked to take care of things; feed the pigs, care for the cows, be the first one up in the morning to rattle the stove, and get the fire going. Judith Hannah was a woman of many talents, amoung them being a talent for growing flowers. She caused the farm to "blossom as a rose". No matter how poor the soil, no matter where flowers were planted, they always grew and thrived for her. She had a pansy bed under a large tree that grew and thrived year after year and never seemed to perish in the cold winters when her neighbor's did. When visitors came, they were taken out in the garden and always left with a beautiful bouquet in their hands. In the cool summer evenings she hoed the weeds in the garden and when darkness came she sat on the front porch to rest and cool off and watch the neighbor children at play. In the early morning she worked in the garden and when the sun was high she went in and wrote letters while she rested. She received letters from many friends and relatives both near and far. Several times a year a letter came from far-off Austraila from a cousin. Snow, cold winds and frost would be rampant at Lost River and the cousin wrote, "canaries are nesting here in the lilac bushes." A friend, Jane Morris, who lived just blocks away once wrote, "will you roost with me over Christmas?" That was a letter the children read and laughed about. Her sister-in-law, Mary Ann Eason Babcock wrote her from Arizona relating the vital dates for her, George, and their children. On Sunday mornings the Babcock family rode to church in their surrey "with fringe on the top". It had lamps on the front that could be filled with oil and lighted on a dark night. A large vase was filled with flowers and taken to church with them to beautify the pulpit. Then the flowers were given to someone to take home; Grandma Black, Grandma Beverland, or whomever happened to be favored that day. Albern and Judith Hannah planned to go to a convention in Salt Lake City for the veterans of the Black Hawk War one year. Albern was reluctant to leave home but after much persuasion he consented to go. He and J Hannah went to Utah planning to stay long enough to visit relatives in the area. Albern got homesick after about 2 days. He left J Hannah in Utah to attend to the visiting and returned home. He walked to his house from "the switch" proudly presenting Emily and the boys with a paper bag of bananas. Albern liked to be at home. Albern attended church only on certain occasions, but he was a true Latter-Day-Saint. He was an honest tithe-payer. Bishop William N. Patten, of the Moore Ward once made the statement that Br. Albern Babcock was always amoung the first to get his tithing paid up in full. In 1915, Ross filed on a homestead in Beck Canyon. He built a house and lived out there 12 years "baching" it. He plowed 100 acres of land with a sulky plow and 4 horses, clearing away rocks and sagebrush. Then he built 6 1/2 miles of fence. His brother, Reuben was already there 2 miles away on his own homestead. "Rube "took up his homestead on Era Flat. He built himself a house. One day Rube was sitting in his house when he noticed ants crawling up through the floor boards. He thought, "I'll fix them." So he poured kerosene along the cracks. They stopped coming so he had indeed fixed them. He wanted to make sure the kerosene had killed them and stuck a match to see down the cracks by; the match dropped into the crack and the dry grass under the floor instantly caught fire along with the floor. Rube did the only thing that could be done and ran outside, grabbed the ax, and quickly chopped a hole in his nice new, burning floor; and put the fire out. (Our family likes to laugh over this little story.) Rube had a great sense of humor and was quite fearless. One day a traveling salesman went clear out to the homesteads to sale his wares. Rube saw the salesman coming and he and Ross conspired to have some fun with the poor man. Ross agreed to talk to the salesman and make sure he knew that Rube often had "spells" and to watch out for him. Rube's part was to go a ways off and work the ground with a hoe well within the sight of Ross and the salesman. During the course of the conversation, Rube gradually got closer with his garden hoe. Then suddenly he came running toward the salesman, with the garden hoe in hand. The salesman didn't stay long enough to sale anything. He took off for his car and drove away as quick as he could. The "boys" had a great laugh. And the tale was told again and again. Rube liked to play tricks on salesman. Another salesman had talked the Babcock family into buying an organ. Surely, Emily could learn to play it. Buyers regret took over only a few minutes after the salesman left. Rube was ready for another good laugh and borrowed Ross's 38 revolver. He went after the salesman and soon caught up with him. Rube informed the man the family had changed their mind about the organ but the man had his answer ready and told Rube, "No the deal is all closed now." Rube showed the revolver and said, "We are opening it up again. And if the organ isn't gone soon, we will chop it up with an ax. Destroying a musical instrument must have horrified the man and he removed the organ. One time at a dance, Rube demonstrated his fearlessness when some guy pulled a gun on him. Rube promptly took it away from him. The guy tried to talk his way out of the situation by saying, "It's not loaded." Rube knew better and said, "We'll see," and pointed the gun at the ceiling and pulled the trigger. It shot a hole right through the ceiling. Down in Roosevelt, Utah where Dan and Hazel now lived, life was going well. He had a nice piece of ground and built a brick house on it. They had a 2cd child, Alice Hazel. In the spring of 1916, Dan was managing a shearing corral. He caught a severe case of typhoid fever when he drank some bad water. Before the men could get him home, typhoid became pneumonia. He died three days later on May 2. Hazel was a young widow now with 2 small children. Coincidently, she later married a cousin of Dan's who lived around Roosevelt, George David was Albern's brother, John's son. Another of Albern and J Hannah's children died too early. Out of 10 born to them they now had half still living. By the beginning of 1917, Albern found himself ill. He died at home on February 11. As was the custom of the day, the interior of the church building was draped by the Relief Society and the Moore Ward Choir furnished music for the funeral. Bishop Patten and Charles D. Johnson Sr., another of Albern's dear friends who had been a neighbor in Spanish Fork spoke at his funeral. During that year, Reuben, Ross, and Ralph were required to fill out draft cards. The US was at war. Only Ross was drafted and left for WWI October 3rd. Ross' cousin, Lorenzo Branch, one of John's sons, also served in WWI. He went in about a month before Ross. J. Hannah was left with Reuben, Emily and Ralph at home. The next October, Reuben died of the flu at age 29. That left 3 at home now. In 1919, Ross returned from France. He had seen some awful sights and had some narrow escapes. But his faith got him through it. He gladly looked upon the Statue of Liberty when his ship arrived in the harbor. Youngest son, Ralph married Amy Perry May 6th of 1919, a month after Ross returned from the war. He took over the old family farm and ran some sheep with Ross at Ross's dry farm on the homestead in the summer. He worked with Ross's family shearing, separating and driving the lambs home in July using the Chris Beck corral that was nearby. He had a mail order bride for a while. He liked to go fishing and hunting at the East Fork of the Salmon River. Harold remembers that Ralph smoked a pipe. When his daughter, Juanita grew up and moved away, Ralph lived alone. Sometime during this chapter of loss and change, J. Hannah hired a house to be built in Moore. She and her daughter, Emily, moved into the new house. J. Hannah kept busy and it was not long til there were apple trees and shade trees growing on the lot along with lilac and rose bushes. Vines grew over the front porch and flowers bloomed everywhere. She even had a grape vine on the south side of the kitchen. There were raspberries, strawberries and always a garden. Her neighbors and friends were always receiving gifts of vegetables and flowers. Ross married his neighbor, Bertha Artelle Noble on April 4th 1928 in the Logan Temple. They started out in the homestead cabin and eventually moved to a farm close to their parents places. His son, Harold remembers moving from the homestead to a place close to his grandparents homes. But his father Ross still spent summers out at “the dry farm” as they called the homestead. He drove the Model T home every weekend with a load of wood for the cookstove. Ross always carried his 25-35 rifle to shoot coyotes..He was an excellent shot; he could shoot a coyote at 300 yards running through sagebrush and a goose right out of the sky. Harold and Jimmy began to go with their father out to the dry farm in summer and helped their father. Harold learned to build fence and use a saw and axe from his father. Ross also taught him to garden, fish, drive a team of horses, keep your word, go to church, and not get mad. As the family grew to 8 children, they often went to get Ross's mother from her house in Moore to come visit. She often brought a bouquet of flowers with. Ross's children liked to go with to take Grandma Babcock back home again. Bertha was very resourceful and self sufficient. She milked the cow and learned how to make mattresses. She made a bow and arrow for Harold and Jimmie and then demonstrated by shooting a chicken right in the eye. She taught her children to chop the heads off chickens and toast bread on a fork over the cookstove. She walked with her children to church and read to them in the evenings while Ross was out at the dry farm. She loved church and taught a Book of Mormon class; she walked to Relief Society and was the historian for the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers. Her children helped her with many of the home chores like weeding the garden and hauling water back and forth for the mechanical washing machine and then for the gas powered one. When electricity came so did an electric washing machine. There was plenty of water that Harold and Jim carried for bath day. All this water had to be carried back out after everything and everyone was clean. After school, Bertha was always doing something: baking cookies, peeling potatoes, or letting the kids have a piece of bread and read the funny papers before heading out the door to get wood or do errands for her. Harold remembers being sent to retrieve the five gallon cream can from the mailbox where the mailman had conveniently left it after its trip to Blackfoot full of cream. Harold hauled it a quarter of a mile on the sled and it kept falling off. There was snow and his hands got so cold. Harold said his mother was thoughtful of others and encouraged her children to treat each other with kindness. Ross regularly took some of his children to Moore to get his mother Judith Hannah and bring her home for the day. Harold remembers the orchard and garden Judith Hannah had there. In her kitchen was a small hand water pump in one end of the kitchen sink. It was quite a modern convenience. She also had a coal furnace in the basement of her new house which was a new way to heat homes there. Ross's family visited regularly and often visited with Emily when she came to stay with her mother in the summer. Harold and Jim weren't used to the hugs Emily always wanted to give them when she saw them. But they liked the gifts she brought them from California. Emily married Lewis Edward Whitesides the 25th of March 1920. Lewis had been a mailman in the Lost River Valley. They eventually moved to California. She wrote letters to her brother, Ross and once gave Harold some snow skates he used a lot. Another time, she gave Harold and Jim some tops that spun when the wound on string was pulled off. She brought them "alligator pears" (avocados) and hand-me-downs sometimes. She and her husband were there to meet Harold when he traveled through on his way to serve a mission in Hawaii. They met him at the train and made sure he got on the SS Lurelina for Hawaii. On his return two years later, Emily and Lewis, along with Ross, Bertha, and Agnes met Harold and then Emily and Lewis took them all to Knotts Berry Farm. J Hannah never wasted a minute at her home in Moore. When she walked to the post-office to get her mail, she knitted as she went; shawls, wool petticoats, new socks and new feet in old socks. She crocheted lace for handkerchiefs, pillowcases, bureau scarves, doilies etc. She made quilts and clothes and the soap to wash them with. In her later years, she took a bar of that home-made soap with her to spend the winter with her daughter, Emily, in California. J. Hannah worked in the Relief Society presiding over a meeting or quilt and rug making. She gave talks in other wards and she was a visiting teacher bringing cheer to the homes she visited. Aunt Agnes sent me a page written by Judith Hannah titled "Qualifications of A Mother." (I wondered if she taught this sometime.) When new neighbors moved in, she was amoung the first to bring food or flowers and visit. She spent 22 years as a widow but never complained of being alone. When sons and daughters suggested they get someone as a companion to stay with her she told them she would let them know when she needed someone. Though she suffered from diabetes in her later years she cared for herself and attended to her diet to the last. In the last few weeks of her life a nurse cared for her, Geneva Pearson being one of them and her daughter-in-law, Maude was another. J. Hannah joined her husband and 5 of her children in heaven January 7th, 1939. GEORGE Nearly all of George's history is from the research his great granddaughter, Patricia Miller, did. She spent a lot of time learning about him. I did change one incident. New information from the John Acer letter changes the story of George and Dolphus coming home from California to find Jerusha dead. The letter doesn't specifically say that George went to California with his father, but Dolphus makes reference to George saying that Jerusha had promised him and George 3 times to go to California. Dolphus says in the beginning of the letter that he came to back to Utah to his "4" children which leads the reader to assume George was with him in Missouri. These clues lead me to conclude that George was his father's right hand man. George was 16 when his family arrived in Utah in the fall of 1847. No doubt he was his father's partner. George's older brother, Lorenzo had a family of his own back at Winter Quarters and had gone to retrieve them. George's little brothers were too young to be much help. After moving around some those first couple of years, his father and mother disagreed on future plans and where to live. There were misunderstandings and hurt. George and his father left for California by way of Bear River. When they returned in the spring of 1851, Jerusha had died and the younger children were living with Lucy and William, the "little English son-in-law". President Young refused to let Dolphus take his children until he had planted some ground into crops. (Probably to prove he was willing to show his obedience to the only law in such a new community-Pres Young. I think Pres Young had to exert his authority in all aspects of the pioneers lives because there had to be order in a place that didn't yet have a set of laws established. The church organization was the only law at the time.) This must be why George got offended and left. (I don't really blame him when I stop and think about being in such a situation.)He went east. Here I begin quoting Pat Miller. "In the time between 1851 and 1866, very little is known of his(George’s) life. He did not maintain contact with his Utah family during that time frame. What is presented for these "missing years" is family lore that we have not been able to verify. 1. George apostatized and went east. He met a Spanish lady and married her. He accumulated considerable property. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in the army. While in this service, his property was destroyed and his wife eloped with an army officer. After the war was over, George came back to Colorado and married Mary Ann Eason where he lived until about 1872. 2. George, according to the family verbal history, came west with Major Lafayette Head. George and Major Head struck it rich in the California gold fields. George and Major Head returned from the gold fields and homesteaded, George on Cherry Creek, southeast of Denver and Major Head in the area of Golden Colorado. George's son, Earl Lafayette, born in La Jara, CO in 1899, was named after the Major. As a child Earl was called "Maj" or "Madge". Earl Lafayette later used the name Major singularly, His WWI and WWII draft registrations were issued to Major Babcock. On August, 15th 1866 George and Polly(Mary) Ann Eason were married by Baptist preacher Adams at Hardscrabble, Colorado. Hardscrabble and Arkansas Valley settlement no longer exist. From an airplane, Hardscrabble is still visible in an alfalfa field near Florence, Colorado. Mary Ann was born February 1850 and was christened Polly Ann Eason in Williamson Co. Illinois (Southern Illinois in or near Marion). Polly Ann's parents both died in 1865 when she was 15. She and her 3 siblings went to live with Parker relatives (probably an Aunt Sarah Parker Crouch) in Canon City, Colorado. She married George, age 35, in 1866. Her younger brother and sister came to live with her and George. Nothing more is known of the other sibling. Some time shortly after 1866, Polly Ann's name became Mary, alternate ly Mary Ann. By 1870, George and Mary had 2 children, George K. and Franklin R. (originally called Benjamin). The federal census for that year indicates that George was a stock raiser and the value of the property was $7000. This valuation was considerably more than any of his neighbors. However, by 1872, the family moved on from Colorado to California, presumably to the gold fields. In August of 1872, Ellen Ida was born in Corrine, Utah. George came through Salt Lake City with his family from California. They camped at the old Tithing Yard. Hotel Utah now stands on this particular spot. George bought a Deseret Newspaper which contained advertising for George, himself by the Babcock heirs of the estate of his father. George's father had died earlier that year and George's brother, Albern was trying to find George so he placed this ad in the Deseret Newspaper." (Found in Utah Digital Newspaper: Deseret News 1872. Local and Other Matters--From Monday's Daily, Aug 26, 1872 page 449, The Deseret News Aug 28, 1872. "INFORMATION WANTED---Spanish Fork City, August 25th, 1872. I wish to ascertain the whereabouts of my brother George Babcock, as he would find it to advantage to communicate with me at Spanish Fork City. The last I knew of him he was running the Green River Ferry along with Lewis Robinson, some twenty-one or two years ago. Please ask the Nebraska papers to copy. ALBEM BABCOCK (PER DESERET TELEGRAPH)" (It seems like a miracle that George and family happened to be passing through Utah the very same time Albern put an ad in the paper looking for his brother. Albern must have been inspired to put the ad in at that particular time and George must have been inspired to to travel when he did and then buy a paper when he did. What a wonderful reunion it must have been after so long apart.) Family stories say that George's family stayed in Spanish Fork that winter. Lorenzo was in the state. Permelia, Albern, John, W Henry were in the vicinity of Spanish Fork. It safe to say that there was a lot of catching up and time together during that winter. From there George went back to California. The family returned to Spanish Fork in the winter of 1876 after son William Lorenzo was born in Dayton, Nevada in 1875. (More time for family to be together.) US census for 1880 finds George twice; in Oldham Co Texas and Briscoe Co Texas. George's occupation was listed as stockman. Daughters Mary Ada and Sarah Alice were born in Texas, in 1878 and 1880, respectively. George and his family moved back to Colorado, sometime during or before 1882. Son Jessie Pearle was born in Pueblo in 1882. Emma Arella was born December1885 at St. Charles. The 1885 Colorado Census shows the Babcocks living in Pueblo Co. George's occupation was listed as farmer. George K was no longer with the family. George K went on to be a rodeo cowboy and later a successful cattle and sheep rancher in the Bayfield and Pagosa Springs, Colorado communities. About 1886, George homesteaded 78 acres in the San Luis Valley of Colorado near La Jara in a very small community named Henry. Children Earl Lafayette (1889) and Georgia Estella (1890) were born here. Unfortunately, the 1890 census records awere lost in a fire. George moved one last time to San Juan Co, New Mexico to the community of Flora Vista, about 3 miles from Aztec, New Mexico about 1894. George died February 11, 1899 in Aztec, New Mexico and is buried in the Aztec, New Mexico Cemetery.(I thought Lorenzo moved alot. George may have him beat.) A year later in the US census, Mary Ann is living in Colorado. She is the head of the house, 50 yrs old, a widow with 10 children. Living with her is son George K, 32 yrs old, is stock raising and single. Frank R, a son, is 31 yrs old, a sawmill hand, married 1 yr. Ellen I, a daughter, 27 yrs old, married 11 yrs with 4 children 4 living. W L , a son, 23 or 24 yrs old, sawmill hand, married 1 yr. Mary A, a daughter, 22 yrs old, married 4 yrs with 3 children 3 living. Sarah A, a daughter, 20 yrs old, married 4 yrs with 2 children 2 living. Jessie P, a son,18 yrs old, single. Emma A, a daughter, 13 yrs old. Earl L, a son, 11 yrs old. Georgia E, a daughter, 9 yrs old. Clara M, a daughter-in-law, 20 yrs old with 1 child, married 1 yr. Fanny, daughter-in-law, 28 yrs old, married with 2 children. Bertie, a grandson, 5 yrs old: Mary S, a granddaughter 3 yrs old; Sara E, a granddaughter, 2 yrs old. Mary Ann had quite a family by then Georgia, Mary Ann and George's youngest daughter, married in 1906 to Earl Charles Ohwiler. In 1914 Mary Ann wrote a letter to George's brother and wife, Albern and Judith Hannah. They were living in the Lost River Valley of Idaho. J Hannah kept correspondence with several friends and relatives. It is good to think the two families stayed in contact once they were reunited in 1872. She also mentions Permelia in the letter as if she got a letter from her. The letter belongs to Dorothy Babcock Stewart of Arco, Idaho at present time. Winslow, Arizona March 31,1914 Mr & Mrs Albern Babcock , My Dear Brother and sister and family, It is with pleasure I answer your kind and welcome letter that came to hand some time ago. I have been haveing the Rheumatism pretty bad this winter. My youngest girl is sick in bed with the Lagrip and my 3rd girl has been pretty sick she lost a baby it lived 4 days and died it was taken with instruments so my daughter was pretty sick the rest are all well as far as I no. hope you are all well I got a letter from aunt Permelia she said she was feeling as well as usual. I was sure glad to here from folk and to here Albern was so spry for his age I sure would love to see you all the besr in the world. We are having aful nice weather here we have not had any snow this winter down here but where we came from in Durange Colo the snow was 4 feet deep. it has been Pretty quite here this winter but work is picking up now this is a rail road town and when the rail road stops all the work stops I have a Daughter living at camp verde she said Peaches was as large as good sized Peas down wher she lives that is about 75 miles from where i live she said they we going to cutting there first crop of hay so it looks like_______ this is the List of George and my ages and also our children. the First on is your Brother George George Babcock born Feb 7, 1831 at New York and died at Aztec New Mexico Feb 11, 1899 My name before I was married George Babcock was Mary an Eason I was born Maryan(Marion) Illinois Feb 19, 1850 Married to George Babcock August 19,1866 at Hardecrable by Baptist Preacher Adams Fremont Co Colorado and now I will give my children ages this is my oldest son George K Babcock born August 26, 1867 at St Charles Colorado he married a woman by the name of Eva Patten at Bayfield Colo. they have no children, 2nd son Franklin R Babcock born May 18 1869 Canyon City Colorado he has been married 3 time he lost his first wife and 6 children her name was Dora Jones they were Married at Alamosa Colorado. 3rd son John E Babcock born September 27 1871 ar Casasporde Colorado and died october 2 1871 4th child Ellen Ida Babcock born August 4 1872 at Corinn Utah she married a man by the name of John Vanetten they were married ar Alamosa Colo. they have 6 children. 5th child William L. Babcock born June 17 1875 at Daton Nevada he married a woman by the name of Clara Kidd they had 3 children one child died with Black diptheria and his wife and little got killed in a cyclone one year ago he has one boy left thery were married in Durango Colo. 6th child Mary Ada Babcock born Feb 16 1878 at Ceyretes Lacruse, Oldham Co. Texas she married a man by the name of robert Conder they have 9 children 3 dead they were married at Aztec New Mexico 7th child Serah Alice Babcock born April 28 1880 at San Francisco Oldham Co Texas she married a man by the name of Lenard Woolery they have 7 children 2 dead 8th child Jessie Pearl Babcock born May 26 1882 in Pueblo Colo he married a woman by the name of Pearl Shrewsburry they had one child they were married in Denver Colorado they seperated (This is the only record of Jessie P being married to Pearl Shrewsburry.) 9th child Emma Arells Babcock born 5 of Dec, 1885 at St Charles Colo she has been married 2 times her first Husbands name was Preston Appersan they had one child and her second husband name is Criss Tamm they have one child 10th child Earl. L. Babcock born april 7 1889 at Lajara Colo. he is single and my baby name is Georgie Estella Babcock born October 27. 1890 at Henry Colo she married a man by the name of Earl Ohwiler they were married at Durango Colo the have 2 children she is the one I live with. so I have give you the names of all my children and ages I haven't lost any of my children only the one little boy Johnie and he only lived 8 days so I will close Please write soon your loving sister and Family Mrs. M. A. Babcock, Winslow, Arizona Mary Ann died the following year on April 12th 1915. She is buried in Middle Verde Cemetery, Camp Verde, Yavapai, Arizona. JOHN Like George's, this history has been researched and compiled by others that I am quoting. I didn't do much searching or checking. The sources are: a history prepared by his daughter, Permelia Morgan, a history by Jane Coffey and "Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude." I worked up the courage to knock on the door of the house in Spanish Fork that I was pretty sure was his. It is! The owner, Nicole, was interested in her house enough to learn a little about it which she shared with me. John was born in Nauvoo like his brother, Albern. His history talks about the donkey he and Albern rode on as they crossed the plains. They were so sad when the donkey died one night. But they were able to join with some other boys riding and playing on the old cannon the company brought with them. In Utah, John grew up learning to farm with his father and brothers and going to school whenever he could. John courted and married Harriett Persis Mckee. She was born at Winter Quarters in 1852 to David T and Persis Moors Sweat. Harriet Persis' mother and friend had the job of folding the entire 2cd edition of the Book of Mormon back in Kirtland, Ohio. Joseph Smith then gave Persis a copy which she cherished. Harriett P was the 7th of 10 children. Her family moved to Spanish Fork about the same time John's family did. They were most likely acquainted when Harriett was a small girl and John not much older. If the date on FamilySearch is correct (I can't find a source), she married John October 22, 1866 four months shy of her 15th birthday. John was 23. At the end of the next year, their first child was born. They named him John Willard. John and Harriett were sealed in the Old Endowment House February 16th 1869 and their family kept growing. Thomas Alburn was delivered in 1870 and Adolphus in 1872. Adolphus died the next year in 1873 of lung fever. Little Harriett was written as being born in February 1873 five months after Adolphus. That is hardly possible unless Harriett was different than any other woman. If the year was recorded wrong and should be the following year then Pauline’s birth year would have to be wrong too because 6 months between births is also not possible. That would make Pauline's birth year 1875. During their first years as a family, Harriett Persis and John homesteaded 140 acres known as the Upper Bottoms near Spanish Fork. The tract of land ran from hill to hill. John built a log home on the bank of the old millrace. (One family story says they built their house near Lucy, but Lucy died in 1863 in Minersville and her husband stayed there and worked at a store to support his kids and 2cd wife. Another story says they built their home by Wellington Woods for a while) Later they moved the log home across the river to the south side of the farm. They planted a large orchard and established the first mollasses wheel and factory on the old mill race. The winter months were spent peddling the products of his orchard and farm in different mining camps. On one occasion while peddling in Peoche, Nevada, John slipped off his wagon and broke his arm. The people thought he was in need of money and immediately began a subscription for him. They raised a considerable amount of money and presented it to him. John refused to accept it saying that he thought they "were in need of the money more than myself, I have ample money for my needs." The settlers that lived in places away from the main settlement had to be on constant guard against Indian attacks. During the Blackhawk War, John stood guard at night and worked in the daytime. It was the duty of all able-bodied men in the community to protect the women and children. John's daughter, Permelia, wrote that her mother took the children and hid in the grainfield for protection from Indians many times while her father stood guard. On several occasions it was necessary to flee from their home to the protection of the Spanish Fork Settlement. In the US Index to Indian Wars Pension Files 1892-1926 it says John served from May 1866-October 1866 under Captain Silas Hillman Co M Utah militia. John and Harriett Persis' family kept growing. George David was born in 1878, Permelia in 1881, Hyrum in 1883, Susan Sophia in 1886, and Branch Lorenzo in 1888. They also lost a son. Thomas Alburn died in November of 1882. He was 12 yrs old. At this time, John was doing well for his family. In "Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude' it says Harriett Persis’ husband found gold in Nevada, making her very rich. Whether he got money from gold or from the prospectors who bought his products, it was enough to build the first brick house is Spanish Fork. He built it on a lot given to him by his father. It was the north edge of the family farm. The house was quite spacious and John and Harriett Persis allowed the house to be used for a meeting place for weddings, births, and deaths. In the US census of 1870 taken that summer, it shows Dolphus age 70, next in line is W Henry age 21, then next is John. They all have their own dwelling number in the dwelling column of the census. Maybe John already had his brick house built or maybe they could have built a cabin there first, which was common then. The present owner, Nicole said she was told that John's house was built in 1871. Dolphus was listed as a farmer, W Henry as a laborer, and John as a farmer. Harriett is 18, and little John Willard is 2. For several years, the family lived on their farm during the summers and returned to town in winter so the children could go to school. The first school was a one room building with shingles ( That was quite progressive for those days) built in 1862. For over 100 families it must have been crowded at times. John's brother, Albern had children that probably went to school with their cousins part of the time. John's nieces and nephews from Spring Glen sometimes visited in the fall. They could have stayed with or nearby, giving the cousins plenty of time to play-and probably fight too- and become friends. Harriett Persis and John were kind people and gave generously to the poor and aid to the emigrants who needed help after arriving in Utah. In 1888, 3 months after Harriet delivered Branch Lorenzo, John died of pneumonia. He was only 45. Harriett Persis was a young widow-35 yrs old. She had 8 children to start her single parent life with. The oldest, John Willard, was 20 but he died the following year, making young Harriett P the oldest at 16. She helped for a year then married Thomas Albert Smith in February 1891. Harriett Persis now had 6 children to care for. In spite of the loss and her youth, she never remarried. John had left her comfortable enough she didn't need another income. She applied for John's pension from government for his service in the Indian Wars and received it. She had John's brother, Albern and his wife nearby (which I feel was a big help and comfort to her and her children). She devoted her life to raising her children and caring for the lovely home John had left her. In 1893 the next oldest child, Pauline married the brother of her sister's husband; his name was John Willard Smith ( Yes, the two brothers have the same names as Harriett Persis' older sons who have passed away, strange coincidence.) George David married Charlotte Elizabeth Ostler in 1897 who died, then married Elsie Jenette Ray Bardman who also died, then he married Hannah Hazel Lublin Babcock who was the widow of George David's cousin, Daniel John Babcock. (Another interesting coincidence.) Hyrum married Beulah Daly briefly then moved back in with his mother. He was a farmer like his father. Permelia and the youngest sister, Susan Sophia both got married in 1904 to Ralph David Morgan and John Prior, respectively. Youngest brother Branch Lorenzo got married in 1921 to Christine Joylene Lindley. He supported his family as a woodworker making cabinets. Finally in 1924, Hyrum married again to Anna Louise Traudt. He eventually moved to Nampa, Idaho. Six years later, in 1930, Harriett Persis went to visit her son, Hyrum. She died there and was buried. Knowing Hyrum was the last to leave home and that Harriett Persis was visiting him leads me to believe they had a close relationship. WILLIAM HENRY This has been a different experience from the other siblings. There are no family stories about Henry, only some documented facts of his life. But there is a wonderful and engaging autobiography written by his daughter, Lydia Jane that I got from FamilySearch. She tells of a happy childhood in spite of hardships and parents who struggled with their marriage. This history is her autobiography mixed with the facts from official records. In all the reading and researching I have done about the family members, Henry was the only one that gave me the distinct impression he was a private person that didn't like the world knowing his troubles. I am the same which is probably why I get that feeling as I have "read between the lines". It is easy to understand why he loved to be at home with his children around him and why he lived alone the last 7 years of his life. Henry's son was killed in a mine accident and other sons worked in mines, so I have included a little of the compelling story of the biggest mine disaster that happened in the West. It happened in 1900 at the same mine Benjamin was killed at 2 years later. I met Jackie Caras who straightened out Benjamin's death history for me. Henry most likely didn't remember his mother. She died when he was only one or two years old. His sister, Lucy mothered him for a short while til Dolphus came and took his young children to Spanish Fork, where they helped settle the town. Henry had his older sisters, Permelia and Eliza to help take care of him. And then Hannah Goodworth for a short time too. And of course there were his brothers, Albern and John around to work with and play with. In Lydia's story she refers to her father getting enough school to learn to read and write quite well. These clues make me think he did ok. During the Black Hawk War, Henry served under Capt. Jonathon Page Co. Utah Militia Cavalry for six weeks in July and August of 1866. He marched into Fort Gunnison and was assigned to duty in the Sevier Valley.(Utah, Indian War Service Affidavits 1909-1917) Henry married Mary Jane Parsons for eternity December 1868 in the Endowment House located in Salt Lake City. They began their life together in a two room "dobie" house; one room in front with a leanto on the back. They were neighbors to Henry's father, Dolphus, and Henry's brother, John. In the 1870 US census it has the 3 men listed in a row. This means their dwellings were one right after another. Mary Jane became a mother in April of 1870. George Oliver was his name. In 1872, William Henry Jr (Will) was born in October, a few months after his grandfather Dolphus died. Then Alburn Parsons was delivered in November of 1874. Three boys to keep their mom and dad busy. Before another child was born, 5 year old Oliver drowned in the Spanish Fork Mill Race. Note: A mill race is a channel built to strengthen and speed up the flow of water turning the mill wheel. It was probably impossible to get to little Oliver til the water washed him all the way through the mill race. He had already had an accident with fire as a toddler. He tipped his high chair over into the fire and had a scarred face from it. (It must have been hard to have to return to the sight of such a tragedy every day to get their daily water supply.) The experiences Lydia relates here are what you'd expect children to do at that time, (but I hope their accidents with fire were not typical.) In 1876, the first sister arrived in December; Mary Rebecca. Then Mary Jane delivered Benjamin Franklin in February 1879. In 1880, Henry went to work on the railroad in Colorado. Coincidently, his father was in Colorado the same year working on the railroad. Maybe they crossed paths there or maybe it was Dolphus who told Henry about it. Dolphus was in Colorado for the US Census but Henry was living in Spanish Fork, so he must have went a little later. I now quote Lydia's words. "While he (Henry) was there Mother learned to write. She wrote her first letter to him. Mother only had the chance of going to school for three weeks in her life, but for all that, she learned to write a real nice hand. When he (Henry) returned, he came through what they then called the Castle Valley Country and fell in love with the country; especially one place where there was a beautiful grove of cottonwood trees." The following spring, the author of this lovely singular history was born in Spanish Fork. Her parents named her Lydia Jane. She got off to a rough but active start. One day when she was about six months old, her mother put her on the bed while she went to get water at the Mill Race, 2 blocks away. "The bed was along the side of the room and the fireplace was at the end of the bed. My sister, Mary (5 yrs old) was playing with me. She put me at the end of the bed nearest the fireplace then she went to the window and looked out, and seeing a bird she thought was crippled, she ran outside to catch it. I was a healthy active baby and I kicked and wiggled myself off the bed into the fireplace. Brother Ben, who was about 2 1/2 ran to the door and said,"Oh Gallie" meaning Mary, "Lydia's in the fire." Mary screamed and ran into the house, and Mother heard her scream, dropped the buckets of water and ran, when she got into the room Mary and Ben were pulling me out of the fire with the big red coals of fire stuck to my tiny head. Mother and Father were frantic, and the neighbors ran in and told Mother to put baking soda on my head to draw the fire out. Mother grabbed a handful of dry coda and put it on my head and it sizzled and fried and made the burns much deeper than they would have been. Mother and Father walked the floor with me for days and a neighbor lady by the name of Jones, came and put some salve she had made that was very good for burns. It was very healing and she cared for my head until the burns were healed. I was left with a large scar on the side of my head and a smaller one on the back where the hair roots were entirely destroyed. And now after being nearly 55 yrs old in 1936, I had my hair cut and permanent wave given by my children. It was lovely and for all the compliments on how much nicer I looked and how much younger I looked, I sure had them! In the spring of 1882, Father sold some of his farming land and taking our family and house hold goods we moved out to Castle Valley. Cousin Bill Babcock (Uncle Lorenzo's son) came with us. We first lived in the home of James Gay, (who I believe was the first settler in the place that was soon named Spring Glen). James Gay was a bachelor; his home was on the west side of the river. It was built of cottonwood logs, a dirt roof, and a home made door with an old fashioned latch that was pulled up by a string that hung on the outside of the door. Our first home was much like it, only we had a large rock fireplace in one end of our log cabin home, and to me it was such a happy home! Father homesteaded 160 acres of land on which stood the cottonwood grove, a merry-go-round, and teeter-totter. The merry-go-round was made by putting a stout post in the ground and putting a long plank about 10 inches wide over the top of it, then fastening the plank to the post with a bolt in the center and when the boys or girls got on each end of it then someone would push the plank and around it would go. We children spent many happy carefree hours playing in this grove. We gathered the beautiful wild flowers in the grove. Lilies of the Valley grew in the the shade of the Squaw Bushes where the snowdrifts lay the longest in the spring. There was a patch of beautiful Bluebells farther up in the grove and some lovely yellow flowers with blossons shaped like Sweet Peas. That part of the country was noted for quick thunderstorms in the mountains and "flash floods" would come leaping and roaring down the deep washes and gullies of which there were quite a number. The water would fill the washes to the tops and sometimes overflow. It would bring down the timber and brush and great boulders and small rocks. Most always when we heard a flood coming we would run to the wash to see the floods come down. It was a sight to see the water coming down in a crest from 10 to 14 feet high, boiling and churning as it came. When the floods came through the edge of the grove and then began to dry, we children gathered the sticky damp clay the floods brought down and had a grand time molding it into clay dolls, dishes of all kinds- cups, plates, bowls- and then we let it dry and we played house with our clay dishes and dolls. There was a lovely vine called the Wild Deer Vine that had leaves the shape of grape leaves and the flowers were small and grew in large clusters. They were a creamy white and had a lovely perfume. We girls gathered them and made lovely wreaths of them to wear on our heads. Happy childhood days. One day (September 1883) when Mary was about six, she came up missing. The folks looked everywhere but no sign of Mary. Father found her bonnet along the railroad tracks where she had lost her bonnet on the way home from Uncle Andrew Simmons (Mary Jane's half brother). The folks were frantic. They had heard a panther (mountain lion) cry that day real close and were afraid it had gotten Mary. Mother got on a horse and went across the river to look for her. After searching everywhere, they found Mary asleep along side the summer kitchen under a wagon cover. She had a habit if she got hurt, she would hold her breath until she passed out. Then she would come to and go to sleep; this is what she did on this day. Mother had injured herself when she got on the horse and as result she had a baby boy born dead. Father named him John. Every fall we went to Spanish Fork to dry fruit for the winter.(There are many times Lydia talks of interactions with her aunts and uncles. Family needed each other and I believe they depended on each other for help and friendship.) There was no fruit around where we lived, only wild Currants and wild Buffalo Bull berries. We left the home in the care of Emily Perkins and went on our way. Tiny, our small dog didn't want to go, but we felt it was best. We traveled up through Garden Creek and over Beaver Mountain along down Beaver Canyon. The river twisted and turned and we crossed it and re-crossed it many times. There had been a recent flood and we came to a crossing where the bridge was gone. Father had to ford across and the wagon got stuck in the mud. We had to unload the wagon and were standing on the bank all interested in watching to see if the horses could pull the wagon out. Tiny wandered off into the brush. One of the boys heard her yelp. A panther had her in its mouth carrying Tiny off. He yelled to father and father came running with the ax, but it was too late. Everyone cried over the loss of Tiny. We all felt that she hadn't wanted to come with us because she knew something would happen to her. We tried to feed her tiny little puppies but they were too young and so we lost them also. One fall when Mary, Ben, and I were small, Father butchered a pig. Our dogs, Fanny and Jeff stole some of the meat. Father was angry about it and said," The dogs ought to be hung," and so we decided to hang them. We took them out to the grove and proceeded to hang Fanny. But when we tried to hang Jeff, he was too large to handle. We put the rope around his neck and over the limb of a tree and pulled on it. He was too heavy to pull off the ground, so all he did was stand on his hind legs and walk around the tree. This frightened us for we thought he was trying to chase us. So we let him go and loaded Fanny into the wagon and hauled her to the house. Father said, "What in the world have you been doing?" Ben said, "You said the dogs ought to be hung for stealing meat, and we have hung one of them for you, but the other one won't let us hang him." When I was almost 4 yrs old, one morning Mother wasn't feeling too well, so Father took me and my sister Mary down to the neighbor's by the name of Darling and left us while he went to Price and got the doctor. Later, when he was taking the doctor back to Price, he stopped and told Mary that we had a new baby sister. Mary was so thrilled and excited she put me in the little express wagon and she and 8 yr old Tine Darling pulled the wagon. Away they went up the railroad tracks. They sure did travel. The wagon bounced from side to side over the ties and I hung on for dear life, but it was no use. The wagon finally tipped over spilling me out. I cried and Mary scolded me and said it was my fault that it tipped over. They put me in the wagon again and away we went for home. When I went to the bed to see Mother she showed me the baby. I wasn't a bit thrilled. I tried to slap it. I had been the baby for nearly 4 years and I didn't like the idea of someone taking what I thought was my place! Lucy was her name and she was born in January 1885. When Lucy was 9 months old, Mother was sick in bed with milk leg. Note: milk leg is a severe, often white colored swelling caused by a blood clot in the main vein of the leg.) All the men folk were gone and Ben had gone to the river for water and as he was returning he saw a fire in the stack yard. When the neighbors saw the smoke they came to help, but it was too late. It burned the corn, hay and strawstacks, the corral, and the stable. The large pig would not leave her pen, so she burned with all the rest of the barn and the winter feed. We went to our old home in Spanish Fork where we stayed and Father took care of Mother and did all the things the doctor told him. Mary, Lucy, and I were with them and 13 yr old Will, 11 yr old Alburn, and 6 yr old Ben stayed in Spring Glen. (It seems less worrisome to leave those young boys when you remember that Mary Jane's half-brother was nearby to help them.) One day when Father was wringing cloths out of hot water to put on Mother's leg, some of the turpentine splashed onto the stove and caught fire. It caught the turpentine on Father's hands and burned them real bad. He was helpless to take care of himself or Mother. Uncle Andrew told Will he thought something was wrong with us and Will came to Spanish Fork to see. When he found his father in a terrible condition, he stayed and helped 8 yr old Mary take care of things and we were so happy to see him. Uncle Albern Babcock came and cut wood for us and helped Will take care of Mother and Father. Finally, Mother was better and we returned home to Spring Glen. We had gone out to Spanish Fork on the narrow gage railroad. It had been built since we had moved down to Castle Valley. (The family took advantage of the opportunity to travel to Spanish Fork quite often. And when the wide gage railroad was built, they used it too.) Mother was a tall, large woman. For years she weighed 225 pounds and she was strong and healthy. She loved dancing and parties. Father seemed just the opposite. He liked to stay at home and keep us children around him. He didn't like Mother sending the boys to Price for school every week with food supplies to come home only on weekends. Francis Marion Ewell had a large frame two story house about a mile away. There was a large room on the bottom floor with a fireplace on one end. We held our first Sunday School and meetings there and our dances and Christmas parties. We had many enjoyable times there. When there was a dance, the one bed they had downstairs was usually filled with sleeping babies. The winter I was going on 5 yrs old, Mary, Ben and I were playing with a stump on the ice. I fell and broke my left leg. I didn't know it was hurt so badly and no one else seemed to know. I limped around til Christmas. My leg started to hurt really badly; it got swollen til it was glassy and white. I was put to bed and my leg hurt day and night. In March, the folks sent a telegram to Uncle John in Spanish Fork to tell him we were coming. The ride(from the depot)for me lying in the bumpy wagon hurt so bad I could hardly stand it. I was put to bed. The doctor wanted to open my leg and scrape the bone, but Mother was afraid I would die and left it up to me. Of course I was afraid, so I said "No!" I didn't understand. So they let it go. Aunt Hanner(probably Albern Babcock's wife Judith Hannah) came and brought me 2 apples. How I did enjoy those apples for I always loved apples; they were such a treat to me! Uncle Ben Simmons came to see us and take us to his home. I was happy to go. It was a pleasant spring day and I enjoyed the ride in the light buggy to Uncle Ben's in Lake Shore. They bought me a doll. This warmed my 6 yr old heart and I enjoyed playing with my doll for many years to come. In May, Mother brought me home again. I was in bed all that year. The bone decayed and came out of my leg and I suffered lots of pain. David Thompson came to us and talked to me and brought me some pretty valentines which his sister Alice had sent with him. I enjoyed his visits so much; they made me forget my pain. I have always appreciated his thoughtful kindness in trying to give a child some happiness. The Elders would come and administer to me and I would say, "Put your hands on my leg, that is where the pain is so terrible." The Bishop told me years afterwards that when they would administer to me the pain would go up their arms. I would immediately find relief from the pain and would rest. The Spring when I was 7, the folks made me a pair of crutches and Aunt Agnes helped me learn to walk on them. Oh, how happy and thankful I was to be able to walk outside again and see the lovely green trees and enjoy the beautiful sunshine. I walked on the crutches all summer and could get around real well. In August of 1887, my brother Vardis Andrew was born. I was happy to have a baby brother. Now I had a sister and a brother younger than me. Father and Mother seperated in May before Vardis was born. (Lydia wrote that "Father would take a trip each summer and leave his family, finally Mother grew tired of this and she seperated from him.) My brothers and Mother had to make a living. The spring of 1888 we went up Spring Canyon to stay for the summer while Will and Alburn got ties. We had our cows up there with us. One day us children went up on the hill to roll down rocks. I couldn't climb the hill with my crutches, so I left them at the bottom and went up without them. We had fun rolling rocks, but when we went down the hill it wasn't so good. The rocks had smashed one of my crutches. I sure felt bad and cried and cried. I tried to get the boys to make me another crutch, but Mother said no, I could walk with one. She said I should learn to walk without crutches anyway. I got so I could walk all right with just one crutch. Then Albern got his foot smashed while hauling wood and he had to use crutches. We would run races on our crutches but he always won the race. The summer I was 9 yrs old, we went and lived up in Castle Gate and Will worked there for about 3 months. Father was with us. On our way there, we had to drive under a bridge. It was only high enough for a team with a wagon box to go under. Father didn't notice, and he and I were sitting in the spring seat on the wagon box. The horses went under the bridge and Father was caught between the bridge and the spring seat. The horses pulled on the wagon before anyone could stop them. Father was hurt, but I was safe. Him being larger than me saved me from being hurt, but Dad was hurt quite bad and it was some weeks before he could get around and he never really got over the crushing he got that day. While we were there the first mine explosion occured. There were two men in the mine setting off blasts and both of them were killed . That was the first of many mine explosions through the years. In the fall our log meeting house was finished. They had a free school there. It was closer than where it had been held before so I was able to go; I could walk to it! I was so pleased to be able to go to school at last. We sat on long benches-no desks. We did our writing and arithmetic holding our slates on our laps. It was several years before they had desks to use. I could hardly wait til I was old enough to join the older class of elocution and recite "The Rising of 1776, or Oleah for Castile, or Abu Ben Abbot". The summer I was 10, us children were playing with Purmitt Ewell on the whirly gig. It was right after the 24th of July Celebration in our cottonwood grove. I got hit on the arm I used my crutch with. it was so sore I couldn't use my crutch. Father had been trying to get me walk without the crutch but I couldn't go as fast without a crutch. Now I had to go without it. I thought about the new coat Father had promised me if would try. I reluctantly gave up my dear old crutch-oh dear, oh my. The wide gage railroad was built down through the valley that summer and the narrow gage was disbanded. That summer was also when Chauncey Harvey Cook and family moved to Spring Glen. Their son, Ray Curtis, became my husband. When my brother, Will was 18, he went to herd sheep for Scott Elliot. One day a man came to visit and left body lice. Will had a hard time getting rid of them. Mother told him to boil his clothes. He started with cold water and by the time it boiled the lice had adjusted and still lived. Mother sent him some oil of cedar which Will put on his body instead of his clothes. He finally did get rid of the lice. When he came home to see us he would take me across the river to pick and eat Buffalo berries and talk in the the shade of the trees. I thought I was really favored when he would do this. He was such a kind and good brother to me. He was like a father to us kids and I loved him dearly. (He had some nicknames for Lucy and Lydia. He called Lucy "Monk" and Lydia "Lid". ) When he was 19, he got pneumonia and was so very ill. We were all so worried about him. The doctor came. He asked Mother if Will smoked. She said "No". He said "if he don't smoke, we have a good chance to pull him through, but if he uses tobacco, I wouldn't give two cents for his life". After a few weeks he was well and strong again. Then he went to Castle Gate to work loading coal. When I was about 11, Mother bought 30 acres of school trust land joining our homestead and hired Chauncy Cook to build a cabin on it. The boys went up the canyon and cut pine logs, then they were sawed at the mill. The house was one large room and a loft. We moved into it in the spring of that year before the doors and windows were in. The wind blew extra hard that spring (1893), anyway it seemed that way. We had a terrible time keeping the door propped up with a 2x4 plank. There were quilts at the windows. In the fall a carpenter, Ode Cassin, came and put doors and windows in for us. He'd had a broken arm and it took him quite awhile. That summer Mother sold milk to the people in Helper. The woman who ran the cafe, Carrie Thomas, bought milk from us. Lucy and I carried the milk to Helper night and morning. Lucy was a very ambitious sister and she always did her share. We had a good time together delivering the milk. I think it was a two-gallon can. Sometimes one of us would get a ride to Helper with the Haycock boys in their dart and take the milk. After two trips to Helper a day, 2 1/2 miles each round trip, I'd had all the exercise I could take. So Lucy would have to go down to the river bottoms and bring the cows home by herself. One dark stormy night, we had played too long coming home. We were so late getting back. We heard someone coming on a horse. When they came along side of us it was our neighbor, Thomas H. Jones. He took us on his horse and took us home-another kindness I have never forgotten. The 21st of January 1894, Lucy turned 9. Mother gave her a little party and invited Ethel and Will Savage with others. I was 13 and took the honor upon myself of passing the refreshments around, which I should have let Lucy do, as it was her party. I was sorry I had spoiled it for her and I made up my mind I would never do anything to make her feel bad again. Lucy didn't live to have another birthday. But I had made up my mind long before she died that I would always be fair and treat her good and not be bossy with her. I enjoyed her, oh, so very much that when she died in June with membrainious croup, I was so lonely without my little sister, oh, but I did miss her so. It nearly broke my mother's heart when she lost Lucy. I think we all missed her in the family. She was so thoughtful and kind of Mother and we all loved her deeply. On the 4th of July, Mother let me go to Nine Mile to visit cousin John Babcock's family because she knew how lonesome I was. Mother bought a cart and we could haul our milk to Helper with it so I went back to my milk-selling job. One day when I took the milk to Carrie Thomas, she gave me a little black puppy. She said she knew how lonesome I had been since I had lost my sister and she wanted me to have the puppy. It sure was a lot of company; it was with me all the time. It would play hide-and -seek with me and enjoy it so much. On Sundays he would walk into church with me and get under the bench and just keep still until Sunday School was out and then he would be ready to go the minute I was. (Lydia's big sister got married on October 10th of 1894 to another resident of the community; William Henry Davis.)Mother went to Spanish Fork in October and my lame leg started to bother me, but I kept on selling the milk. Finally it got so bad that I couldn't walk. Mary and her husband were at home with me and she or one of the boys would wrap my leg up good and warm and off I would go to Helper in the cart. The folks who bought milk would have to come to the cart and get their milk because I couldn't take it to them. Albern would carry me to bed but I couldn't sleep. Then Mary and Ben went to Helper to live, so Albern asked Alice Thompson to come and do the housework and take care of me (Alice became a part of the Babcock family 2 years later when she married Will on March 1st of 1896). She made life a little more pleasant for me than Mary could, so it was a happy change. Albern went to Spanish Fork and got Mother. When she came home she sent to Price and asked Mrs. Lydia Abi Mead to come and help her doctor my leg. Mrs Mead had quite a lot of experience in that line. The first night Mother was home she gave me a half tablespoon of laudanum and I slept lightly. The next night she gave me a whole tablespoon and I slept good all night and awakened in the morning feeling refreshed. Mrs Mead stayed for 10 days. They took cattails and mashed them into pulp and put milk on them; then warmed it for a poultice and put it on my leg. They used ground flaxseed for a poultice too. Mrs Mead made powder our of sulpher and gunpowder and poured it by the teaspoonfuls in the hole that broke in my leg. She said it would help cleanse the wound and make new bone. It was well enough by January that I could go back to school. I was happy for this blessing. The next summer Ben was riding a horse and it backed into a fence with him. The barbed wire cut great long gashes in his leg and hurt him terribly. He was laid up all summer, so I tried my best to cheer him up and help him until he could walk again. That same summer Margaret Morgan (Keefer) and I were chosen to be on the finance committee for the Primary to gather donations for the celebration of Brigham Young's birthday. Our route was the south part of Spring Glen. We took my dog Topsy along as usual. When we got to the river it looked pretty high, but we saw wagon tracks and thought people had been crossing. So I put Topsy in front of me on the horse and Margaret was behind and went in. When we got to the swiftest place the water just roared! I felt frightened but we went through safely and on to Garley's place. They asked us how we came across the river; we said on the horse and they said, "Do you know no one has dared to cross that river for the the past week?" Well... we were surprised to hear that! But we had to cross back. This time we did it in safety by going over the bridge on the canal. (Reading this story was like reading a season of Little House on the Praire for me. I learned that Lydia's gratitude and youthful optimism shone through every hard thing she experienced. I would like to have such an attitude.) Albern got married at the end of 1895. He married Annie Haycock on New Years Eve 1895. In 4 more years, Lydia Jane got married to her high school sweetheart, Ray Curtis Cook on Christmas Eve. They had a wedding dance the day after Christmas. In September 1898, Mary Jane got married to Edward Tallen. He was a blacksmith by trade and they stayed in Spring Glen. In the Federal Census of 1900, it says that Mary Jane and Henry's boys, Benjamin F and Vardus A lived with them. Benjamin is shown as a farm laborer. In 1902 Benjamin was working in the No. 5 Winter Quarters Mine at Scofield. Family records say he was injured and that he died there. Utah Death Records say he died at St Mark's Hospital and Spring Glen Cemetery burial records show him buried there. While looking for more information that could document what happened to Benjamin, I learned about the Winter Quarters Mine Disaster of 1900. For a while I thought maybe that was when he got injured. The Disaster was a heart wrenching tragedy that killed brothers and cousins all at once and fathers and sons together in an instant. It left widows and children to pick up the pieces and somehow go on without means or resources. I was touched to read of the generosity of people all over that reached out to those families that would never be the same. I am so proud to belong to the human family when they show how compassionate they can really be. Sweetest was reading that school children filled 3 traincars with flowers for the 200 coffins loaded on trains at Scofield to take their solemn loads silently to their last destinations. This isn't part of Benjamin's death exactly. But living in Utah for any length of time gives you a feeling for the mining heritage that is a part of so many people. I married into a family with mining in it's family. I have discovered mining in the Babcock family, especially Henry's; and my son married a coalminers daughter. It is everywhere. So here is a picture of the largest coal mine disaster in the Western United States. Soon after the Mormon settlers arrived in Utah, it was apparent coal was a needed resource. By 1849, extensive coal deposits were found in the canyons of the region but were too far from SLC to be mined economically. In 1854 Brigham Young offered a reward of $1000 for the discovery of a coal vein within 40 miles of the city. After the railroad was completed in 1869, the distance didn't matter so much and almost overnight mining camps boomed. A small mine was opened on the western slope of a canyon in an area known as Pleasant Valley in 1877. Today it is the location of the tiny town of Scofield and the Scofield Reservior. The camp was named after an early severe winter stranded the miners in the coal pit keeping them snowed in til the following February. They called it Winter Quarters. This new town became a thriving, most impressive city of Utah. It is hard to imagine from the few ruins that remain today. At the time, Winter Quarters Mine was considered to be the safest in the region. (Troy Taylor, Down In the Darkness,2003) On May 1, 1900-it being the first of the month-many miners carried new 25 pound kegs of black powder with them. Then they would make charges and blast the coal faces. Around 10:15 am 300 men were working deep within the mountain's mine when a low rumble churned to a deafening thunder. Number Four had exploded. Fierce billows of smoke, coal dust, sand, dirt and burnt powder, together with acrid smells, broken and splintered timbers, twisted rails, and mangled mine cars shot through the mine corridors and portal carrying men with it. Detecting a safe passageway in Number One, 103 miners followed good air into the canyon and escaped. But for the other 200 miners, if the violent explosion didn't instantly kill them, the devastating afterdamp-poisonous mixtures of gases containing carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen-did. (Eileen Hallet Stone Special to the Tribune,2016) Fathers died with sons. (One father and son were found later in a last embrace.) Two, three, and even five brothers perished in the same instant. Nephews, cousins, sons, brothers, brothers-in-law, husbands and fathers were lost, sometimes many from the same family all at once. Impromtu rescue teams formed almost immediately, but lingering gases repelled initial forays into the mines. Family and friends gathered quickly outside the mines, then waited all day to spot a loved one. "Here the scene beggared all descriptions, the lamentations were most heart piercing." (Tribune) Those killed by gas were loaded into coal cars, sometimes a dozen at a time, and hauled out. Those mutilated by the explosion were put in sacks. Bodies were stripped of blackened clothes and sponged clean before being turned over to families. A telegraph operator dispatched news of the disaster. Over the next few days, trains brought doctors, ministers, friends, undertakers and coffins from SLC and Denver. Utahns responded generously. Relief funds raised $216,000. Charity baseball games and concerts were staged. Catholic Bishop Lawrence Scanlan volunteered the Orphan Asylum would take in children. They went from 69 to 96 that year. At ZCMI, 200 burial outfits were prepared- black cloth suits, white gloves and shirts, slippers and white ties. The company paid for the suits and burial expenses, gave each victim's relatives $250 and a hand delivered last paycheck. They forgave $8000 in debts at their store. School children filled three train cars with flowers for the graves. By May 4th, a day "awful for it's silence" as families paid last private respects, trains departed draped in black and white streamers, left Scofield, carrying victims to final resting places in 7 Utah counties and 4 other states. May 5th was burial day. Volunteers were still digging graves when the first coffins were put in the ground. The weather could hardly have been bleaker--cold, windy, and a constant threat of rain. Mormon hymns filled the air as apostles from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints blessed grave after grave. Finns laid out their masses to rest with "music of a strange language", the Knights of Pythias and Order of Odd Fellows performed rituals. So the scene went on til the mourners and priests were driven from the cemetery by rain. John Birch stood watch through the rainy night to safeguard the exposed coffins not yet buried. There were 114 buried at the Scofield Cemetery before it was done.(Mike Gorrell, Salt Lake Tribune) Benjamin was working in the No 5 Winter Quarters Mine as a pump man on May 14th, 1902 when two empty mine cars ran away from the dump back into the tunnel. The first one ran over Benjamin breaking his leg, cutting his head and causing much bruising. Dr Isgreen accompanied Benjamin to St Mark's Hospital. Benjamin died there a few days later. ( There must have been more damage than mentioned in the newspaper to take Benjamin that quickly.) He was taken home to Spring Glen where he is buried in the cemetery with other family. The information I finally found to document his death is found in "Utah Digital Newspapers, Eastern Utah Advocate, and the Spring Glen Carbon County Cemetery Index." I owe this knowledge to a friend, Jacky Caras, who researched her mining heritage for 15 years. Benjamin's name is on the Price City Miners Memorial that was erected in 2015. There are about 1400 names there. Back to Mary Jane and W Henry. In 1903, Henry wrote a sweet poem in celebration of his sister, Permelia's 50th wedding Anniversary. It is in Permelia's story. Mary Jane married again this time to Washington Tracy on March 2cd just a few days before Permelia's Anniversary Party. Henry married Margaret Groves on August 10 of the same year. It is sad to think that Mary Jane and Henry outlived 5 of their 10 children but they both added a child to their families. Henry's wife, Margaret was the daughter of a John Groves. (I couldn't help but wonder if she is related to the John Groves that Henry's older sister, Eliza, married in 1855.) They became parents to William Fredrick soon after their wedding day. And by 1910, Mary Jane had adopted a boy. His name was Ernest Leroy Miller and he was born in 1902 in Spring Glen. He eventually grew up and joined the military. He spent his life in California. Lydia and her husband decided to move to Canada in 1904, looking for better opportunities. In September they said good bye to their family and friends and wondered if they would ever see them again. "We arrived in SLC and went to a hotel where we prepared to go to the temple and do our temple work for our own endowments and be sealed for time and all eternity and have our little ones sealed to us. We also did work for my sister, Lucy, and for my brother, Ben. He was killed in the mine (Winter Quarters); he was injured in the mine and died as a result of that injury. After we arrived in Canada, I had a letter from my mother and she asked me if we had done Ben's work as she had asked us to do it. She said she had a dream. Now she didn't know we went to the temple or whether we had done Ben's work. She dreamed Ben came to her and stood in the room and said, "Here's my dark suit, Mother, I have my white one on." She said he had a bundle under his arm that he gave to her and she awoke and the dream was so real she wrote to ask if we had done Ben's work." She had her dream the same night Lydia and her husband did Ben's work in the temple-September 22, 1904. In the 1910 Federal Census it says that Mary Jane is a widow, that she owns her own home, and she still lives in Spring Glen. Her 22 yr old son Vardus lives and works there with her as a farm laborer. 8 yr old Ernest is attending school and there is a boarder living with them. Her name is Ida Thompson. She is 17 yrs old and works "out". Having a boarder, selling milk, and doing other peoples wash are all mentioned in Lydia's autobiography. Between this and the work that Vardus does on the family farm must have been enough to keep Mary Jane self sufficient. In the affidavits Henry and his comrades, Orlando T. Herren and John Davis wrote in 1910, they mention their service in the cavalry under Pt. Captain Jonathon S Page. Henry was assigned duty in the Sevier Valley, south of Gunnison Fort for about 6 weeks. He was able to get a pension. In the US Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards it shows a rate of 204 in March 1917 and 50$ in April 1927. The 1920 Federal Census is confusing. I have heard from my family that Henry and Mary Jane got back together again. This is the only possible document of that and its not clear. The head of the house hold on the census is a "M G" Babcock. But all the rest of the information matches Henry's age, and birthplaces of himself and his parents not Mary Jane's. Then Mary is listed just under the head of the house hold as wife with all the information matching her. Their son Vardus is living with them in Spanish Fork. With all the living they did in Spring Glen, they kept returning to the family's original home in Spanish Fork. (I share that with them. I may have been raised in Lost River Valley Idaho but I eventually returned to those same roots here in Utah Valley where I have become connected to my kindred dead in such a meaningful way for me.) A year later, Mary Jane died in January 1921. Vardus got married a month later to Mary Marelda Albertson. (This is probably why the next records show Henry living alone. He wasn't going to spoil his son's newly wed togetherness and so he gave them some space.) Henry spent his last years alone living in a small house in Spanish Fork, according to family stories. His nephews Ross and Ralph, Albern's sons came to visit him. Henry wanted to give them an old calendar, several years outdated and an old horse collar. It was about all he had to give away. Ross and Ralph accepted the gifts. Henry died a few years after this visit. He was found dead sitting in his chair. Albern often told Ralph he was going to be just like his Uncle Henry because he like to stand in front of the looking glass so well. Henry's death certificate says he was a retired farmer, that he was last seen alive on March 17th, 1928 in his cabin in Springville a few miles north of Spanish Fork. Vardus filed the death certificate on March 23 when his father was buried in Spanish Fork Cemetery. EPILOGUE Jerusha and Dolphus had about 78 grandchildren. Their stories begin in this family history and a few of them end here. But most of them are still being made in the great-grand children and great-great-grand children. I hope we all live up to the heritage our forefathers (and mothers) have given to us with so much sacrifice and courage to keep living a good life. Let's make them proud to call us their children. Our family roots are scattered all over Utah as well as other places. We belong to this country where the tradition of family was planted deep and strong with the pioneers that sacrificed so much to be with their families living the gospel they had chosen. I have learned so much more than just the life stories of our family. I have learned many things that make Utah what it is. The more you learn about something, the more you love it. I truly love this country and the states I have lived in. It has been delightful to meet cousins I never knew and some of them live in the same valley I do. I feel the passion for our pioneer history expressed by other historians I have had the privilege to meet and who have mentored me. I have visited places our ancestors have lived and felt the history there even when all physical evidence has disappeared. Each one lends an understanding that just reading never reaches. There are still a few mysteries I will continue to investigate and more places I am excited to visit. Thank you for caring about your roots enough to read my somewhat self indulgent compilation of the Dolphus and Jeusha Family History “Together”. THE END For more, contact Christine Behling at cbmax1@gmail.com. I have compiled a book with these words as well as photos and documents some of which are from familysearch

Life timeline of Adolphus Babcock

1800
Adolphus Babcock was born on 23 Feb 1800
Adolphus Babcock was 19 years old when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds Singapore. Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles, FRS was a British statesman, Lieutenant-Governor of British Java (1811–1815) and Governor-General of Bencoolen (1817–1822), best known for his founding of Singapore and the British Malaya.
Adolphus Babcock was 26 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
Adolphus Babcock was 32 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
Adolphus Babcock was 40 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Adolphus Babcock was 60 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Adolphus Babcock was 61 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Adolphus Babcock died on 15 Mar 1872 at the age of 72
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Adolphus Babcock (23 Feb 1800 - 15 Mar 1872), BillionGraves Record 1627715 Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States

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